Page 1

VOL. 106, ISSUE 37 • SEPTEMBER 14, 2017

INSIDE

CRIMINALS BEWARE!

La Jolla Neighborhood Watch groups quadruple since last year NEWS ANALYSIS BY ASHLEY MACKIN-SOLOMON n summer 2016, La Jolla was experiencing an increase in residential burglaries and other theft-related crimes. The town responded with an increase in grassroots activism by way of Neighborhood Watch groups in sub-areas across La Jolla, and a citizen’s crime advisory committee under the La Jolla Town Council. By September, 10 Neighborhood Watch groups had formed. Now, one year after La Jolla Light published the story “Neighborhood Watch programs become a force in La Jolla,” the number of Watches has jumped to 44, and the La Jolla-area groups have refined their approach and seen a reduction in burglaries. “From a law enforcement standpoint, we’ve made huge strides in Neighborhood Watch,” said San Diego Police Department Community Relations Officer Larry Hesselgesser, who is charged with helping to launch Watch groups. “There are a lot more meetings, a lot more coordination, and we have Neighborhood Watch captains in certain areas who can take part of the work and help me out. Now, we have much more of a melding of police and citizens and working together, which has been much more effective (in fighting crime).” In the citizen groups, headed largely by Barber Tract resident Cynthia Chasan, there is also a hierarchy through which information is fielded. First, a Neighborhood Watch area is established, covering one block or several. Each of these areas SEE CRIME WATCH, A10

I

Students pack supplies for school in Houston, A20 ■ Tarnishing Our Jewel, A3 ■ Crime, A16 ■ Calendar, A18 ■ Opinion, A22 ■ Obituaries, A26 ■ News Nuggets, A26 ■ Birch Aquarium marks 25th year, Saturday, B1 ■ Let Inga Tell You, B3 ■ People in Your Neighborhood, B6 ■ Business, B9 ■ Kitchen Shrink, B11 ■ Best Bets, B14 ■ Social Life, B19 ■ Classifieds, B20 ■ Real Estate, B22

LA JOLLA

LIGHT An Edition of

565 Pearl St., Suite 300 La Jolla, CA 92037 (858) 459-4201 lajollalight.com

Old Neighborhood Watch signs suggest the area is not being monitored, and the La Jolla Community Crime Watch committee wants them replaced soon.

PHOTOS BY ASHLEY MACKIN-SOLOMON

New Neighborhood Crime Watch signs are specific to La Jolla and imply active response.

Greatrex denies allegations of $67K theft of Rec Center funds BY ASHLEY MACKIN-SOLOMON Former La Jolla Park & Recreation, Inc. board chair Cindy Greatrex has been accused of stealing more than $67,000 from Rec Center funds, a charge she adamantly denies. She is to appear in Superior Criminal Court in San Diego on Friday, Sept. 15, where her lawyer is confident the charges of grand theft by employee, filed July 5, will be dismissed. If convicted, the penalty for grand theft is based on several factors and determined by legal officials. It could include thousands of dollars in fines and/or jail time. Greatrex is a former chair of the La

Jolla Community Planning Association (LJCPA), but vacated her board seat after missing three meetings to attend to her dying mother. At the Sept. 7 special election to fill the seat, Greatrex ran and was elected to a new term. She was present at the onset of that meeting. Greatrex was also chair of La Jolla Park & Recreation, Inc. until spring 2017, when allegations of misuse of funds were raised. At that time, Greatrex stepped down as chair, citing conflict with other board members. La Jolla Park & Recreation, Inc. is in the midst of a playground renovation, and is currently discussing layout concepts and will soon begin fundraising.

According to court documents, over the span of about a year, “Greatrex stole money belonging to La Jolla Park & Recreation, Inc. … She made out company checks made payable to herself or cash, and these checks were cashed by her through (bank) accounts.” The loss total was $67,935.86. “These checks contained just her signature; bypassing board policy of having two authorizing signatures,” the document continues. The declaration in support of an arrest warrant and warrant, deposed by San Diego Peace Officer Bernie Piceno, states that Piceno was instructed to SEE REC CENTER FUNDS, A24

Karen Hickman The #1 choice to sell your home. Your Local Expert in La Jolla with Worldwide Exposure

Cindy Greatrex

LIGHT FILE

KAREN HICKMAN 858-459-4300

Karen@SellsTheCoast.com Cal Bre #01015206


www.lajollalight.com

PAGE A2 - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

See LaJollahomes.com for Exclusive Pocket Listings

Endless Panoramic Eastern Views 24/7

In an Exclusive Gated Enclave atop Mt Soledad $4.498m

0,,%$'.%(# -*)(" +%$!/$ &#%$" 1*,# <%(IK' <;IG2 :!%5 JI;%K;!*O> 9E@D60M

Panoramic Bay, City, Ocean Views <I*G!K# -%!O!K#FB :*F; 7!K'I5F 9D@E4M

Sophisticated Renovated Hillside Spanish P*F;%G <8!;% 7"!;%5*;%GB NIG;" <"IG% :!%5F 9D@414M

Authentic Updated Spanish at Sea Lane .%*("?.*G)%GA .%*(" *K' :!OO*#%?-OIF% 9D@04M

Phenomenal Panorama at View Point <HG*5O!K# -O*FF!(B SG*(!I8F ,%;*!OF 9C@6/4M

Luxurious Beach House at La Jolla Shores N%5%G -IKF;G8(;!IKB J*KIG*M!( :!%5F 9C@3/0M

Grand, Newer Traditional Residence SIG#%I8F SGI8K'FB RMH%((*)O% -G*$;FM*KF"!H 9C@04M

Ronchetti Signature Manse L&%G%' *; +*G .%OI5 =%HO*(%M%K; -IF; 96@6/0M

Fantastic ‘Street of Dreams’ Tropical Modern P*#K!Q(%K; SGI8K'FB 7"!;%5*;%G :!%5F 94@0/0M

GREG NOONAN & Associates Representation & Results You Can Trust

1-800- LA JOLLA (525-6552) · LaJollaHomes.com ©2017 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties (BHHSCP) is a member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates LLC. BHH Affiliates LLC and BHHSCP do not guarantee accuracy of all data including measurements, conditions, and features of property. Information is obtained from various sources and will not be verified by broker or MLS. Buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information. CalBRE 01317331


www.lajollalight.com

LA JOLLA LIGHT - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - PAGE A3

TARNISHING OUR JEWEL

Leaky dumpster soils beach-access stairs in The Village

I

live in the highrise at 939 Coast Blvd. Like so many other residents and tourists, I walk these stairs daily down to the beach. The stairs are at the base of the alley between a real estate office and Smashburger at 1000 Prospect St. Something must be done to clean up these stained, smelly, greasy stairs and there should be a big, sand-filled cigarette disposal can to collect butts, placed there, too. The site is despicable. The restaurant has a large dumpster and I’ve spotted rats and bugs, etc. outside it. Last year, I asked the manager to do something about the food stains. New cement was poured, but the grease continues to run down these steps. — Cheryl Hintzen-Gaines, a La Jolla resident who cares!

■ Fellow La Jollans: Please send La Jolla Light your leads of Village eyesores. E-mail the scenarios and attach a photo, or call us and we’ll investigate who or what is Tarnishing Our Jewel! Reach Editor Susan DeMaggio at (858) 875-5950 or e-mail: editor@lajollalight.com

SEASIDE MASTERPIECE

OCEAN-VIEW CONTEMPORARY

412 MARINE | $2,995,000

W NE ICE R P

PHOTOS BY CHERYL HINTZEN-GAINES

%!$+ *'/&() - 1$,00",+++ . 1#,#0",+++

W NETING S LI

THE BRETT DICKINSON TEAM

858.822.9699 | brett.dickinson@sothebysrealty.com |

CalBRE#01767484

-FF/HHH 0>7$)AJ29 H?7);?C7!>?CM 1)CM7J :'EM!C7)9 GG6D : 1)CM>&J 6>@=C?JD :MM 1!&$79 1)9);4)*D 0>7$)AJ29 H?7);?C7!>?CM 1)CM7J. !9 C ;)&!97);)* 7;C*)@C;N M!+)?9)* 7> 0>7$)AJ29 H?7);?C7!>?CM 1)CM7J :'EM!C7)9 GG6D :? L<5CM 3==>;75?!7J 6>@=C?JD L<5CM I>59!?& 3==>;75?!7JD LC+$ 3'E+) !9 H?*)=)?*)?7MJ 3K?)* :?* 3=);C7)*D 6CM81L "B,#%#(O(D


www.lajollalight.com

PAGE A4 - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

Bird Rock Council grapples with real estate signs BY ASHLEY MACKIN-SOLOMON The Bird Rock Community Council (BRCC) has received complaints of excessive realtor signs being illegally posted in the public right-of-way on La Jolla Boulevard sidewalks and roundabouts. The sign proliferation, and what can be done about it, was discussed at the Sept. 5 BRCC meeting at Bird Rock Elementary School. Introducing the issue, BRCC treasurer Barbara Dunbar said, “These signs are in violation of our community code and the San Diego Municipal Code. It’s a serious problem. Last week, and the weekend before that, there was an intersection on La Jolla Boulevard with eight signs. These signs are positioned so they block the handicap ramps, and we’ve received complaints from people having to step out into traffic (to get around them) and people with strollers trying to manuever by them. It’s also a safety issue because they are a distraction to those driving along La Jolla Boulevard, who are looking at the signs. Plus, it looks terrible.” Dunbar said she understands the City’s Code Compliance Department “has a lot going on” and does not have a lot of manpower, and most of the problems occur on the weekends when open houses take place. Nevertheless, she said the problem “is getting worse.” When asked by a meeting attendee what could be done, Dunbar said “(My husband and friends and I) lay the signs down when we walk around. We can actually remove them, but instead, we take a printed version of the applicable Municipal Code and affix it to the signs and lay them down.” Citing San Diego Municipal Code Chapter 14, Article 2, Division 12, which reads “It is unlawful to … place, post, paint or secure any sign, pennant, flag, banner, balloon or similar attention-seeking device on public property or within the public right-of-way unless otherwise provided in the Municipal Code or specific state statute,” Dunbar later e-mailed La Jolla Light with the notices she affixes: “Open house signs in the Bird Rock Neighborhood and Bird

COURTESY

Realtor flags and Open House signs on Bird Rock medians.

Rock Maintenance Assessment District areas are prohibited by San Diego Municipal Code. Regarding these signs in the Bird Rock Neighborhood, the City of San Diego Municipal Code prohibits the placement of signs on public property or in the public right-of-way. This includes all sidewalks, handicap ramps, streets, bicycle lanes, driveways, curbs, crosswalks, roundabouts, roundabout aprons, splitters and medians, and public landscape areas including the areas maintained by the Bird Rock Maintenance Assessment District.”

In other Bird Rock Council news

■ Pleas for repairs continue: City Council member Barbara Bry stopped by and the board took advantage of her

presence to seek help in getting long-delayed municipal repairs carried out. One longstanding request is to have the netting that surrounds the Midway Bluff overlook removed. When the Midway Bluff stabilization project was completed last year, orange netting was set up to help establish new plants and walking paths. “We got the orange netting taken down, but now there is beige netting. The plants have been established since last fall,” Dunbar said. Another request is for repairs to the uneven sidewalk near La Jolla Boulevard at Colima Street, which BRCC has been seeking for more than six months. There is currently an A-frame sign and orange striping to draw attention to the uneven sidewalk dangers. ■ Bry takes the mic: When it was her turn to speak, Council member Bry updated the board and attendees about the ongoing search for a new San Diego Police Chief. “As most of you know, Chief Shelley Zimmerman is retiring in March and the City is commencing a national search to replace her,” Bry said. “Right now, the City is in the process of hiring a search firm, but there will also be a number of community forums. Residents will be able to provide input in terms of the characteristics they’d like to see in the next police chief, and what they think the major issues are that are facing the City in terms of public safety.” The forum for District 1 (which includes La Jolla) will be at the Standley Rec Center, 3585 Governor Drive in University City at an October date to be determined. ■ More street benches: After issuing a call for donations for new artful sidewalk benches, Dunbar said the BRCC collected enough for two large benches and one small one, to be decorated by mosaic artist Jane Wheeler. “If you’ve seen some of her benches around town, they look really nice. It’s indicative of Bird Rock to me,” Dunbar said. A date for installation was not announced. — Bird Rock Community Council meets 6 p.m. first Tuesdays at varied Bird Rock venues. birdrockcc.org

La Jolla New Construction 18 Luxury Village Homes Now Selling

d y ite lit m bi Li ila a Av Each residence includes a private elevator, roof top deck, and 2 car garage. Claudette Berwin, Gallery Properties, 7861 Herschel Ave., La Jolla | 858.361.7448 | www.AvelineLaJolla.com Exclusively Represented by Gallery Properties, a CA licensed broker. CalBRE 01215982


www.lajollalight.com

LA JOLLA LIGHT - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - PAGE A5

Rancho Santa Fe | 5BR/4BA | $3,000,000

San Diego | 2BR/3.5BA | $4,750,000

La Jolla | 6BR/8BA | $9,500,00

Bankers Hill | 3BR/3.5BA | $3,250,000

Santaluz | 5BR/4.5BA | $2,875,000

La Jolla | 4BR/2BA | $6,900/mo

J A N E G R A N A D O S , C H I E F O PE R AT I N G O F F I C E R & M A N AG I N G B RO K E R 1131 WALL STREET, L A JOLLA | 858.459.4033 | INFO@WILLISALLEN.COM A N D R E W E. N E L S O N , P R E S I D E N T & O W N E R


www.lajollalight.com

PAGE A6 - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

La Jolla planners draft ‘granny flat’ preferences

BY ASHLEY MACKIN-SOLOMON Ahead of the City of San Diego’s scheduled vote on a new companion unit ordinance Sept. 12, the La Jolla Community Planning Association (LJCPA) created a list of suggestions during its meeting Sept. 7 at La Jolla Rec Center. The City Council vote was taken past La Jolla Light deadline, but the result will be reported in a future issue. The ordinance, which the City of San Diego has modified beyond what the State of California has approved, is designed to loosen regulations on constructing accessory units to create more housing opportunities. The City Council voted to support the ordinance at its July 24 meeting during what is known as a “first reading,” but it will need to be voted again during a “second reading” on Sept. 12. Thirty days after the second reading vote, the ordinance will go into effect. Under current regulations, “companion units” of no more than 750 square feet are allowed, but the new regulations would

increase that maximum to 1,200 square feet and the new regulation would add what is known as a “Junior Unit” of no more than 500 square feet. Observing several ways in which the City’s proposed ordinance conflicts with La Jolla’s Planned District Ordinance, Community Plan and existing regulations, LJCPA trustee Phil Merten created a “menu” of suggestions for the City. The board discussed the items on that list one by one. Merten said he is fine with companion units, “provided that they comply with current regulations regarding building height, setbacks and parking. They should not be granted exemptions. I am also of the opinion that it is important we come up with a list of suggestions so that if the City is going to allow buildings to encroach, we have a counter-recommendation to that.” The board voiced agreement with the notion that new accessory units be constructed in compliance with current code when it comes to major features such as building height, floor-area ratio and setbacks, and included it on their list of recommendations. Among the other leading concerns is parking in impacted beach and university areas. Current regulation says an accessory dwelling unit requires two parking spaces. With the proposed ordinance, there is no requirement to increase available parking when the unit is within half mile from a major transit stop or if the unit is one city block from a bike station. With a junior unit, creation of additional parking is not

JUST SOLD! $5,300,000 6460 La Jolla Scenic Dr South

OFF MARKET: $1,995,000-2,195,000 www.BirdRockViewHome.com

ASHLEY MACKIN-SOLOMON

LJCPA trustee Phil Merten suggests recommendations the board could make regarding the City’s accessory unit ordinance. required. In all other cases, the parking requirement has been reduced from one parking space per bedroom unit to .5 parking spaces per unit with a minimum of one space. Merten explained, “If you build a companion unit up to 1,200 square feet, the City ordinance is only requiring a half a parking space for each bedroom. If a 1,200 square foot space has two or three bedrooms, there could easily be two occupants in each room. … Parking is also allowed in any configuration, including front yards and

setback areas.” Based on the proximity to public transit, trustee John Shannon noted that with MTS bus route No. 30, which spans from Pacific Beach through Bird Rock, the Village, La Jolla Shores and Scripps Institution of Oceanography, new accessory development in the most parking-impacted areas would not need to include additional parking. Other recommendations included a minimum 30-day stay, to prevent these properties from becoming short-term vacation rentals; and that the property be owner-occupied. Questioning the political reality of the situation, Shannon said, “I wonder how much the City is going to listen to the community groups in terms of picking and choosing which elements to enact. … The reason this (ordinance) was put in place, was that communities were being too restrictive to build houses. What happens is, if we are too restrictive, they are going to steamroll over us. The City municipalities have been given this edict from the state that they must do this. Things are changing, this is what the state is telling cities to do. It’s moving the needle and accommodating the future.” However, with majority support for submitting LJCPA recommendations, Merten said he would draft a letter encapsulating what was discussed and submit it to the City Council. — La Jolla Community Planning Association next meets 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 5 at La Jolla Rec Center, 615 Prospect St. lajollacpa.org

JUST SOLD! $2,300,000 5970 La Jolla Mesa Drive

FOR SALE! $2,499,000 www.5554Taft.com


www.lajollalight.com

LA JOLLA LIGHT - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - PAGE A7

Ask the Financial Expert by Aubrey Morrow, Certified Financial Planner®

How to WRECK Your Retirement by overlooking possibility of need for Long Term Health Care ASHLEY MACKIN-SOLOMON

Stanchions were placed at the foot of Playa Del Norte near WindanSea.

Planners ask City to evaluate WindanSea stanchions

BY ASHLEY MACKIN-SOLOMON In a rare move, the La Jolla Community Planning Association (LJCPA) voted against the wishes of residents when it comes to the stanchions recently placed at the foot of Playa Del Norte near WindanSea. With the support of nearby residents, the plastic post barriers were installed in an existing red-curbed, striped, no parking zone to deter the illegal parking and loud activities occurring there. The installation was approved at the June La Jolla Traffic & Transportation advisory group meeting, and completed before the LJCPA meeting the following month. LJCPA trustee Glen Rasmussen requested the item be presented for full review at the Sept. 7 meeting and the board ultimately voted to ask the City to seek other alternatives for illegal parking and activities. Representing the office of District 1 City Council member Barbara Bry, Mauricio Medina said the City worked with the neighbors and was involved in the decision to place the stanchions and that it would be redundant to have them re-conduct the study. Nonetheless, he agreed to ask traffic engineers to come before LJCPA to explain their reasoning and why they went with stanchions. “The stanchions were placed in an area where many of us who’ve lived here for a long time and surf go to, to view the ocean, the break at WindanSea, and the wave sets. We ought to have the opportunity to discuss alternatives to these stanchions,” Rasmussen said. “I believe a good alternative would be a three-minute white loading zone so when you’re driving down that street and want to pull over to look at the surf, you have a place to do so and move on. That disallows partying down there, to the extent the parking laws are enforced, and we all know enforcement is an issue.” Beach-access advocate Melinda Merryweather said the area has been used as a view corridor by surfers for decades and identified as such in the La Jolla Community Plan. “The idea that we’ve been blocked out from a view corridor by way of these stanchions (is upsetting). And it was done before this board got to vote on it,” she said. “I would like to see that corner opened back up as a view corridor. We live in a surfing community, just like Aspen is a skiing community. We need to think about our beaches.” However, Cynthia Chasan, speaking on behalf of the neighbors, and as a

LONG-TERM CARE is the #1 Financial Risk faces by retirees. According to the Department of Health and Human Services, at least 70 percent of people over 65 will eventually need long-term care, either at home or in a nursing home, and that can be very expensive. The average stay for a woman entering a nursing home is almost four years; if she’s in a semiprivate room that costs in San Diego is about $375,000. For married couples, the chances that one spouse will need long-term care rises to 91%.

Below are Annual Care Costs in San Diego for 2016: Home Health Care

Annual Costs

Monthly Costs 5-year Growth in costs

Homemaker services

$53,768

$4,481

4%

Home Health Aide

$54,912

$4,576

4%

Adult Day Health Care

$20,800

$1,733

0%

Assisted Living Facility

$48,000

$4,000

3%

Semi-Private Room

$87,600

$7,300

1%

Private Room

$119,355

$9,946

4%

Nursing Home representative for the San Diego Police Department Northern Division Captain’s Advisory Board, and as co-chair of the La Jolla Town Council Crime Watch Committee, explained why the stanchions were posted. “In March 2017, I was asked by Police Community Relations officer Larry Hesselgesser to meet with residents who were having public nuisance issues impacting their right to peace and quiet. I visited the site on multiple occasions and on each occasion, the striped area was subject to illegal parking … and the illegal parkers were loitering and playing loud music from their cars,” Chasan explained. She added that residents have witnessed eggs and firecrackers being thrown at the condominium complex adjacent the no parking area, illegal drinking and drug use by minors and more. “These may seem like mindless teenage antics, but they are a public nuisance. So after working with police and traffic engineers, we brought this plan to La Jolla’s Traffic & Transportation Board as recommended by the City,” Chasan said. Several residents spoke in support of keeping the stanchions. One said, “The stanchions are working. It’s incredible what they have done for our community and our street.” Another said the stanchions would not deter people from walking on the sidewalk to view the surf. “The City put in the stanchions, which have proven to be an inexpensive and effective way to enforce the law. It makes life safer,” he said. One resident was “out of order” and asked to leave because as a discussion over enforcement arose, he yelled, “The police can’t enforce what’s going on, but they’re going to enforce a loading zone?” The board supported the idea to have the stanchions re-evaluated. — La Jolla Community Planning Association next meets 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 5 at La Jolla Rec Center, 615 Prospect St. lajollacpa.org

Genworth 2016 Cost of Care Survey, conducted by CareScout®

Options to pay for Long-Term Health Care Costs ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔

Deplete Savings. How long can your funds last considering costs above? Use Your Retirement Income sources – what about spouse on-going financial needs? Sell Assets – deplete your investments and retirement nest egg Borrow – if possible Ask Children to provide financial help Reverse Mortgage – getting more difficult to qualify. Sell home – terrible decision to make Cash Value of Life Insurance – depletes the death benefit Purchase Long Term Health Care Insurance individual policies – problem of increasing rates. Purchase Certificate of Deposit Type Policy which provides substantial LTC benefits, life insurance to heirs if LTC is not needed and return of original deposit if requested Count on Medicare. Medicare only covers up to 100 days of rehabilitation following hospitalization. Then, nothing.

Learn More - Join us at our upcoming educational luncheon workshops Wednesday, Sept 20th 2017 |12:00 – 1:30 pm Butcher Shop Steakhouse | 5255 Kearny Villa Road San Diego, CA 92123 Thursday, Sept 21st 2017 |12:00 – 1:30 pm Bistro West | 4960 Avenida Encinas, Carlsbad, CA 92008 Make Reservations at Financial Designs, Ltd. at (858) 597-1980 Or at www.MoneyTalkRadio.com - see workshop link Unfortunately, Individuals requiring medical devices such as a walker, cane, wheelchair or oxygen are not eligible for the insurance-based solutions which will be discussed. As a matter of courtesy to others we ask that you do not attend and take up the seat of someone who could benefit from the information.

Aubrey Morrow, President of Financial Designs, Ltd. is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ practitioner with over 30 years of experience. He is a Registered Representative offering securities and advisory services through Independent Financial Group, LLC, member FINRA and SIPC.


www.lajollalight.com

PAGE A8 - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

City to remove DecoBikes from coastal communities BY ASHLEY MACKIN-SOLOMON Although the long-contested and loudly objected to bike-sharing program known as DecoBike never made it to La Jolla, residents can breathe a sigh of relief to know the City is removing DecoBike kiosks up and down the San Diego coastline, as part of a larger re-prioritization project. The City will now focus its bike-sharing efforts on San Diego’s “urban core.” The City is relocating 15 bike-share kiosks in coastal communities and moving them to the Downtown and Uptown communities. The City once announced that as many as 17, 16-bike kiosks would be installed in La Jolla. A memo was issued on Sept. 1 announcing the City’s latest decision. It reads: “The City, per discussions with DecoBike, will focus on expanding the bike station locations by increasing the use of bike-share for transit connectivity and short trips, which continues to support the City’s Climate Action Plan efforts and mobility hub plans. As a result, the City is proposing new locations in the urban core areas.” The relocation of the stations was to be completed the week of Sept. 11. The stations that will be relocated include ones at the Mission Bay Boat Ramp, the Pacific Beach boardwalk, fronting the Pacific Beach lifeguard station, Bonita Cove Park, Ventura Cove Park, Liberty Station and Fiesta Island Park. There are also two on North Harbor Drive, two on Mission Boulevard, one on West Mission Bay Drive, one on North Mission Bay Drive, one on Newport Avenue and one on Spray Street that will be moved. The City will present the new locations for

LIGHT FILE

DecoBike kiosks across the City are stationed on sidewalks, park spaces and more. public input to the respective community planning groups in the Uptown and Downtown communities in the next few months. From the time proposed DecoBike kiosks in La Jolla were announced, community planning groups opposed them with near unanimity. San Diego communications officer Katie Keach said the decision to rearrange the DecoBike map was based on a variety of factors, “including complaints.” “The City continuously evaluates the bike-sharing program and has discussions with DecoBike,” she said, via e-mail. “The

Buy Fresh, Buy Local

WE SOLVE YOUR COMPLEX TAX ISSUES! Now is the perfect time to start planning on how to reduce your tax burden in future years. Is this you? • International or Local Business Owner? • High Income Wage Earner? • S-Corporation? • Need Trust and Estate Planning?

Gelson’s carries more than 900 local products! From organic chicken locally raised in California to sweet honeydew melons fresh from the farm, have a taste of all California has to offer!

99¢

Locally Grown in California /lb Honeydew Reg. $1.29/lb

$10 off

your entire order of $50 or more*

Our way of saying “thanks” for shopping with us!

www.gelsons.com

*Offer valid at Gelson’s La Costa/Carlsbad, Del Mar, and Pacific Beach locations only. Excludes pharmacy, tobacco, alcohol, gift cards, and postage stamps. Cannot be used with any other offer. Limit one coupon per customer per day. No cash back. No reproductions accepted; coupon must be surrendered when tendered.

Expires: 9/20/2017 La Costa/Carlsbad 7660 El Camino Real 92009 760-632-7511

long-term success of bike-sharing is dependent on connectivity and networks or hubs for users. Expanding the network in the urban core to provide a last-mile solution for transit riders and an alternative for short local trips was determined to be an appropriate move at this point. We will examine options for expansion in the future to other communities including the beaches.” On Jan. 30, concerned residents from La Jolla, Mission Beach and Pacific Beach gathered at La Jolla Community Center to speak out against DecoBike. At the gathering, led by La Jolla resident Cindy Greatrex,

participants listed the reasons DecoBike does not work in San Diego (and specifically La Jolla): 1) DecoBike has a series of negative reviews online, ranging from complaints about multiple credit card charges, issues with getting bikes in and out of kiosks, and difficulty reaching customer service; 2) DecoBike does not provide locks or helmets to users; 3) DecoBike offers bikes that are not recommended for the hilly topography in La Jolla; and 4) DecoBike is not practical as a non-car alternative because there are no large public transit stations in La Jolla. Of the withdrawal, Greatrex told La Jolla Light, “I’m very pleased that the City heard us out and responded positively to our requests, which were that DecoBike target small gaps in the transportation network, a feat achieved by focusing on our urban core and its network of car-free transportation and cycling lanes. The City also responded favorably to our request that certain pre-existing coastal stations be relocated so as to best support that premise.” The City of San Diego’s 2013 Bicycle Master Plan calls for “a bike-sharing program to offer cyclists the opportunity to rent a bicycle from an unattended docking station, ride it wherever they want within the network, and return it to any station with an open dock.” To meet the terms of this plan, the City entered into a corporate partnership agreement in 2013 with DecoBike LLC, which provided approximately $8 million in infrastructure investment in return for the ability to sell advertising on the bikes and kiosks.

Allen Barron, Inc. offers strategies to reduce taxes and increase the amount of income you are able to keep. Our Tax Experts assist and prepare careful plans to reduce the amount of tax you pay each year. Call us today for a non-obligatory Consultation at 866.631.3470, 858.376.1501, or visit us at AllenBarron.com. Janathan L. Allen, Senior Partner

PLU #8840

Del Mar 2707 Via De La Valle 92014 858-481-9300

Pacific Beach 730 Turquoise St., San Diego 92109 858-488-0044

info@allenbarron.com | allenbarron.com OFFICE 858.376.1501 | FAX 858.376.1410

/ilovegelsons

@gelsonsmarkets

@gelsonsmarkets

/gelsonsmarkets

16745 West Bernardo Drive, Suite 260 | San Diego, CA 92127


www.lajollalight.com

LA JOLLA LIGHT - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - PAGE A9

BROTHERS

LA JOLLA MARKET STATS | AUGUST 2017 AVERAGE SALES PRICE $2,781,494 AVG. % OF LIST PRICE RECEIVED 90.0%

M/M

v

v

$

AVERAGE SALES PRICE $1,039,338

$

AVG. # OF DAYS ON MARKET 41

AVG. PRICE PER SQUARE FOOT $823

AVG. PRICE PER SQUARE FOOT $660

HIGHEST SALE IN AUG. 2017 8204 PRESTWICK DR | $5.350M

HIGHEST SALE IN AUG. 2017 6767 NEPTUNE PL 303 | $3.840M

MONTHS OF INVENTORY 7.2

v

v

#

AVG. % OF LIST PRICE RECEIVED 95.8%

AVG. # OF DAYS ON MARKET 75

$

NUMBER OF UNITS SOLD 37

v

$ v

$

Y/Y

v

NUMBER OF HOMES SOLD 17

Y/Y

$

MONTHS OF INVENTORY 2.8

ALL OTHER ATTACHED UNITS

#

v

SINGLE FAMILY HOMES

M/M

OUR RECENT ACTIVITY

JUST REDUCED $3,595,000 8268PaseoDelOcaso.com

JUST REDUCED $1,492,000 939Coast7H.com

$9,995/mo. Rent8268PaseoDelOcaso.com

JUST LISTED $2.995M - $3.395M 342PlayaDelSur.com

DREW NELSON BRE #01376023

TIM NELSON

BRE #01801493

JUST LISTED | FOR RENT

COMING SOON $1.995M - $2.295M 7455Pepita.com

FOR ADDITIONAL LISTINGS VISIT: NELSONBROTHERSREALESTATE.COM

(866) NEL-SONS | NELSONBROTHERS@WILLISALLEN.COM | NELSONBROTHERSREALESTATE.COM Information based on data available from the Sandicor MLS and 10K InfoSparks. Sandicor MLS, Tim Nelson and Drew Nelson are not responsible for its accuracy. If your property is listed, this is not meant to be a solicitation. Information deemed reliable, but not guaranteed.

@

willis allen


www.lajollalight.com

PAGE A10 - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

Growing the Watch program

FROM CRIME WATCH, A1 has an assigned block captain. Above them, there are six area coordinators working with Chasan, who oversees the La Jolla program. She works in concert with Hesselgesser to get crime information out to residents. The coverage area under the La Jolla Neighborhood Watch group includes Mount Soledad, The Village and Bird Rock. In these areas, Chasan said there has been a reduction in burglaries. “In 2016, from January to September, we had 178 residential burglaries. In 2017, we’ve had 54 residential burglaries,” she said. “So far this year, we’ve had 41 motor vehicle thefts, but our 10-year average is 128 motor vehicle thefts.”

Tools for success

ASHLEY MACKIN-SOLOMON

Old Neighborhood Watch signs suggest the area is not being monitored, and the La Jolla Community Crime Watch committee wants them gone.

In addition to the communication structure, Hesselgesser said the “most helpful” resource has been the community-based social media site nextdoor.com on which residents report suspicious activities. “When it was introduced two or three years ago, the site helped us all come together and be more in tune to what’s going on in a neighborhood. The residents talk, that information gets to the coordinators, and that gets to me,” he said. “In year’s past, we had meetings and then the momentum would just die out after a couple of months because people wouldn’t communicate. Having the social media aspect makes it easier for people to know what’s going on in their neighborhoods.” Chasan added that improvements in home surveillance have made documenting — and sharing — criminal activity easier. Specifically, she advocates for in-home equipment such as “Ring” doorbells (which automatically record people who come to a front door) or other cameras. “We are capturing video of these people and we can post the video on nextdoor.com so people know what to look for; that’s made a big difference,” she said.

TRUST IN US — to — HELP GUIDE YOUR FINANCIAL FUTURE

To further improve the workings of the La Jolla Neighborhood Watch program, resident and La Jolla Town Council Crime Watch Committee co-chair Catharine Douglass designed new Neighborhood Watch signs that provide more information to deter criminals. Chasan explained, “This sign was designed specifically for La Jolla. We found research that suggests if your city’s name is on the sign, it looks like someone is organizing the Watch, rather than it being a generic message. So we put ‘La Jolla’ on the signs and a note that reads ‘monitored video’ surveillance, and that’s different from other signs. “If we can get 10-12 residents to gather and have a Neighborhood Watch meeting and get a few to put in Ring doorbells, we put one of these signs in their area.” One goal for the coming year is to “get the decrepit old signs replaced” she said. “If someone has one of those (tarnished signs) on their street, I would like for them to contact the offices of City Council member Barbara Bry, who will, in turn, contact me. All they have to do is have a Neighborhood Watch meeting with about a dozen neighbors and we will replace their signs with newer ones.” Hesselgesser added that burglars casing a neighborhood will notice whether the signs are old and uncared for, or if they are new and specific. Another goal is to expand the program into La Jolla Shores. Chasan reports the first Watch meeting in The Shores will be later this month.

The need continues

Despite the improvements in crime prevention due to the Neighborhood Watch program, crime will still be a reality, Chasan said. She pointed out that by January 2018, San Diego is going to have fewer than 1,800 officers in the department. With more than 1.3 million people, San Diego is the eighth-largest city in the United States and the second-largest in California,

OUR COMMITMENT WE ARE DEDICATED TO OUR CLIENTS WE BELIEVE IN ONE WORD: CARE Our clients may need comprehensive financial planning that includes a written financial plan, guidance on savings programs, budgeting, investments, taxes, insurance, education funding, debt management, retirement projections, charitable giving and estate planning. Our quarterly fee is based on the services provided and includes unlimited consultation and advice on all financially related matters. You want individual attention including time available to answer your questions. We provide wealth management that is individually designed to meet your needs. We specialize in clients wanting an advisor who will become their confidential guide through what can be a very confusing group of options. We understand the obstacles and opportunities in wealth management. We are dedicated to serving your needs. We have been a Registered Investment Advisor since 2002. We manage individual stocks/bonds, mutual funds and ETFs. We offer our clients help in attaining current life-living goals. We make a great effort to try and determine what you really want from our company. We are a fee-only advisor, which means we place you (or keep your current investment custodian/products) in products structured without commissions or rebates. Call us for a complimentary review of your situation!!!

EAGLE HILL WEALTH MANAGEMENT Peter T. Cacioppo, CFP Registered Investment Advisor 7736 Ivanhoe Ave, La Jolla, CA 92037 | Tel 925-360-5570

WWW.EAGLEHILLADVISOR.COM


www.lajollalight.com according the the U.S. Census Bureau. “When you go on nextdoor.com, you see posts of people being on hold with the police for 45 minutes and asking what the point is of having a police department. We don’t have an immediate fix for the lack of officers. People can complain all they want about this being the police department’s fault. It’s COURTESY not. We have an This new sign reportedly deters understaffed police criminals by providing more details, department, so we have suggesting the Neighborhood to come together as a Watch is out in force. community at this point,” she said. Hesselgesser added, “This is a little bit of a Band-Aid approach, but we don’t have the ability to patrol like we used to and be proactive. We need more people to be aware of what’s going on. We need the public to be the eyes and ears of the community and let us know what’s going on.”

Want To Know More?

■ La Jolla Town Council Crime Watch Committee website: lajollatowncouncil.org/crime-watch-committee Hesselgesser said the site contains answers to most of the questions he receives and describes how to start a Neighborhood Watch group. ■ City Council member Bry at sandiego.gov/cd1 has posted a link with resources “Set Up Neighborhood Watch on Your Block.” It has step-by-step instructions, contacts, resources and more. ■ nextdoor.com is a community-based social media site on which residents may report suspicious activities.

LA JOLLA LIGHT - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - PAGE A11

Crime in La Jolla July 2016 vs July 2017

La Jolla Light compiled the crime statistics used in our Crime & Public Safety reports for a side-by-side comparison of how crime trends have changed, randomly selecting the month of July. The City of San Diego recommends crimemapping.com for viewing crime statistics, but not all crimes are reported on the site.

July 2016 • Residential burglary: 11 • Vandalism: 7 • Vehicle break-ins/car theft: 26 • Weapons: 1 • Drug/alcohol violations: 9 • Street robbery: 2 • Petty theft: 9 • Commercial burglary: 2 • Grand theft (value of over $950): 5 • Assault (with a weapon/sexual assault/battery): 1 • Open container in public park: 2 • DUI: 2 • Fraud: 1

July 2017 • Residential burglary: 4 • Vandalism: 11 • Vehicle break-ins/car theft: 23 • Weapons: 0 • Drug/alcohol violations: 3 • Street robbery: 1 • Petty theft: 15 • Commercial burglary: 7 • Grand theft: 9 • Assault (with a weapon/sexual assault/battery): 7 • Open container in public park: 10 • DUI: 0 • Fraud: 4


www.lajollalight.com

PAGE A12 - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

Settlement on I-5 expansion calls for rail tunnel under UTC mall

DANIEL WHEATON

BY JOSHUA EMERSON SMITH Those in Southern California may someday be able to ride the Coaster or Pacific Surfliner trains through a tunnel under the Westfield UTC shopping complex — a project that could shorten travel times and include an underground transit station at the mall. Under a court settlement between Caltrans and a small but influential local conservation group, a previously shelved plan to tunnel under University Town Center in order to bypass the slowest section of the coastal rail corridor between Los Angeles and San Diego is being reconsidered. A legal agreement to explore the idea was quietly inked in January as the culmination of a lawsuit filed by the Cleveland National Forest Foundation that sought to block the widening of I-5. “It’s a big deal,” said Duncan McFetridge, leader and co-founder of the foundation. “It advances a project that is critical to the state-of-the art functioning of the (rail) corridor.” While the tunnel project has been included in previous Caltrans planning documents going back more than a decade, officials have yet to act on the idea that has been estimated in the past to cost roughly half a billion dollars, and instead have put resources elsewhere. The foundation’s lawsuit, filed in 2013, alleged that Caltrans’ $6.5 billion, 30-year North Coast Corridor Program failed to analyze whether projected greenhouse gas emissions from the highway widening project would be in line with California’s targets to fight climate change. The plan spans 27 miles from La Jolla to Oceanside, including improvements to highway, rail, bike lanes and coastal access. The signature element is the $3.5 billion widening of I-5 that includes four new express lanes, two in each direction to serve carpools, buses, motorcycles and electric cars and toll customers. While the court settlement is a public document, the arrangement called for holding off on issuing a news release until the tunnel project cleared several key hurdles, including a feasibility study and a financing plan. Under the settlement, the foundation agreed to dismiss the case with prejudice, meaning it cannot file another legal challenge on the same grounds. Caltrans also agreed to pay the nonprofit’s attorney fees of $220,000. The proposed rail project would tunnel for roughly 5.6 miles under Miramar Hill to bypass the slow and winding nine-mile section of track that loops away from I-5, through

Mar aryyl Weight m an

Ready To Move? Wondering about your options? Call me for a free home evaluation Broker Associate with Team Chodorow

(858) 354-2913

maryl@marylweightman.com ©2017 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties is a member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates LLC. CalBRE 01317331

Rose Canyon east of I-805 and north of SR-52. The foundation argues the tunnel and a station at UTC would greatly increase transit use in the areas, especially because it could create a transfer point with the 11-mile Mid-Coast Trolley extension that’s expected by 2021 to connect downtown San Diego to the sprawling job center that is University City. “This is an opportunity for change, and I think Caltrans sees it as an opportunity for change as well,” said Jana Clark, board member for foundation, who worked closely on the agreement. “Our hope is that if the tunnel goes in, there would no longer be a need for freeway widening in the corridor.” Under the settlement, the tunnel and the underground transit station are contingent on a feasibility study that would look at whether the project is physically and financially viable. To get a green light, modeling would also have to show the project would attract a significant number of riders who would have otherwise driven to their destination. “As part of the Cleveland National Forest Foundation lawsuit resolution, Caltrans has agreed to perform a preliminary feasibility study of the tunnel concept,” said Cathryne Bruce-Johnson, spokeswoman for Caltrans. “The study is in the procurement phase and analysis has not yet begun.” An initial report on the project was slated to be completed this fall, but Caltrans officials said this key document for determining whether to move forward with the tunnel has been delayed and wouldn’t be completed until late 2018. The agency didn’t provide further details. “We hope to get it started by the end of the year, and we expect it to take a year to complete,” Bruce-Johnson said. Caltrans and the county’s regional planning agency, the San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG), have looked at the option of decreasing travel times by tunneling under Miramar Hill, either along I-5 or under UTC, but so far, the idea has garnered little support, said Linda Culp, A SANDAG planner. “A tunnel is very expensive,” she said. “It comes to trade-offs. Our board made a decision to invest in double tracking so we could add more stations, add more trains, in lieu of, say, tunnels.” SANDAG is now looking for financing to complete double tracking on the loop, which faces delays along a section of the track where only one train can pass at a time.


www.lajollalight.com

LA JOLLA LIGHT - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - PAGE A13


www.lajollalight.com

PAGE A14 - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

www.lajollalight.com

LA JOLLA LIGHT - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - PAGE A15

Visit us online at bhhscalifornia.com

LA JOLLA’S LEADER IN HOME SALES* 2000 • 2001 • 2002 • 2003 • 2004 • 2005 • 2006 • 2007 • 2008 • 2009 • 2010 • 2011 • 2012 • 2013 • 2014 • 2015 • 2016 HOMES SOLD IN LA JOLLA Top 4 Offices

September 1, 2016 - August 31, 2017**

1BD/1BA • 3068 VIA ALICANTE #G, LA JOLLA $349,000 • 858.733.4433

4BD/3BA • 5503 CHELSEA AVE, LA JOLLA $2,795,000 • 858.454.7355

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties Total Homes Sold: 275 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Total Homes Sold: 141

5BD/4BA • 5961 LA JOLLA SCENIC DR, LA JOLLA $2,750,000 • 619.261.3804

4BD/4BA • 8305 CALLE DEL CIELO, LA JOLLA • $3,650,000 • 619.838.9400 OPEN SAT & SUN 1-4PM

4BD/3BA • 6445 AVENIDA WILFREDO, LA JOLLA $2,198,000.00 • 619.813.8626

Rosamaria Acuna 619.890.2828

Kate Adams 858.775.0007

Andrew Jabro 858.525.5498

Ruth Mills 858.967.7722

Susana Corrigan and Patty Cohen 858.229.8120 • 858.414.4555

Claire Melbo 858.551.3349

Willis Allen Total Homes Sold: 116

OPEN SATURDAY 1-4

4BD/2BA • 6571 AVENIDA WILFREDO, LA JOLLA $1,999,000 • 858.525.5498

Doris “Day” Dirks 619.813.9503

Buster & Tinker Mico 858.344.8551

GRAND OPENING SEPT 23RD & 24TH

3BD/2.25BA • OCEAN VIEWS • 638 ARENAS ST, LA JOLLA $1,375,000 • 858.551.3349

Carol Doty 858.997.8151

Michelle Dykstra 858.344.7653

Greg Noonan 1.800.525.6552

Janicke Swanson 858.733.4433

1BD/1BA • 2628 TORREY PINES ROAD, LA JOLLA $409,000 • 858.454.8519

4BD/3.5BA • 784 LA CANADA, LA JOLLA • $2,750,000 • 858.551.6630

Pacific Sotheby’s Total Homes Sold: 136

Ron Fineman 858.751.9210

2BD/2BA • 100 HARBOR DR, #1404, SAN DIEGO $1,149,888 • 760.310.8777

Craig Gagliardi 619.813.9557

Karla and Mark Stuart 858.454.8519

Maxine and Marti Gellens 858.551.6630

Goldie Sinegal 858.342.0035

Joan Schultz 619.261.3804

©2017 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties (BHHSCP) is a member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates LLC. BHH Affiliates LLC and BHHSCP do not guarantee accuracy of all data including measurements, conditions, and features of property. Information is obtained from various sources and will not be verified by broker or MLS. Seller will entertain and respond to all offers within this range. Buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information. *This report (Total sales volume) is published 4/2017 based on data available from 1/1/00 through 12/31/16 for the top four offices/brokerages in La Jolla, CA. **Total homes sold in La Jolla, 92037 is published 9/2017 based on data available from 9/1/16 through 8/31/17 for the top four offices/brokerages in La Jolla, CA. Trendgraphix, Inc. CalBRE# 01317331

Jeannie Gleeson 858.551.3355

Naomi Shiraishi Cooper 760.310.8777

Jamaica Grace 619.316.0423

3BD/3BA • 428-448 EMERALD, EL CAJON FROM $499,000 • 858.751.9210

1BD/1BA • 7340 EADS AVE, LA JOLLA $866,000 • 858.344.7653

Lynda Gualtier 619.988.7799

Barry and Betty Tashakorian 858.367.0303

Anthony Halstead 619.813.8626

Marie Huff 619.838.9400

Sandie Ross and John Tolerico 858.775.7677 • 858.876.4672

Gina Hixson and Elaine Robbs 858.405.9100 • 858.766.8229

Brant Westfall 858.454.7355

Vernon Youngdale 858.442.4541

LA JOLLA OFFICE | 1299 Prospect St. | 858.459.0501


www.lajollalight.com

PAGE A14 - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

www.lajollalight.com

LA JOLLA LIGHT - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - PAGE A15

Visit us online at bhhscalifornia.com

LA JOLLA’S LEADER IN HOME SALES* 2000 • 2001 • 2002 • 2003 • 2004 • 2005 • 2006 • 2007 • 2008 • 2009 • 2010 • 2011 • 2012 • 2013 • 2014 • 2015 • 2016 HOMES SOLD IN LA JOLLA Top 4 Offices

September 1, 2016 - August 31, 2017**

1BD/1BA • 3068 VIA ALICANTE #G, LA JOLLA $349,000 • 858.733.4433

4BD/3BA • 5503 CHELSEA AVE, LA JOLLA $2,795,000 • 858.454.7355

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties Total Homes Sold: 275 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Total Homes Sold: 141

5BD/4BA • 5961 LA JOLLA SCENIC DR, LA JOLLA $2,750,000 • 619.261.3804

4BD/4BA • 8305 CALLE DEL CIELO, LA JOLLA • $3,650,000 • 619.838.9400 OPEN SAT & SUN 1-4PM

4BD/3BA • 6445 AVENIDA WILFREDO, LA JOLLA $2,198,000.00 • 619.813.8626

Rosamaria Acuna 619.890.2828

Kate Adams 858.775.0007

Andrew Jabro 858.525.5498

Ruth Mills 858.967.7722

Susana Corrigan and Patty Cohen 858.229.8120 • 858.414.4555

Claire Melbo 858.551.3349

Willis Allen Total Homes Sold: 116

OPEN SATURDAY 1-4

4BD/2BA • 6571 AVENIDA WILFREDO, LA JOLLA $1,999,000 • 858.525.5498

Doris “Day” Dirks 619.813.9503

Buster & Tinker Mico 858.344.8551

GRAND OPENING SEPT 23RD & 24TH

3BD/2.25BA • OCEAN VIEWS • 638 ARENAS ST, LA JOLLA $1,375,000 • 858.551.3349

Carol Doty 858.997.8151

Michelle Dykstra 858.344.7653

Greg Noonan 1.800.525.6552

Janicke Swanson 858.733.4433

1BD/1BA • 2628 TORREY PINES ROAD, LA JOLLA $409,000 • 858.454.8519

4BD/3.5BA • 784 LA CANADA, LA JOLLA • $2,750,000 • 858.551.6630

Pacific Sotheby’s Total Homes Sold: 136

Ron Fineman 858.751.9210

2BD/2BA • 100 HARBOR DR, #1404, SAN DIEGO $1,149,888 • 760.310.8777

Craig Gagliardi 619.813.9557

Karla and Mark Stuart 858.454.8519

Maxine and Marti Gellens 858.551.6630

Goldie Sinegal 858.342.0035

Joan Schultz 619.261.3804

©2017 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties (BHHSCP) is a member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates LLC. BHH Affiliates LLC and BHHSCP do not guarantee accuracy of all data including measurements, conditions, and features of property. Information is obtained from various sources and will not be verified by broker or MLS. Seller will entertain and respond to all offers within this range. Buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information. *This report (Total sales volume) is published 4/2017 based on data available from 1/1/00 through 12/31/16 for the top four offices/brokerages in La Jolla, CA. **Total homes sold in La Jolla, 92037 is published 9/2017 based on data available from 9/1/16 through 8/31/17 for the top four offices/brokerages in La Jolla, CA. Trendgraphix, Inc. CalBRE# 01317331

Jeannie Gleeson 858.551.3355

Naomi Shiraishi Cooper 760.310.8777

Jamaica Grace 619.316.0423

3BD/3BA • 428-448 EMERALD, EL CAJON FROM $499,000 • 858.751.9210

1BD/1BA • 7340 EADS AVE, LA JOLLA $866,000 • 858.344.7653

Lynda Gualtier 619.988.7799

Barry and Betty Tashakorian 858.367.0303

Anthony Halstead 619.813.8626

Marie Huff 619.838.9400

Sandie Ross and John Tolerico 858.775.7677 • 858.876.4672

Gina Hixson and Elaine Robbs 858.405.9100 • 858.766.8229

Brant Westfall 858.454.7355

Vernon Youngdale 858.442.4541

LA JOLLA OFFICE | 1299 Prospect St. | 858.459.0501


www.lajollalight.com

PAGE A16 - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

CRIME AND PUBLIC-SAFETY NEWS Pedestrian injured in head-on crash with car A 51-year-old man was seriously injured when he was struck by a 21-year-old driver in University City at 9:13 p.m. Sept. 5. The pedestrian was wearing dark clothes and crossing La Jolla Village Drive. The driver saw the pedestrian and attempted evasive action, but struck the pedestrian head on. Police report the pedestrian sustained serious injuries and was transported to the hospital by medics. His injuries are not considered life threatening. Alcohol was not involved. Traffic division responded to the scene and are investigating the accident.

Veteran missing, vehicle found in La Jolla Police are seeking help in finding a missing veteran whose car was found in La Jolla, Sept. 3. According to police reports, Johnathan Steven Surmont was last seen at his residence on Sunday, Aug. 27 near Chollas Lake Park. On Aug. 31, Surmont contacted his ex-wife and said he was in a “rough place” in Los Angeles. On Sept. 3, Surmont’s vehicle was recovered in La Jolla. Family and friends report it is abnormal for Surmont not to contact loved ones. Surmont is a white

male, six-feet tall, 212 pounds, brown hair and brown eyes. Those with information are asked to contact the San Diego Police Department at (619) 531-2000 or SDPD Missing Person’s Unit (619) 531-2277.

Homicide down in first half of 2017 The number of homicides that occurred in the region during the first half of 2017 were lower than the first half of 2016, with property crime also showing sizeable decreases, according to a new SANDAG report, Crime in the San Diego Region Mid-Year 2017 Statistics. In the first half of 2017, homicides in the region decreased 14 percent and rapes reported to law enforcement decreased by 3 percent over the previous year. However, there were slightly more robberies (up 3 percent), aggravated assaults (up 1 percent), and domestic violence incidents (up 2 percent) reported. Of the nine types of crime included in the report, six saw decreases in the first half of 2017 as compared to the first six months of 2016.

Police: Pedestrian fatalities on the rise Police report that pedestrian fatalities are increasing in California as more people use

non-motorized means of transportation. Locally, the San Diego Police Department has investigated more than 250 fatal and injury collisions involving pedestrians during the past three years. In 2013, California witnessed 701 pedestrian deaths accounting for 23 percent of all roadway fatalities, that’s much higher than the national average of 15 percent. Following a Sept. 5 safety and education program police carried out, police issued these safety tips for drivers and pedestrians. Drivers must: • Look out for pedestrians, especially in hard-to-see conditions such as at night or in bad weather; • Slow down and be prepared to stop when turning or entering a crosswalk where pedestrians are likely to be; • Stop at the crosswalk stop line to give drivers in other lanes an opportunity to see and yield to the pedestrians, too; • Be cautious when backing up — pedestrians, especially young children, can move across your path. Pedestrians must: • Be predictable. Follow the rules of the road, cross at crosswalks or intersections, and obey signs and signals; • Walk facing traffic and as far from traffic as possible if there is no sidewalk; • Pay attention to the traffic moving around you. This is not the time to be texting or talking on a cell phone; • Make eye contact with drivers as they

approach. Never assume a driver sees you; • Wear bright clothing during the day and reflective materials (or use a flashlight) at night; • Look left-right-left before crossing a street.

Police Blotter Aug. 21 ■ Fraud, 700 block Kline St., 12 a.m. Aug. 25 ■ Petty theft, 900 block Pearl St., 1:08 p.m. ■ Open container in park, 600 block Tourmaline St., 1:44 p.m. ■ Open container in park, 6900 block Neptune Place, 2 p.m. Aug. 26 ■ Open container in park, 6800 block Neptune Place, 2 p.m. Aug. 29 ■ Fraud, 400 block Palomar Ave., 12 p.m. Sept. 1 ■ Residential burglary, 7200 block Eads Ave., 9 a.m. Sept. 2 ■ Petty theft, 6000 block La Jolla Hermosa Ave., 2 p.m. Sept. 3 ■ Grand theft, 5600 block Desert View Drive, 9:45 a.m. Sept. 4 ■ Petty theft, 900 block Van Nuys St., 12:40 p.m.

Considering a Remodel? Tour our showroom and get expert advice at our no-obligation, free seminar. When: Saturday, September 23rd, 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Where: Jackson Design & Remodeling Showroom Gain valuable information for a successful remodeling experience. Learn how to select a contractor and obtain permits. Discover trends, view materials, and meet designers and architects.

Lunch will be served. $10 DONATIONS go to benefit San Diego Habitat for Humanity® Seating is limited! Call 858.292.2357 or sign up at

JacksonDesignandRemodeling.com

Community Expertise Values History Integrity Networking

When it's missing, the signs are always clear.

REBA, working to protect your privacy and the beauty of La Jolla. Ask your agent if they’re a REBA member. Bringing agents together to get deals done for 90 years!

Visit our website:

See our award-winning projects and process and be inspired!

REBA agents get RESULTS 2013 SAN DIEGO

License #880939

REBA Agents : Bringing You Home Since 1924 858.454.6126 • 908 Kline Street • La Jolla, CA 92037 • www.lajollareba.com

Photos provided by the La Jolla Historical Society and REBA.

La Jolla Real Estate Brokers Association


www.lajollalight.com ■ Petty theft, 5300 block Cass St., 9 p.m. ■ Residential burglary, 6000 block La Jolla Blvd., 9:30 p.m. Sept. 5 ■ Vehicle theft, 6900 block Via Estrada, 12:01 a.m. Sept. 7 ■ Petty theft, 700 block Loring St., 2:45 a.m. ■ Residential burglary, 600 block Tourmaline St., 10 a.m. ■ Vehicle theft, 1100 block Prospect St., 3 p.m. ■ Petty theft, 7500 block Girard Ave., 4:20 p.m.

LA JOLLA LIGHT - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - PAGE A17

Fire department has resources for residents 12-page document can be found at sandiego.gov/fire/safety

Reporting Crimes ■ To report crimes not in action, file a report online at sdpdfilemypolicereport.org ■ To call in a life-threatening emergency or crime in progress, dial 9-1-1 ■ To call in a non-emergency, dial (619) 531-2000 ■ To report suspected code violations, dial (619) 236-5500 ■ To report street maintenance repairs and lights out, dial (619) 527-7500 ■ To report illegally parked cars, dial (858) 495-7856 ■ To report uncollected trash, dial (858) 694-7000.

COURTESY

The cover of San Diego Fire and Rescue’s “Ready, Set, Go” preparedness guide.

LIGHT FILE

BY ASHLEY MACKIN-SOLOMON People may consider September and October to be “fire season” in San Diego, but in years past, fire season has started as early as June and ended as early as December and January. Nevertheless, with the conventional season upon us, fire officials want to remind residents about the Ready, Set, Go document with helpful information about what to do before a fire strikes. The 12-page document can be found at sandiego.gov/fire/safety “The best thing people can do is make themselves aware of the Ready, Set, Go program,” said San Diego Fire-Rescue Battalion Chief Jeff Mitchell. “It’s an important thing for us to get that message out. Since we’ve started putting this document out 15 or 20 years ago, we see a difference in people’s preparedness.” Among its contents are an explanation for “defensible space,” how to make your home fire-resistant, the makeup of a fire-ready house, a fire action guide and multiple checklists. These include how to prepare your family before a fire (Ready) what to do as a fire approaches (Set) and what to bring in the event of an evacuation (Go). “These are things that are hard to research in the moment and good information to have in advance,” Mitchell said. For example, if you live next to a naturally

vegetated area, often called the Wildland Urban Interface, provide firefighters with 100 feet of defensible space to protect your home. The buffer zone you create by removing weeds and brush, and thinning vegetation helps keep the fire away from your home and reduces the risk from flying embers. Also, “A home within one mile of a natural area is in (what is known as) the Ember Zone. Wind-driven embers can attack your home. You and your home must be prepared well before a fire occurs. Ember fires can destroy homes or neighborhoods far from the actual flame front of the wildland fire.” Mitchell added, “In year’s past, weather conditions have changed, especially with the onset of the drought, that have brought the fire season to year ’round. Grass grows more with the rains and dries in the droughts, and weather is driven by fuel, weather and topography, so if any of those two come together in the right conditions, a fire could start anywhere.” He added people in La Jolla are susceptible to fires, but fires are more common in the back-country because it’s hotter and drier. “We do canyon fire safety and brush removal in areas that need it, and when we go door-to-door to anyone who lives near a canyon or an area exposed to wildland fire, we try to leave them with this information.” Mitchell’s typical post is in Bay Park at Station 25, but he’s been serving at Station 35 in University City, headquarters for services to La Jolla.

Dedicated to making your home buying experience a remarkable one. When you choose Citi, you’ll receive the guidance and expertise of one of our dedicated Mortgage Representatives, who will be there for you from pre-approval through closing. Plus, you’ll have several jumbo mortgage solutions available to you, helping you achieve your home buying goals. THE BENEFITS OF A CITI JUMBO MORTGAGE: !

Jumbo loan sizes up to $3 million — loan sizes up to $8 million available to well-qualified buyers who meet Citi’s High Net Worth1 requirement

!

Mortgage discounts with Relationship Pricing2

!

SureStart® Pre-approval,3 so you can confidently find the right home

Experience a service tailored to your needs. Contact your local Mortgage Representative today. Tony Tafreshi Home Lending Officer 858-531-0956 tony.tafreshi@citi.com NMLS# 633647

Terms, conditions and fees of accounts, products, programs and services are subject to change. This is not a commitment to lend. All loans are subject to credit and property approval. Certain restrictions may apply on all programs. Offer cannot be combined with any other mortgage offer. 1 Available for clients with a minimum of $1 million or more in investable post-close assets, and at least $50,000 in traditional assets must be on deposit with Citi at least 10 days prior to closing. This amount may be part of the $1,000,000 eligibility requirement. Real estate, loan proceeds, stock options, restricted stock and personal property will not be counted as part of the $1 million or more investable post-close assets. Investable assets are defined as deposit accounts (checking, savings, money market, Certificates of Deposit), unrestricted stocks, bonds and retirement accounts held by the individual who is personally liable on the loan. Similar asset types held in revocable trust may be used provided the trust document meets the Trust Policy. The assets held in trust must be of the investable quality stated above. Additional conditions apply. 2 A Citibank deposit account and automated monthly transfers of the mortgage payment from a Citibank personal deposit account using EZ Pay will be required to receive Citibank mortgage Relationship Pricing. Ask a Mortgage Representative for details on eligible balances and the qualifying closing cost credit or rate discount. Availability of the Citibank mortgage Relationship Pricing for Citibank account holders is subject to change without notice. 3 Final commitment is subject to verification of information, receipt of a satisfactory sales contract on the home you wish to purchase, appraisal and title report, and meeting our customary closing conditions. There is no charge to receive a SureStart Pre-approval. However, standard application and commitment fees will apply for the mortgage loan application. © 2017 Citibank, N.A. NMLS# 412915. Member FDIC and Equal Housing Lender. Citi, Citi and Arc Design and other marks used herein are service marks of Citigroup Inc. or its affiliates, used and registered throughout the world.


www.lajollalight.com

PAGE A18 - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

■ Wolfstein Sculpture Park Tour, 11 a.m. 9888 Genesee Ave. Docent-guided tour of the more than 25 pieces on the campus of Scripps La Jolla. Wear comfortable shoes and sun protection. RSVP: (858) 626-6994. ■ La Jolla Bar Association meets, noon, Meredith Alcock will discuss “What’s Happening?” Manahattan Restaurant, Empress Hotel, 7766 Fay Ave. $50 annual membership, guests free. (858) 875-5142. ■ Pen to Paper writing group meets, 1 p.m. Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. (858) 552–1657. lajollalibrary.org ■ La Jolla Town Council meets, 5 p.m. La Jolla Rec Center, 615 Prospect St. (858) 454-1444. ■ Film screening, “Vaden Versus,” 7 p.m. Jewish Community Center, 4126 Executive Drive. Tickets: $24-$28. Story centers on a retired boxer’s struggle toward redemption, followed by a motivational speech by Vaden. lfjcc.org

14

Thursday, Sept. 14

Friday, Sept. 15

■ Sunrise Rotary Club of La Jolla meets, 6:55 a.m. The Shores Hotel, 8110 Camino Del Oro. $20. (619) 992-9449. ■ Silver Age Yoga, 9 a.m. La Jolla Community Center, 6811 La Jolla Blvd. Donation suggested. (858) 459-0831. ljcommunitycenter.org ■ Small business consulting, 9 a.m. Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. (858) 552-1657. lajollalibrary.org ■ Qi Gong, 9:30 a.m. Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. (858) 552-1657. lajollalibrary.org ■ Chair Yoga, 10:15 a.m. La Jolla Community Center, 6811 La Jolla Blvd. (858) 459-0831. ljcommunitycenter.org

■ La Jolla Golden Triangle Rotary Club breakfast meeting, 7:15 a.m. La Jolla Marriott, 4240 La Jolla Village Drive. $20. (858) 395-1222. lajollagtrotary.org ■ Braille Institute workshop, “Cooking without Looking,” for sight-impaired people, plus a campus tour, 10 a.m. Braille Institute, 4555 Executive Drive. Register: (858) 452-1111. ■ Tai Chi, 10 a.m. beginner, 10:45 a.m. advanced, La Jolla Rec Center, 615 Draper Ave. (858) 552-1658. ■ Computer Help Lab, 11 a.m. Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. (858) 552-1657. lajollalibrary.org ■ Kiwanis Club of La Jolla meets,

Building your future, one brick at a time. U.S. Bank has financing options that could help you buy, remodel or build your next home. We’re here with step by step guidance and rates that may make your dream of homeownership a reality.

noon, La Jolla Presbyterian Church, 7155 Draper Ave. First three meetings free, then $15. (858) 900-2710. kiwanisclublajolla.org ■ Back to School Family Picnic, 6:30 p.m. La Jolla Elementary School, 1111 Marine St. (858) 454-7196.

Saturday, Sept. 16

■ Ikebana flower arranging, 9:15 a.m. advanced, 11:30 a.m. beginner/intermediate, Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. (858) 552-1657. lajollalibrary.org ■ Health lecture, “Diagnosing mental health disorders,” 9:30 a.m. Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. (858) 552-1657. lajollalibrary.org ■ Seniors Computer Group, 9:30 a.m. Wesley Palms, 2404 Loring St., Pacific Beach. How to use computers and smartphones safely. Free for guests, $1 monthly membership. (858) 459-9065. ■ Informed Prostate Cancer Support Group, 10 a.m. Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Center Auditorium, 10905 Road to the Cure. Patients and loved ones welcome. ipcsg.org ■ Children’s Virtues Class, 10:30 a.m. La Jolla Rec Center, 615 Prospect St. childrensclass.webs.com or hedyy19@gmail.com ■ Dog adoption event with Operation Greyhound, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Ark Antiques, 7620 Girard Ave. (858) 459-7755. ■ Writer’s Block writing group meets, noon. La Jolla Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. (858) 552-1657. ■ Dog adoption event with Second Chance Rescue of San Diego, 2-6 p.m. Unleashed by Petco, 8843 Villa La Jolla Drive. (858) 457-2036.

■ Lecture, “What parents and students need to know about college” with Stanford College dean Don Chu, 2 p.m. Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. (858) 552-1657. lajollalibrary.org ■ Bio-tech workshop, “Food Science: Experiments with Enzymes,” 3 p.m., appropriate for ages 8-14. Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. (858) 552-1657. RSVP: lajollalibrary.org

Sunday, Sept. 17

■ La Jolla Open Aire Farmers Market, 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Girard Avenue at Genter Street. (858) 454-1699. ■ Book talk, “Anthology of local literary works,” 2:30 p.m. Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. (858) 552-1657. lajollalibrary.org

Monday, Sept. 18

■ Ico-Dance class, 9 a.m. La Jolla Community Center, 6811 La Jolla Blvd. $7 members, $12 non-members. amandabanks.com/ico-dance ■ Exercise class for adults, 9:30 a.m. United Methodist Church of La Jolla, 6063 La Jolla Blvd. (858) 459-3870. ■ Braille Institute campus tour, 1 p.m. Braille Institute, 4555 Executive Drive. Register: (858) 404-5009. ■ La Jolla Pen Women meet with guest pet portraitist Jill Williams, 1 p.m., La Jolla Library, 7555 Draper Ave. (858) 245-1677. ■ La Jolla Shores Planned District Advisory Board meets (pending items to review), 11 a.m. La Jolla Rec Center, 615 Prospect St. bit.ly/planningagendas

Tuesday, Sept. 19

■ Silver Age Yoga, 10 a.m. La Jolla

Wax before waves.

usbank.com/mortgage

CHUCK HELSEL Private Mortgage Loan Originator cell: 858.729.2513 email: chuck.helsel@usbank.com 7733 Girard Ave. La Jolla, CA 92037 NMLS #: 501884

Loan approval is subject to credit approval and program guidelines. Not all loan programs are available in all states for all loan amounts. Interest rates and program terms are subject to change without notice. Visit usbank.com to learn more about U.S. Bank products and services. Mortgage and Home Equity Products are offered through U.S. Bank National Association. Deposit Products are offered through U.S. Bank National Association, Member FDIC. ©2017 U.S. Bank 170506C 4/17

HILLCREST-SAN DIEGO 1040 University Ave. Suite B205 San Diego 619.269.9770


www.lajollalight.com

LA JOLLA LIGHT - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - PAGE A19

Community Center, 6811 La Jolla Blvd. Donation suggested. (858) 459-0831. ljcommunitycenter.org ■ French Conversation Class, 10:30 a.m. La Jolla Community Center, 6811 La Jolla Blvd. Free for LJCC members, $5 non-members. (858) 459-0831. ljcommunitycenter.org ■ Rotary Club of La Jolla meets, noon, La Valencia Hotel, 1132 Prospect St. Lunch $30. Guests welcome. lora.fisher@usbank.com ■ Mind/body fitness for older adults, 12:30 p.m. Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. (858) 552-1657. lajollalibrary.org ■ La Jolla Garden Club meets, 1 p.m. La Jolla Woman’s Club, 7791 Draper Ave. Speakers from Anderson’s La Costa Nursery will share tips on California gardening. (858) 273-0407. ■ Development Permit Review Committee meets (pending items to review), 4 p.m. La Jolla Rec Center, 615 Prospect St. info@lajollacpa.org ■ Enhance La Jolla meets, 4 p.m. Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. enhancelajolla.org ■ Community Balance Class, learn techniques to walk safely and maximize independence, 6 p.m. Ability Rehab, 737 Pearl St., Suite 108. Free for MS Society members, $10 non-members. (858) 456-2114.

Wednesday, Sept. 20

■ Soroptimist International of La Jolla breakfast meeting, 7:15 a.m. The Shores Restaurant, 8110 Camino Del Oro, first two meetings complimentary, then $16. (858) 454-9156 or soroptimistlj@gmail.com ■ Kiwanis Club of Torrey Pines meets, 7:20 a.m. Good Samaritan Episcopal Church,

board meets (pending items to review), 4 p.m. La Jolla Rec Center, 615 Prospect St. manana@san.rr.com

Thursday, Sept. 21

Church Rummage Sale Saturday ■ A variety of items in excellent condition (furniture, jewelry, house wares, clothing, electronics and more) will be for sale, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 16 at La Jolla Lutheran Church, 7111 La Jolla Blvd. Payment is cash and credit cards only. Net proceeds will benefit Feeding America San Diego. Unsold items will be donated to the San Diego Rescue Mission. lajollalutheranchurch.com Roetter Hall, 4321 Eastgate Mall. First three meetings free, then $15. tbilotta1@gmail.com ■ Exercise class for adults, 9:45 a.m. United Methodist Church of La Jolla, 6063 La Jolla Blvd. (858) 459-3870. ■ Torrey Pines of La Jolla Rotary Club meets, 11:30 a.m. Rock Bottom Brewery, 8980 La Jolla Village Drive. $20. (858) 459-8912. gurneymcm@aol.com ■ Social Bridge, 12:30 p.m. La Jolla Community Center, 6811 La Jolla Blvd. $2 LJCC members, $4 non-members. (858)

459-0831. ljcommunitycenter.org ■ Alzheimer Caregiver Support & Discussion Group meets, 1:30 p.m. La Jolla United Methodist Church, 6063 La Jolla Blvd. Alzheimer’s San Diego provides comprehensive, knowledgeable and free resources to families impacted by forms of dementia or memory loss. (858) 454-3745. ■ Movie Club, 1:30 p.m. La Jolla Community Center, 6811 La Jolla Blvd. Free for LJCC members, $5 non-members. (858) 459-0831. ljcommunitycenter.org ■ La Jolla Traffic & Transportation

■ Sunrise Rotary Club of La Jolla meets, 6:55 a.m. The Shores Hotel, 8110 Camino Del Oro. $20. (619) 992-9449. ■ Silver Age Yoga, 9 a.m. La Jolla Community Center, 6811 La Jolla Blvd. Donation suggested. (858) 459-0831. ljcommunitycenter.org ■ Small business consulting, 9 a.m. Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. (858) 552-1657. lajollalibrary.org ■ Qi Gong, 9:30 a.m. Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. (858) 552-1657. lajollalibrary.org ■ Chair Yoga, 10:15 a.m. La Jolla Community Center, 6811 La Jolla Blvd. (858) 459-0831. ljcommunitycenter.org ■ Pen to Paper writing group meets, 1 p.m. Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. (858) 552–1657. lajollalibrary.org ■ Poetry workshop, 2 p.m. Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. (858) 552-1657. lajollalibrary.org ■ Art and Wine talk, 6:30 p.m., LJ Crafted Wines, 5621 La Jolla Blvd. Featured artist is Lei Tang. monarchfineart.com All events are free unless otherwise noted.

Did we miss listing your community event?

■ E-mail information to: ashleym@lajollalight.com ■ The deadline is noon, Thursday for publication in the following Thursday edition. Questions? Call Ashley Mackin-Solomon at (858) 875-5957.

HEALTH. WHAT COULD BE MORE IMPORTANT? Did you know that an estimated 1/3 of men and 1/4 of women will die between the ages of 50 and 74 years old*, mostly from age-related chronic diseases? Health Nucleus is a genomics-based, health assessment platform designed to identify potential health risks EARLY when they can be optimally addressed.

Health Nucleus X (HNX) analyzes high-resolution, full-body and brain MRI and high-quality whole genome sequencing, to provide you and your physician with insight into your state of health so you can maximize it. Health Nucleus. When you’re serious about your health. Enroll now for HNX, $2,500** for a limited time (regularly priced at $4,900).

VISIT WWW.HEALTHNUCLEUS.COM/COASTAL OR CALL 844-838-3322 CANCER

NEUROLOGICAL

METABOLIC

Health Nucleus is a clinical research platform delivered by Human Longevity, Inc., the genomics-driven health intelligence company founded by Dr. J. Craig Venter who led the team that first sequenced the human genome.

* 2015 US data from the Global Burden of Disease project (http://www.healthdata.org/gbd) ** Appointment must be completed by September 15, 2017. The HNX assessment is delivered in a state-of-the-art facility located in La Jolla, CA.


www.lajollalight.com

PAGE A20 - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

What can you learn about senior living at our Lunch and Learn? A whole bunch. Ask questions. Take a tour. Ask more questions. Try the food. Ask even more questions. You get the idea. It’s casual, it’s complimentary and you’re invited.

Simplify Your Life & Move-In with Ease Tuesday, September 26th • 11:30am-1:30pm Enjoy a delicious lunch and learn helpful tips to organize, de-clutter and get the most for your home. Call 858.345.2521 to RSVP.

COURTESY

Barnard Elementary students pack supplies for a sister school in Houston, Texas.

Barnard for Houston: Kids Helping Kids

I

am a parent at Barnard Elementary School, 2445 Fogg St., in Pacific Beach. We are a public Mandarin school that is part of the San Diego Unified District. Because we are a magnet school, we have students from all over San Diego County, with many families

from La Jolla. Our school is sending supplies to a Mandarin school in Texas that was damaged by the Hurricane Harvey. When word got out that Hurricane Harvey damaged more than 200 schools and destroyed thousands of homes in the City of Houston, the families of Barnard Elementary immediately went into action. “Our school has a connection with the Mandarin Immersion Magnet Elementary School (MIMES) in Houston,” said Barnard Principal Aida Hernandez. “We share a love for the same language and the same culture. Every minute that kids can be learning is a minute that counts, so our parents were eager to help those kids get back to school as quickly as possible.”

I n de p e n de n t & A s s i s t e d L i v i ng R e s i de nc e s

850 Del Mar Downs Road • Solana Beach, CA SRGseniorliving.com • 858.345.2521

Barnard’s PTA has been collecting new school supplies and new or gently used clothing for the families of MIMES. Three boxes have been sent so far and four more will be on the way next week. In addition, an Amazon registry was created (and remains open at amazon.com/wedding/share/Barnard-Helping-Houston) so anyone can send the most-needed supplies directly to the school. Damage to the school itself is thankfully minimal and was set to reopen on Sept. 11.

RCFE# 374602832

Besides the clothes and school supplies, the students of Barnard send their Texas friends lots of love and a big yong bào (hug). — Tracie Kersten


www.lajollalight.com

LA JOLLA LIGHT - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - PAGE A21

PHOTO OF THE WEEK

NO VIKINGS VICTORY LAST WEEK

PEARL PREIS

The La Jolla High Vikings clashed with the Central Union High Spartans of El Centro, Sept. 8, losing the game, 21-13, on their home field. The next varsity football game is another home game, 6:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 15 against Santa Fe Christian of Solana Beach. — Pearl Preis

LA JOLLA’S ONLY PEDIATRIC DENTAL OFFICE We are dedicated to providing the highest quality of dental care in a fun & friendly environment. From birth to 16, we will be your comprehensive pediatric dental office. Our staff is highly trained, warm, caring and will ensure that you and your child’s visit is as enjoyable as possible and equally informative.

ANTHONY J. SCOMA, DDS 875 Prospect Street. Suite 202. La Jolla

858.551.9700


PAGE A22 - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

LA JOLLA

LIGHT 565 Pearl St., Suite 300 La Jolla, CA 92037 (858) 459-4201

lajollalight.com La Jolla Light (USPS 1980) is published every Thursday by Union-Tribune Community Press. Adjudicated as a newspaper of general circulation by Superior Court No. 89376, April 1, 1935. Copyright © 2017 Union-Tribune Community Press. All rights reserved. No part of the contents of this publication may be reproduced in any medium, including print and electronic media, without the expressed written consent of Union-Tribune Community Press. Subscriptions available for $125 per year by mail.

President & General Manager • Phyllis Pfeiffer ppfeiffer@lajollalight.com (858) 875-5940 Executive Editor • Susan DeMaggio susandemaggio@lajollalight.com (858) 875-5950 Staff Reporter • Ashley Mackin-Solomon ashleym@lajollalight.com (858) 875-5957 News Design • Michael Bower, Lead, Edwin Feliu, Crystal Hoyt, Daniel K. Lew Vice President Advertising • Don Parks (858) 875-5954 Media Consultants • Jeff Rankin (858) 875-5956 • Sarah Minihane (Real Estate) (858) 875-5945 • Dave Long (858) 875-5946 Ad Operations Manager • Colin McBride

OPINION

www.lajollalight.com

GUEST COMMENTARY

Council action to up ‘granny flat’ permits will move needle on affordable housing BY LOUIS RODOLICO n July 24, San Diego City Council took up item ITEM-603: Amendments to the Land Development Code & Local Coastal Program to modify citywide Companion Unit (CU) regulations and other items. San Diego is finding a way to accommodate the recent passage of California State Bills SB 1069 and AB 2299. With some modifications, Council voted 8-1 to move forward with the State bills and staff recommendations for CUs, moving to modify or eliminate many of the CU restrictions in its Municipal Code. Staff recommendations remove many of the barriers to building a CU in San Diego, but there still needs to be a second City Council reading (Sept. 12) and a final vote. On a personal note, in 2004, we were told a CU permit could not be issued for our property based on Code restrictions. Why was it so difficult to get a permit in the first place? Well, back then, Mayor Dick Murphy went on record stating that CUs are low-income housing and therefore not compatible with San Diego neighborhoods, and this view transferred down through City government. The State disagreed with Mayor Murphy and wanted CUs since they provide affordable housing and present a low burden on existing infrastructure. When Mayor Murphy resigned in 2005, we saw an opportunity to try once again to get our project built. Also, we were bolstered by Council’s 2006 vote to build the Regents Road Bridge, so it looked like emergency service times would begin to improve. We were also told the Development Impact Fees (DIF) we paid would be used to build things like the Regents Road Bridge. My father was a wheelchair-bound decorated war veteran and my mother needed auxiliary support to keep him living in a house. With Murphy gone, a better ear from Development Services and the State of California interceding on our behalf, we were granted a permit in 2006. We began construction in 2007, and in 2008, my parents moved in. In 2008, two CUs were built in the City; in 2016, there were 10. Council wants that number to go up and has embraced State recommendations that eliminate many restrictions. Once the approved Code changes go into effect, San Diego should be permitting

O

The Rodolico family’s 700-square-foot Companion Unit with porch, sits on a hillside in University City. 100-200 CUs and Junior Units per year. This will help move the needle on affordable housing in our City. At the July 24 hearing, it was clear to me that Council was looking for ways to assist with permits and other fees. They could consider phasing-in the additional CU property taxes over a five-year period. Development Services fees could be reduced if an owner picks a pre-approved design. Council could reduce Development Impact Fees, since CUs have a low impact on existing infrastructure. Given all the home improvements we’ve made with insulation, reduced irrigation, low-flow shower heads and toilets, high-efficiency appliances and LED lights, our house with the CU, is less of a burden on the existing utility infrastructure than our house alone was 20 years ago. Having your parents on your property means you can render support sooner without getting in your car and adding to traffic. Based on staff testimony, fees will probably not be addressed until next year, but the Council may be able to broadcast their intent this week since staff stated it would bring in at least an outline of possible fee reductions. According to Council member Sherman, the Coastal Commission may overturn some of Council’s decisions regarding restrictions on short-term rentals (under 30 days). Many Council members stated that CUs are for housing San Diegans and are not intended as

COURTESY

vacation rentals. Current CU property owners are required to live in either the house or the CU, and since they are not absentee landlords, they’re allowed to rent the other residence as they choose. But this may change. If property owners are no longer required to live onsite, than requiring both living units to be rentals over 30 days makes sense. Council spent a lot of time discussing this issue. Anyone planning to build a CU or Junior Unit as a vacation rental, should wait and see if short-term rentals will be permitted in their neighborhood. However, if you are planning to help a loved one or rent on a monthly basis, you should check the new Code out in a few months (Municipal Code Section 141.0302 with a date after Sept. 12, 2017). At the July 24 hearing, a person I sat near was also having problems getting a CU permit to assist his parents. The fact that it took us four years was discouraging to him, but with these new Code requirements more properties will qualify and delivery times should improve. There is a need for affordable housing and family assistance housing in San Diego. I applaud the State of California and San Diego City Council decision to remove overburdening restrictions from the Municipal Code. — Louis Rodolico has been a University City resident since 2001. He ran unsuccessfully for the District 1 San Diego City Council seat in 2016. Rodolico can be reached at louisrodolico.com

Production Manager • Michael Bower Advertising Design Laura Bullock, Maria Gastelum, Bryan Ivicevic, Vince Meehan Obituaries • (858) 218-7228 or monica@utcommunitypress.com Service Directory • (858) 218-7228 or monica@utcommunitypress.com Classified Ads • (858) 218-7200 or placeanad.utcommunitypress.com

OUR READERS WRITE Idea for fixing pinniped problem at Children’s Pool, La Jolla Cove Since La Jolla’s Children’s Pool and The Cove have become overrun by seals and sea lions, they have both been turned into cesspools and Citycertified bio-hazardous areas. A great deal of money, ink and frustration has been spent on these issues with no meaningful leadership or remedial action. The City’s position appears to be “Don’t ask, don’t swim, don’t care.” In the interests of good stewardship and finding a long-term, sustainable and low-cost solution to these problems, let’s make these beaches off-leash and dog-friendly. These beaches have become unfit for human use and consumption, so let us help rebalance these natural

ecosystems by letting our four-legged and four-flippered friends share these dilapidated and uncared for urban beaches together. The politicians have lost sight of the needs of the local community, residents, tourists, taxpayers and voters … so long live animal rights and the dog days of summer! Woof! Mark Pretorius

What gives at our local grocery store? The main grocery store in La Jolla has gone steadily downhill to the point where I find it’s not worth shopping at anymore. Ever since Jonathan’s closed, it’s gotten worse and we are held hostage to poor service and high prices. Let’s start with the lack of parking. The shelves are constantly unstocked


OPINION

www.lajollalight.com

LA JOLLA LIGHT - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - PAGE A23

OUR READERS WRITE (CONTINUED) and the aisles are blocked for restocking during opening hours. The deli counter has become so slow I often leave without meats while the employees stand there doing other things instead of helping the customers. The chip readers are breaking down and management isn’t fixing them. The check-out lines are long. I don’t want to sound like a snob, but this is La Jolla. We should have higher quality service than this. What can we do to demand more? Joanie Connell

Gun owners question Bry vote The San Diego County Gun Owners (SDCGO) PAC, a diverse and inclusive 700-plus-member political action committee promoting Second Amendment rights, is greatly disappointed with San Diego City Council member Barbara Bry. After signing a San Diego City Council proclamation declaring May 6 as “San Diego County Gun Owners Day in the City of San Diego,” Ms. Bry reversed herself and voted to rescind the proclamation on June 13, when SDCGO appeared before the nine-member Council to express appreciation for their support. We are disappointed in Bry’s political flip-flop. Clearly, Ms. Bry is unable to rise above the political rhetoric to honor community members who support the Second Amendment. The Second Amendment is about protection of yourself, your family and your dignity. To learn more, visit sandiegocountygunowners.com Michael Schwartz SDCGO Executive Director

■ This new business in WindanSea has a way to avoid high commercial rents. — Resident Bill

UC San Diego’s latest proposed expansion plans are ‘insane’ A campus with 45,000 students and an increase of 3,000 to 4,000 staff is not what La Jolla deserves nor what the campus was ever to be, according to what residents were told when it was to be built long ago. There is not sufficient parking as evidenced by the number of cars parked in neighborhoods all along La Jolla Scenic Drive and Torrey Pines Road. The university charges $8 per day for parking, so students and others associated with the school fill our streets instead. There does not seem to be any way of stopping UCSD from continuing to expand and build ugly buildings to further the degradation of what is left of our Jewel. Traffic, speeding, trash, noise, weeds, beggars on street corners, and the lack of visible accountability or enforcement seem to top my list. If you live in La Jolla help clean it up! Bill Allen

Service Dog Branson will be missed La Jolla lost a special member of the community Aug. 29, when Branson, the service dog companion of Beverly Bica, passed away after a valiant fight against bone cancer. Branson and Beverly rescued a girl in distress in the ocean off the Marine Room in October, 2013. The episode was detailed in the Nov. 11, 2013 issue of La Jolla Light. Branson was a true hero who was loved by everyone he met. Last February, one of his rear legs was amputated in an effort to slow the cancer, but that did not keep him from making his friends and neighbors smile each day — and Branson smiled back at all of us. We are all aware of the toll that bone and other cancers take on humans. Let Branson’s life be an inspiration and a reminder that dogs, cats and other animals suffer from the same cancers as humans. The organizations and research facilities trying to prevent and cure these cancers deserve our support. Branson’s spirit and love will be greatly missed. Barry Schochet

What’s on YOUR mind? ■ Letters published in La Jolla Light express views from readers in regard to community issues. To share your thoughts in this public forum, e-mail them with your name and city of residence to editor@lajollalight.com or mail them to La Jolla Light Editor, 565 Pearl St., Suite 300, La Jolla, CA 92037. Letters reflect the writers’ opinions and not necessarily those of the newspaper staff or publisher.

■ As you can see from this photo, the property owner blocks the view of the historic kiln in Pottery Canyon so its neglect and deterioration can continue! The City does nothing to stop this and La Jolla Historical Society claims it can not do anything either! However, as Charles Lindbergh once said, ‘Nothing is impossible, try trying.’ — Bill Allen


www.lajollalight.com

PAGE A24 - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

Reporter Corey Levitan joins La Jolla Light news team

L

a Jolla Light welcomes Corey Levitan as its newest staff writer. Levitan will cover community and government meetings for the newspaper and website, as well as contribute science and offbeat human-interest and humor stories. He joins the news team headed by editor Susan DeMaggio, with five-year Light reporter Ashley Mackin-Solomon and a talented group of freelance writers, including David L. Coddon, Will Bowen, Jeanne Rawdin, Inga, Lonnie Burstein Hewitt, Diana Saenger and Catharine Kaufman. A native of Long Island, Levitan comes to the Light, and San Diego, directly from Las Vegas, where he wrote an award-winning humor column for the Review-Journal newspaper. He has also written for Rolling Stone, New York Magazine and Playboy, and is the former Hollywood correspondent for the New York Post. “I’m beyond psyched to start this new chapter of my career,” Levitan said. “To work in a place as beautiful as La Jolla, where the residents are among the friendliest and most intellectual in the world — are you kidding me?”

— Cindy Greatrex

FROM REC CENTER FUNDS, A1

Corey Levitan

LIGHT FILE

He added, “And, by the way, I’m not just saying this because I spent the last decade in Vegas.” Levitan will also launch a series on odd jobs he attempts for the day around town. To volunteer your La Jolla business as a subject, or if you have any other ideas you’d like to pitch, feel free to e-mail him at clevitan@lajollalight.com

Light still seeking sports reporter The La Jolla Light has resumed its search for a part-time sports reporter to cover high school games and write features about local athletes. The ideal candidate will also take incredible action photos! If interested, send an e-mail with your contact information to editor@lajollalight.com or call (858) 875-5950. We’re looking for someone to write 1-2 stories per week.

Silver Restoration Event Is your family silver old or broken?

Before

speak with then La Jolla Park & Recreation, Inc. vice-president (now acting president) Mary Coakley Munk to investigate the alleged embezzlement. During such interview, Coakley Munk provided Piceno “various documents (including) … spreadsheet itemizing stolen funds, copies of unauthorized checks, copies of invoices, copies of e-mails, and letters to and from Greatrex,” among other items. Piceno’s deposition goes on to state, “During the course of my duties, I have learned the following information, based upon having read the reports of or talked with the named victim and witnesses, or by having read reports of or talked with other officers and investigators, who have spoken with the named victim and witnesses.” In the course of his research, Piceno said Greatrex’s personal accounts showed “21 unauthorized La Jolla Park & Recreation, Inc. checks being deposited into her accounts, and numerous cash deposits being made into her accounts.” An appearance warrant and bail were set in July for Greatrex to respond to the charges against her. “In my case this makes sense, I travel two weeks of the month for work, so they wanted to make sure I showed up, which of course I did,” she said, adding that bail in these circumstances is “very normal.” When asked about the theft allegations, Coakley Munk told La Jolla Light neither she nor other members of the Parks & Recreation, Inc. board, could comment on the situation, and more information would be made available at the preliminary hearing, Sept. 15. Greatrex maintains her innocence and said the funds in question were used to purchase grant writing for the Rec Center and other in-house items.

“There are no missing funds,” Greatrex told La Jolla Light. “The checks were made payable to me because they were reimbursements for the grant-writing fees (I paid) over a long period of time.” She added that the statement given that two signatures are required to cash the checks is inaccurate. A Light review of the LJP&R, Inc. bylaws found no reference to the number of signatures required on checks cashed. Her attorney Paul Neuharth reports he had recently submitted receipts to the District Attorney’s office showing where and how the funds in question were spent, which he considers to be “exonerating evidence.” He said the evidence would be heard at the Sept. 15 preliminary hearing. Greatrex said she questions the timing of when these charges were brought to light, given its correlation to elections at the LJCPA board level, of which she is part. The original accusations arose around the time LJCPA held its annual election, where Greatrex was up for re-election. She was elected to another term, but was unable to continue as a trustee due to personal absences. The most recent report on the charges became public before the LJCPA special election, for which Greatrex was again up for election. LJCPA makes recommendations to the San Diego City Council, Planning Commission and other agencies on land-use matters. “I believe this is about besmirching my name and removing me from La Jolla Park & Recreation, Inc. and La Jolla Community Planning Association boards,” Greatrex said. She again pointed to a longstanding conflict with a current Park & Recreation, Inc. board member, who she believes filed the charges. Greatrex is scheduled to appear in court on Sept. 15 for a preliminary hearing, at which time both parties will have a chance to state their cases.

Warwick’s

! FREE Restoration Estimates ! FREE Straightening & Dent

7812 Girard Ave. 858-454-0347 www.warwicks.com

Discussing & Signing / Reserved Seating Available *Please call the Warwick’s Book Dept. for details.

JamieFord

“New York Times” Bestselling Author of “Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet”

Removal with any Replating Sterling Silver Polished Broken Pieces Repaired Missing Parts Replaced 25-Year Warranty on Replating No appointment necessary

LoveandOtherConsolationPrizes

Monday, September 18th 7:30pm

Bowers Jewelers FRI, SEPT 22nd 9:30am - 4:30pm 7860 Girard Ave La Jolla • 858.459.3678

SAVE 20% 1 Day Only!

Bring in your silver & meet Tim Rader, the Silver Restoration Expert, who will tell you whether your heirlooms can be (or should be) restored so you can entertain again with pride or pass them along to the next generation with love.

! ! ! ! !

There are no missing funds. The checks were made payable to me because they were reimbursements for the grant-writing fees (I paid) over a long period of time.

“New York Times” Bestselling Author of “Black Hawk Down”

After

MarkBowden

in conversation with John Wilkens

Hue 1968

Thursday, September 28th 7:30pm


www.lajollalight.com

LA JOLLA LIGHT - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - PAGE A25

LJCPA trustees cast their vote for the Calle del Cielo project, which passed 9-5-2.

Planners approve Calle del Cielo subdivision, 9-5-2 BY ASHLEY MACKIN-SOLOMON The controversial Calle del Cielo subdivision project was approved at the La Jolla Community Planning Association (LJCPA) meeting, Sept. 7, after three sub-committee hearings, one special meeting and more than four hours of LJCPA debate (over two months). After hearing an updated presentation on substantial conformance, a sensitive issue for some trustees, LJCPA voted to approve the project 9-5-2. Project plans call for subdividing a 4.45-acre site at 8280 Calle del Cielo in La Jolla Shores into eight lots and building a house on each. The land is considered one of the last, large, open parcels in the area. The team behind the project includes developer Louis Beacham, design architects James Alcorn and Paul Benton of Alcorn & Benton Architects, engineer Tony Christensen, and landscape architect Jim Neri. The applicants are selling the lots themselves and the houses would be constructed when buyers are located. In past presentations, design renderings and guidelines for the houses, which LJCPA trustees favored, were shown. The houses, as presented, come with a Coastal Development Permit, saving the buyer thousands of dollars and the years it would take to independently apply for the permit. The outlying issue for LJCPA trustees is whether the City would carry out a Substantial Conformance Review (SCR) when a buyer comes forward and requests a building permit. The SCR process looks at any changes to approved building permits to determine whether the modifications are close enough to what was originally approved for the buyer to proceed. To oblige the board, land-use attorney Scott Williams said, “We’ve added language to the design guidelines, which says that any time a resident applies for a building permit — and not just when there is a question of substantial conformance — they have to come and give and informational presentation to you or the La Jolla Shores Permit Review Committee. That is above and beyond what the Municipal Code requires. So even if there is no SCR issue, an informational presentation is required. Even if the builder says ‘the home design is exactly what was approved,’ you still get to review it. That’s been added since last month to ease your concern; nothing is going to be ‘snuck’ through.” Further, architect Paul Benton wrote into the design guidelines that “substantial changes” include “any alteration of the architectural forms, materials, colors or finishes of the approved design concept as

PHOTOS BY ASHLEY MACKIN-SOLOMON

Architect Paul Benton and land-use attorney Scott Williams speak to committee concerns. presented,” “any decrease to the approved building setbacks for each lot” and “increases to the approved gross floor area for each lot” among other items. Benton also reaffirmed his pledge to personally notify LJCPA when a permit building is applied for and who the project manager is on each house. With mixed feelings in the room, trustee Patrick Ahern said he doesn’t think “anyone will ever be completely satisfied,” but that the new modifications show “the applicants have done their work” and that “it’s a reasonable project.” Whereas trustee Ray Weiss said he was bothered by the informational nature of the promised presentations because they lack “force.” All said, trustee Brian Will noted, “Four-and-a-half acres in La Jolla Shores is a big deal. It’s a scary project but in La Jolla, vacant lots get sold with entitlements all the time and we approve them with no other assurance than the City’s normal SCR. We’ve demanded this applicant go above and beyond. I know the SCR process is broken, but it’s what we’ve got and I don’t think we can hold up this project indefinitely because we don’t like how the City does its job. The applicant has offered something better than SCR, and we have to have faith in that.” Will moved to support the project, and trustees passed the motion. — La Jolla Community Planning Association next meets 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 5 at La Jolla Rec Center, 615 Prospect St. lajollacpa.org

NINA KATCHADOURIAN, Whale, 2014

KELSEY BROOKES, One Pointed Attention, 2014

Enhance La Jolla, the 501c3 entrusted to manage the La Jolla Village Maintenance Improvement District (MAD) is seeking a qualified District Manager to oversee the special benefit services performed in the district. Qualified individuals are encouraged to apply before September 15, 2017 for the part-time position that will start January 1, 2018, concurrent with the funding of the MAD. For position details, required qualifications, hours, compensation, how to apply and other information please go to: http://enhancelajolla.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/ Enhance-La-Jolla-District-Manager-Job-Description.pdf

Space donated by La Jolla Light


www.lajollalight.com

PAGE A26 - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

LA JOLLA NEWS NUGGETS I-5 nightly closures are due to Gilman Drive bridge work A series of overnight closures of all northbound or all southbound lanes on I-5, from the I-805 merge to La Jolla Village Drive, will be needed over the next several weeks to conduct work on the Gilman Drive Bridge linking the east and west sides of the UC San Diego campus, SANDAG has announced. Southbound I-5 from the I-805 merge to La Jolla Village Drive, will be closed nightly 9:30 p.m. to 5 a.m. through Thursday, Sept. 14. Overnight closures will continue the weeks of Sept. 17 and Sept. 24. Southbound motorists will be detoured via I-805. Closures of northbound I-5, from the I-805 merge to La Jolla Village Drive, will begin the weeks of Oct. 1 and Oct. 8. The northbound I-5 closures are scheduled from 10:30 p.m. to 5 a.m. Northbound motorists will be detoured via I-8, SR-52, and the La Jolla Village Drive ramps.

Westfield UTC breaks ground on first residential tower Westfield UTC is expanding into the residential market, and has broken ground on a new 23-story residential tower at the intersection of Nobel Drive and Lombard Place. Slated to open to residents in 2019, the tower will encompass 300 modern studios, one-bedroom, two-bedroom, and three-bedroom apartment homes. Among the amenities are a pool area with outdoor kitchens, cabanas and fire pits; a “sky lounge” on the 23rd floor; fitness center; underground parking and more. The residential development at UTC is Westfield’s first such project in the United States. Westfield is examining opportunities to create 8,000 homes on land it currently owns across the globe. “Being able to offer the chance to live in close proximity to great shopping, dining, entertainment, health and fitness, and workspaces, is very exciting,” said John Alderson, Westfield’s vice president of development in San Diego. “Westfield has been a dedicated champion of the UTC neighborhood for the past 40 years, and breaking ground on

A rendering of the new Westfield UTC residential tower the new residential tower is an important milestone and the next step in our chapter as we continue to showcase the community. We’re looking forward to welcoming new residents to the neighborhood.”

SIO creates Climate Change center, appoints first director Mark Merrifield, who has spent the past two decades studying global and regional sea-level change, has been named the first director for the Center for Climate Change

Life Tributes

Everlasting memories of loved ones

Betty Joe Hayward

July 28, 1930 - September 2, 2017 La JoLLa — She was born and raised in Hollywood, Ca. Following WWII, Betty met Richard B Hayward at a college age Bible class on a Sunday night at a 3000 member church in Hollywood. Betty completed one year of college and after a year of courtship, they were married and Richard entered into the Seminary. Growing up Betty had been told that she was dumb and in addition a high school teacher had once told her never to

go to college. Richard decided to pay for Betty’s three years of college and help her earn her degree.

Richard’s three years in Seminary happened in San Francisco. Richard went to Seminary and put Betty through the University of California Berkeley. They both finished their education in 1953, and Richard became an air Force Chaplain. Betty taught grade school on all of Richard’s bases and they traveled through Europe, asia, and the western United States. after 20 years, he retired from the air Force. Presbytery decided to close a church and

someone suggested Richard spend a couple of years to let them find a pastor. Richard liked the church, and helped it grow for 20 years, finally retiring. In 2016, Richard was celebrated as a Coronado hero. Richard and Betty spent over 60 years of happiness together. a service will be held on Wednesday, September 20, 2017, at 2pm, at Fort Rosecrans, San Diego. Please sign the guest book online at legacy.com/ obituaries/lajollalight.

To place a Life Tribute, Celebration of Life, or Celebration ad, call Monica Williams at 858-218-7228 or email monica@utcommunitypress.com

COURTESY

Impacts and Adaptation (CCCIA) at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego. The CCCIA was created in 2015 with a $5 million gift from Scripps supporters Richard and Carol Hertzberg. The goal of the Center is to draw on the expertise of climate scientists like Merrifield as well as experts ranging from economists, sociologists, and engineers to urban planners and political scientists to document climate change impacts on the environment, ecosystems, and humans and to devise practical solutions to climate change effects widely regarded as inevitable. Besides sea-level rise, those effects range from coastal erosion and flooding to the spread of human health impacts and the increased incidence of Mark Merrifield drought and extreme weather events. “Mark Merrifield has an impressive track record of applying science to real-world societal problems and bringing people together to create partnerships across industries and governmental units to inspire smart, strategic decisions and actions that inform policymakers,” said UC San Diego Chancellor Pradeep Khosla.

Salk’s Elizabeth Blackburn in TIME magazine project Salk Institute president Elizabeth Blackburn — the Institute’s first female president and one of only 12 women to have won a Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine — is among 46 honorees featured in FIRSTS, a TIME multimedia project celebrating “women who broke ground in their fields” and “played pioneers in history.” The FIRSTS project is included in the Sept. 18 issue of TIME and online at time.com/firsts, where you can view Blackburn’s video segment at ti.me/2wZv5vF Blackburn won the Nobel Prize in 2009 for discovering the molecular nature of telomeres, the ends of chromosomes that serve as protective caps essential for preserving genetic information, and for co-discovering telomerase, an enzyme that maintains telomere ends. Helping to guide public science policy, she was a member of the Stem Cell Research Advisory Panel for the California State Legislature and is a regular participant in the World Economic Forum.


www.lajollalight.com

LA JOLLA LIGHT - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - PAGE A27

LA JOLLA NEWS NUGGETS (CONTINUED) UC Cancer Centers link for consortium University of California’s five academic cancer centers have formed a new consortium to share new approaches and treatments, data, minds, resources and more. The five centers comprising the consortium are UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, UC Irvine Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and UC San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center. “The Consortium is unprecedented in size and ambition,” said Scott Lippman, M.D., director of Moores Cancer Center. “Some of the world’s best cancer physicians and scientists will now be able to collaborate in ways impossible before, benefitting tens of thousands of patients throughout the state.” To learn more, visit health.ucsd.edu/specialties/cancer

Saturday is California Coastal Cleanup Day

publishing house. The cost is free to SD/PEN members and $10 for nonmembers. There will also be refreshments and networking. RSVP by Sept. 20 to pr@sdpen.com More at sdpen.org

Doctor to discuss life without disease Explore the human immune system through a different lens when Dr. Zbigniew Mikulski discusses “From Asthma to Zika: Life Without Disease,” 4:30-6:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 28 as part of a free community lecture series at La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, 420 Athena Circle. The event will include a Q&A after the presentation. RSVP at lji.org/lwd or (858) 752-6535.

Canyoneers offer free guided hikes in San Diego

The California Coastal Commission’s 33rd annual beach cleanup will take place 9 a.m. to noon, Sept. 16 at 1,000 sites along California beaches, bays, rivers, creeks, parks and roadsides. There is an interactive map that provides locations and other site-specific information at coastalcleanupday.org “Trash in our environment and in our ocean can cause enormous harm, even death, to wildlife, and plastic fragments are known to travel up the food chain and potentially end up on our dinner plates,” said cleanup director Eben Schwartz. “Coastal Cleanup Day is our opportunity to invite everyone in California, no matter where they may live, to help protect not just our communities and our environment, but all the animals — including us — that call it home.”

More than 75 free hikes will be offered from September 2017 through June 2018, when the new Canyoneer hiking season kicks off. Hikes are offered on weekends (with a few midday hikes on select dates) and cover diverse terrain, ranging from the coast to the Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, and from the Tijuana Estuary to Palomar Mountain. Canyoneers are citizen scientists and volunteers who have had training by The NAT Museum scientists and local experts on the natural history of the region. One of the few trail-guide groups nationwide affiliated with a natural history museum rather than a park or reserve, Canyoneers have provided free guided tours in San Diego County since 1973. Find the hike schedule and interactive maps online at sdnat.org/canyoneers Canyoneer-led hikes are also offered to schools at no cost, so students can learn about habitats and ecosystems in their own backyards. Space is limited on the hikes. To book a school hike, visit sdnat.org/schoolnaturehikes or call (619) 255-0349.

Networking program for editors, Sept. 21

Latino Art exhibition opens across Southern California

Jared Kuritz will talk to editors and writers about book publishing options during “Publishing with a Purpose,” the next program of the San Diego Professional Editors Network (SD/PEN), 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 21, in the San Diego County Health Services Complex, 3851 Rosecrans St. Kuritz is a managing partner of STRATEGIES, a firm that focuses on literary development, publishing, business modeling, marketing and public relations for traditional, small press and self-published authors of all genres. Kuritz is also the director of the 17th annual La Jolla Writers Conference, a three-day immersion dedicated to teaching authors about the art, craft and business of writing. Kuritz and his firm also manage NightStand Press, a

“Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA” is an ambitious exploration of Latin American and Latino art in dialogue with Los Angeles. Supported by grants from the Getty Foundation, the exhibition will take place September 2017 through January 2018 at more than 70 cultural institutions across Southern California. Visitors will receive free admission, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sunday, Sept. 17, at 50 of the locations, including the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego at 1100 Kettner Blvd. in downtown San Diego. MCASD’s contribution is “Memories of Underdevelopment: Art and the Decolonial Turn in Latin America, 1960-1985,” Sept. 17-Jan. 21, 2018. (Find other

BIRD ROCK'S NEW SALON & BOUTIQUE

DEEP CONDITIONING * * WITH COLOR SERVICE. JUST MENTION THE LA JOLLA LIGHT ADVERTISEMENT

5726 LA JOLLA BLVD #105 LA JOLLA, CA 92037 (858) 230-7992 | IG: WAYLONSALON

participating museums at pacificstandardtime.org/freeday). (858) 454-3541

Scripps to aid in surf, currents, erosion study UC San Diego’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography will help lead one of the largest efforts in decades to understand the forces that influence surf, currents, eddies and the nutrients that are essential to the marine food chain. The $11 million project is funded by the Office of Naval Research, which is partly interested in developing safer ways for ships to operate in shallow waters. But the project is mainly focused on helping recreational boaters, fishermen, surfers, divers, coastal planners and engineers who monitor how pollution moves along the shore. “Understanding these complicated physical processes (occur) in the coastal ocean is crucial for everything from the health of our fisheries to pollutant dispersal, plus the science is fascinating!” said Jennifer Mackinnon, an oceanographer who is helping lead the Scripps’ end of the project. Scripps is working with co-lead Oregon State University, which says the project will involve up to 100 scientists from more than a dozen universities and agencies who will study the so-called “inner shelf” between Pismo Beach and Point Conception. The term refers to the area from the surf zone out to a depth of about 160 feet. This is where a lot of wave energy dissipates as it reaches shore. That dissipation affects everything from waves to currents to erosion. “We’re going to give this inner shelf region a complete physical,” OSU oceanographer Jack Barth said in a statement. The two-month project, which is about to get underway, will involve an array of instruments from airborne sensors to drones to satellites to seafloor platforms.

Bry explains Council action to regulate marijuana supply chain In a Sept. 11 decision, the City Council asserted local control over how it would regulate the complete adult use marijuana supply chain. The next day, District 1 City Council member Barbara Bry released this statement on the vote: “Regulating the supply chain will ensure that consumers have a safe and vetted product and will deter an illegal black market. By allowing for local government oversight of the cannabis industry, we can benefit from new jobs and a new source of much needed tax revenue for the general fund. “San Diego voters overwhelmingly turned out to pass Proposition 64, and it is our responsibility to put reasonable regulations in place that protect public safety and enhance our local economy.” ■ Have a La Jolla news tip? E-mail details and a related photo, if possible, to editor@lajollalight.com

FREE first time hearing consultation • Diagnostic / Basic Hearing Evaluation • Earwax Removal • Clean, Repair & Reprogram Hearing Aids • Custom Earmolds 849 Coast Blvd. La Jolla

(In the Casa De Manana Wellness Center)

619.756.7848

www.peninsulahearingcenter.com Dr. Dena J Riso, Au.D. – Audiologist


PAGE A28 - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

www.lajollalight.com

The Perfect Windansea Beach Home! OPEN SATURDAY & SUNDAY 1-4:00 P.M. PRICE REDUCED! Coming home from a day of fun at the beach, only a short stroll away, you’ll find comfort and joy in the serenity that this home offers. There is plenty of space with 3 good-size bedrooms and 2.5 baths, a family room connecting to the kitchen complete with granite counters, breakfast bar and gas stove, and a separate dining room. The light-filled living room, with its high ceilings, opens to a delightful front porch/patio, perfect for people watching while enjoying sea breezes. There are beautiful wood and stone floors, a large upstairs deck, and a finished 2-car garage, a rarity in this area. Welcome to your sea house! 302 Bonair Street, La Jolla $1,740,000

Susana Corrigan & Patty Cohen | 858-229-8120 www.LaJollaResidential.com scorrigan@lajollaresidential.com CalBRE# 00837598 | CalBRE# 01340902 ©2017 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties (BHHSCP) is a member of the franchise system of BHHAffiliates LLC. BHHAffiliates LLC and BHHSCP do not guarantee accuracy of all data including measurements, conditions, and features of property. Information is obtained from various sources and will not be verified by broker or MLS. Buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information. CalBRE 01317331


A chat with Nobel Laureate Roger Guillemin

B6

LIFESTYLES

Thursday, September 14, 2017

lajollalight.com

Theater, glamour at Globe Guilders Luncheon

B19

SECTION B

Birch Aquarium to mark 25th year with a family event on Saturday SIO hatching plans to expand the popular facility BY GARY ROBBINS irch Aquarium — a science center that frequently suffers from crowding due to its small size (64,000 square feet) and high popularity (nearly 500,000 visitors last year) — may be expanded to accommodate at least 100,000 additional guests per year. The aquarium is run by UC San Diego’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO), which is close to choosing an architect to prepare conceptual drawings for expansion. The drawings could be ready by next summer. A public aquarium has been part of SIO since 1905 with the Little Green Laboratory at La Jolla Cove. Several iterations of aquariums at Scripps preceded the opening of Birch Aquarium on Sept. 16, 1992 at 2300 Expedition Way. The marine life museum will mark its 25th anniversary this Saturday with a plethora of special programming from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The expansion project is in its early stages. But current and past Scripps officials have said expansion could cost in the vicinity of $20 million. The aquarium needs an expansion and overhaul to cope with its own success. Annual attendance has increased by roughly 100,000 over the past decade, partly because staff is doing a better job of highlighting the research that Scripps scientists are doing in such exotic places as Antarctica. Over the past year, family memberships have increased by roughly 3,500 — reaching the 10,000 mark. The crowds have SEE BIRCH AQUARIUM, B4

B

Aquarium Party SATURDAY, SEPT. 16 ■ 25 Years on the Hill: Birch Aquarium’s 25th anniversary celebration runs 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 16 at 2300 Expedition Way. ■ Schedule: Day-long Scavenger Hunt (Information Desk check-in), fish-printing craft (Education Courtyard), Wall of Fishes and Favorite Photos/Memories Slideshow (Galleria); • 10-10:45 a.m. and 12:15 to 1 p.m. Music with Hullabaloo, face-painting (Boundless Energy exhibit); • 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Music with Lee Coulter, 1-2:30 p.m. Music with The Professors (Tide Pool Plaza Stage); • 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Interactive Photo Booth; • 2:30-4 p.m. Music with Jonny Tarr Trio (Splash Café by The French Gourmet). ■ Share favorite photos and memories from trips to the aquarium using the hashtag #25onTheHill. Staff will choose and the best to add to the website and broadcast as part of the event. ■ Aquarium admission: Adults $18.50; Ages 3-17, $14. ■ Contact: (858) 534-FISH. aquarium.ucsd.edu

A scene from a past Scripps SEA Days event at Birch Aquarium

STACEY FOSTER

Tasende Gallery celebrates 38 years in La Jolla

MAURICE HEWITT

At the Aug. 31 reception, José Tasende (far right) poses with his daughter Betina (far left), gallery director Mary Beth Petersen, and his son Aitor. Behind them is ‘American Crown,’ a painting by German artist Lambert Maria Wintersberger.

BY LONNIE BURSTEIN HEWITT On Aug. 31, after a year of renovation, the family behind Tasende Gallery in La Jolla invited friends and collectors to a special reception celebrating both their reopening and their 38th anniversary with “Signs of the Times,” an exhibit honoring 19 of the artists who have shown here over the years. The exhibition space is smaller now, but the show includes pieces by superstars like Henry Moore, Louise Nevelson and Fernando Botero, and a colorful ceramic totem by Niki de St. Phalle, who lived in La Jolla from the mid-1990s until her death in 2002. Also on view is a small bas-relief of the bronze doors Italian sculptor Giacomo Manzu made for St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome. Manzu was featured in the gallery’s inaugural exhibition in June 1979. SEE TASENDE GALLERY, B8


PAGE B2 - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

www.lajollalight.com


www.lajollalight.com

LA JOLLA LIGHT - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - PAGE B3

In pursuit of creativity

E

veryone has a creative strategy, a time when you can really let your mind go wherever it wants in pursuit of problem solving or the unleashing of artistic energies. Olof’s is mulling. Mine is wombing. Olof’s prime mulling time is in bed at night before he goes to sleep. Now that he’s retired and can work on programming problems to his engineer-heart’s content, he will position himself on his back and just stare off into space. For an hour. Sometimes two hours. Occasionally until two in the morning. When he’s found the solution he was looking for, a satisfied smile creases his face and he flips off the light. Years ago, before we were married, Olof offered to replace a section of six-foot fence on my property that had fallen down. I immediately suggested hiring him an assistant. But no, he said, there were some difficult engineering issues to solve and an assistant would interfere with mulling. And indeed, he would just stand out there, leaning on his post hole-digger seemingly in a trance. But a few minutes later (sometimes a lot of minutes), he’d nod his head and proceed. I know to never, ever interfere with mulling. The house would have to be on fire first. Meanwhile, I have always done my best thinking by going back to the womb. You make the bathroom as dark as possible then

curl up on the floor of the shower like a pretzel letting the nice warm water cascade over you. Close your eyes. Let your mind go. Regress. Remember the good old days. It used to be that the only limit on the length of time you could spend in the womb was the size of your hot water heater. But that was before the drought. It became politically and environmentally (and especially financially) incorrect to waste that much water even in the cause of creative pursuit. So I had to find a wombing substitute. Fortunately walking works pretty well, too, especially if it is on the beach. Even more fortunately, I live near a beach as this would have been a less successful strategy in Omaha. I’m hardly the first to appreciate the creative powers of walking. There is a wonderful Latin expression, Solvitur ambulando, meaning “it is solved by walking.” Let me take a short detour here to mention that in high school I studied Latin for four years and still have a huge fondness for the language. Well, the first two years of Latin anyway. Third year Latin (Julius Caesar’s description of the Gallic wars) was that a total snorer. But then I’ve never been into war stories anyway. Sadly for my high school sensibilities, chick lit was in its infancy in Caesar’s era. Fourth year was Vergil’s epic poem, the

COURTESY

Inga stuffing chocolate in her face at a 2,034th birthday bash for the Roman poet, Vergil Aeneid. More war stuff but at least it had a big fake horse and a hot babe (Helen). Sadly, 54 years later, I can quote all of the first three words: Arma virumque cano ... “I sing of arms and of a man.” But that does kind of sum it up (lots of arms, and a man, Aeneas). Already weary of the Aeneid’s ponderous dactylic hexameter a month into the school year, I was delighted to discover that Vergil was a fall birthday — Oct. 15, 70 BCE, to be exact. Keenly aware even at this young age that chocolate is an antidote to pretty much anything, I got permission from our Latin teacher to throw Vergil a 2,034th birthday party during class time. I figured everyone deserves a party even if they’ve been dead 2,000 years. Yup, that’s the photographic evidence right there: Inga stuffing chocolate in her face at Vergil’s bash. The phrase Solvitur ambulando is said to have originated from the Greek philosopher Diogenes in 4th century BC, and the concept of walking as a freer of the mind has been espoused by many notables including Thomas Jefferson, Nietzsche, Ernest

Hemingway and Thoreau, among others. It allegedly helps combat the effects of aging, although I’m afraid in my case that ship has sailed. Still, my best writing is done in my head as I saunter slowly down the beach with the waves as white noise in the background. A paragraph that I was stuck on slowly resolves. Great lines that the La Jolla Light will never print ricochet around my brain like ping pong balls in a lottery cage. The resolution of decisions that had been plaguing me seem to suddenly become clear. While the drought put a damper on wombing, now that it is officially over, can I start wombing again? Yeah, probably, but one thing that ISN’T over is astronomical water bills. So I can womb to my heart’s content if I’m willing to pay Tier 4 water rates and turn over my Social Security check to the water folks. I think I’ll just keep walking. — Inga’s lighthearted looks at life appear regularly in La Jolla Light. Reach her at inga47@san.rr.com

OSHER FALL 2017 OPEN HOUSE Established

Enrichment through lifelong learning OSHER L I F E L ON G L E A R N IN G I N S TI TU T E

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23 9:30 AM – 12PM Program begins at 10am

UC San Diego Extension Campus 9600 N. Torrey Pines Rd., La Jolla ATTEND TO LEARN ABOUT MEMBER BENEFITS: Dynamic programs designed for active 50+ lifelong learners 120 academic courses each quarter

FREE EVENT PARKING!

Access to UCSD libraries Exclusive tours Engaging social events

Visit our website to RSVP: olli.ucsd.edu/openhouse (858) 534-3409

1905

CELEBRATE WITH US!

ivities All acted with includ ission adm

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 16 | 9-5 P.M. Join us as we celebrate 25 years in our current location “on the hill” with a family-friendly anniversary event. ⁰ Scavenger hunt with fun prizes ⁰ Fish printing craft ⁰ Face painting ⁰ Interactive photo booth

Live music featuring: ⁰ Hullabaloo ⁰ Lee Coulter ⁰ The Professors ⁰ The Jonny Tarr Trio aquarium.ucsd.edu 858.534.FISH


www.lajollalight.com

PAGE B4 - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

PHOTOS BY JESSICA CRAWFORD

Who says science has to be serious? The seasonal Haunted Aquarium at Birch Aquarium is popular year after year.

The educational programs and events for all ages at SIO’s Birch Aquarium have contributed to its success.

FROM BIRCH AQUARIUM, B1

change at the world’s poles to monitoring the health of coral reefs in remote areas of the Pacific. The aquarium has addressed the problem, in part, by opening a large interactive exhibit that focuses on the Sally Ride, the institute’s newest research ship. The vessel is named after the late astronaut Sally Ride, the first American woman to travel in space. Ride joined the UC San Diego faculty after her NASA career, and became a beloved figure in San Diego for running an education program aimed at children. The new Ride exhibit lets visitors take a

virtual tour of the ship, and provides video overviews of its research, including seafloor mapping. More recently, the aquarium opened “Research in Action,” a small exhibit that replicates life on a coral reef. The exhibit is billed as a “working laboratory” where Scripps scientists can test equipment and techniques before they go to sea. “The San Diego community has come to rely on Birch Aquarium as a source for information about all of Scripps Oceanography research, not just a place to see marine organisms,” said Leinen, an oceanographer.

ON VIEW AT MCASD DOWNTOWN:

Thomaz Farkas, Populares sobre cobertura do palácio do Congresso Nacional no dia da inauguração de Brasília, 1960, gelatin silver print, 24 x 36 cm.Courtesy of Instituto Moreira Salles. © Thomaz Farkas/ Instituto Moreira Salles Collections.

La Jolla Cultural Partners

added to the building’s physical stress, causing problems. In 2014, Birch Aquarium had to close its popular kelp forest for a month to conduct major repairs. Additional repairs were needed earlier this year. The recent problems occurred as the aquarium was emerging from a period of deficit spending. Harry Helling, the aquarium’s executive director, said it has returned to the black, financially. But it will have to move slowly to pull off an expansion. “We would need to

raise money, gain community support, and go through the regulatory agencies, including the California Coastal Commission,” he explained. The aquarium is exploring the idea of doing the expansion in phases to avoid having to close the facility. Birch Aquarium has always highlighted the work of SIO researchers. But the subject has received increased attention since Margaret Leinen became the institute’s director in 2013. She wants the public to have a better understanding of SIO, which does everything from studying climate

MEMORIES OF UNDERDEVELOPMENT SEPTEMBER 17, 2017 THROUGH JANUARY 21, 2018

Memories of Underdevelopment showcases conceptual and performance artworks that subvert artistic norms and redefine avant-garde practice within the context of Latin America during the 1960s to 1980s, a period that coincides with both the apex and unraveling of the developmentalist project in many countries in the region. See the exhibition FOR FREE on Sunday, September 17 thanks to Bank of America.

1100 Kettner Blvd. > San Diego, CA 92101 858 454 3541 > www.mcasd.org 11 AM–5 PM Thurs–Tues > Closed Wednesday

CHECK OUT WHAT’S HAPPENING CELEBRATING 25 YEARS “ON THE HILL”

September 16: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Scripps Oceanography has had a public outreach center since 1905, and this year, we are celebrating the 25th anniversary of our current location “on the hill.” Join us for a festive celebration featuring live music, face painting, crafts, and much more. Included with admission ion 858-534-3474 aquarium.ucsd.edu

THE DANISH GOLDEN AGE

A five-week literature, art, and music lecture-concert series by Victoria Martino and Musica Pro Arte Ensemble

Mondays, September 18 & 25; October 2, 9 & 16, 7:30 PM

The complete works for violin by Niels Gade will be presented against the vivid backdrop of one of the richest artistic and intellectual milieus of the 19th century, boasting architects, choreographers, composers, painters, philosophers, playwrights, scientists, and storytellers who had a profound impact on international culture up to the present day.

Tickets: $20/25; Series: $90/115

(858) 454-5872 ljathenaeum.org/special-concerts

LA JOLLA SYMPHONY & CHORUS Steven Schick, Music Director

SUBSCRIBE NOW TO 2017-18 SEASON! • • • • •

Cecil Lytle performs Rhapsody in Blue Carl Orff’s Carmina Burana Faure’s Requiem and Mahler’s 4th Symphony Duke Ellington and Ornette Coleman reimagined Percussion concerto!

San Diego’s Most Adventurous Symphony Experience

LA JOLLA MUSIC SOCIETY’S 49TH SEASON: 2017-18

Single Tickets on sale now!

Don’t miss any of our exciting 2017-18 performances including: Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Crosscurrents featuring Zakir Hussain, Dave Holland, Chris Potter & Shankar Mahadevan, 2017 Van Cliburn Gold Medalist: Yekwon Sunwoo, Richard Goode, Dianne Reeves, Herbie Hancock, “super trio” Emanuel Ax, Leonidas Kavakos & Yo-Yo Ma and more.

6-Concert Season: $160-$185

Visit our website for more information about all of our upcoming performances.

(858) 534-4637 www.lajollasymphony.com

(858) 459-3728 www.LJMS.org


www.lajollalight.com

LA JOLLA LIGHT - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - PAGE B5

J A M E S A U S T I N M U R R AY La Jolla, July 18th – Madison Gallery proudly presents New York City based artist James Austin Murray’s first West Coast solo exhibition, Light On Black. Black. Known for his large-scale, monochromatic ebony oil paintings, Murray’s work invites the viewer to look beyond the black canvas and see infinite colors and forms. His gestural brushstrokes create wave patterns which reflect light from the surface and provide a layered and wondrous landscape that is sexy and ever mysterious. The black paint becomes a beacon of light in each composition. In darkness there is always light...

The exhibition features a new body of work created during Madison Gallery’s inaugural Artist in Residency program earlier this year. As the first artist selected for the program, the collection reflects the artist’s experience in La Jolla and the West Coast vibe. Light On Black explores the visceral experience of light through new eyes and the chance of new beginnings. For 11 years, Murray was a firefighter, working in the South Bronx, Harlem, the West Village, and on the Lower East Side. During that period, he taught a class at Parsons and ran a gallery with two partners in Tribeca.

James Austin Murray is a graduate of Parsons School of Design, New York, NY (1992). Murray opened and managed the HartnettMurray Gallery and The Markham-Murray Gallery in Tribeca, New York. He has exhibited throughout New York, Brooklyn, Chicago, Atlanta, Miami and East Hampton, NY. He is a recipient of the Dedalus Foundation Fellowship Award for residency at The Vermont Studio Center, VT and has completed residencies at The Woodstock Byrdcliffe Guild in Woodstock, NY and Bermis Center for Contemporary Art in Omaha, NE. Murray’s work is found in public collections such as Sofitel (Philadelphia, PA), Hotel Palomar (Philadelphia, PA), Four Seasons Hotel (Washington, D.C.), Omni Hotel (Nashville, TN) and Tom Ford (Designer). James Austin Murray lives and works in New York City.

Founded in 2001, Madison Gallery is committed to representing emerging, mid-career and established international artists whom work in a range of media. Inspired by an earnest dedication and passion for art, the gallery consistently exhibits a high standard of contemporary art. Madison Gallery works closely in building private, corporate and public collections thus placing it amongst the leading contemporary galleries in California. Blouin Modern Painters Magazine has recognized our program for the fifth year in a row as one of the Top 500 galleries worldwide. J A M E S A U S T I N M U R R AY : L I G H T O N B L A C K MA D I SO N GA LLERY, LA J O LLA , CA S E P T EM B E R 1 6 - N OV EM B E R 1 , 2 0 1 7

O p en in g R e cept i on wi t h ar t is t in a t t en d an ce S a t urda y, S ept emb er 1 6 t h from 6 - 9 p . m . P l e as e R SV P v i a em a i l a t in fo @m a d is on g a l l er i es . com or ca l l 85 8 . 45 9. 0 83 6

10 55 WA L L S T R EE T | L A J O L L A , C A | 8 58 4 59 0 836 | M A D I S O N G GA A L L ER I ES.CO M


www.lajollalight.com

PAGE B6 - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

PEOPLE IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD

Meet Nobel Prize recipient Roger Guillemin BY ASHLEY MACKIN-SOLOMON Editor’s Note: La Jolla Light’s “People in Your Neighborhood” series shines a spotlight on notable locals we all wish we knew more about! Light staff is out on the town talking to familiar, friendly faces to bring you their stories. If you know someone you’d like us to profile, send the lead via e-mail to editor@lajollalight.com or call us at (858) 875-5950.

I

t’s not every day you get to sit down with a Nobel Prize winner, but for this edition of “People in Your Neighborhood,” we spoke to 93-year-old La Jolla resident Roger Guillemin, who served as interim president of the Salk Institute for two years. Guillemin shares the 1977 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1977 “for the discoveries concerning the peptide hormone production of the brain.” The father of six and grandfather (with the first great-grandson due at the end of this year) is also a member of La Jolla Parks & Beaches advisory group. When affirming or confirming, he says “you know it all” and “of course” without an ounce of condescension, and joyfully recalls the first time he visited the Salk Institute campus. “I was invited by Dr. Salk, they were looking for new faculty to start a neurobiology or neuroendocrinology (department). I didn’t know about the place. When I saw it for the first time, I was so amazed. I thought to myself, ‘whatever the offer is, I’m going to say yes.’ And I’ve been here ever since.”

Where did you grow up?

Burgundy, France … I became very interested in fundamental biology and eventually that would lead to medical school. In France, you can start practicing medicine before you get the M.D. degree, so long as you have completed a certain amount of schooling. So I started practicing medicine and seeing patients.

How did your medical studies evolve?

One day, I saw that a man from Montreal named Hans Selye, who is the one who introduced the word ‘stress’ to medical literature, was giving lectures in Paris. I went, and I couldn’t believe what he was saying. It was hypnotizing. There were colored slides on the screen, can you believe it? I wanted to study what he was talking about, so I approached him afterward, and after some talking, he agreed. I took a plane for the first time in my life and went to Montreal. I stayed there for a year and studied extensively. There were about 12 people working in the lab. Three of us became ill with TB. One died, the other had part of a lung removed. I got meningitis. But it would happen that streptomycin was just introduced as a medication against TB, so I was admitted as a patient in the local hospital. I received a spinal injection every day for a month. It worked so well, I married the nurse that administered it, and we are still married!

What brought you to Salk?

When I decided to leave (Montreal), I had several offers for places to work and study. … A friend convinced me to go to Baylor College as a staffer in the college of medicine. That’s where I did all the work that led to the discovery of the brain molecule that controls the pituitary gland functions. We published papers on this, and one of them must have gotten the attention of Jonas Salk, because I was invited here to establish a neuroendocrinology laboratory. We kept working on these brain molecules, and eventually, we isolated and characterized the molecule. The first molecule was an incredibly simple and small one. So small, in fact, we thought we made a mistake. But we learned this was indeed the molecule that is in all our brains that controls the function of the thyroid gland. That was the beginning. Later, we characterized six or seven other molecules made in the brain.

Was that the work for which you earned the Nobel Prize?

Of course. Quite a few people in the world were trying to isolate these molecules, but could not for various technical reasons. That was the work that led us to Stockholm for the Nobel Prize. During the Nobel Prize ceremony, there were representatives from the Nobel Foundation and the king and queen were there. The king gives you a book with your name on it with all the Nobel

Nobel Prize winner, 93-year-old La Jolla resident Roger Guillemin

PHOTOS BY ASHLEY MACKIN-SOLOMON

laureates and the medal, and when I sat down, I realized he had given me (co-recipient Andrew) Schally’s book and he had given Schally my book. We nudged each other and chuckled. We were not about to switch books in front of 800 people and dignitaries. So we switched books privately.

Where is the Nobel Prize and the book now?

I gave the book to Baylor College with the condition that it be displayed in a way and place where students could walk by, see it and maybe think, ‘He got the Nobel Prize, maybe I can, too.’ The medal is in safe keeping. I told one of my daughters to sell it when my wife and I pass away, and divide the money between her brothers and sisters.

How many children do you have?

Six — five daughters and one son. My wife is Lucienne. I’m 93 and she is 96 (chuckles).

How did you get involved with La Jolla Parks & Beaches?

I was reading in your paper some of the issues that were being discussed and wanted to get involved. One issue that is important to me, but not everyone, is the planned reservoirs. One is being proposed at a park near my home. In my opinion, it is a social tragedy and I’m not convinced it’s even necessary. That little park is going to be destroyed for years.

What do you like to do in your free time?

In my office, there are posters for the lectures held here in my name, which have been given at Salk every year. I made those posters. I was one of the first people in my lab here at Salk to use computers for graphing of bio-acids. I thought about putting color functions into the programming and creating digital art. So I made the images for the posters and I love to create pieces on the computer. I have some very early computer paintings in the office. … A couple of my computer paintings hang in the president’s office. Whatever you have in mind, you can put it onto canvas or paper.

Do you have a philosophy in life?

Help people. I really wanted to be a physician … I knew all my efforts would be to help people.

Some of the ‘digital paintings’ Roger Guilleman has made for Salk lectures.


www.lajollalight.com

LA JOLLA LIGHT - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - PAGE B7

SEASON

OVERY

17

20

R

BE

NO

VE

M

AS

T

OC

O

N

E

S E E T NC A R ZA I P N E E7 H T F PER 201 O OB

OF DISC

MARÍA DE BUENOS AIRES JANUARY 2018

sd

, 2 LE & 01 Y 8

M A O ZI N LI N SE E G LI IG N RE N ER DS H G M GR TRO T AY IM M 5 S

E L G N I &S S N W TIO O P I N R E C SUBS TS ON S|A61L9-533-7000 TICKEopera.org/UTCP

A

T

O N8D RARY 201 UA TU BR FE

A I C N E R FLO EN EL S A N O Z AMA MARCH 2018


www.lajollalight.com

PAGE B8 - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

FROM TASENDE GALLERY, B1 Among the venerable artists are two new contemporaries: Brooklyn-based Jonathan Seliger, a neo-Pop sculptor, and Melissa Chandon, a NoCal painter who teaches at UC Davis and was mentored by Wayne Thiebaud, who also has a piece in the show. Several of the guests, like longtime La Valencia bartender Ray Arcibal and Donna Van Belle, were at the gallery’s 1979 opening. “We served Champagne here,” Van Belle remembered, raising her glass. “Signs of the Times” will be on view through Nov. 4. Next up, in mid-November, is a new Manzu exhibition: “The Artist and the Pope.” ■ IF YOU GO: Tasende Gallery, 820 Prospect St. Hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday-Friday; 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. (858) 454-3691. tasendegallery.com

DOUGLAS GATES

Evening in La Jolla will also feature music and conversation on the Birch Aquarium veranda as the sun sets, along with a curated selection of reserve wines and exclusive experiences available in the silent auction and one-of-a-kind live auction items.

Artist Melissa Chandon and her ‘Green Canoe with Turquoise Dock’

PHOTOS BY MAURICE HEWITT

Niki de Saint Phalle’s ‘Totem: Bull Head’

Tickets on sale for Evening in La Jolla to benefit San Diego Bar Foundation

S

an Diego County Bar Foundation’s 20th annual “Evening in La Jolla” will be held 6-10 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 23 at Birch Aquarium, where the county’s judges, lawyers and legal supporters will network while enjoying an array of food stations and a Champagne bar. Organizers refer to it as “the most fun legal event of the year,” and an event that raises funds to provide legal assistance to those in challenging circumstances, such as foster children and at-risk youth, domestic violence victims, sick and disabled individuals, refugees and the elderly. A variety of event sponsorship opportunities are also available, from $1,000 individual sponsorships to a $10,000 invitations sponsorship. Current sponsors include Cohelan Khoury & Singer, Perkins Coie, Antonyan Miranda, Wright, L’Estrange & Ergastolo, Kirby & Kirby LLP, JLL, Noonan Lance Boyer & Banach LLP, and Best Best & Krieger LLP. Tickets, available at sdcbf.org, are $150 for general admission; $200 for hosts; and $85 for judiciary, government attorneys and attorneys practicing law less than five years. Birch Aquarium is at 2300 Expedition Way.

1/2 OFF Every T E Tuesday* d *

Bottles of Wine Come and enjoy our relaxed atmosphere with a superb glass of wine, and our selection of favorite Italian meals.

Now accepting reservations for holiday parties. Private room available.

2151 Avenida de la Playa · La Jolla

858.551.1221

www.OsteriaRomantica.com

*with purchase of 1 entree per person. Limit two bottles per table at discounted price.


www.lajollalight.com

LA JOLLA LIGHT - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - PAGE B9

Art San Diego moves to Del Mar, Sept. 28-Oct. 1 4 days of contemporary art at the Fairgrounds

FROM ART SAN DIEGO REPORTS Held for the last eight years in Balboa Park, this year’s Art San Diego — the largest contemporary art show in town — will move to a larger venue, the scenic Wyland Center at the Del Mar Fairgrounds, for a four-day run Sept. 28-Oct. 1. With presenting sponsor UBS Financial Services, the annual event draws 15,000 attendees. Art San Diego 2017 will feature 60 galleries and studio artists from around the world, showcasing more than 500 artists and their paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, photographs, videos and cutting-edge multimedia artworks. The show, renowned in the art world for its museum exhibitions, special events, themed-art projects and inspiring art talks, is owned by Redwood Media Group, which also owns and operates fine art shows Artexpo New York, Spectrum Miami, Art Santa Fe and Red Dot Miami. One-day tickets for Art San Diego are $20 online/$25 at the door for general admission. For opening night attendance, tickets are $75 online/$85 at the door. The 2017 program will again feature the

A past exhibit at the Art San Diego Contemporary Art Show highly anticipated Art Labs, San Diego Art Prize and LaunchPad Artist Program — from a carefully curated group of special installations by modern, contemporary and cutting-edge artists. In addition to UBS Financial Services’ return as presenting sponsor, this year’s lead media sponsors are Modern Luxury magazine and The San Diego Union-Tribune. “Moving Art San Diego to Del Mar gives us

ROBERT J.HIBBS

space to expand our exhibits, showcase larger installations and opens up exciting new creative possibilities. We have an amazing 30,000-square-foot space with outdoor plazas and convenient, ample parking. This allows us to enhance our exhibits while providing guests with a high-end experience,” said Eric Smith, CEO of Redwood Media Group. Founded in 2009 as the first and only

contemporary art show in San Diego, Art San Diego features leading artists from around the world. Since its inception, the show has seen the sale of more than $10 million of artwork, showcased more than 15,000 art pieces and exhibits and hosted over 100 Art Talks and special Art Lab installations. “Art San Diego has given UBS a great opportunity to support one of the leading cultural events in Southern California, bringing together various factions of the art and cultural sides of this community. It allows us all to connect with art and artists from around the world and has inspired attendees, including children, with its site-specific art projects, panel discussions, specially selected emerging artists and networking opportunities,” said Chris Marsh, UBS market director for San Diego. ■ Schedule: First Preview (UBS & Collectors Club/Invitation Only): 5-7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 28; Opening Night Preview Party 7-9 p.m.,Thursday, Sept. 28; Public Show Hours noon to 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 29 and Saturday, Sept. 30; noon to 5 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 1. ■ Information: art-sandiego.com — Business Spotlight features commercial enterprises that support La Jolla Light.

TACO THURSDAYS I N

T H E

B A R E FO OT

B A R ®

STARTING SEPT. 21

Now Open for Lunch Outdoor and Indoor Dining Options Free parking Just two blocks from the ocean Tranquil setting in PB Fresh seasonal Baja menu Margarita Happy Hour 7 Days a Week

$3

Enjoy Fresh Fish, Pork or Chicken Tacos every Thursday from 5-8pm

1216 Prospect St, La Jolla, CA 92037

877 HORNBLEND ST. PACIFIC BEACH

858.412.3312 PUEBLOPB.COM

DUKESLAJOLLA.COM | 858.454.5888 BREAKFAST | LUNCH | PAU HANA | DINNER


www.lajollalight.com

PAGE B10 - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

Country Day student seeks La Jolla Shores dog beach

ASHLEY MACKIN-SOLOMON

La Jolla Country Day School student Navid Massarat and his dog, Lexus

BY ASHLEY MACKIN-SOLOMON A La Jolla Country Day School student would like to convert a section of a La Jolla Shores beach into an off-leash dog beach and is drafting a petition he hopes will ultimately land on District 1 City Council member Barbara Bry’s desk for consideration. 17-year-old junior Navid Massarat proposes the area north of Scripps Pier for the dog beach. Other San Diego dog beaches include ones on Fiesta Island (15 minutes away) and Ocean Beach (25 minutes away), as well as Del Mar (15-30 minutes away, based on traffic). There are also dog parks at the base of Soledad Mountain Road and at Doyle Park. “The idea started two or three years ago, the first time I visited the dog beach in Del Mar,” Navid explained. “My dog, Lexus, is really hyper, and letting her swim is the fastest and easiest way for her to exercise and to tire her out. When I went to the dog beach, I also realized it was a fun way for her and I to spend time together and bond. I had fun, I got to swim. I invited friends to bring their dogs. “The problem is that I live here in La Jolla and the only time you can bring your dog to La Jolla Shores is between 4 p.m. and 9 a.m. November to March, and 6 p.m. to 9 a.m. April to October. A dog must be leashed at all other times. So there isn’t a time you can bring your dog to your local beaches. From there, I realized a dog beach could be a great improvement to the community.” To determine the issues that could come with a dog beach and address them in his proposal, Navid reached out to Del Mar lifeguards. Among the concerns he discovered are the “rare” instances of a dog biting a person, environmental impacts, and owners not cleaning up after their dogs. The answer to most of these, Navid thinks, is

location. “Lifeguards said dogs biting or bothering people was generally rare and it would be nothing out of the ordinary to get law enforcement if the situation was out of hand,” he said. “One of the aspects my petition would consider would be to limit the beach to north of Scripps Pier. That negates one of the big concerns of dogs running over tourists or getting in the way of other beach activities. It’s closed off. To the north, you have rocks that you can’t cross when the tide comes in. To the south is the Pier, so this would limit the dogs to this one area and the dogs won’t interfere with beach-goers.” He added that other than picking up the dog’s waste, lifeguards said there are no environmental impacts. “I wouldn’t want to speak for other dog owners, but the dog beaches are rare and special. If you look at Del Mar and Fiesta Island, they are clean because dog owners pick up after their dogs. They do not want to lose that special place to take their dog,” he said. In 2014, a similar proposal for off-leash hours on the beach was introduced, but for Marine Street Beach. Facing backlash over several community hearings, the proposal was withdrawn. But Navid said he hopes his proposal, which may make the rounds at community planning groups, will be more successful. “I want to draft my petition, make it public and get enough signatures on it to take this to the San Diego City Council and Council member Barbara Bry,” he said. “In researching this idea and looking at how the laws would have to change, I found out the dog beaches that exist were made dog beaches by the City, so I’m hoping that’s where this will go.” Navid can be reached through his school advisor at jshulman@ljcds.org

GALAS & FUNDRAISERS ■ Be the Light Charity Gala, 5-9 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 16 at Hyatt Regency La Jolla at Aventine, to benefit Shelter to Soldier, a non-profit that adopts dogs from shelters and trains them to be psychiatric service dogs for combat veterans suffering from Post Traumatic Stress (PTSD), Traumatic Brain Injury and other injuries associated with military experiences. Entertainment by singer/songwriter Kinnie Dye, silent and live auctions, plus memorable moments with service dogs and their veteran handlers. The auction lineup includes a Fender electric guitar autographed by Jimmy Buffett. Tickets: $125 for valet parking, hosted beer by Lost Coast Brewery or wine, tray-passed hors d’oeuvres and plated dinner with dessert. sheltertosoldier.org ■ The Rady Children’s Hospital La Jolla Unit Auxiliary has partnered with the Lorna Jane shop at 7840 Girard Ave. for a “Be Fit Fair,” 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 23. This is a kick-off event to introduce the group’s major fundraising event in April, 2018. Four classes will be highlighted at $23, per class, including yoga and kickboxing, by Lorna Jane instructors. Ticket and more details at

facebook.com/RCHLaJollaAuxiliary ■ National CHEERS Foundation will mark its fifth anniversary with a fundraiser 5:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 29 at La Jolla Beach & Tennis Club, 2000 Spindrift Drive. Themed “A Night in Valle de Guadalupe,” the event will feature Mexican cuisine, wine and tequila from Valle de Guadalupe, entertainment and dancing under the stars. Proceeds support organizations that help women improve their lives through health care and education, research and support. Tickets: $125 each or $225 for two. ncheers.ejoinme.org/cheers2017 ■ Casino Night 2017 to benefit A Bridge for Kids, a non-profit helping teens in need, 6-11 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 7 at La Jolla Country Club. Hosted bar, strolling magicians, blackjack, craps, roulette and more, plus live auction and drawings for a chance to win prizes, including tickets to see rock icon Steven Tyler at a private show in Palm Springs, a four-day vacation from Exclusive Resorts, a week at a MGM Resorts Penthouse in Las Vegas, a culinary wine and dine experience from Gen7 Wines and more. Tickets (before Sept. 22) are $125, afterward, $175. abridgeforkids.org

Be Fit Fair co-chairs Elle Field McDougall, Mary Stolper and Mallory Leonard

COURTESY


www.lajollalight.com

LA JOLLA LIGHT - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - PAGE B11

Here’s how to pick a winner in the produce aisle: Part 1

I

t’s always humorous watching fellow supermarket shoppers perform a series of ritualistic gestures as they grope, squeeze, sniff, knock, cradle, shake and rattle a piece of produce to hedge their bets for selecting a perfectly ripe one. Of course, to get the best out of fruits and vegetables always buy in season, local and organic, where possible. Remember that some items will ripen further after they’re picked (like avocados, stone fruits and tomatoes) while others will not ripen after picking no matter how much prodding (especially berries, citrus and watermelon). Here’s an A to Z produce primer on picking winners for all seasons: Apples, the fragrant forbidden fruit in the Garden of Eden, and autumn’s crisp little darlings, have been revered by ancient peoples for millennia. Since that time, 7,500 varieties grown worldwide have been pressed into juice, fermented into vinegar, pureed into sauces, and baked in pies, strudels and turnovers. Apples of all manners should be firm with solid heft, and free of bruises, soft spots, worm holes, puckering and wrinkling. Try to select ones with stems attached. Bananas, a portable potassium powerhouse, give a quick energy boost, ease nerves, reduce blood pressure, and amp up immunity. To tell the ripeness of a banana,

R FO

! NT E R

simply look at the colors and spots on its peel. Unripe ones are green-hued, containing more starch and less sugar than golden ripe ones, which are conversely sweeter and less starchy, since the ripening process converts the starch into natural sugars, such as fructose, glucose and sucrose. A smattering of brown spots on the peel are still fine for eating, yet black markings indicate bruising, and these should be discarded. Cucumbers are a refreshing reservoir of water and silica with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties to hydrate and rejuvenate. Whether slicing, hothouse, Persian, or pickling varieties choose a dilly. Cukes should be firm without soft spots, blemishes or withering skin, and also have a good heavy feel for their size. Dandelion greens at their peak during spring months are a Herculean source of protein, calcium, iron, antioxidants and assorted minerals. This high-fiber leafy green adds a pungent nutritional oomph to salads, smoothies or sautéed sides. As these greens tend to be slightly bitter, they balance well with sweet, dense fruits like mangoes, figs, bananas and papayas. Usually sold in bunches, look for dark green leaves free of spots or blemishes. Smaller leaves also tend to be less bitter.

Enjoy the Best of La Jolla Village!

7635 Eads Ave. Beautiful 2BR, 2BA, A/C, $3500 per month.

Eggplant is a beloved nightshade throughout the lands, including the exquisite “aubergine” central to many French dishes, and the vibrant “melanzana“ incorporated in classic Italian fare. Leave the berry unpeeled as the skin has the greatest source of nutrients, but make sure it’s dark purple and glossy, without soft spots or bruises. Also, select eggplants with elongated “belly buttons” for the sweetest flesh, without bitter nuances. Fungi, the class of marvelous mushrooms once feared by mighty Roman emperors for their poisonous properties, are now treasured as an immune- boosting warrior with remarkable healing properties. Whether choosing beefy, buttery Portobellos, earthy, piney Shiitakes, rich woodsy Porcinis, or floral Chanterelles, make sure the caps and gills are free of moisture and mold, soft spots and blemishes. Stems should be soft, not straw-like. Take a whiff, and if you detect a foul odor, the ‘shrooms are spoiled. Grapes, nature’s portable refreshers should have a rich, jeweled color, whether green, red, purple, pink or black varieties. The berries themselves should be plumpish and firm, and strongly secured to a soft green stem. The presence of a white powdery substance called “bloom” is nature’s protective mechanism to ward off moisture that can cause mold, and is perfectly safe to eat. Heirloom tomatoes, so called because of their fine lineage with characteristics passed down from generations, including their gorgeous ugliness, divine Technicolors, patterns, and sweetness make them a rock star of the culinary world. When choosing

Easy Caprese ■ Ingredients: 3 assorted heirloom tomatoes, sliced 1/2-inch thick; 1 pound, oval ball fresh or buffalo mozzarella, sliced 1/4-inch thick; 12 fresh basil leaves; 1/4 cup each virgin olive oil and balsamic vinegar or reduction ■ Method: On a large platter, arrange tomatoes and cheese in an alternating pattern. Scatter basil leaves, sprinkle with salt and pepper and drizzle with oil and vinegar. — kitchenshrink@san.rr.com

heirlooms, please don’t squeeze these delicate fruits, rather use your olfactory and sniff for a deep fragrant aroma. The bottoms of heirlooms should also be a darker shade than the rest. — Check out next week’s column for the rest of the culinary alphabet.

Bay Park! Ocean, Beach & Bay!

1933 Frankfort St. Gorgeous, Newer 4BR,2.5BA, Dream Kitchen! d $1,325,000 $1,325 25,0 25 ,000 ,0 00 Seller will entertain offers between $1,175,000 and

PAUL FERRELL 858.449.5090 BROKER ASSOCIATE, CalBRE #01020000

Representing Buyers and Sellers of San Diego’s Finest Homes for Over 25 years! ©MMVII Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC. All Rights Reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a registered trademark licensed to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. CalBRE#01767484


www.lajollalight.com

PAGE B12 - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

FALL KICKOFF

SALE!

MOONVALLEYNURSERIES.COM

SAVE BIG! FALL’S THE BEST

www.lajollalight.com

FREE PROFESSIONAL

PROFESSIONALLY & GUARANTEED FREE PLANTING! PLANTED DESIGN ALWAYS FREE AT NURSERY. 199 AT HOME OR JOBSITE. CALL FOR DETAILS. $

TIME TO PLANT!

Timothy Burger: 760.990.1079

San Diego, El Cajon, Pacific Beach, Chula Vista, South County & nearby

EES!

IN CA LIFOR NIA

XL PYGMY

DATE PALMS HURR

LIMIT TIMEE! D LIMIT 6 WITH THIS AD

$

C/C

Y IN!

69

99 199 $

TROPICAL BIRD OF PARADISE

• APPLES • APRICOTS • LIMES • PLUMS • NECTARINES & MORE THOUSANDS TO CHOOSE FROM! OM!

FRESH

HOM LIMIT 6 WITH THIS AD

$

C/C

69

99 199 $

$

199

$

HUGE HEDGES

99

NOW FROM

ALMS PA BEST

ICE OF PR YEATRHE !

C/C

AT

3 SUPER!

E

7’-10’ TALL

ORGA NIC!

CHOOSE FROM 1000's!

HOLLYWOOD STYLE HEDGES

OUR #1 BEST SELLER - HERE'S WHY:

C/C

$

OAH

499

INSTANT POOL OASIS!

PIRU QUEEN

PALMS

8’-12’ TALL

TALL 3 HUG GE! 8’-12’ $ $ $

1399 1499 1399-

6999 $

199

C/C

N SOUNATURAL D BA RRIER

SAMPLE PACKAGE

NEW HOME 2K PACK

#FREEPLANTING

PALM PARADISE

Moon Valley Nurseries has the Largest Selection of Trees and Palms in San Diego County!

INSTA PRIVA NT

3 HUGE Instant Trees or Palms 2 SUPER Trees or Palms 10 BIG Shrubs of Choice $ FREE BONUS! ($80 VALUE) 1 JUG MOON JUICE 1 BAG MOON SOIL CONDITIONER

FREE DESIGN AT NURSERY!

3400

1999

$

SAMPLE PACKAGE

CA GIANT NEW YARD PACK

Reg. Individual Price per tree applies. In stock only. Not valid with package pricing. Excludes wholesale. Lowest price tree“free”See store for complete details.

5 $2199 BUY 5 $799 BUY SUPER FROM HUGE FROM

CANARY DATE PALM

KING PALM

• INDIAN LAUREL • WAX LEAF PRIVET • CAROLINA CHERRY • JAPANESE PRIVET • ITALIAN CYPRESS • BOTTLEBRUSH

AND MANY MORE VARIETIES!

2 GIANT Trees or Palms 3 BLOCKBUSTER Trees or Palms 6 HUGE Instant Trees or Palms 7 SUPER Trees or Palms $ 19000 12 BIG Shrubs of Choice

FREE BONUS! ($160 VALUE) 2 JUGS MOON JUICE 2 BAGS MOON SOIL CONDITIONER

FREE BONUS! ($160 VALUE) 2 JUGS MOON JUICE 2 BAGS MOON SOIL CONDITIONER

$

999

FREE

WITH MOON VALLEY BRAND FERTILIZERS & NUTRIENTS

BUY 2

GET 1

Wittth Coupon - Expires 9.30.17

8 VARIETIES YOUR CHOICE MIX & MATCH

• Super Moon Juice • Soil Conditioner • Moon Green (Liquid Iron) • 8-0-8 Dry Palm Food • Moon Dust • Super Palm Juice • Moon Royale • Desert Juice

9999

$

FREE PROFESSIONAL PLANTING & GUARANTEED TO GROW!

Re eg. retail price applies. No other discounts or offers. e

FREE DESIGN AT NURSERY!

LET US CUSTOM DESIGN A PACKAGE FOR YOUR LANDSCAPE! PACKAGE PRICING WITH AD ONLY FOR YELLOW SELECT TREES. RED SELECT TREES, SPECIALTY VARIETIES, FIELD DUG TREES AND JUMBOS CAN BE INCLUDED FOR AN ADDITIONAL FEE PER TREE. CRANE OR ADDITIONAL EQUIPMENT IF NEEDED IS EXTRA. OTHER RESTRICTIONS MAY APPLY. PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE

SUCCULENTS

POTTERY 50% OFF

Plant Now!

Pay Later!

FISHTAIL PALM

NO INTEREST FINANCING!

Orders of $499 and up, based on approved credit. See store for details.

20 FT TALL TREES!

4999

$

BEST TIME TO FERTILIZE!

CA ULTIMATE YARD PACK

1 GIANT Tree or Palm 2 BLOCKBUSTER Instant Trees or Palms 3 HUGE Instant Trees or Palms $ 8 BIG Shrubs of Choice 10000

12 MONTH

MAGNOLIA TREE

KENTIA PALM

NOW FROM

SAMPLE PACKAGE

AVOCADO TREES

SHRUBS & VINES

FRUIT TREES

CY

• Creates Instant Privacy • Keeps Your Home Shaded From Nosy Neighbors! And Cool All Year! • Easy To Care For! • Great Sound Barrier!

SPECIMEN SIZED TREES & PALMS

Paradise Palms Expert - County Wide - San Diego, Rancho Bernardo, Poway, Carmel, East County & nearby

Each Package includes FREE DESIGN at our nurseries, all trees and plants listed, hand select your exact trees, professional installation with custom blended Moon Valley mulch and our proprietary Moon Juice! Plus everything we plant is GUARANTEED to grow!

AVE THE BIGG TR EST

KING K

AFTER

CUSTOM LANDSCAPE PACKAGES WE H

XL CITRUS & FRUIT

Dave Schneider: 951.331.7279

Murrieta, Temecula, Hemet, Wine Country & nearby

Fallbrook, Escondido, San Marcos, Oceanside, Carlsbad, Vista & nearby

BEFORE

ON ALL BOX SIZE TREES & PALMS

OAH

Rancho Santa Fe, Encinitas, La Jolla, La Costa, Del Mar, & nearby

Naia Armstrong: 760.444.4630

PLUS GET FREE PLANTING!

SHADE TREES

Kraig Harrison: 619.320.6012

Andrew Hahn: 619.312.4691

FREE PLANTING ON 24” BOX TREES & LARGER. CRANE IF REQUIRED IS EXTRA. NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFERES. SOME RESTRICTIONS APPLY. EXCLUDES PACKAGES AND WHOLESALE PRICES.

FLOWERING TREES

CALL A NURSERY PRO TODAY!

LANDSCAPE DESIGN CONSULTATIONS

OR THE BEST TREES ON EARTH - GO STRAIGHT TO THE MOON!

CITRUS TREES

LA JOLLA LIGHT - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - PAGE B13

WHOLESALE

& UP PLANTED & GUARANTEED!

TO THE TRADE

2 GIANT NURSERIES OVER 100 ACRES! OPEN DAILY Mon - Sat 7:30 - 6 Sundays 9-5 Just $119 delivers any order within 20 miles radius of nursery. Other areas higher.

PALM PARADISE

760.291.8223

Oceanside

Vista

Carlsbad

78 San Marcos

La Costa Encinitas

4-5 STAR RATING!

La Jolla

EVERY CALIFORNIA NURSERY LOCATION!

Rancho Santa Fe

Escondido

Rancho Bernardo

26437 N. City Centre Pkwy. - Escondido, CA 92026 I-15 Exit Deer Springs Rd. Easet to City Centre then South 1.5 mi.

Landscapers, Designers, Architects, Project Managers, Developers & Large Quantity Orders SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA WHOLESALE MANAGER

KRAIG HARRISON 760.742.6025

SAN DIEGO •ESCONDIDO

760.316.4000

Oceanside

Vista

Carlsbad

78

San Marcos

La Costa Encinitas La Jolla

Rancho Santa Fe

Escondido

Rancho Bernardo

26334 Mesa Rock Rd. Escondido, CA 92026

I-15 Exit Deer Springs Rd. West to Mesa Rock

PROFESSIONAL TREE SERVICES REMOVALS & MORE

760.291.8949

All offers exclusive to this ad and require ad to be present. Unless noted, prices are for yellow select trees, ad is valid 10 days from issue date and all offers are for in stock itemss. Offers not valid on previous sales. Some restrictions apply. See store for details. Largest box tree grower claim based on industry knowledge and box size trees in production. Challenges welcomed.


www.lajollalight.com

PAGE B12 - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

FALL KICKOFF

SALE!

MOONVALLEYNURSERIES.COM

SAVE BIG! FALL’S THE BEST

www.lajollalight.com

FREE PROFESSIONAL

PROFESSIONALLY & GUARANTEED FREE PLANTING! PLANTED DESIGN ALWAYS FREE AT NURSERY. 199 AT HOME OR JOBSITE. CALL FOR DETAILS. $

TIME TO PLANT!

Timothy Burger: 760.990.1079

San Diego, El Cajon, Pacific Beach, Chula Vista, South County & nearby

EES!

IN CA LIFOR NIA

XL PYGMY

DATE PALMS HURR

LIMIT TIMEE! D LIMIT 6 WITH THIS AD

$

C/C

Y IN!

69

99 199 $

TROPICAL BIRD OF PARADISE

• APPLES • APRICOTS • LIMES • PLUMS • NECTARINES & MORE THOUSANDS TO CHOOSE FROM! OM!

FRESH

HOM LIMIT 6 WITH THIS AD

$

C/C

69

99 199 $

$

199

$

HUGE HEDGES

99

NOW FROM

ALMS PA BEST

ICE OF PR YEATRHE !

C/C

AT

3 SUPER!

E

7’-10’ TALL

ORGA NIC!

CHOOSE FROM 1000's!

HOLLYWOOD STYLE HEDGES

OUR #1 BEST SELLER - HERE'S WHY:

C/C

$

OAH

499

INSTANT POOL OASIS!

PIRU QUEEN

PALMS

8’-12’ TALL

TALL 3 HUG GE! 8’-12’ $ $ $

1399 1499 1399-

6999 $

199

C/C

N SOUNATURAL D BA RRIER

SAMPLE PACKAGE

NEW HOME 2K PACK

#FREEPLANTING

PALM PARADISE

Moon Valley Nurseries has the Largest Selection of Trees and Palms in San Diego County!

INSTA PRIVA NT

3 HUGE Instant Trees or Palms 2 SUPER Trees or Palms 10 BIG Shrubs of Choice $ FREE BONUS! ($80 VALUE) 1 JUG MOON JUICE 1 BAG MOON SOIL CONDITIONER

FREE DESIGN AT NURSERY!

3400

1999

$

SAMPLE PACKAGE

CA GIANT NEW YARD PACK

Reg. Individual Price per tree applies. In stock only. Not valid with package pricing. Excludes wholesale. Lowest price tree“free”See store for complete details.

5 $2199 BUY 5 $799 BUY SUPER FROM HUGE FROM

CANARY DATE PALM

KING PALM

• INDIAN LAUREL • WAX LEAF PRIVET • CAROLINA CHERRY • JAPANESE PRIVET • ITALIAN CYPRESS • BOTTLEBRUSH

AND MANY MORE VARIETIES!

2 GIANT Trees or Palms 3 BLOCKBUSTER Trees or Palms 6 HUGE Instant Trees or Palms 7 SUPER Trees or Palms $ 19000 12 BIG Shrubs of Choice

FREE BONUS! ($160 VALUE) 2 JUGS MOON JUICE 2 BAGS MOON SOIL CONDITIONER

FREE BONUS! ($160 VALUE) 2 JUGS MOON JUICE 2 BAGS MOON SOIL CONDITIONER

$

999

FREE

WITH MOON VALLEY BRAND FERTILIZERS & NUTRIENTS

BUY 2

GET 1

Wittth Coupon - Expires 9.30.17

8 VARIETIES YOUR CHOICE MIX & MATCH

• Super Moon Juice • Soil Conditioner • Moon Green (Liquid Iron) • 8-0-8 Dry Palm Food • Moon Dust • Super Palm Juice • Moon Royale • Desert Juice

9999

$

FREE PROFESSIONAL PLANTING & GUARANTEED TO GROW!

Re eg. retail price applies. No other discounts or offers. e

FREE DESIGN AT NURSERY!

LET US CUSTOM DESIGN A PACKAGE FOR YOUR LANDSCAPE! PACKAGE PRICING WITH AD ONLY FOR YELLOW SELECT TREES. RED SELECT TREES, SPECIALTY VARIETIES, FIELD DUG TREES AND JUMBOS CAN BE INCLUDED FOR AN ADDITIONAL FEE PER TREE. CRANE OR ADDITIONAL EQUIPMENT IF NEEDED IS EXTRA. OTHER RESTRICTIONS MAY APPLY. PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE

SUCCULENTS

POTTERY 50% OFF

Plant Now!

Pay Later!

FISHTAIL PALM

NO INTEREST FINANCING!

Orders of $499 and up, based on approved credit. See store for details.

20 FT TALL TREES!

4999

$

BEST TIME TO FERTILIZE!

CA ULTIMATE YARD PACK

1 GIANT Tree or Palm 2 BLOCKBUSTER Instant Trees or Palms 3 HUGE Instant Trees or Palms $ 8 BIG Shrubs of Choice 10000

12 MONTH

MAGNOLIA TREE

KENTIA PALM

NOW FROM

SAMPLE PACKAGE

AVOCADO TREES

SHRUBS & VINES

FRUIT TREES

CY

• Creates Instant Privacy • Keeps Your Home Shaded From Nosy Neighbors! And Cool All Year! • Easy To Care For! • Great Sound Barrier!

SPECIMEN SIZED TREES & PALMS

Paradise Palms Expert - County Wide - San Diego, Rancho Bernardo, Poway, Carmel, East County & nearby

Each Package includes FREE DESIGN at our nurseries, all trees and plants listed, hand select your exact trees, professional installation with custom blended Moon Valley mulch and our proprietary Moon Juice! Plus everything we plant is GUARANTEED to grow!

AVE THE BIGG TR EST

KING K

AFTER

CUSTOM LANDSCAPE PACKAGES WE H

XL CITRUS & FRUIT

Dave Schneider: 951.331.7279

Murrieta, Temecula, Hemet, Wine Country & nearby

Fallbrook, Escondido, San Marcos, Oceanside, Carlsbad, Vista & nearby

BEFORE

ON ALL BOX SIZE TREES & PALMS

OAH

Rancho Santa Fe, Encinitas, La Jolla, La Costa, Del Mar, & nearby

Naia Armstrong: 760.444.4630

PLUS GET FREE PLANTING!

SHADE TREES

Kraig Harrison: 619.320.6012

Andrew Hahn: 619.312.4691

FREE PLANTING ON 24” BOX TREES & LARGER. CRANE IF REQUIRED IS EXTRA. NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFERES. SOME RESTRICTIONS APPLY. EXCLUDES PACKAGES AND WHOLESALE PRICES.

FLOWERING TREES

CALL A NURSERY PRO TODAY!

LANDSCAPE DESIGN CONSULTATIONS

OR THE BEST TREES ON EARTH - GO STRAIGHT TO THE MOON!

CITRUS TREES

LA JOLLA LIGHT - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - PAGE B13

WHOLESALE

& UP PLANTED & GUARANTEED!

TO THE TRADE

2 GIANT NURSERIES OVER 100 ACRES! OPEN DAILY Mon - Sat 7:30 - 6 Sundays 9-5 Just $119 delivers any order within 20 miles radius of nursery. Other areas higher.

PALM PARADISE

760.291.8223

Oceanside

Vista

Carlsbad

78 San Marcos

La Costa Encinitas

4-5 STAR RATING!

La Jolla

EVERY CALIFORNIA NURSERY LOCATION!

Rancho Santa Fe

Escondido

Rancho Bernardo

26437 N. City Centre Pkwy. - Escondido, CA 92026 I-15 Exit Deer Springs Rd. Easet to City Centre then South 1.5 mi.

Landscapers, Designers, Architects, Project Managers, Developers & Large Quantity Orders SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA WHOLESALE MANAGER

KRAIG HARRISON 760.742.6025

SAN DIEGO •ESCONDIDO

760.316.4000

Oceanside

Vista

Carlsbad

78

San Marcos

La Costa Encinitas La Jolla

Rancho Santa Fe

Escondido

Rancho Bernardo

26334 Mesa Rock Rd. Escondido, CA 92026

I-15 Exit Deer Springs Rd. West to Mesa Rock

PROFESSIONAL TREE SERVICES REMOVALS & MORE

760.291.8949

All offers exclusive to this ad and require ad to be present. Unless noted, prices are for yellow select trees, ad is valid 10 days from issue date and all offers are for in stock itemss. Offers not valid on previous sales. Some restrictions apply. See store for details. Largest box tree grower claim based on industry knowledge and box size trees in production. Challenges welcomed.


www.lajollalight.com

PAGE B14 - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

‘Testigo/Witness: Popular Fiction and the Dismembered Object’

Concert Times

Art Exhibits

■ Violinist Victoria Martino and pianist James Lent will present the complete works for violin and piano by Edvard Grieg, considered the northern “titan” of Romantic composers, 7:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 15 at Athenaeum Music & Arts Library, 1008 Wall St. Tickets: $30-$35. (858) 454-5872. ljathenaeum.org

■ The 99th annual La Jolla Art Association fundraiser is underway at lajollaartassociation.org where (so far) there are 50 paintings on view. For $200, ticket-holders will be entered into an art drawing at the reception, Saturday, Sept. 23, where the first name drawn gets first choice of art, etc. Ticket-holders do not need not be present. The art is on display Sept. 10-23 at the gallery, 8100 Paseo Del Ocaso, Suite B, La Jolla Shores. (858) 459-1196.

■ A Bel Canto Ensemble concert will bring together 10 performers — with piano, saxophone, violin, trumpet and traditional Chinese instruments and singers — 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 16 at Good Samaritan Episcopal Church, 4321 Eastgate Mall. More than a dozen pieces will be performed. Suggested donation $20.

James Austin Murray’s ‘Light on Black’

■ The Odeum Guitar Duo (Fred Benedetti and Robert Wetzel) return to Mt. Soledad Presbyterian Church for a ninth concert of the year, 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 16 at 6551 Soledad Mountain Road. The musical theme is “Two Guitars and Two Centuries.” $10 with discounts. (858) 248-9300.

Some of life’s great moments. Available by reservation.

■ James Austin Murray’s “Light on Black,” a collection of his large-scale, monochromatic ebony oil paintings, will be on display Sept. 16 to Nov. 1, with an opening reception 6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 16 at Madison Gallery, 1055 Wall St. “Murray’s work titillates the viewer to look beyond the black canvas and see infinite colors and forms,” according to curators. Free. (858) 459-0836. madisongalleries.com ■ “Testigo/Witness: Popular Fiction and the Dismembered Object,” a multi-faceted exhibition of new

ON THE MENU:

NEW DELIGHTS WITH AN OCEAN ON THE SIDE RESTAURANT WEEK

September 24 to October 7 | $30 per person

High Tide DINNERS

Last dates of the season — September 15-20 Before the summer ends, treat yourself to an unforgettable evening and witness this wavecrashing phenomenon found only at The Marine Room. Dine on à la carte choices including Red Walnut Crusted Alaskan Halibut, alongside our seasonal dinner menu. Starting in October our High Tide Breakfast Buffets will be available on select weekends.

Restaurant Week

September 24 to October 1 | three-courses | $50 per person Feast on our three-course menu that features such delicacies as Pistachio Ras El Hanout Spiced Prawns, Wild Rice Crusted Shetland Islands Salmon and Tabula Rasa Beer Braised Prime Beef Cheeks. Upgraded main courses, including Center Cut Black Angus Filet Mignon are available for an additional $15. Tax, beverage and gratuity are not included in prices listed. Menu items subject to change.

We’ve extended this amazing event for two weeks so you can "Eat. Laugh. Share" with a delicious threecourse prix fixe menu that includes Cedar Plank Salmon and Mocha Stout Braised Angus Short Ribs.

HAPPY HOUR — SEVEN FOR $7 Sunday through Friday | 3 to 6 p.m.

Our oceanfront patio is the perfect spot to pair one of our new local Craft Drafts, like Karl Strauss Windansea Wheat, with our tasty Honey Ancho Chicken Wings or Ginger Pork Potstickers on the seven items for $7 menu.

LOBSTER BOIL

Thursday and Friday Evenings $39.50 per person, three course menu Treat yourself to a traditional New England feast, featuring a Steamed One Pound Maine Lobster, soup or salad and Banana Split Mudd Pie for dessert.

DINE ON THE BEACH

Located next to Kellogg Park at La Jolla Shores Hotel 888.691.3040 | TheShoresRestaurant.com

Reservations 877.477.1641 or MarineRoom.com

Tax, beverage, and gratuity, unless otherwise noted, are not included in prices listed. Menu items subject to change.


www.lajollalight.com

Mark Christopher Lawrence performs at Tuesday Night Comics.

LA JOLLA LIGHT - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - PAGE B15

Sheila Fugard, Geri Westphal, Carol Soloway and Ally Loprete are among the featured speakers at Womens Museum of California’s ‘An Evening with Women Writers.’

work by Thomas Glassford, is “part cabinet of curiosities, part ready-made surreal museum.” See it with an artist’s reception, 10 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 16 at the new Quint Gallery, 5171 Santa Fe St., Bay Ho area of San Diego. Exhibit closes Oct. 28. Free. (858) 454-3409. quintgallery.com ■ “Endangered: Exploring California’s Changing Ecosystems,” features the work of eight artists who have explored the devastation of local flora and fauna in an interactive and educational way. It’s on exhibit through Sept. 28 at San Diego Mesa College Art Gallery, 7250 Mesa College Drive. Gallery hours 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday-Wednesday, 1-8 p.m. Thursday. Free. sdmesa.edu

Listen and Learn ■ The Danish Golden Age, a five-week literature, art and music lecture-concert series from lecturer and violinist Victoria Martino and Musica Pro Arte Ensemble, will celebrate the Bicentennial of Niels Gade (1817-1890). Series

begins 7:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 18 and continues Mondays through Oct. 16. Athenaeum Music & Arts Library, 1008 Wall St. Each lecture, $20-$25; series $90-$115. (858) 454-5872. ljathenaeum.org/special-concerts ■ The R-rated local variety show Tuesday Night Comics returns to the stage, 7:30 p.m. Sept. 19 at North Coast Repertory Theatre, 987 Lomas Santa Fe in Solana Beach. There will be a new lineup of talent from across the country with late night television credits, as well as credits from Comedy Central, HBO and Showtime. Pre-show happy hour 6:30 p.m. Tickets: $23. (858) 481-1055. northcoastrep.org ■ Four authors will share readings, answer questions and sign their books as part of “An Evening with Women Writers,” 6 p.m. Thursday Sept. 21 at the Women’s Museum of California, 2730 Historic Decatur Road, Suite 103, Liberty Station, Point Loma. These include Sheila Fugard, Ally Loprete, Carol Soloway and Geri Westphal. Admission: $5. (619) 233-7963. womensmuseumca.org ■ MOXIE Theatre opens its 13th season with

Snakes return to the La Jolla Library Sept. 15.

“Ironbound,” by Martyna Majok and directed by Jennifer Eve Thorn. Runs Sept. 17-Oct 22 with opening night Sept. 23. At a bus stop in a run-down New Jersey town, Darja, a Polish immigrant cleaning lady, is done talking about feelings; it’s time to talk money. Spanning more than 20 years, three relationships and three presidents, Darja negotiates for her future. A darkly funny, heartbreaking portrait of a woman for whom love is a luxury — and a liability — as she fights to survive in America. Tickets: $20-$40. 6663 El Cajon Blvd., San Diego. moxietheatre.com

Snakes Alive! ■ Slithering snakes will return to La Jolla, 10 a.m. Friday, Sept. 15 for a little scientists program for ages 3-5 at La Jolla Library, 7555 Draper Ave. Children will learn how adaptations make snakes successful predators and get up close and personal with a snake. Free. (858) 552-1657. lajollalibrary.org

SPONSORED COLUMNS PANCHO DEWHURST GDC Construction 858.551.5222

What to Do (And What to Avoid) When Renovating an Historic Property Buying an historic home can be an exciting adventure. There is something very special about connecting with history through the architecture and design of your own property. But all that history requires both responsibility and commitment from a homeowner. Historic homes often come with their own challenges. Age, in addition to adding character, can also damage or deteriorate a structure and its foundations. And historic features require specialized knowledge and, sometimes, equipment, to maintain and repair. It shouldn’t come as a surprise to anybody, therefore, that maintaining or restoring an historic home shouldn’t be placed in the hands of just any construction company.

At GDC construction, we have close to 100 years of experience building, renovating, maintaining and upgrading some of La Jolla’s finest historic homes. We’ve built a wealth of specialized knowledge about the Jewel’s unique character and architecture, and we’ve spent five generations getting to know how to best preserve our regional history. Are you thinking of buying an historic home in La Jolla? Or are you searching for the right team of specialists to give your property a crucial makeover? Either way, we have some key pointers for you: Make a plan (with expert help) and stick to it: Whether you’re investing in a new property in the area or upgrading or modernizing elements of your current home, you need a solid plan from the get-go. Renovation projects are very different to fullscale restoration projects. So, schedule some time to sit down with an expert to talk over your options. Then set a plan in motion. After all, once you’re in the thick of a renovation project, it’s easy to lose sight of all the minor changes and add-ons. Be realistic: Experts like the engineers and designers at GDC can help you ascertain whether your historic property will support big changes or additions, and whether the character of the home will be maintained by the project you’re

envisioning. And we’ll help you understand the shortcomings and capacities of your home’s existing HVAC, plumbing and electrical systems. Work with construction experts who have done this work before: Working on an historic home is not always a walk in the park. There could be all sorts of hidden challenges and problems that inexperienced builders might fail to see. So, bring in a team with plenty of experience working on historic properties from the first day. You won’t regret it. Hire an expert architect: You also want to ensure your chosen architect understands your vision, but also has respect for the historic value of the home. A great architect should be able to make recommendations and add to your vision for your home. GDC regularly works with some of the most well respected architects in the region. Maintain, maintain, maintain: If you own an older home, you must always be vigilant for wear-and-tear. Historic homes typical require more maintenance and regular upgrades to repair and replace outdated, faulty or damaged infrastructure. Look out for leaks: Older properties are especially prone to leaky pipes, which can cause mold. Mold can obviously be hazardous to your health, and can undermine the overall structure of

the house, making the property dangerous. Check for sagging: Sagging walls or floors could be a sign of water damage or a weakened foundation, which will need to be repaired as soon as possible. Amp it up: Check your home’s electrical panel for the amperage rating. If the house is older than 40 years and hasn’t undergone a major renovation before, chances are good that you won’t have enough amperage to accommodate your modern appliances, and you’ll need an upgrade. Follow the Rules: Renovation and renewal of an historic home is always an option, but you must always be aware of, and follow, the regulations of the local historic landmarks commission. Some historic properties require special permits for any construction work and the project may need to be supervised. Unapproved renovations not meeting with the guidelines may be subject to steep fines. Again, GDC has decades of experience dealing with historical bureaucracy in La Jolla. Don’t forget that owning a historic property means that maintenance and upkeep are ongoing. Column continued at http://www.lajollalight.com/gdc-construction/sd-ljlour-columns-gdc-construction-renovating-historicproperty-20170828-htmlstory.html

Look to these local authorities for professional guidance on daily living at lajollalight.com/news/our-columns/ STEPHEN PFEIFFER, PH.D. Clinical Psychologist 858.784.1960 pfeifferphd.com

SCOTT MURFEY

DR. VAN CHENG

Murfey Construction 858.352.6864 MurfeyConstruction.com

San Diego Vein Institute 760.944.9263 sdveininstitute.com


www.lajollalight.com

PAGE B16 - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

The Tentacled Sea Witch

Former La Jollan returns for role in ‘The Little Mermaid’

Jennifer Allen as Ursula in ‘The Little Mermaid,’ coming to San Diego Civic Theatre Sept. 19-24

RELIGION SPIRITUALITY Open Hearts, Open Minds, Open Doors

ALL HALLOWS Catholic Church

7715 Draper Ave. (underground parking

The Rev., Dr. Philip Wood, Pastor | 6063 La Jolla Blvd. 858-454-7108 | www.lajollaunitedmethodist.org

Weekday Masses: M, T, W & F Mass at 7am Communion: Th 7am & Sat at 8am Reconciliation: Sat at 4:30pm

Sunday Masses: Sat Vigil at 5:30pm • 8am & 9:30am Rev. Raymond G. O’Donnell

Sunday Services: 8:45 & 11:00 Traditional with the choir & organ 10:00 Contemporary with the band

urch Ch

858-454-0713 www.ljpres.org

Childcare available

esbyteria Pr

n

on Kline St. between Draper and Eads)

10 a.m. Worship Service and Sunday School Chapel Open, Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m.

La Jolla Presbyterian Church

La Joll a

LA JOLLA

UNITED METHODIST

STEVE WILSON

BY LONNIE BURSTEIN HEWITT Jennifer Allen has come a long way since her school days at Muirlands Middle School and La Jolla High. She’s gone on to a successful career in musical theater, and will be back here this month as Ursula, the tentacled Sea Witch in “The Little Mermaid,” when Broadway San Diego brings the Disney classic to the Civic Theatre Sept. 19-24. Allen, who left for New York City when she was 19, is actually a third-generation La Jollan. Her grandmother moved here during World War II to take a job at Convair, and her mother, the late Priscilla Allen, was a much-loved local actress and acting teacher. “My mother got me involved in San Diego Junior Theater when I was six or seven,” Allen said in a recent interview. “It was natural for me to do what I’m doing as far back as I can remember.” What she’s doing is playing a variety of roles in topflight musicals. On Broadway, she was the Mother Superior in “Sister Act,” Grizabella in “Cats,” and Adelaide in “Guys and Dolls.” She was featured on the national tours of “Ragtime” (as Emma Goldman) and “Cabaret” (as Sally Bowles). And that’s just a small sampling of her credits over the decades. She’s been in “The Little Mermaid,” on and off, for the past two years. “The show has been very good to me,” she said. “It’s a co-production with different producers, and it’s been enormously popular everywhere.” As anyone who has seen the movie knows,

%&$( )$!'*#!" christianscience.com

PASTOR

6602 La Jolla Scenic Drive So., La Jolla, California (858) 459-2975 • www.allhallows.com

Midweek Service, Wednesday • 7:30pm Sunday Service & Sunday School • 10am 1270 Silverado Ave. La Jolla • 858-454-2266 24/7 hear weekly Sentinel Radio Program 817-259-1620

Contact Monica Williams today to place your ad. (858) 218-7228 · monica@utcommunitypress.com

Explore A New Perspective, VISIT… Christian Science Reading Room 7853 Girard Ave. La Jolla • (858) 454-2807


www.lajollalight.com

LA JOLLA LIGHT - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - PAGE B17

The writing for my character is just delicious, and I really enjoy the costume. It’s opera-style gorgeous, the tentacles are worked like puppets, and it weighs about 50 pounds. Jennifer Allen, BC (Before Costume) Ursula is the villain in “The Little Mermaid,” but Allen loves playing her. “The writing for my character (by Doug Wright, a Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright) is just delicious, and I really enjoy the costume,” she said. “It’s opera-style gorgeous, the tentacles are worked like puppets, and it weighs about 50 pounds. The whole thing is quite delightful, I get to improvise a little with the audience, and it never gets old.” If you liked the movie, you’ll like the show, she added, but noted that the two are

— Jennifer Allen on playing Ursula

quite different. “This version goes deeper into the family relationships, and they’ve added a song for my character where she talks about her difficult childhood, and why she’s seeking revenge. I think people will be surprised and moved.” Allen said she’s glad to be coming home. “I have a lot of friends and family to see, and it’s nice to be back onstage here,” she said. “It’s great to be in the ‘Light’ again, too. I was in it before, when I was a child performer. This was the paper we grew up with.”

More La Jolla Connections: The ‘Mermaid’ Playwright

ENCINITAS

New 2017 VW Jetta S 1.4T Manual

Lease for

99

$

PER MO. PLUS TAX

1at this payment 279467 24 month lease, $0 Security Deposit. $1,732.56 plus government fees and taxes due at signing with approved above average credit, mileage limitation is 20,000 total miles with 20 cents per excess mile. Offer ends 10/2/17.

New 2017 VW Passat S 1.8T Automatic

■ Doug Wright, who wrote the book for the stage production of ‘The Little Mermaid,’ has his own La Jolla history. His one-man, multi-character play ‘I Am My Own Wife’ began life as a 2001 Page-to-Stage workshop at La Jolla Playhouse and went on to Broadway, where it won the Tony Award for Best Play and the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 2004. ■ After following up with the book for Broadway’s ‘Grey Gardens’ and his new version of ‘The Little Mermaid,’ he was commissioned by The Playhouse to adapt and direct August Strindberg’s ‘Creditors’ (2009) and then to write the book for the musical ‘Hands on a Hardbody’ (2012), which had a brief Broadway run. His most recent adventure, the musical ‘War Paint,’ about rival beauty empresses Helena Rubenstein and Elizabeth Arden, is playing on Broadway.

Lease for

129

$

PER MO. PLUS TAX

1 at this payment 004250 24 month lease, $0 Security Deposit. $2763.54 plus government fees and taxes due at signing with approved above average credit, mileage limitation is 20,000 total miles with 20 cents per excess mile. Offer ends 10/2/17.

New 2017 VW Tiguan S 2.0L Automatic

Lease for

187

$

PER MO. PLUS TAX

1 at this payment 042817 24 month lease, $0 Security Deposit. $3,427.04 plus government fees and taxes due at signing with approved above average credit, mileage limitation is 20,000 total miles with 20 cents per excess mile. Offer ends 10/2/17.

0

OR...

% APR

for

60 MONTHS*

Plus a $1,000 Volkswagen Bonus** On New 2017 VW Jetta, VW Passat or VW Tiguan

*0% APR with approved credit for 60 months on new 2017 Jetta and 2017 Passat and 2017 Tigunan with other low rates available on most new VWs, cannot be used in conjunction with any other VW offer, example with $0 down, 60 monthly payments of $16.67 per month per $1,000 financed. **Bonus applied toward MSRP and is not available for cash. Fleet customers are not eligible. Offer ends 10/2/17.

The Soledad Club offers spectacular views from its wide windows and terrace.

COURTESY

Soledad Club launches Ballroom Dancing nights

T

he Soledad Club will begin hosting a Ballroom Dance club from 6 to 9:30 p.m. on the third Tuesday of each month at 5050 Soledad Road in La Jolla. The first is set for Sept. 19. Members will gather for an evening of dancing to a live band, socializing and partaking of a buffet dinner. The cost is $60 per couple. Those interested may contact club president Bill Waterman at (703) 505-9654 or wmwaterman@hotmail.com for a guest sponsorship. Couples may attend two dances as guests, and then will be encouraged to become members.

ENCINITAS

760.753.6256

1435 Encinitas Boulevard | Encinitas, CA 92024 | www.cookvw.com All advertised prices exclude government fees and taxes, any finance charges, any dealer document processing charge, any electronic filing charge, and any emission testing charge expires 10/2/17.


www.lajollalight.com

PAGE B18 - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

From The Jewel to The Grave

La Jollan to film indie project in town next week By Ashley Mackin-Solomon La Jolla native and filmmaker Kai Collins will return to her roots next week to film her latest indie project, “To the Grave,” a dark comedy about perfectionism in a small town. She’s been in La Jolla scouting locations since July and will be “cameras up” throughout The Village starting Sept. 16. Filming is expected to take about three days. The La Jolla High School grad is also co-writer on the Web series, “How to Survive a Breakup,” and pens some comedic “branded entertainment” for the American Heart Association. She just co-produced a series called “TEMP(orary)” about Millennials. “ ‘To The Grave’ is a dark comedy I dream about. It was an idea my writing partner and I came up with 10 years ago, and I’ve been itching to write and direct it since,” Collins said. “The story centers around two best friends who go to extremes as local women’s doubles tennis champions in a fictional town. It’s less a story about tennis and more about friendship and the extremes you’ll go to, to get what you want.” According to press material, Dana Powell (“Modern Family,” “Bridesmaids,” “VEEP,” “Two Broke

Geitz (Autohaus) was a household name for cars, and there is a character (in the film) who is a total perfectionist, so I pictured her driving a Mercedes Benz. It turns out my dad is working with someone from Heinz Geitz and they’re letting us use one of their cars.” Further, she said she asked family friends if cast and crew could stay in their houses while production is going on. “It’s the spirit of filmmaking and the spirit of La Jolla, which I didn’t see as a child, but I see now. We show up for each other,” she said.

Working with the City

La Jolla native and filmmaker Kai Collins working on set. Girls” and “The Office”) and Shannon Nelson (“Drop Dead Gorgeous,” “West Wing,” “ER” and “The Practice”) star in the film with Collins. Supporting roles have been cast with San Diego actors, improvisers and comedians. Collins said La Jolla “lends itself” to the project because “it looks like a perfect world on the outside — because it is beautiful with picket fences and beaches — but behind closed doors, there might be

COURTESY

something darker.” Plus, Collins saw filming in La Jolla as an opportunity to come home, reconnect with childhood friends and draw some attention to her town. “My parents still live in La Jolla. I live and work in LA, but this film had to happen in La Jolla,” she said. “I will be filming in places I used to be dragged to as a kid, like Meanley and Sons hardware. “When I was growing up, Heinz

As for what it takes procedurally to film in La Jolla, Collins said the City of San Diego makes the process easy for movie-makers. “It’s so welcoming. This experience has encouraged me to move more production to San Diego, to be honest. The process also considers the community and issues good neighbor notices … I still had to apply for permits and fill out a lot of paperwork, but in LA, they require a lot more for a lot less. They require fire marshals for scenes when someone is reading a book. “We’re not using explosives, so we don’t need that and the City of San Diego understands that,” she said.

Collins will be directing, producing and starring in “To The Grave” and despite the three jam-packed days of filming, she said there is nothing she would rather be doing. “I like to remind myself, that no matter how tired I am, we’re adults getting to play make-believe and making a living out of it. I just want to make people laugh. To me, that is essential.”

Marketing the film

Once filming is complete, Collins will submit her project to the film festival circuit, many of which have submission deadlines in October. She said she’d like to have “To The Grave” shown at San Diego festivals, but will start with one such as South By Southwest, and those in Santa Barbara, Palm Springs and Sedona. After that, she said she’ll play on existing film connections and, hopefully, partner with an online streaming network to make her project available to the masses. Could a feature film be next? “There is a feature film I wrote that has a similar tone to this project that I would want to direct, so this for me, is sort of a springboard,” she said. —Learn more about Collins and her projects at kaicollinsfilms.com

LET’S REVIEW

Laughter steams off ‘Last Of The Red Hot Lovers’ By Diana Saenger Who doesn’t like to see a good romantic comedy? That’s what audiences will find at North Coast Repertory Theatre’s “Last Of The Red Hot Lovers.” NCRT associate director Christopher Williams helms the 1969 Neil Simon treasure. The casting is excellent and includes Phil Johnson (Barney Cashman), Katie Karel (Elaine), Noelle Marion (Bobbi), and Sandy Campbell (Jeanette). We first see restaurateur Barney Cashman hurry into his mother’s apartment as he hollers out, “MOM?” With no reply, he hurries to remove some items, change others and place alcohol bottles and glasses on a table. Next he makes a phone call, and shortly afterward, the doorbell rings. He opens the door to his expected company, Elaine. He knows her as a frequent patron in his restaurant. Barney, married and nervous, has decided he needs to have one affair in his life. Elaine knows exactly what’s expected of her and makes little gestures signaling she’s ready. However, Barney seems flabbergasted and tries to just keep talking as if he didn’t even

know she was coming. After her departure, Barney has learned a few tips for a more successful tryst and again rushes through the room making changes and putting out offerings on the table. The doorbell rings again and he opens it to welcome Bobbi. She’s a looker, but also a young, giggly girl stoned and hopping around while making silly conversation. He’s so far removed from what she’s saying or proposing (like smoking a joint) that he’s out of his league once again. Barely able to get Bobbi out of the apartment, Barney takes some deep breaths. He touches up of the room before his last hopeful arrives. Jeanette is a small, stiff lady who is already showing signs of what-am-I-doing-here anxiety. The two run around the room as he tries to remove her pocketbook from her arms, but she hangs on like it’s full of gold. We learn she’s a family friend and the two banter back and forth, neither getting anywhere. However, it seems Barney learns a lot from this experience, and Johnson does homage to Neil Simon’s hit with

AARON RUMLEY

Katie Karel, Noelle Marion, Phil Johnson and Sandy Campbell in North Coast Repertory Theatre’s ‘Last Of The Red Hot Lovers,’ playing through Oct 1. Aaron Rumley non-stop laughs. A local actor, writer, producer and director, Johnson knows how to spin dialogue from the playwright’s paper into a living, breathing character we might all know.

■ IF YOU GO: ‘Last Of The Red Hot Lovers’ is on stage through Oct. 1 at the North Coast Repertory Theatre, 987 Lomas Santa Fe Drive, Solana Beach. northcoastrep.org


SOCIAL LIFE

www.lajollalight.com

LA JOLLA LIGHT - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - PAGE B19

PHOTOS BY VINCENT ANDRUNAS

Globe Guilders president Angie DeCaro, Jo Ann Kilty, Freedome Bradley-Ballentine, Kim Neapole, Lynn Silva and Lisa Berry Shaw

Old Globe Theatre to benefit from Guilders fashion luncheon

T Fashion show

Zandra Rhodes, Evelyn Truitt

he Globe Guilders Celebrating Couture 2017 Patron Party was held Aug. 21 at the Oxford Social Club, and the resulting signature Luncheon & Fashion event followed at the Omni La Costa Hotel & Spa, Aug. 30. Proceeds from the

27th annual fundraiser, which featured Neiman Marcus glamour on the runway, will be used in support of The Old Globe Theatre in Balboa Park.

SEE MORE PHOTOS, B21

SERVICE DIRECTORY TONY ROBBINS

PITBULL LIVE Pre-Sale Tickets REG. 149.00

49

$

Limit 3 Per Person

REGISTER NOW! Sat/Sun Nov. 4 & 5 Los Angeles Convention Center

1-800-213-5533 Use Discount Code JUST49 SAVE $100

PET OF THE WEEK BLANCHE, a 12-yearold Chihuahua mix, is looking for a loving home. This sweet senior was found as a stray. She is very shy and a little slow to share her affection, but once she is given some time to approach on her own terms, Blanche is a loving, easy-going companion who is great with other dogs. She would love to find a mellow family with plenty of love to share! Blanche is available for adoption at the San Diego Humane Society’s Escondido Campus at 3450 E Valley Parkway. To learn more about making her part of your family, please call (760) 888-2275.

GOOD DOG

CONCRETE MASONRY

Rattlesnake Avoidance Clinic SEPTEMBER 19th Private Lessons & Clinics Pr

PATIOS • PATHS • STEPS ALL WALLS & FLAT WORK DRIVEWAYS • CONCRETE

Training School

* Behavior Problems * Dogs & Puppies Lynne Moore, Owner/Trainer 858 735-8318 • GoodDogTrainingSchool.com

BRICK • BLOCK • STONE • TILE DRAINAGE • WATER PROOFING

www.carsonmasonrysandiego.com

858.405.7484 (cell)

William Carson - Contractor’s Lic #638122

AIRLINE CAREERS START HERE

3*< <'#>%*0 #; 4)) .*'8=*0 ):>#8,% $*.!%>.>#%2 4>%#%.>#" #>0 -,' (9#">=*0 ;<90*%<;2 6,/ +"#.*&*%< #;;>;<#%.*2 1#"" ):>#8,% 5%;8<9<* ,- 7#>%<*%#%.*

877-205-4138

Complete Tree Care

FREE ESTIMATES

CROWN POINT CLIPPERS TREE SERVICE, INC.

WHEN EXCELLENCE COUNTS

• Artistic Tree Lacing • Fine Pruning & Thinning • Tree & Stump Removal

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED • SINCE 1979 858.270.1742 • CROWNPOINTCLIPPERS.COM Member Tree Care Industry Assoc. California • Association of Tree Trimmers

CONCRETE MASONRY SERVICES Quality Work

Driveways • Retaining Walls • Patios • Paving Concrete Blocks • Stamp Concrete • Residential Only when you ad 20% OFF mention

FREE ESTIMATES

Call Us First!

760-580-6060

Pancho’s CLEAN-UP & HAULiNg • Demolition • Yard/ Garage • Concrete • Tree Trimming • Dirt /Junk Removal

Free Estimates • 760-801-2009

20% OFF for Seniors


CLASSIFIEDS

PAGE B20 - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

LA JOLLA, 3BR/2BA Must see, pristine home w/att’d gar. Blocks to beach/village/market. $4,975/mo. 714-801-1972

60 - HOME SERVICES GARDENING / LANDSCAPING

COMPleTe Yard Care La Jolla - 25 yrs experience Bill (858) 279-9114 CG

70 - PETS & ANIMALS dOgS

POMeranian PuPPieS 9 wks, darling, pls call 858-349-3369

80 - JOBS & EDUCATION dOMeSTiC eMPlOYMenT

Caregiving individual To do errands and marketing. 858-875-1298 ext. 375AL

100 - LEGAL NOTICES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-9018823 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. Plug In To Admin Located at: 1526 Reed Avenue, San Diego, CA 92109, San Diego County. Registered Owners Name(s): a. Arianna Mathiopoulos, 1526 Reed Avenue, San Diego, California 92109. b.Andrea Mathiopoulos, 1526 Reed Avenue, San Diego, California 92109. This business is conducted by: a General Partnership. The first day of business was 6/1/2017. This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 07/25/2017. Arianna Mathiopoulos. LJ5135853 8/24, 8/31, 9/7, 9/14/2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-9019658 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. Coast 2 Coast Moving Located at: 4305 Noyes Street, San Diego, CA 92109, San Diego County. Mailing Address: 4305 Noyes Street, San Diego, CA 92109 Registered Owners Name(s): a. Jessica Beth O’Neill, 4305 Noyes Street, San Diego, CA 92109, California. This business is conducted by: an Individual. 05/01/2017. This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 08/02/2017. Jessica B. O’Neill. LJ5126285 8/31, 9/7, 9/14, 9/21/2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-9021681 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. GW Eye Associates Inc An Optometric Corporation Located at: 7841 Fay Avenue, La Jolla, CA 92037, San Diego County. Registered Owners Name(s): a. GW Eye Associates, Inc., 7841 Fay Avenue, La Jolla, CA 92037, California. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. The first day of business was 08/28/17. This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 08/28/2017. Wildon Wong, VicePresident. LJ5164910 9/7, 9/14, 9/21, 9/28/17 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-9020875 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. The Water Source b. The Water Well Located at: 3268 Governor Dr #268, San Diego, CA 92120, San Diego County. Registered Owners Name(s): a. Charles Tilman Kohlenberg, 2942

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-9021990 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. Cacao Port Located at: 428 Santa Cecelia, Solana Beach, CA 92075, San Diego County. Registered Owners Name(s): a. Adum Inc, 6483 Dowling Dr, La Jolla, CA 92037, California. b.Matthew Boese, 428 Santa Cecelia, Solana Beach, CA 92075. This business is conducted by: a General Partnership. The first day of business has not yet started . This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 08/31/2017. Manuel Adum, President. 9/14, 9/21, 9/28, 10/5/2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-9019954 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. Hana Cafe La Jolla Located at: 456 Pearl St, La Jolla, CA 92037, San Diego County. Mailing Address: 456 Pearl St. La Jolla, CA 92037 Registered Owners Name(s): a. Maria A Munoz, 4303 Beta St San Diego, CA 92113. This business is conducted by: an Individual. The first day of business has not yet started . This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 08/07/2017. Maria A Munoz. LJ5155626 8/31, 9/7, 9/14, 9/21/17 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-9021392 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. Omni2Courier Located at: 1202 Morena Blvd, Suite 100, San Diego, CA 92110, San Diego County. Registered Owners Name(s): a. Omni2Max, Inc, 1202 Morena Blvd, Suite 100, San Diego, CA 92110, CA. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. The first day of business was 08/24/2017. This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 08/24/2017. John D. Nell, Executive Vice President. LJ5155629 8/31, 9/7, 9/14 & 9/21/2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-9021959 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. BBI Career Coaching and Recruitment Located at: 6481 Corte La Luz, Carlsbad, CA 92009, San Diego County. Registered Owners Name(s): a. Eartha Pharnzie Genece , 6481 Corte La Luz, Carlsbad, CA 92009. This business is conducted by: an Individual. The first day of business was 08/30/2017. This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 08/31/2017. Eartha Pharnzie Genece. LJ5171430 9/7, 9/14, 9/21, 9/28/2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-9020350 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. Me Thai Massage Located at: 7742 Herschel Ave. # M, La Jolla, CA 92037, San Diego County. Registered Owners Name(s): a. Panwaporn Kijja, 5401 Baltimore Dr. #50 La Mesa, CA 91942. This business is conducted by: an Individual. The first day of business was 8/1/17. This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 08/11/2017. Panwaporn Kijja. LJ5135218 8/24, 8/31, 9/7, 9/14/17 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-9018887 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. Beau and Hunter Located at: 6455 La Jolla Blvd. Apt 334, La Jolla, CA 92037, San Diego County. Registered Owners Name(s): a. Tanya Kay Hunt, 6455 La Jolla Blvd. Apt 334, La Jolla, CA 92037. This business is conducted by: an Individual. The first day of business has not yet started . This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 07/25/2017. Tanya Kay Hunt. LJ5142020 8/24, 8/31, 9/7 & 9/14/2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-9022510 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. Radical Sales Coaching Located at: 888 Prospect Street Suite 200, La Jolla, CA 92037 , San Diego County. Registered Owners Name(s): a. Lucas Armando Barra, 1472 1/2 Pacific Beach Drive, San Diego, CA 92109. This business is conducted by: an Individual. The first day of business was 08/08/2016. This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 09/08/2017. Lucas Barra. LJ5183579 9/14, 9/21, 9/28, 10/5/2017 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO 330 W Broadway San Diego, CA 92101 PETITIONER(S): Natalie Herrera on behalf of a minor Alanis D. Rincon Herrera for a change of name ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR A CHANGE OF NAME CASE NUMBER: 37-2017-00029754-CU-PT-CTL TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS PETITION OF: Natalie Herrera on behalf of Alanis Desiree Rincon Herrera filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as

ANSWERS 9/7/2017

10 - FOR RENT RENTALS

erg, 2942 Arnoldson Ave, San Diego, CA 92122. This business is conducted by: an Individual. The first day of business has not yet started . This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 08/17/2017. Charles Tilman Kohlenberg. LJ5168104 9/7, 9/14, 9/21, 9/28/2017

Stuff Sell Your Stuff

2500

$

For 4 Weeks

Individuals only and items under $500

Reach us at

(800) 914-6434 or (858) 218-72"! placeanad.utcommunitypress.com

court for a decree changing names as follows: a. Present Name : Alanis Desiree Rincon Herrera to Proposed Name: Alani Desiree Rincon Herrera. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date:

NOTICE OF HEARING Date: September 29, 2017 Time: 9:30am Dept: 46 The address of the court is: 220 West Broadway San Diego, CA 92101 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: La Jolla Light Date: August 14, 2017 Jeffrey B. Barton Judge of the Superior Court 8/24, 8/31, 9/7, 9/14/2017

DID YOU KNOW...? The word millionaire was first used by Benjamin Disraeli in his 1826 novel Vivian Grey.

crossword

www.lajollalight.com

THIS JUST IN! Corridor Project Phase II delayed

The second phase of the Torrey Pines Road Corridor Project has been delayed a few months and will begin in early 2018. The plan was originally to start work on the roadway improvements in the coming weeks. Engineers still plan to have the enhancements complete by Memorial Day 2018. The Corridor Project will address both sides of Torrey Pines Road between Prospect Place and La Jolla Shores Drive, and create continuity of the sidewalk and buffered bike lanes, install a pedestrian-activated crosswalk known as a HAWK signal, lay a flat median in the middle of the road and post a stabilizing wall.

UCSD launches transportation design challenge

The UC San Diego Design Lab started a city-wide civic design challenge called “Design for San Diego,” or D4SD for short. The challenge seeks to harness the power of crowdsourcing and human-centered design to address concerns with transportation and mobility in San Diego. Steven Dow, assistant professor of cognitive science at UCSD, who is directing D4SD as part of the Qualcomm Institute-based Design Lab, said the challenge is focused on four related areas: 1) Enhancing the commuter experience; 2) Promoting walkable and bike-able communities; 3) Improving accessibility; and 4) Preparing for a future with autonomous vehicles. On Sept. 21, the D4SD kick-off event will be held downtown featuring San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer, UCSD Chancellor Pradeep Khosla and Design Lab Director Don Norman. The challenge begins the next day, Sept. 22, with a design sprint and hackathon, also at Downtown Works, for participants to generate ideas, form teams and rapidly prototype a concept. Teams that enter the challenge will showcase their solutions Oct. 25-26 at the Design Forward 2017 Summit in Liberty Station. The best solutions will earn prizes and private, one-on-one meetings with start-up investors. To learn more and/or register, visit d4sd.org


SOCIAL LIFE

www.lajollalight.com

LA JOLLA LIGHT - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - PAGE B21

FROM THEATRE, B19

Joan Jacobs, Iris Strauss, Karen Cohn, Nancy Browar, Nina Doede, Joyce Gattas

Dixie Welsh, Liz Helming, Arianna Kilty, Angela Kilty, Jill Kilty-Newburn, Cindi Steiger

Patsy Millard, Carol Rumsey, Marilyn Tracey, Ann Brizolis

Jeanette Stevens, Julie Sarno, Pam Fuson

Charlotte Jacobs, June Ash, Lynn Congemi

Linda Van Vark, Nadine Masters, Jo Ann Kilty, Carol Hanson, Neiman Marcus staffers Ida Sandico-Whitaker

Meredith Radzins, Marilyn Barrett, Peggy Fisher, Merle Lotherington, Diana Hill, Lisa Marks

Runway model in the show


PAGE B22 - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

LA JOLLA HOMES & REAL ESTATE

www.lajollalight.com

- Sponsored Content -

real estate profiles Open House Preview Party Saturday Sept. 23rd 5-8pm

Historic Gem Dazzles with Ocean Views and Timeless Charm

HOME OF HOME OFTHE THEWEEK WEEK

Open Sunday 1-4 7032 Draper Ave

1941 Charming Beach Cottage in the coveted Beach-Barber Tract • 2 Bedrooms/1 Bath • 951 Square Feet • 3,975 Square Foot Lot • Detached 1 car garage • New Exterior Paint • Amazing Original Hardwood Floors • Private backyard with built-in spa • Perfect vacation home! • Fantastic re-model potential!

Price - $1,399,000

Christie Duguid Realtor

®

C 858-722-8844 | 858-459-5478 christie.duguid@harcourtsusa.com CalBRE #01901149

Nestled along La Jolla’s gorgeous coastline, 7025 Vista Del Mar is an extraordinary historic property that offers enduring elegance with modern flair. The single-story home boasts 3,210 square-feet—including four bedrooms and three full bathrooms—all sprawled on a 1/3-acre lot just a block away from the famed Windansea Beach, one of the region’s best surf spots. Its sheer size, layout and location make the property a rare find; but its rich history and character make it even more remarkable. Designed by renowned architect Harold Abrams, this 1936 masterpiece beautifully showcases Colonial Revival, a style that was popular from the late 19th century to the mid 20th century. Discerning eyes will note its defining details, such as the low pitched gabled roof and accented 8-panel wooden entry door. “The house still has all of its original glass door knobs, custom wood work and one of the most beautiful wood ceilings I've seen,” said realtor Kurt IuliKinsey. “There are very few Colonial Revival homes and this is one of the very best preserved examples in La Jolla.” In fact, this home is Harold Abrams signature residential project. Long known for his commercial projects, this piece transitioned into the residential arena. When guests enter the home, they are greeted with a formal foyer that overlooks the quaint back yard. The interior is an entertainer’s delight, thanks to a kitchen that has been opened onto a family room addition. Also, the dining room and living room both offer lovely ocean views that are sure to make gatherings all the more enjoyable. “The home’s positioning on the lot make it especially conducive to capturing the ocean breezes, which is one of the best benefits of living at the beach,” Iuli-Kinsey said. Adding to the property’s appeal, it is located within the distinguished Barber Tract, a stretch of La Jolla’s premiere beach properties that date back to the early 1900s. “This home truly represents La Jolla at its best,” Iuli-Kinsey said. “I’m so excited to share this home with the public and look forward to seeing the life and care its new owner will give it.” An open house preview party is slated for Saturday, Sept. 23, from 5 to 8 p.m. The celebration will feature refreshments and live swing music courtesy of Sue Palmer, known as the ‘Queen of Boogie-Woogie.’ You can schedule a private showing of this home by contacting realtor Kurt Iuli-Kinsey at lajollasmanabouttown@gmail.com or (858) 848-5878. For the inside scoop on La Jolla, visit YouTube.com and enter “La Jolla’s Man About Town” in the search bar: www.youtube.com Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. 930 Prospect St La Jolla, CA. 92037

Kurt Iuli Kinsey

858-848-KURT (5878)

Cal BRE 00959646

kurt@lajollasmanabouttown.com


www.lajollalight.com

LA JOLLA LIGHT - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - PAGE B23

OPEN HOUSES More open house listings at lajollalight.com/homes

909 Coast Boulevard # 6

Beautiful 2BR/2BA ocean view location all on one level with elevator access! Complex is directly across from Children’s Pool Beach! Walk to world class shopping, fine dining & theaters! Spacious SW corner location w/cool ocean breezes & bright open floor plan. Living room w/floor-to-ceiling windows, stunning sunset views, 2 gated parking spaces, pool, laundry in unit. $1,095,000

858-859-2037 Chad A. Perkins

CalBRE # 01941279 | CalBRE # 00909738

| Cameron Volker

E S SIV CE LU DEN TION C EX SI LE 16 Y RE OMP R XU G C LU RIN A NE

4 Acres with Ocean Views

2550 VIA BARLETTA | 4 BD | 4.5 BA | 4,252 SQ FT ON 4 ACRES | $6,000,000 E US " HO 1 - 4 ! N N E O P & SU T SA

Co-listed with David Bergsma

THE BRETT DICKINSON TEAM

858.822.9699 • brett.dickinson@sothebysrealty.com • CalBRE# 01767484

La Jolla Office : 858-926-3060 1111 Prospect Street | La Jolla, California | 92037

PacificSothebysRealty.com ©MMVII Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC. All Rights Reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a registered trademark licensed to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. CA DRE#01767484

$699,000-$719,000 2BD / 2BA

435 ROSEMONT ST, LA JOLLA TODD RANDAL BLOOM, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES

SUN 1 P.M.-4 P.M. 858-551-3385

$855,000 3BD / 2BA

4155 EXECUTIVE DRIVE, #E-412, LA JOLLA NATASHA ALEXANDER, ENGEL & VÖLKERS

SAT 12 P.M.-4 P.M. 858-336-9051

$900,000-$945,000 3BD / 2BA

2245 CAMINITO LORETA, LA JOLLA KAREN HICKMAN, PACIFIC SOTHEBY'S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

SUN 1 P.M.-4 P.M. 858-459-4300

$1,099,000 3BD / 2.5BA

8142 GILMAN COURT, LA JOLLA KAREN HICKMAN, PACIFIC SOTHEBY'S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

SUN 1 P.M.-4 P.M. 858-459-4300

$1,100,000 3BD / 2.5BA

2225 CAMINITO LORETA, LA JOLLA KAREN HICKMAN, PACIFIC SOTHEBY'S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

SUN 1 P.M.-4 P.M. 858-459-4300

$1,375,000 3BD / 2BA

638 ARENAS STREET, LA JOLLA CLAIRE MELBO, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES

SAT 1 P.M.-4 P.M. 858-551-3349

$1,385,000-$1,480,000 4BD / 4BA

785 BELLEVUE PLACE, LA JOLLA SERAFINI BUETTNER GROUP, COLDWELL BANKER RESIDENTIAL

$1,399,000 2BD / 1BA

7032 DRAPER AVELA JOLLA CHRISTIE DUGUID, HARCOURTS

$1,460,000 4BD / 2.5BA

2755 RIDGEGATE ROWLA JOLLA IRENE MCCANN, COLDWELL BANKER RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE

$1,595,000 3BD / 3.5BA

7571 HERSCHEL AVE, LA JOLLA LYNDA GUALTIER, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES

SUN 1 P.M.-4 P.M. 619-988-7799

$1,695,000 3BD / 3.5BA

7573 HERSCHEL AVENUE, LA JOLLA LYNDA GUALTIER, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES

SUN 1 P.M.-4 P.M. 619-988-7799

$1,740,000 3BD / 2.5BA

302 BONAIR STREET, LA JOLLA SUSANA CORRIGAN & PATTY COHEN , BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES

$1,775,000 2BD / 2BA

1827 AMALFI STREET, LA JOLLA TEAM CHODOROW, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES

SUN 1 P.M.-4 P.M. 858-456-6850

$1,979,000 5BD / 3BA

5528 VIA CALLADO, LA JOLLA LINDA DANIELS, WILLIS ALLEN R.E.

SUN 1 P.M.-4 P.M. 858-361-5561

$1,989,000 3BD / 2.5BA

302 PROSPECT ST, UNIT #6, LA JOLLA JERI HEIN, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES

SAT 12 P.M.-4 P.M. 858-775-5374

$1,998,888-$2,098,888 4BD / 2.5BA

7420 VIA CAPRI, LA JOLLA TIM HINES, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES

SUN 1 P.M.-4 P.M. 619-316-2604

$1,999,000 4BD / 2BA

6571 AVENIDA WILFREDO, LA JOLLA ANDREW JABRO, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES

SAT & SUN 1 P.M.-4 P.M. 858-525-5498

$2,000,100 5BD / 3.5BA

6411 AVENIDA MANANA, LA JOLLA BRANDON WHITE, PACIFIC SOTHEBY'S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

SAT & SUN 1 P.M.-4 P.M. 619-905-3313

$2,195,000 4BD / 4BA

1161 VIA ANGELINA, LA JOLLA DAVID SCHROEDL, PACIFIC SOTHEBYS INTERNATIONAL REALTY

SAT & SUN 1 P.M.-4 P.M. 858-353-5300

$2,198,000 4BD / 3BA

6445 AVENIDA WILFREDO, LA JOLLA ANTHONY HALSTEAD, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES

SUN 1 P.M.-4 P.M. 619-813-8626

$2,390,000 6BD / 4BA

8473 PRESTWICK DRIVE, LA JOLLA MAXINE & MARTI GELLENS, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES

SAT & SUN 1 P.M.-4 P.M. 858-551-6630

$2,696,000 5BD / 4.5BA

5453 CARDENO DRIVE, LA JOLLA KATHLEEN BALCH, KELLER WILLIAMS

SAT & SUN 1 P.M.-4 P.M. 858-692-2800

$2,795,000 4BD / 3BA

5503 CHELSEA AVE, LA JOLLA BRANT WESTFALL, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES

$2,817,000 3BD / 3.5BA

6887 AVENIDA ANDORRA, LA JOLLA IRENE CHANDLER & JIM SHULTZ, COLDWELL BANKER RESIDENTIAL

SUN 1 P.M.-4 P.M. 858-354-0000

$2,995,000-$3,295,000 5BD / 4BA

5617 WAVERLY AVE, LA JOLLA SUZANNE M. GIANNELLA, PACIFIC SOTHEBY'S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

SAT 1 P.M.-4 P.M. 858-248-6398

$2,995,000 4BD / 2.5BA

2271 VIA ANITA, LA JOLLA SHAWN RODGER, WILLIS ALLEN REAL ESTATE

SUN 1 P.M.-4 P.M. 858-459-4033

$2,995,000-$3,295,000 5BD / 4BA

5617 WAVERLY AVE, LA JOLLA SUZANNE M. GIANNELLA, PACIFIC SOTHEBY'S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

SUN 1 P.M.-4 P.M. 858-248-6398

$3,200,000 4BD / 6BA

5859 BOX CANYON ROAD, LA JOLLA MAXINE & MARTI GELLENS, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES

$3,250,000 5BD / 4BA

7715 WHITEFIELD PLACE, LA JOLLA PAM REED, WILLIS ALLEN R.E.

$3,995,000 5BD / 5.5BA

5831 FOLSOM DRIVE, LA JOLLA SUZANNE M. GIANNELLA, PACIFIC SOTHEBY'S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

$4,500,000-$4,950,000 7BD / 6.5BA

7773 STARLIGHT, LA JOLLA THE BRETT DICKINSON TEAM, PACIFIC SOTHEBY'S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

$4,650,000 5BD / 6.5BA

1740 COLGATE CIRCLE, LA JOLLA MAXINE & MARTI GELLENS, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES

$5,500,000 4BD / 6BA

6331 CAMINO DE LA COSTA, LA JOLLA ARLENE SACKS, WILLIS ALLEN RE

SAT & SUN 1 P.M.-4 P.M. 858-922-3900

$5,500,000-$5,950,000 6BD / 5.5BA

5915 CAMINO DE LA COSTA, LA JOLLA THE BRETT DICKINSON TEAM, PACIFIC SOTHEBY'S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

SAT & SUN 1 P.M.-4 P.M. 858-822-9699

$6,000,000 4BD / 4.5BA

2550 VIA BARLETTA, LA JOLLA THE BRETT DICKINSON TEAM, PACIFIC SOTHEBY'S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

SAT & SUN 1 P.M.-4 P.M. 858-822-9699

$7,950,000-$8,950,000 4BD / 4BA

5366 CALUMET AVE, LA JOLLA THURS 2:30 P.M.-5:30 P.M., FRI 3 P.M.-6 P.M., SAT 10 A.M.-4 P.M.,SUN 12 P.M.-4 P.M. PETER MIDDLETON, COLDWELL BANKER RESIDENTIAL 858-764-4808

$19,988,000 7BD / 10BA

7400 VISTA DEL MAR, LA JOLLA AMBER ANDERSON, PACIFIC SOTHEBY'S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

SAT & SUN 1 P.M.-3 P.M. 858-829-6210 SUN 1 P.M.-4 P.M. 858-722-8844 SUN 1:30 P.M.-4 P.M. 858-232-7373

SAT & SUN 1 P.M.-4 P.M. 858-229-8120

SUN 12 P.M.-3 P.M. 858-922-8610

SAT & SUN 1 P.M.-4 P.M. 858-551-6630 SAT 12 P.M.-3 P.M. 858-395-4033 FRI & SAT 1 P.M.-4P.M., SUN 2 P.M.-5 P.M. 858-248-6398 SUN 1 P.M.-4 P.M. 858-822-9699 FRI, SAT & SUN 1 P.M.-4 P.M. 858-551-6630

WED 9:30 A.M.-1 P.M. 619-840-3400

For the most up-to-date list of open houses, mapped locations, and *premium listings with photos, visit lajollalight.com/open-houses-list/

Contact Sarah Minihane • sarahm@lajollalight.com • 858.875.5945


www.lajollalight.com

PAGE B24 - SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

Peggy Chodorow

Eric Chodorow

OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-4 1827 Amalfi St T ED S J U UC D E R

North Pacific Beach Home with Pool

Charming single-story 4BD/2BA home ideally located in North Pacific Beach on a quiet cul-de-sac. This home boasts two large master bedrooms both with full baths and one with fireplace. You’ll love the backyard patio, pool, spa and waterfall feature all contributing to a wonderful entertaining environment. $1,295,000

Modern Bird Rock Masterpiece

Enjoy striking panoramic ocean views from almost every room of this modern four bedroom four bathroom home located two blocks from the ocean in Bird Rock. Designer features include top-of-the-line appliances, European oak flooring, quartzite countertops and cherry kitchen cabinetry. $3,395,000

EN1-4I ST P O N A LF S8U27 AM

Classic La Jolla Home

1

Old La Jolla charm can be found in every room of this 2BR/2BA fantastic 1924 classic offering sweeping ocean views from the Cove to the North Shore. This updated home features Spanish tile flooring, hardwood flooring, and built-in bookshelves. Live in this charming home only blocks from the beach or expand it to build your dream home in this fabulous location. $1,775,000

EWING N T S Old LI

Spectacular Muirlands Home

We proudly present this expansive 4BD/4BA single level home on more than a half-acre lot in the highly-coveted Old Muirlands neighborhood. The floor plan is eclectic with several versatile living areas, studios and family rooms, perfect for your family’s many activities. The outdoor spaces are an entertainer’s dream with a sparkling pool, waterfall, relaxing spa, fire pit and bar. $3,750,000

7780 Girard Avenue, La Jolla, CA BRE #00992609 | BRE #00409245 ©2017 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties (BHHSCP) is a member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates LLC. BHH Affiliates LLC and BHHSCP do not guarantee accuracy of all data including measurements, conditions, and features of property. Information is obtained from various sources and will not be verified by broker or MLS. Buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information. CalBRE 01317331

Profile for MainStreet Media

La Jolla Light 09 14 17  

Weekly Community Newspaper

La Jolla Light 09 14 17  

Weekly Community Newspaper

Advertisement