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LOS ANGELES

DOWNTOWN

NEWS Volume 41, Number 47

November 19, 2012

Get On The Ice 11

2

A big land deal, a plaza revealed, and other happenings Around Town.

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Phil Jackson is gone and, believe it or not, Mike D’Antoni is better for the Lakers.

W W W. D O W N T O W N N E W S . C O M

The Strangest, Most Exciting Meals in Downtown From Brains to Hooves, From Upscale Establishments to Holes in the Wall, Everything Is on the Menu in the Central City

photo by Gary Leonard

At the new Fashion District restaurant, The Parish, inventive chef Casey Lane makes a pot pie out of a pig’s head. He uses the snout, cheeks and ears. by Richard Guzmán city editor

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veryone knows that Downtown Los Angeles has a hot dining scene. The neighborhood is filled with talented chefs and an adventurous clientele willing to try just about anything. These days, there is more and more opportunity for adven-

ture, as kitchen masters are putting meals built around some very unexpected animal parts — as well as some unexpected animals — on plates. Food experts are not surprised that just about any part of the animal from just about any place in the world can be eaten in the Central City. “It gets boring eating rib-eye and baked potato,” said

Merrill Shindler, who hosts a weekly radio show on dining and restaurants on KABC 790 AM and who is a contributing editor to the Zagat Los Angeles restaurant guide. He said the parts of the animals, or even entire animals that were discarded at one point in history have now found their way to the menus of talented chefs. “These parts are very flavorful, so in a lot of ways it just see Food, page 8

Babies, Crime and the City Attorney’s Race Scenes and Highlights From the First Trutanich-Feuer Debate by Jon Regardie executive editor

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n Wednesday, Nov. 14, I decided to watch two competitors at the top of their field throw down in a highly anticipated clash. I was looking forward to witnessing precision, emotion, unparalleled grace and, if things got heated, a kidney punch or two. the regardie report

Unfortunately, I couldn’t get tickets to the Clippers-Miami Heat game at Staples Center that night. So instead, I went to the first City Attorney debate. I figured that even if the precision, emotion and grace were not on display, that the encoun-

ter between incumbent Carmen Trutanich and Assemblyman Mike Feuer had a good chance of providing the kidney blows. Thus, I grabbed my passport and climbed into the car for my annual trip to the San Fernando Valley. In that far-off land I sat with the Valley Americans as they watched Trutanich and Feuer engage in, I guess you could call it dialogue. Over one generally exciting, sometimes amusing and occasionally thought-provoking hour I was treated to feisty rhetoric, rampant accusations and even a couple of facts that might help voters make up their minds when they head to the polls next March. Only one thing was missing, though it was a doozy — the third viable candidate for the office. For whatever reason, attorney Greg Smith, who has more than $700,000 to spend on

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JOURNALISM

the election (including $600,000 in personal funds), was shut out of the process. Twelve days before the debate, Smith’s campaign sent out a statement charging that event organizer the Sherman Oaks Homeowners Association would not let him play in their reindeer games (I’m paraphrasing) and demanding to be included. I’m sure the organizers have their reasoning, but if one of the top dogs wants to be on the stage but is frozen out, then things are hinky. That said, the evening was unquestionably entertaining. Here are some of the highlights and winning points. Early Bird Gets the Handshake: The debate at Notre Dame see Debate, page 10

downtownnews.com/ supportlocaljournalism


2 Downtown News

AROUNDTOWN eveloper Sonny Astani has partnered with parking lot giant L&R Group to buy a three-acre South Park parcel for $29 million. Astani, who developed and then lost the Concerto tower (which opened recently as the Apex), hopes to build a $250 million apartment complex on the site at 12th Street and Grand Avenue. The seller was the State Bar of California, which in a parallel move has acquired an office building and parking lot at 845 S. Figueroa St. from L&R for $50 million, according to Astani. L&R is in the midst of a $5 million renovation of the five-story edifice, which will become the State Bar’s new home (a Smart & Final Extra will be on the ground floor). Astani and L&R plan to erect a 640unit apartment complex on the site bounded by 12th and Olive streets, Pico Boulevard and Grand Avenue. The partnership is planning a two-phase development, with the initial segment consisting of a 300-unit structure. The complex will eventually have 42,000 square feet of retail space. The property currently operates as a surface parking lot. “This deal is the last unspoken acreage in the South Park area of Downtown which is shaping up nicely as a live/work neighborhood that is close enough to USC,” Astani said in a statement.

Pete’s Café Celebrates 10 Years

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decade ago, Pete’s Café and Bar was the first eatery aimed at Downtown’s burgeoning residential population. Now the Fourth and Main streets establishment is a veteran, and it is celebrating its 10th anniver-

sary. The Old Bank District restaurant hosted a neighborhood party last week and this week there is an invitation-only event. Pete’s opened Nov. 18, 2002, on the ground floor of the San Fernando Building at 400 S. Main St. It was intended to serve residents of the adaptive reuse project pioneered by developer Tom Gilmore. Area inhabitants had complained of not having enough dining options, so Gilmore encouraged first-time restaurateur Peter McLaughlin to open the business. A 2003 Los Angeles Downtown News article described the then new establishment as “a handsome space, in a decidedly unglamorous pocket of Downtown where there isn’t much competition.” Today Pete’s is next door to celebrated Bäco Mercat, which is next door to French bistro Kitchen Table. Down the street is the popular Vietnamese spot Blossom. They are part of a dining boom that has brought dozens of new restaurants and celebrity chefs to Downtown since Pete’s opened in 2002.

Jeff Bridges, Father Boyle Highlight Aloud Season

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et ready for big names and free Downtown events. Aloud, the Library Foundation of Los Angeles’ acclaimed speaker series housed at the Central Library, announced its winter season last week. It kicks off Dec. 10 with Homeboy Industries’ founder Father Gregory Boyle chatting with author and activist Anne Lamott. In a special Aloud event at the Aratani/Japan America Theatre on Jan. 10, zen master Bernie Glassman will chat with the dude, Jeff Bridges. Other highlights include journalist Amy Wilentz discussing the aftershocks of the 2010 Haiti earthquake on Jan. 15; Pulitzer

Barbara Kruger @ The Broad

November 10, 2012

Prize winner Katherine Boo on life, death and hope in Mumbai on Feb. 25; and on Feb. 21, a multi-generational look at feminism and women’s rights on the 50th anniversary of Betty Friedan’s groundbreaking book The Feminine Mystique. Tickets for most of the events are free, but they often fill up. Make reservations at lfla.org/aloud.

Frances Hashimoto Plaza Unveiled

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ity leaders and family members of a late Little Tokyo leader gathered at the intersection of Azusa and Second streets on Thursday, Nov. 15, to unveil Frances K. Hashimoto Plaza. Hashimoto passed away Nov. 4 at the age of 69 after a long battle with cancer. She was president and CEO of Mikawaya, a Little Tokyo-based bakery and

2nd Street and Grand Avenue

ice cream empire owned by her family since 1910. She was also a founding member of various Little Tokyo civic organizations. “Frances Hashimoto was a true force of nature,” said Ninth District City Councilwoman Jan Perry in a statement. “Frances was a positive and integral part of this community and her legacy should and will be remembered for generations to come.” Hashimoto’s husband Joel Friedman attended the ceremony, as did Ryan Friedman, one of her two sons. On the plaque under her name are the words: “A Life of Leadership, Tradition, Philanthropy, and Service to Little Tokyo.” Born in the Poston War Relocation Center in Arizona in 1943, Hashimoto helped launch organizations such as the Little Tokyo Community Council and the Little Tokyo Business Improvement District. From 1994 to 2008 she was the president of the Little Tokyo Business Association and served as the organization’s chair until her passing.

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4 Downtown News

November 19, 2012

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EDITORIALS Noise and The Right Response

Urban Scrawl by Doug Davis

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omething went wrong at a major electronic dance music event in Downtown on Nov. 3. Not terribly wrong, as in people being hurt or killed or vast expanses of property destroyed. Not, as complaints about raves sometimes involve, with numerous individuals overdosing and clogging area emergency rooms. Instead, the thing that went wrong was the noise. The show, called Hard Haunted Mansion Presents: Day of the Dead, was excessively loud and sparked complaints across the Central City. Although the concert that drew 35,000 people took place in Los Angeles State Historic Park on the edge of Chinatown, police fielded calls from neighborhoods including the Historic Core, the Arts District, Solano Canyon and Boyle Heights. It was a bothersome situation, as well as one that seemingly should not have happened. But after things went wrong, they also, oddly in this day and age, went right. What happened? Well, Live Nation, the concert behemoth and parent company of Hard Events, came out and admitted the mistake. Then Live Nation apologized, and promised that it would not happen again. Maybe an apology should not seem so radical, but in 2012, publicly saying “I’m sorry” and pledging to do better next time is increasingly rare. Maybe it’s a legal thing — in an increasingly litigious society, apologizing can be spun as guilt and can open the door to lawsuits. Los Angeles Downtown News reported on the noise complaints last week. The article noted that Hard concerts have long taken place at the park with few problems. This was the first event with noise issues. It was also the first show since Live Nation purchased Hard Events. Although the exact problem had not yet been identified, park officials speculated that it stemmed from changing the orientation of the speakers, and/or adjusting the audio levels. In a statement to Downtown News, the promoters said, “For those residents that were affected by any unusually high audio levels coming from one of the stages at the event this past Saturday evening, Hard Events and Live Nation would like to apologize for any discomfort or inconvenience that may have been caused. We are taking the information being provided to us very seriously and are addressing the issue so that hopefully this unusual occurrence won’t happen again.” The statement is simple. It says we messed up and will do better. It’s refreshing and is exactly what should happen when this type of situation arises. Of course, what really matters is what happens next. It seems that the relationship between the promoters and the park will continue, and it should (the rental fees from the concerts will help pay for the park’s upcoming renovation). So should the pre-event meetings between organizers and community leaders. Live Nation and Hard deserve another chance to get things right. Park officials are watching closely, and have said that the issue has to be resolved or shows will stop. We hope this gets fixed. We hope that, in the future when problems arise, others will learn from this example and will fix things and move forward.

Speedy Council Tax Proposal Weakens Public Trust

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ast week, the Los Angeles City Council moved to combat a structural deficit that has the city starting each fiscal year about $200 million in the red. If all works out as planned, the proposal would help shore up the embattled budget. That’s a good thing, a sign of local leaders exhibiting fiscal responsibility and taking steps to prevent layoffs and service cuts, right? Well, not so fast. After all, this is the City Council we’re talking about, and things are rarely as they at first seem. We think the council needs to put on the brakes here. Rather than offer proclamations and power forward, a better and wiser move would be to slow down, open the topic to public discussion, and ensure that everyone knows what is happening and why. The council voted 10-4 on Tuesday, Nov. 13, to put a half-cent sales tax increase on the March 5 ballot (a second vote is required this week since the vote was not unanimous). If approved by the public — and at this point that’s a mighty big if — it would raise the sales tax within city limits to a whopping 9.5% (including the statewide quarter-cent increase following the recent passage of Proposition 30). It is estimated that this would bring about $200 million a year into city coffers. Again, it all sounds good at first blush. However, when considered in the context of how and when this happened, as well as who it would impact and who is already opposing it, we see red flags. The problems start with the speed of the approval process, and that flows from the measure’s author, Council President Herb Wesson. While it might seem that a permanent tax increase would only materialize after lengthy public discussions, during which everyone from economists to business leaders to regular citizens have the chance to weigh in and offer pros and cons, that wasn’t the case. Instead, Wesson first brought up the proposal on Oct. 30. Just two weeks later, with only limited debate, the go-ahead was given to put the matter before voters. It is disconcerting to see the public largely frozen out of the process. Sure, a sales tax hike will raise a lot of money, but it will also impact a lot of people, and the poor will be harder hit with this than they would, say, a tax on real estate transactions. (Not that those are a good idea either, since real estate usually leads us out of recessions.) Curiously — and could it be coincidentally?

— the council recently decided to kill just such a proposed tax on real estate transactions. Also curiously, the real estate community lobbied heavily against it. We’re not saying that’s wrong. What’s wrong is rushing the process, letting real estate be the only voice. The city push contrasts with the recently approved state tax hikes. Gov. Jerry Brown’s Proposition 30, which raised the state sales tax a quarter cent for four years and increased income taxes on people earning $250,000 or more for seven years, was the result of careful deliberation and consideration. Brown spent months shaping and pitching the proposal. The work paid off when California voters said yes on Nov. 6. The pace has been much quicker for Wesson’s tax. It has also sparked opposition from some city leaders, including council members Jan Perry and Eric Garcetti, who voted against placing a measure on the March ballot (as did Dennis Zine and Mitch Englander). Perry and Garcetti’s opposition is not surprising — although they have often sided with the majority of the council, both are running for mayor (as is Controller Wendy Greuel and attorney Kevin James). Voting for a tax hike is a great way to lose an election. We are not, by the way, saying that the idea of a half cent sales tax completely lacks merit and should be shelved. The city’s dire financial situation mandates that our elected representatives consider many solutions, some of them unpalatable. Perhaps the case can be made that this tax would finally put Los Angeles on a firm fiscal footing, and that doing so will ensure that public safety is not compromised and that services continue at a reasonable level. The problem, however, is that we have not heard any convincing so far. Instead, under Wesson, it has been decision-making by virtual decree. The illustrious few are ramming through their solutions, opposition be damned if not silenced. Ultimately, this tactic is shortsighted. It runs the risk of igniting opposition to any eventual vote. It also undermines the confidence that citizens have in their elected leaders. It is time for the council to slow down, take a breath, and begin to explore and explain how the clear need for additional revenue should be apportioned. Delay the matter until, at the earliest, the May ballot. In the meantime, start listening to and speaking with the public.


November 19, 2012

Downtown News 5

DowntownNews.com

They’ve Had Their Phil, Now Move On Call It Sacrilege, but Mike D’Antoni Is Better for the Lakers Long Term Than the Zen One by Dave Denholm contributing writer

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o thanks, Phil. That’s what Laker management said to their excoach, Phil Jackson, after considering asking him to return to the bench. Laker fans have gone ballistic, reacting like team brass did a combination of cancelling Christmas, punching a puppy and, the greatest sin of all, ruining any chance of ever winning a title again. But beyond the emotion, there’s a serious question: Did Jerry and Jim Buss and GM Mitch Kupchak really get it wrong when they hired Mike D’Antoni instead of the Zen One to replace the fired Mike Brown? Most people agree that Brown was never the right hire for this team. He is no more than a pretty good assistant-level NBA coach who happened to fall into leading a squad with LeBron James on it. Brown’s playoff rotations and late game “adjustments” were, to be kind, not good enough. He was always going to struggle to win a title. The Lakers can’t abide that. Not with Kobe running out of years. Will D’Antoni fare any better? More importantly, will he fare better than Phil would have? The Lakers choosing D’Antoni over Jackson shows me two things. First, the Buss bunch yearns to return to the Magic Johnson/James Worthy “Showtime” era and get up and down the court doing what sports teams are supposed to do. You know, entertain. D’Antoni’s team has a mission: Get the ball. Put it in the basket. Repeat. Second, the hire shows me that Jim Buss is really running things and doesn’t want to give back any power to Jackson. And why should he? He is replacing a legend in his dad, Jerry. It’s time for the son to establish his own way of doing things. Jackson represents a different time. Also, try to remember that Phil’s final season of coaching will never make a Lakers All-Time Great Seasons DVD. I don’t doubt that Phil would give the Lakers a slightly bet-

photo by Gary Leonard

Phil Jackson is not the next coach of the Los Angeles Lakers. Deal with it.

ter chance to win a title this season. But, I do believe the team made the right choice for the future by going without him. Go ahead, throw rocks, call it sacrilege. I can take it. Why to Like Mike The West is brutally deep again this year and Miami got better in the offseason. So even with Jeannie Buss’ guy friend, there is no guarantee for the Lakers’ ultimate success. In that case, why not make the long term move and find the right personnel to fit that style? D’Antoni’s up-tempo approach — actually, that’s an understatement. Calling D’Antoni’s offense up-tempo is like saying NASCAR racers drive kinda quick — will please Kobe and Dwight Howard. We already know how successful Steve Nash was in the system.

But the guy I see benefiting the most is Pau Gasol. The Spaniard likes to run the floor and does it better than any big man who will guard him, so expect plenty of easy Spanish baskets. I see tremendous success for the D’Antoni Lakers in the regular season. Even with some defensive questions, they will bludgeon enough opponents offensively to win a lot of games. One player who must step up is Metta World Peace. He will have to defend like, well, world peace actually depends on it. If any man in the NBA is up for the physical and mental challenge every night to lock down the other team’s best player, it’s still Metta. The Lakers are fine with his off-the-wall thing. Remember a few paragraphs back when I asserted that Mike D’Antoni actually hurts the Lakers chances for a title this season? OK, maybe I didn’t say exactly that. But it’s true. The new fast-paced play will allow Kobe and the starters to light up the scoreboard and fill the stat sheet. The problem is, these guys are going to wear out a lot faster sprinting up and down the floor all night, every night. That means the starters will have to play fewer minutes to survive the season. I don’t care how in-shape they are, by playoff time they will show the effects of the physical pounding. Worse, it means the Lakers bench will have to see more playing time. That is a recipe for disaster. Vince Lombardi, John Wooden and Casey Stengel all rolled into one could not improve the bench. How badly that unit gets outscored by the opposition will go a long way toward determining how the Lakers fare in the playoffs. Buss and Kupchak need to grab three or four bench players who fit the new style. Then we can start talking about more banners in the rafters at Staples Center. Less chance to win it all in 2013? Yeah. Better future for the purple and gold? No doubt. Sorry, Phil. No thanks. Dave Denholm likes sitting in the 300 level at Staples Center, buying tennis balls at Target and living Downtown.


6 Downtown News

November 19, 2012

Twitter/DowntownNews

The Industriel Evolution French-Inspired Farm Cuisine Tries to Grow at Sixth and Grand by RichaRd Guzmán city editoR

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t’s almost never good news when a restaurant goes out of business. But it’s likely that very few people miss the Carl’s Jr. that for at least 20 years occupied the 6,000-square-foot space on the ground floor of the Milano Lofts. The fast food spot at the busy corner of Sixth Street and Grand Avenue closed in 2010. In May, it was replaced by Industriel, a French-inspired two-story restaurant created by Armen Hakobyan and his chef and business partner, Joseph Antonishek. “We wanted to open something in a heavy traffic urban area with a big population, and Downtown is now perfect for that,” said Hakobyan, who also owns the Green Street Tavern in Pasadena. A year-long renovation eradicated the old restaurant’s familiar yellow happy face star and instead brought in decorations such as the two wall-size black and white images of worn, Depression-era farmers. They flank the entrance to the 95-seat restaurant. Inside the decor mixes a farm feel with an industrial vibe. It’s augmented by a Frenchbased rotating menu described by the restaurant as “urban farm cuisine.” That means everything from escargot panini to duck cassoulet to house made goat cheese, chutneys, pickles and even bourbon. Antonishek is pleased, if not poetic, about the result. “We replaced a really [expletive] fast food chain with a fine restaurant, and that just helps build the city,” he said. “The more

places like this that open up here, the more the area will benefit.” Long and Winding Road Hakobyan, 43, has been in the food business since he was 12, when he began working in his family’s restaurant in Armenia. About 10 years later he was running his own place. He moved to the United States and opened the Green Street Tavern in Old Town Pasadena in 2007. Antonishek’s culinary roots go back just as far. The 40-year-old Michigan native said he was born into a family of cooks. His great grandfather was president of the Michigan Restaurant Association and operated food trucks that catered to construction workers starting in the 1930s. Antonishek got his first restaurant job at 15. In 1992, he graduated from the Culinary Institute of America at Hyde Park in New York and has since worked for chefs including Charlie Palmer. He clocked time as the chef at the Mondrian Hotel on the Sunset Strip and helped open O Bar in West Hollywood and Minx in Glendale. He joined Hakobyan to open Green Street Tavern. The duo first saw the ground floor of the Milano Lofts at 609 S. Grand Ave. about two years ago after Eric Shomof, whose family owned the building until two months ago (it was sold to Equity Residential), came to the Green Street Tavern. With the Downtown dining scene in full swing, Shomof said business at the Carl’s Jr. had tapered off. He wanted to replace the fast food chain with a higher-end, privately owned restaurant that would fit in with the

photo by Gary Leonard

Armen Hakobyan (left) and Joseph Antonishek spent a year turning a former Carl’s Jr. space into the two-story Industriel. They serve a French-based rotating menu they describe as “urban farm cuisine.”

changing neighborhood. “We really wanted to get a cool restaurant,” Shomof said. “Something that would bring more character to the area.” Construction took about a year and cost a little more than $1 million. It included the complete gutting of the space. Hakobyan didn’t worry about the fast food past. “I’ve been in the restaurant industry for 20 years, so for me it didn’t matter what was there before,” he said. “You give me a room and I’ll make a restaurant.” Industriel’s entryway features a pair of old-fashioned chairs flanking a gray metal trunk near a display of mason jars with pickles, vegetables and jams. The dining room’s dominant feature is an arrangement of bear shaped honey jars hung like a cascading beehive over a white bathtub. The seating is a mix of gold-colored vinyl banquettes, red chairs and faded white tabletops meant to look like cow skin. Old wooden soda crates cover the walls.

Upstairs is a bar and more dining space dominated by a gold vinyl couch and a wallsized black and white image of a naked woman. Although the nude may not imply it, Hakobyan says he was inspired by the similarities between farms and restaurants. “The farm, like a restaurant, is a place where you work hard. There are long hours, but it’s beautiful because you are making something beautiful,” he said. The farm connection continues with the menu, as Antonishek frequents farmers markets in Downtown and Pasadena. He said a goal is to prepare as much as possible inhouse. Thus, the Industriel kitchen workers bake their own bread and make their own chutney, ricotta, pickles and jams. The trend continues at the bar, where Antonishek said they barrel-age bourbon. One batch is meant for holiday cocktails and is flavored with dried figs and cinnamon. Current drink highlights include the cusee Industriel, page 20

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Downtown News 7

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WHAT’S FOR SALE An Empty Fashion District Building Is Ready for Its Residential Conversion by Ryan VaillancouRt staff wRiteR

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n the column “What’s for Sale,” Los Angeles Downtown News looks at everything from condominiums to multi-family buildings to vacant lots now on the market. We hope that regular snapshots of individual properties will make for a wide-ranging survey of the overall state of Downtown real estate. This week, the focus is on the Grether & Grether Building, a 1924 structure on Los Angeles Street that has secured city approvals for a transformation into a 60-unit residential complex. It is listed at $8.6 million. The Property: The six-story building at 730 S. Los Angeles St. is situated among the collection of apartment and condominium structures that comprise what was once known as Santee Village (four apartment buildings are now called Santee Court, with two other for-sale properties dubbed the Cornell and the Eckhart). Spec This Out: Built in 1924, the structure was most recently occupied by garment manufacturers. Now, the upper floors are completely vacant and “ready for renovation,” said broker Mike Shustak. The entire building measures 89,191 square feet. Adaptation: The chief selling point of the property may be that it is one of the few remaining Historic Core candidates for residential conversion that already has entitle-

ments in place. The building is approved for 60 housing units. Some of them would face Los Angeles Street, while others would be situated along light wells on the north and south sides. In the rear, the edifice overlooks an alley-like courtyard full of small shops and food businesses that are patronized by many residents in the Santee Court complex. Compared to What?: The asking price for the building is $8.6 million, which works out to about $96 per square foot, or $143,333 per proposed unit. In 2011, Essex Property Trust, which owns four apartment buildings on the block, paid $17 million, or $232,876 per residence, for the 73-unit structure known as The Santee. It paid $187,878 per apartment for the three-building Santee Court complex. Of course, Essex purchased completed apartment projects, whereas a buyer of the Grether building will have to pay for the redevelopment. If the per-unit cost still seems too high, Shustak pointed to the significant amount of retail space in the property. He noted that nearly one-third of the approximately 90,000-square-foot structure is ground-floor commercial space in an area that has vibrant pedestrian activity. Then again, a ground-floor Rite-Aid at Seventh and Los Angeles streets couldn’t make a go of it, and closed in 2008, four years into a 20-year lease. Location, Cubed: A primary draw for the

THE PETROLEUM BUILDING Commercial Office Space for Lease

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The Grether & Grether Building, which is entitled for 60 housing units, is on the market for $8.6 million. The property is at 730 S. Los Angeles St.

property is that its neighbors are all residential buildings and all have ground floor commercial occupants. In that sense, there’s clear evidence of strong residential demand on the block. Near the corner of Seventh and Los Angeles streets, the building is at a sort of nexus between the Historic Core and the Fashion District, which could be attractive to people working in the fashion industry, or those who want easy access to the nightlife on Spring and Main streets. On the other hand, the building could also be described as being in a sort of no man’s land, blocks removed from one of the revitalized hubs of Downtown. The location is also

at a crossroads with Skid Row, which might deter certain interested parties. Who Wants It?: Brokers representing the seller, a family, expect that the buyer will be a developer/owner type with experience doing adaptive reuse conversions, Shustak said. “You could also do creative office in this building or you could do a hotel there,” he said. Contact: Co-listing agent Mike Shustak can be reached at (213) 613-3338. Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.

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tery black cod. At 514 W. Seventh St., (213) 622-3744 or mo-chica.com.

Food

Pig Party: First time visitors to Las Morelianas at Grand Central Market will ask themselves two questions: “Who is this guy sticking a taco in my mouth?” and “What’s in this delicious taco?” The who is Abraham Ibarra, who owns the walk-up eatery. He greets anyone who comes within an arm’s distance to a free sampler taco. The second answer is, every part of the pig. Ibarra’s carnitas surtida taco is a traditional dish from Michoacán, Mexico. It’s made from a mix of pig neck, skin, leg, heart, tongue, liver, kidney, snout, ears and feet. It’s salty, soft, chewy and crispy all at the same time. At 317 S. Broadway, (213) 725-0848.

Continued from page 1 comes down to good flavor,” he said. Those willing and able to sample Downtown’s most exotic meals, should keep reading. Gobble Gobble Gorbals: Ilan Hall, who opened the ScottishJewish hybrid The Gorbals three years ago in the Alexandria Hotel, is known for kicking tradition in the face. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t. But a couple of unusual dishes that have stayed on the menu are the popcorn chicken gizzards and the lamb neck. The gizzard, the pouch on the lower part of a bird’s stomach, can be very tough, so Hall’s dish is pressure-cooked in a cornmeal batter, which softens it up. When served it looks like tempura. The lamb neck is braised in red wine with tomatoes and herbs. It is very tender and comes atop a creamy oatmeal. It’s hearty, rich and a good winter dinner. At 501 S. Spring St., (213) 488-3408 or thegorbalsla.com. Itchin’ for Urchin: Scuba divers and snorkelers know to stay away from sea urchins — getting pricked by the long black spikes can mean some nasty swelling and discomfort, if not a trip to the hospital. At high-end seafood spot Water Grill, chef Damon Gordon wants his customers to get close to the sea creatures. For his Channel Island Red Sea Urchin, Gordon carefully removes the rich orange roe. He serves it next to the spiky shell, which even in Water Grill is not edible, so don’t try. It’s eaten raw with a tangy ponzu sauce. At 544 S. Grand Ave., (213) 891-0900 or watergrill.com. Fishy Fibers: There are a couple things you can do with an alpaca. The coat of the South American animal that looks like a llama makes a fine fabric that’s been compared to cashmere. Ricardo Zarate, the chef/owner of Mo-Chica, serves an alpaca stew with a fried egg and noodles. The flavor is

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Get Your Goat: Diners who can’t decide what part of the animal to eat might head to Industriel. The French restaurant’s goachetta is a de-boned goat that is rolled, marinated and braised, kind of like a porchetta. Except for the head, the entire body is served. The goat takes five hours to cook and comes with gnocchi, mint, olives and smoked red pepper sugo. The restaurant also uses parts of the porker not usually found on menus, such as the crispy pig ear, which it serves with frisee (a mildly bitter vegetable) and pickled strawberries. Industriel isn’t the first new Downtown restaurant to take on the ear — Lazy Ox Canteen did it a couple years ago. At 609 S. Grand Ave., (213) 488-8020 or industrielfarm.com. photo by Gary Leonard

One of the most unlikely meals in Downtown comes from Water Grill chef Damon Gordon. He cracks open a sea urchin and serves it with a ponzu sauce.

surprisingly mild but still savory. For a slightly more gamey and spicy version, try his alpaca burger, which is mixed with lamb meat. Also on the Mo-Chica menu is the paiche, an ancient Amazon freshwater fish. Zarate calls it one of the best tasting fish most people have never had. He likens it to a but-

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Heads Up: There’s nothing unusual about a pot pie. Well, at least until you get to The Parish. The new Fashion District restaurant from well-known chef Casey Lane has a rotating menu that includes a pork head pot pie. It is set to return this week to the gastropub, and is made with pickled root vegetables and cheddar cheese and comes under a crispy crust. The pig head, by the way, really means all of the pig’s head — get ready to munch the snout, cheek and ears. It’s a hearty meal with well-seasoned, tender meat. At 840 S. Spring St., (213) 225-2400 or theparishla.com.

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DowntownNews.com At 600 S. Main St., (213) 622-6333 or artisanhouse.net. Predators: The lines at Wurstküche, the Arts District sausage haven, can get pretty long during lunch. Still, who else in Downtown serves rattlesnake or alligator? The answer: no one! Two of the world’s oldest and meanest predators come in the ground-up and tubeshaped form at Wurstküche. The alligator sausage is mixed with pork meat while the rattlesnake sausage is combined with rabbit. Neither is too gamey and both taste crisp and fresh. Each has a bit of a bite, though not that kind of bite. At 800 E. Third St., (213) 687-4444 or wurstkucherestaurant.com.

photo courtesy Drago Centro

In addition to running a culinary empire, Celestino Drago likes to hunt. His prey sometimes includes partridge. Drago Centro in Downtown serves truffle-crusted partridge — no bullet fragments included.

Another Boar-ing Meal: If pigs are too tame for your taste buds, then sink your teeth into some wild boar at Artisan House. The huge Historic Core restaurant/deli/ market cooks up wild boar meatballs in a Tuscan béchamel sauce with a brown sugar glaze. The result is a sweet, juicy and savory ball of meat, though one better eaten by itself than on top of spaghetti. Artisan House serves it as an appetizer.

A Leg Up: The rooftop restaurant Perch not only offers great views of Downtown, but also taps its French roots for orders of buffalo frog legs. No, they didn’t discover a mammal/amphibian hybrid. Instead, the frog legs are marinated in buttermilk, then tossed in a house made buffalo sauce with some blue cheese added to the mix. Frog legs may not be the most unusual foodstuff ever, but not many Downtown restaurants are serving the hoppers. At 448 S. Hill St., (213) 802-1770 or perchla.com.

and tossed with blood orange, watercress, huckleberries and extra virgin olive oil. At 408 S. Main St., (213) 687-8808 or bacomercat.com. High-End Game Center: Upscale Italian chef Celestino Drago doesn’t just like cooking delicious meals. He also likes to go looking for the critters that end up in his kitchen. In honor of his hunting trips, the Financial District’s Drago Centro is offering an allgame animal tasting menu. It includes venison, rabbit, squab and partridge. The trufflecrusted partridge is the rarest of the dishes. Drago combines salty and creamy flavors with the gamey taste of the bird. It’s served with Brussels sprouts and potato puree, but minus any bullet fragments. At 525 S. Flower St., (213) 228-8998 or

dragocentro.com. Brain Dip: Umamicatessen has several different food concepts under one Broadway roof. They include Pigg, which serves just about every part of the animal. The Pigg menu includes the P!gg Style Fries which are covered in ham puree and, get ready, brainaise. No, that’s not a misspelling of béarnaise. The brainaise is a mix of pig brain and mayo aioli created by chef Chris Cosentino. The aioli has a sort of lemony and mustard-like taste with just a hint of something else — that something else would be the brains. He also serves the sauce with his crispy pig ears. At 825 S. Broadway, (213) 413-8626 or umami.com. Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com.

Legs and Quail, not Dan Quayle: Josef Centeno of Bäco Mercat is best known for inventing the baco, a mix between a gyro and a taco. But his rotating menu also offers other unusual dishes, among them fried quail, lamb neck and a goose leg. None of them are currently being served, but Centeno said they will return soon. Centeno’s quail is buttermilk fried and served with sides, while the lamb neck is braised then glazed in a red wine reduction and served with pasta. The goose leg is cured and marinated, then salted and cooked in duck fat. It is then shredded

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Continued from page 1 High School in Sherman Oaks was scheduled to start at 7:15 p.m. I arrived at 6:57 and Feuer, in a dark suit and red tie, was already working the room, doing quick chats and a succession of handshake/half embraces. Nuch, also in a dark suit and red tie, walked in the door at 7:12 p.m. He did a pretty quick skim of the perimeter before heading to the front. Point: Feuer. Pretty Paper: What a surprise, both candidates had campaign staff spreading paraphernalia to the approximately 300 people in the school’s cafeteria. Trutanich’s team dispensed a four-page handout highlighting his first-term accomplishments. There were also pretty pictures of him, including

one, for no apparent reason other than it polls well, of him holding a baby (a grandchild, perhaps?). Feuer supporters had red, white and blue “I Like Mike” stickers and a one-page handout contesting some of Nuch’s campaign claims. Point: Stickers are nice, but come on, Nuch had a baby. Everyone likes babies. One for Trutanich. Opening Statements: Feuer has clocked six years in the state Assembly, served six years on the L.A. City Council, and ran for and lost a race for L.A. City Attorney (guess which one of those he didn’t mention). Not surprisingly, he’s a polished campaigner, and was sharp and engaging in laying out his bio. He hit touchstones such as work on anti-gun laws and attacking the foreclosure crisis. Nuch did a nice bit highlighting his family, which played up the personal side for a guy who most recently gained notice for trying to get out of his job by running for District Attorney, only to finish a shocking third in the primary. He

photo by Gary Leonard

Debate

November 19, 2012

Twitter/DowntownNews photo courtesy of Mike Feuer for City Attorney

10 Downtown News

State Assemblyman Mike Feuer (left) is running for City Attorney against incumbent Carmen Trutanich. They don’t always play nice.

hopscotched to his achievements since taking office in 2009, noting the successes in the face of some brutal budget cuts. “You’re safer today than you were four years ago,” he said, playing up the law-and-order card. Point: Draw. Call and Response: SOHA decided to let the candidates question each other, which is a dangerous thing, because it produces what are barely disguised attacks. That’s why Feuer asked Trutanich why he won’t take a pay cut when his employees are being furloughed, and why Nuch tossed out, “Real simple Mike: How many jury trials have you done in your career as a lawyer?” Trutanich read his questions off a piece of paper, or was at least consulting notes. Feuer’s stuff was in his head. Feuer was far more effective at parrying Nuch’s thrusts, appearing confident and in control, saying his past, including his time heading Bet Tzedek, which provides free legal assistance to elderly and low-income clients, makes him qualified to lead an office of lawyers. Nuch looked steamed and after the response proclaimed, “I didn’t hear an answer. What’s the number?” He reminded me of the guy in the opening scene of The Music Man who complains about Robert Preston’s flim-flam salesman Harold Hill, yelping/whining, “But he doesn’t know the territory!” Point: Feuer. Grace Under Pressure: Feuer’s campaign experience, which Team Nuch prefers to call being a career politician, helped him stay calm amid the accusations. He had a measured, reasoned response to every zap. When Feuer’s statement that he supported the recent Proposition 34, which would end the death penalty in California, generated some audience bristling, he effectively laid out the argument that it’s a money waster. He may not have changed anyone’s mind, but he displayed a clear logic and reasoning. As the evening progressed Nuch occasionally lost his bearings. Maybe it’s because he only acquiesced to a single debate during the D.A.’s race and is out of practice. Whatever the case, he got heated, and a few times I thought there was an 18% chance that he’d turn green and huge and rip through his shirt like the Incredible Hulk. When discussing the death penalty and a convicted murderer he ignored Feuer’s cost analysis, pronouncing, “If that SOB languishes in prison knowing that someone’s thinking about killing him, I’m OK with that.” He also seemed to tire of Feuer ticking off a list of highprofile backers, among them former LAPD Chief William Bratton. In an effort to slam Feuer for supporting a purportedly questionable candidate, Nuch said, “He’s been talking about endorsements all night. You know, I had endorsements in the last race and that didn’t turn out too well.” Referencing the D.A’s race without someone else bringing it up was, maybe, the 126th best thing to say on the subject. Point: Feuer, by a mile. Miscellaneous: Sometimes Feuer’s mastery of facts and figures worked against him. Again and again, he couldn’t fit his comments into the tight time constraints and, despite being cut off by the moderator, he got all Energizer Bunny and kept on talking. Still, he demonstrated a breadth of knowledge, whether the subject was bond funding for transit projects (concerning the recently defeated Measure J) or working with the LAUSD on truancy issues. Trutanich laid out a base that resonated in the room, citing his office’s legal record (though Feuer questioned the numbers) and feats such as securing injunctions against gangs and taggers. However, he sometimes veered toward bullying and condescension. When on pot, and by that I mean when speaking about medical marijuana, he appeared to treat Feuer like a child, snapping, “11.359 of the Health and Safety Code — you know what that is Mike?” Other times he went with free association. When discussing the costs of Prop 37, which would have required labeling on genetically modified food, Nuch brain jumped to the price of the state’s high-speed rail plan. “Let’s waste the money on ourselves,” he ultimately harrumphed, and suddenly I feared another Hulk eruption. Point: Feuer, though if I see the Hulk, I’m changing it. Contact Jon Regardie at regardie@downtownnews.com.


November 19, 2012

Downtown News 11

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The L.A. Kings Holiday Ice at L.A. Live opens Nov. 24. It boasts what organizers call the biggest outdoor ice skating rink in the city.

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Downtown on Ice at Pershing Square began its 15th season in Downtown last week. It runs through Jan. 21.

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he California sunshine leaves little chance for actual cold winter weather in Downtown. Still, the Central City is about to receive a double dose ofNicy conditions. ntown ews On Thursday, Nov.ce15, the m/L.A.Dow on Ice rink returned oDowntown .c k o o b Fa to Pershing Square, ushering in more than two months of skating and an associated array of concerts and events. On Saturday, Nov. 24, the L.A. Kings Holiday Ice at L.A. Live will return for its fourth installment. The skating and other activities will take place over nearly six weeks, even if the Kings themselves remain frozen out of Staples Center because of the NHL lockout. While one might think there is a competition between the frozen water set-ups, officials with the rinks downplay it, saying the overall action benefits the whole of Downtown Los Angeles. In other words, they think that yes, this community is big enough for two ice rinks. “I think each of the rinks has been very well supported by the community, and it’s all about providing people with something fun for the holidays,” said Michael Roth, a spokesman for Anschutz Entertainment Group, which owns L.A.m or nNews.co Live and sets up the rink. at Downtow hand corner maillist ht rig r pe up s/ the overlap. com/form mbol inisn’t That’s there r this sy E-NEWSnotLoto ntownnews. After all, the AEGok fosay www.ladow P U N IG S owned Kings sponsored the Pershing Square rink until picking up their skates and moving to the arena-adjacent facility in 2009. Although some worried about the older venue’s viability, Pershing Square officials were able to secure other sponsors and keep the skating going. While both rinks see a plethora of wobbly-legged skaters trying desperately not to fall, there are some obvious differences. The L.A. Live attraction has grown in size every year, and AEG officials say it is now the largest outdoor ice skating rink in the city. The 2012 version measures 132-by-80 feet.

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The Pershing Square rink, meanwhile, comes in at 50-by- as big as it’s going to get,” he said. 90 feet. While that is smaller than its southern cousin, it can This year’s rink runs until Jan. 2. Not only is the set-up claim that last year, it hosted actual reindeer. larger, but skaters get to glide around a 66-foot tall artificial Santa and Broomball tree that will be placed in the center of the rink. It’s equipped Starts 9 white LED lights. Downtown on Ice runs at Pershing Square through Jan.November with 120,000 21, 2013. This winter will mark the 15th season for the outThe official tree-lighting ceremony will be Nov. 28, and will door rink. include performances by Ozomatli, Barry Manilow and the However, the season is about more than skating. Canadian Tenors. The ceremony and concert will be broadDowntown on Ice is coupled with the park’s free winter con- cast live on NBC. cert series, which kicks off Dec. 17 and runs through Jan. 6. The The streets around the plaza will also shine a little brighter lineup includes lunchtime and weekend shows with a mix of than usual this year, thanks to holiday illumination, including country, folk, rock and disco bands, as well as holiday music. about 265,000 LED lights that resemble falling snow. They Another highlight is the Winter Holiday Festival, scheduled will be placed on 150 trees in the area. Check Our Website for Full Movie Listings LADowntownNews.com for Dec. 8 from 11 a.m.-7 p.m. The day will include some The campus will also be under bright lights at the top of manmade snow, a train ride, puppet shows, and an appear- every hour, when 13 outdoor video screens will project a holiance from and pictures with Santa Claus. Last year a couple day themed light show. Roth said time will also be set aside live reindeer showed up with St. Nick (though petting them to highlight local charities and nonprofit organizations. They was a no-no). include Habitat for Humanity, the Special Olympics and Ice athletes, or at least those who think they are ice athletes, Downtown-based Para Los Niños. can take part in the Broomball championships Jan. 8-10 and “We want to honor them for the good work that they do,” 15-17. It’s like a hockey game but without skates, since people he said. wear tennis shoes on the ice and use brooms instead of hockey On Dec. 9, Chabad of California will light Chanukah sticks. Past participants have included the L.A. Derby Dolls. candles at 5 p.m. Later that night, Mariachi USA will put on For those who want to get on TV, KMEX-TV Univision a holiday show. On Dec. 16, the Red Cross will be on hand to will broadcast a morning news show from Pershing Square raise money for Hurricane Sandy relief efforts. Starts November 15 to the rink is $13 and includes skate rental. on Tuesday, Nov. 20. Admission Admission for the rink is $6 plus $2 for skate rental. Groups of 10 or more pay $10 and kids younger than 7, seRoyal Ice niors and members of the military pay $6. When the Kings jumped rinks and teamed up with L.A. Downtown on Ice is at Pershing Square, 532 S. Olive St., Live in 2009, the Nokia Plaza set-up was 70-by-50 feet. Due (213) 847-4970 or laparks.org. Check Our of Website Listings LADowntownNews.com to the popularity the event,for theFull spaceMovie has grown. However, L.A. Kings Holiday Ice at L.A. Live is at 800 W. Olympic Roth said that it likely won’t become any larger. Blvd., (310) 535-4400 or lalive.com. “Unless we do some major construction on the plaza, that’s Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com.

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November 19, 2012

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Tea Time, 25 Years Later EWP Turns a Hit War Bride Play Into a Standout Musical by Jeff favre contributing writer

L

ittle Tokyo’s East West Players has forged its reputation as one of the country’s top theater companies during the last 48 years by producing almost all of the seminal works by leading Asian American playwrights, among them Chay Yew and David Henry Hwang. Somehow, though, artistic director Tim Dang and company missed one of the most produced works in the community, Tea, written by Velina Hasu Houston in 1987. That oversight is being corrected, in a big way. To celebrate the one-act drama’s 25th anniversary, Houston has transformed her most popular play into a musical. It also allows EWP to present a world premiere. Directed by Jon Lawrence Rivera, with music by Nathan Wang, Tea, with Music retains most of the entire original script while elegantly reworking key moments into lyrics. It runs through Dec. 9 at the David Henry Hwang Theatre in Little Tokyo. More a play with music than a standard musical, Houston’s revision is a bit shaky in the first couple of scenes, but soon finds its footing. By the end of the 90-minute piece, Tea, with Music evokes more humor and pathos than the original, thanks in no small part to Wang’s accessible piano score (performed by John Gentry Tennyson) and a captivating performance by Joan Almedilla in the lead role. Almedilla dominates the stage as Himiko, a Japanese World War II bride, who in the play’s opening seconds commits suicide. She

is there in spirit when four other war brides arrive to conduct a traditional tea ceremony. The women have little in common other than their outsider status in a small Kansas town, but Himiko’s unexpected death draws them together for a confrontational, soulsearching afternoon. If this sounds like the stuff of a lite Lifetime movie, it’s not. The four women are divided into two camps. Atsuko (Tiffany-Marie Austin) and Setsuko (Yumi Iwama) have retained their Japanese traditions and customs. Teruko (Jennie Kwan) has found success in the American business world, and Chizuye (Janet Song) has seamlessly assimilated into the local culture. Himiko, trapped between two realms, watches over the women as they reminisce about the good and bad times of their marriages and debate whether becoming more American is worth the sacrifice. The unusual construction of the songs — there are no choruses and many don’t rhyme — are at first jarring. Also, the first number, “Tea-Prelude,” is the show’s weakest in melody and lyrical structure. Wang hits his stride with “This Is My Country,” which incorporates recognizable patriotic tunes. It moves directly into the powerful “Land of Milk and Honey,” which signals a dramatic shift to a darker mood. There aren’t any weak voices in the ensemble. Still, Almedilla stands out with her usual, nearly flawless performance. One of the three divas to appear in the 2010 EWP production Road to Saigon, Almedilla has few peers when

photo by Michael Lamont

Joan Almedilla (center) dominates the stage as Himiko, a Japanese World War II bride, in East West Players’ world premiere Tea, with Music.

it comes to conveying a wide range of emotion with her vocal skills. There are a surprising number of lighthearted moments in the serious piece, and much of the humor comes from Kwan as Teruko. The Southern accent she employs when impersonating her good-old-boy husband is disarmingly funny every time. Rivera collaborated with Houston in Calligraphy, which appeared at Downtown’s Los Angeles Theatre Center in 2010. His understated directing style balances Houston, who at times strays into the melodramatic. He creates a matter-of-fact tone, which ensures that scenes that could go over the top remain realistic. John H. Binkley’s set design consists primarily of a series of slanted planks for the actresses to traverse, which keeps a play that has little overt action from appearing static. Adam Flemming’s projection design, which consists of five companion images for each

location or theme, adds atmospheric texture. Also, Adam Blumenthal’s shadow-filled lighting reminds the audience that even in the happier moments there is a sense of mourning. What elevates this production over its predecessor is that the music provides a needed respite from the pervasive sadness. Wang’s score is soothing and often uplifting, even in moments of despair. Tea, with Music discovers newfound depth and freshness in a play that has remained vibrant for a quarter-century. East West Players missed the opportunity to showcase Tea, but they have more than made up for it by producing an impressive premiere that deserves to become a staple in regional theaters. Tea, with Music runs through Dec. 9 at the David Henry Hwang Theater at the Union Center for the Arts, 120 Judge John Aiso St., (213) 625-7000 or eastwestplayers.org.

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Downtown News 13

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sunday, noveMber 25 Turn the Page: A Literary Force Last Bookstore, 453 S. Spring St., (213) 488-0599 or lastbookstorela.com. 2 p.m.: The Roots and Wings Project, a socially transformative theater company, unites with alumni of InsideOut Writers, a program providing incarcerated youth with access to creative writing education, to share stories and explore juvenile justice.

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From Simon & Garfunkel to Miles Davis, Columbia Records was one of the most prominent record labels of the 20th century. It gets its due in the recently opened Grammy Museum exhibit 360 Sound: The Columbia Records Story. The exhibit chronicles the history of the label from its inception in Washington, D.C., circa 1888 through the technological marvels it perpetuated and its long life atop the music game. While the exhibit will be around through next October, the history of Columbia Records tells us time moves fast, so get a move on and check out this recording marvel. At 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 765-6800 or grammymuseum.org.

photo courtesy AEG Live

ROCK, POP & JAZZ Blue Whale 123 Astronaut E. S. Onizuka St., (213) 620-0908 or bluewhalemusic.com. Nov. 20: Natasha Agrama Group. Bootleg Bar 2220 Beverly Blvd., (213) 389-3856 or bootlegtheater.org. Nov. 19, 8 p.m.: November resident folksy duo In the Valley Below won’t go away. At least not for another week. Nov. 20, 8 p.m.: Whale Fall is an instrumental band with a post rock feel. There will also be a trumpet in play. Nov. 21, 8 p.m.: Christopher Litner, alias Swimlessons, begs you to refrain from eating for at least 30 minutes before enjoying his one-man sonic collages. Nov. 24, 8 p.m.: Given Horse the Band’s devilmay-care, self destructive mode of touring, you should count your blessings if they survive their current Central American tour so they can play the Bootleg. Broadway Bar 830 S. Broadway, (213) 614-9909 or broadwaybar.la. Nov. 22, 10 p.m.: Is Broader Than Broadway, HM Soundsytem’s weekly electronica event, actually happening on Thanksgiving, or is this listing the product of a glitch in the 213 Group’s pre-programmed events calendar? Only time will tell. Casey’s Irish Pub 613 S. Grand Ave., (213) 629-2353 or bigcaseys.com. Nov. 23, 10 p.m.: Pristine pastiche as the Health Club dives deep into the dominant styles of ’90s rock. Nov. 24, 10 p.m.: Vise Virsa plans to shin kick you with their expectation shunning back to basics rock. Club Nokia 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 765-7000 or clubnokia.com. Nov. 21, 8 p.m.: If your mind is gone, your brain is blazed or you’ve been wide awake for the past three days, KDAY has the solution. Prolific Bay Area MC Too $hort hits the stage with DJ Quik in “The West Coast Feast.” Nov. 23, 9 p.m.: Hard-hitting local hip-hop upand-comer Dom Kennedy will be on hand. Exchange LA 618 S. Spring St., (213) 627-8070 or exchangela.com. Nov. 23, 10 p.m.: It’s a week to express thanks,

by Dan Johnson, listings eDitor | calendar@downtownnews.com

Nov. 1 is long past, but the spirit of Dia de los Muertos endures at La Plaza de Cultura Y Artes, where Mexican surrealist sculptor José Sacal’s take on the holiday is on display through Jan. 7, 2013. Sacal applies new ideas and lines to the old tradition in a show that simultaneously fractures and mends the margins of the festival. The exhibit is open and free to the public every Tuesday-Saturday from noon-7 p.m. (don’t show up on Thanksgiving though). After you’ve hit the Sacal exhibit, stroll over to Olvera Street and catch the preserved David Alfaro Siqueiros mural “América Tropical.” At 501 N. Main St., (888) 488-8083 or lapca.org.

Tuesday, noveMber 20 Univision at Pershing Square Pershing Square, 532 S. Olive, (213) 847-4970 or laparks.org/pershingsquare. 6 a.m.: “Primera Edicion,” the Univision morning show, will host a live broadcast at Pershing Square’s outdoor ice rink. Skating and holiday cheer will both be free.

2

GaGa for Gabba, and also for WrestlinG and Columbia reCords

Get ready parents: On Friday, Nov. 23, burn off the postturkey day tryptophan with two rousing shows spun off from the Nick Jr. series “Yo Gabba Gabba.” Seriously, why spend Black Friday in a shopping mall when you can hit the Nokia Theatre for the cartoonish and rubbery cast members that unite families with captivatingly vivid children’s entertainment. With shows at 2 and 5:30 p.m., there’s plenty of Gabba to go around, so pack the family in the Honda Odyssey and catch this year’s finest polychromatic display of youth market segmentation. At 777 Chick Hearn Court, (213) 763-6030 or nokiatheatrelalive.com.

4 For 85 years, Downtown’s Grand Olympic Auditorium served as a prominent boxing and wrestling venue, film set and concert hall. The gallery 722 Figueroa (in the old Kim Sing Theatre) is keeping the legacy of that slice of Angeleno history alive with a photo exhibit of the venue featuring the work of the late Theo Ehret. Sure, the days of heavyweight bouts have been traded in for Korean language church services and the building’s current name, the Glory Church of Jesus Christ, doesn’t hold a Gorgeous George candle to Grand Olympic Auditorium. Still, the magic lives on with the pics of Muhammad Ali, Andre the Giant and many others. The exhibit runs through Nov. 30. At 718 N. Figueroa St., (213) 620-9971 or 722figueroa.com.

Continued on next page

Send information and possible Don’t Miss List submissions to calendar@downtownnews.com.

courtesy of the Grammy Museum

Monday, noveMber 19 Physics and Scientific Thinking at Aloud Mark Taper Auditorium, Central Library, 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 228-7500 or lfla.org. 7:15 p.m.: Lisa Randall, a Harvard particle physics professor and author of Warped Passages: Unraveling the Mysteries of the Universe’s Hidden Dimensions, joins author Lynda Obst in a look at the mindset and ideas behind cutting edge science.

The Don’T Miss LisT

five

SPONSORED LISTINGS Downtown On Ice Pershing Square, 532 S. Olive St., (213) 8474970 or laparks.org/pershingsquare. Through Jan. 21: Downtown on Ice returns, positing a patch of frozen water in an unlikely, but very welcome spot: Pershing Square. The seasonal facility has skates for rent for $2, with skate sessions costing $6. There will be an array of special events and programming at the rink for the next two months, including regular lunchtime concerts starting Dec. 17 and running through Jan 6.

photo courtesy of LA Plaza de Cultura y Artes

EVENTS


14 Downtown News

November 19, 2012

Twitter/DowntownNews

Shake It Like Shostakovich

Nov. 20, 10:30 p.m.: Ugly Kids and Criminal Hygeine. Nov. 21: Sid & the Twins, Mountains of the Moon and Black Beverly Heels. Nov. 25: Black Wolf and Kavales. Seven Grand 515 W. Seventh St., (213) 614-0737 or sevengrand.la. Nov. 19: John Daversa Small Band will strategically deploy their horns so as to tickle your aural faculties. Nov. 20: No, the Makers do not take requests. If as a part of their improvised jazz set they choose to play “California Girls” by Katy Perry, that is their prerogative. Nov. 21: Twas the night before Thanksgiving and through Seven Grand, a man named Deacon Jones was tickling the Hammond Organ with his hands. And from down at FIDM to up on Bunker Hill, the Downtowners gathered and drank until they were ill. The Smell 247 S. Main St., alley between Spring and Main streets, thesmell.org. Nov. 21: Oh, the stuffing is ready and the cranberries thoroughly sauced, so leave the kitchen and enjoy DJ sets from Yacht, David Scott Stone and Dane Chadwick.

photo by Mark McNulty

Continued from previous page so while you wait to see Norin & Rad be sure to give gratitude for the things that really matter in your life: earplugs, new pumps and MDMA. Nov. 24, 10 p.m.: Dilate those pupils and sweat profusely to celebrate the man who made BBC 1 a magnet for four on the floor electronica addicts. Pete Tong is in the mix. Nokia Theater 777 Chick Hearn Court, (213) 763-6020 or nokiatheatrelalive.com. Nov. 23, 2 and 5:30 p.m.: It’s not too late! You haven’t missed Yo Gabba Gabba. Nov. 24, 2 and 5 p.m.: And just in case you did in fact miss Yo Gabba Gabba, the Fresh Beat Band will be live in concert. Nov. 25, 6:30 p.m.: If Trey Songz’s prominent presence on Top 20 radio is any indication as to the length and breadth of the hip-hop artist’s talent, you can expect to hear “Say Aah” on repeat for a good two hours. One-Eyed Gypsy 901 E. First St., (626) 340-3529 or one-eyedgypsy.com. Nov. 21: RT N the 44s strum some dark folk. Redwood Bar and Grill 316 W. Second St., (213) 652-4444 or theredwoodbar.com. Nov. 19: Storey & The Tellers and the Tammy Olea Band. Nov. 20, 7 p.m.: Images, Emily’s Army and Prima Donna.

FILM Downtown Independent 251 S. Main St., (213) 617-1033 or downtownindependent.com.

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November 19, 2012 and West. What begins as an idyllic liaison in an enchanting land of cherry blossoms turns into the heartbreaking tragedy of an abandoned bride forced to make an excruciating decision. Tea, with Music East West Players, 120 Judge John Aliso St., (213) 6257000 or eastwestplayers.org. Nov. 21, 23 and 24, 8 p.m. and Nov. 25, 2 p.m.: Tea, With Music is about a group of Japanese war brides from World War II, now living in Kansas, who gather for a farewell tea ceremony for one of their friends who has mysteriously passed away. Through Dec. 9.

CLASSICAL MUSIC Friday, November 23 Petrenko Conducts Shostakovich Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave., (323) 850-2000 or laphil.com. Nov. 23, 8 p.m. and Nov. 24-25, 2 p.m.: Perhaps the most widely misunderstood conductor of the 20th century, Dimitri Shostakovich exists today as a collection of opinions, skewed biographies and notes of the old Soviet era. His Tenth Symphony will be on full display this weekend at the LA Phil.

MUSEUMS African American Firefighter Museum 1401 S. Central Ave., (213) 744-1730 or aaffmuseum.org. Ongoing: An array of firefighting relics dating to 1924, including a 1940 Pirsch ladder truck, an 1890 hose wagon, uniforms from New York, L.A. County and City of L.A. firefighters, badges, helmets, photo-

Downtown News 15

DowntownNews.com graphs and other artifacts. Annette Green Perfume Museum FIDM, second floor, 919 S. Grand Ave., (213) 6241200 or fidmmuseum.org. Ongoing: The FIDM Museum presents an exceptional collection of fragrance, cosmetics, and ephemera from the house of Lucien Lelong. This group of objects was graciously donated by Monique Fink, wife of artist Peter Fink, who worked for Monsieur Lelong as package designer and interior decorator. Ongoing: One of a kind, the museum is dedicated to enhancing our understanding the art, culture and science of the olfactory. Originally opened in New York City in 1999, the collection — 2,000 bottles, perfume presentations and documentary ephemera dating from the late 1800s to the present — was donated to FIDM in 2005. Also, “High Style: Perfume and the Haute Couture” features a selection of fragrance bottles and packaging that reflect the many ways that fame inspires design. California African American Museum 600 State Drive, (213) 744-7432 or caamuseum.org. Through Dec. 30: Shared Thread finds CAAM hosting local artists Charla Puryear, Nikki Presley, Duane Paul, Michael Massenburg, Pam Douglas and Tanya Aguinga. Through Jan. 20: Commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Civil War is African American Military Portraits, a collection of wet plate photographs from the seminal era. Through March 3: The Legacy of the Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Company chronicles the largest corporate owned collection of African-American art in the country. Ongoing: The multi-functional Gallery of Discovery offers visitors the opportunity to con-

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nect with the lineage of their own family, engage in artistic workshops, educational tours and other programs of historical discoveries. Hear recordings of actual living slaves from the Library of Congress archives and discover stories from the past. California Science Center 700 State Drive, (323) 724-3623 or californiasciencecenter.org. Through December 31: The only West Coast appearance of Cleopatra: The Exhibition. This dramatically staged 13,000-square-foot exhibit features the largest collection of Cleopatra-era artifacts from Egypt ever assembled in the U.S. Here for a limited time only. From the producers of the King Tut exhibition. Ongoing: Science in Toyland presents physics through favorite kids toys. This hands-on exhibit engages museum visitors with dominos, sails and roller coasters in a fun but informational primer on friction, momentum and chain reactions. Ongoing: The Science Center’s permanent exhibits are usually interactive and focus on human innovations and inventions as well as the life processes of living things. The lobby Science Court stays busy with the High Wire Bicycle, a Motion-Based Simulator, the Ecology Cliff Climb and Forty Years of Space Photography. The human body is another big focus: The Life Tunnel aims to show the connections between all life forms, from the single-celled amoeba to the 100-trillion-celled human being. The new Ecosystems exhibit explores how life on our planet is shaped by geophysical and biological processes. Chinese American Museum 425 N. Los Angeles St., (213) 485-8567 or camla.org. Permanent: Re-creation of the Sun Wing Wo, a Chinese general store and herbal shop, and Journeys: Stories of Chinese Immigration, an exhibit

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exploring Chinese immigration to the United States with an emphasis on community settlement in Los Angeles. Outlined into four distinct time periods, each is defined by an important immigration law and/or event, accompanied by a description and a personal story about a local Chinese American and their experiences in that particular historical period. El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument 124 Paseo de la Plaza, (213) 485-8372 or elpueblo. lacity.org. Ongoing: The whole of El Pueblo is called a “monument,” and of this monument’s 27 historic buildings, four function as museums: the Avila Adobe, the city’s oldest house; the Sepulveda House, home to exhibits and the monument’s Visitors Center; the Fire House Museum, which houses late 19th-century fire-fighting equipment; and the Masonic Hall, which boasts Masonic memorabilia. Check its website for a full slate of fiestas, including Cinco de Mayo, Dia De Los Muertos (Day of the Dead) in November and December’s beautiful candlelight procession, Las Posadas. Open daily, though hours at shops and halls vary. Grammy Museum L.A. Live, 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 765-6800 or grammymuseum.org. Through February: The most brutal museum exhibit ever, Golden Gods: The History of Heavy Metal, pays tribute to the music form through art, interactive metal making kiosks, memorabilia and good old heavy tunes. This is the only place on earth you can find Slipknot masks and Dimebag’s guitar on the same floor. Through February: Featuring more than 30 portraits from performances, rehearsals, recording ses-

Continued on next page

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November 19, 2012

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Continued from previous page sions and backstage gatherings, Herman Leonard: Documenting the Giants of Jazz is a definitive collection focusing on the years 1948 through 2000. Ongoing: The Beatles LOVE: A Fifth Anniversary Cirque du Soleil Showcase celebrates the anniversary of LOVE, the permanent Las Vegas stage show with signature show pieces, embellished costumes, original production instruments and more. Ongoing: White sequined gloves and other wardrobe pieces are the focal point of the new exhibit case paying tribute to the life and legacy of Michael Jackson. This special display serves as a follow-up to the Museum’s past exhibitions, Michael Jackson: HIStyle and Michael Jackson: A Musical Legacy. Housed on the Museum’s third floor, the launch of the new exhibit coincided with the second anniversary of Jackson’s death. Ongoing: Roland Live is a permanent installation courtesy of the electronic musical instrument maker, Roland Corporation. The exhibit gives visitors a chance to participate in the music-making process by playing a wide variety of Roland products, from V-Drums and BOSS pedals to VIMA keyboards and the MV-8800 Production Studio. Japanese American National Museum 369 E. First St., (213) 625-0414 or janm.org.

THE ANSWER TO LAST WEEK’S PUZZLE

Through January 20: The Japanese American National Museum presents Giant Robot Biennale 3, its third show in conjunction with Eric Nakamura, owner of Asian American pop culture juggernaut Giant Robot. The expansive show features a gallery of eight emerging artists along with a customized vinyl figure collection. Ongoing: Common Ground: The Heart of Community chronicles 130 years of Japanese American history, from the early days of the Issei pioneers to the present. LA Plaza de Cultura y Artes 501 N. Main St., (888) 488-8083 or lapca.org. Current: Los Angeles’ first Mexican American cultural center’s inaugural exhibition, LA Starts Here!, reveals the essential role of Mexicans and Mexican Americans in the founding and shaping of Los Angeles’ history and culture — a multicultural project from the very beginning. Ongoing: Calle Principal invites visitors of all ages to explore the Mexican American community of downtown Los Angeles during the 1920s. Located on the second floor of the historic Plaza House, Calle Principal is an evocative re-creation of 1920sera Main Street, at the time the heart of Los Angeles’ growing immigrant community. Museum of Contemporary Art, Geffen Contemporary 152 N. Central Ave., (213) 621-1741 or moca.org. Museum of Contemporary Art, Grand Avenue 250 S. Grand Ave., (213) 621-2766 or moca.org. Through January 14: The Panza Collection and Selections from Major Gifts of Beatrice and Philip Gersh, Rita and Taft Schreiber, and Marcia Simon Weisman features 92 works, comprising paintings, sculptures and works on paper that serve both as evidence of the intellectual and emotional challenge that is involved in collecting and as a testament to exemplary civic patronage and its enduring legacy in the cultural growth of Los Angeles. Through Jan. 14: Destroy the Picture: Painting The Void 1949-1962 looks at how some artists stopped simply painting on paper or canvas and, in the postwar years, instead started scarring, ripping and other ways defacing the source material. Ongoing: From the Recent Past: New Acquisitions highlights 50 artworks in a range of media — video, drawing, photography, sculpture, and painting — that were recently added through gifts and purchases to the museum’s permanent collection.

Drink Here now Far Bar

T

ucked behind the Chop Suey Café is the Far Bar, where intimacy and a sense of L.A. noir collide. If you can find the place, which you enter through the back of the cafe or via a skinny alley a few doors down, you can throw them back in the same spot author Raymond Chandler is rumored to have done the same. They have maybe the best whiskey list in Downtown outside Seven Grand (23-year Pappy Van Winkle anyone?) and two-dozen craft beers on tap. Try the wasabi fries. At 347 E. First St., (213) 617-9990. Ongoing: Installed chronologically, this selection of some of the most significant works from the museum’s permanent collection introduces major art movements of the 20th century, including abstract expressionism and pop art. Natural History Museum Natural History Museum, 900 Exposition Blvd., (213) 763–3466 or nhm.org. Ongoing: “Age of Mammals” tells an epic evolutionary story that spans 65 million years. But its theme can be distilled into just six words: Continents move, climates change, mammals evolve. Ongoing: The spectacular Humboldt fin whale specimen, “Finwhale Passage,” features the 63-footlong specimen, which weighs more than 7,000 pounds and has been re-articulated to create a more realistic impression of the living animal. An intrigu-

ing sound installation and interactive visitor components will accompany the display, which is one of the best and most complete large-whale articulations

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE

photo by Gary Leonard

16 Downtown News


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18 Downtown News

November 19, 2012

Twitter/DowntownNews

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All ads run for 2 weeks. Ads may be renewed after two weeks for 50% off the original price of the ad.

With a circulation of State Check $

Zip Credit Card $

47,000,

our classifieds get results!

circulAtioN: Jessica Tarr distributioN MANAGEr: Salvador Ingles distributioN AssistANts: Lorenzo Castillo, Gustavo Bonilla

________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________

2009 MERCEDES C300 SPORT Certified, Black/Gray, Only 23K Miles, 7 Speed 6073C / R055512 ONLY....$24,991 Call 888-319-8762. 2009 VW JETTACALIF. EDITION Certified, DOHC-MPFI, Red/ Black, Only 30K Miles ZV1820 / 9M146924 ONLY....$14,980 Call 888-781-8102. 2010 NISSAN CUBE 1.8S Certified, Only 8054 Miles, Black/ Gray N121007 / AT164993 ONLY.....$15,999 call 888-8385089

Restrictions: Offer good on private party ads only. Ads must be pre-paid by cash, check or credit card. Certain classifications excluded. Deadline: Thursday at noon for next issue.

Editor & PublishEr: Sue Laris GENErAl MANAGEr: Dawn Eastin

Los Angeles Downtown News 1264 W. First Street, Los Angeles, CA 90026 phone: 213-481-1448 fax: 213-250-4617 web: DowntownNews.com email: realpeople@downtownnews.com

facebook: L.A. Downtown News

twitter: DowntownNews

ExEcutivE Editor: Jon Regardie citY Editor: Richard Guzmán stAFF writEr: Ryan Vaillancourt coNtributiNG Editor: Kathryn Maese coNtributiNG writErs: Dave Denholm, Jeff Favre, Greg Fischer, Kristin Friedrich, Howard Leff, Ryan E. Smith, Marc Porter Zasada

AccouNtiNG: Ashley Schmidt AdvErtisiNG dirEctor: Steve Nakutin clAssiFiEd AdvErtisiNG MANAGEr: Catherine Holloway AccouNt ExEcutivEs: Yoji Cole, Catherine Holloway, Sol Ortasse sAlEs AssistANt: Claudia Hernandez circulAtioN: Jessica Tarr distributioN MANAGEr: Salvador Ingles distributioN AssistANts: Lorenzo Castillo, Gustavo Bonilla

Art dirEctor: Brian Allison AssistANt Art dirEctor: Yumi Kanegawa ProductioN ANd GrAPhics: Alexis Rawlins

The Los Angeles Downtown News is the must-read newspaper for Downtown Los Angeles and is distributed every Monday throughout the offices and residences of Downtown Los Angeles.

PhotoGrAPhEr: Gary Leonard

One copy per person.


November 19, 2012

2011 CHEVY MALIBU LT Silver/Gray, ABS, CD, AC, Loaded UC134R/ BF135241 ONLY....$17,995 Call 888-8799608

For a complete list of our pre-owned inventory, go to www.DTLAMOTORS.com Autos WAnted DONATE YOUR CAR, truck or boat to Heritage for the Blind. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. 888-9026851. (Cal-SCAN)

ITEMS FOR SALE MedicAl MerchAndise ATTENTION diabetics with Medicare. Get a free Talking Meter and diabetic testing supplies at No Cost, plus free home delivery! Best of all, this meter eliminates painful finger pricking! Call 888-781-9376. (Cal-SCAN) ATTENTION sleep APNEA sufferers with Medicare. Get free CPAP Replacement Supplies at No Cost, plus free home delivery! Best of all, prevent red skin sores and bacterial infection! Call 888-699-7660. (Cal-SCAN) MEDICAL ALERT for Seniors 24/7 monitoring. Free Equipment. Free Shipping. Nationwide Service. $29.95/Month CALL Medical Guardian Today 866944-5935. (Cal-SCAN)

MEET SINGLES Right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now 1-800945-3392. (Cal-SCAN) speciAl events L.A. NEO-NOIR EROTIC FILM FESTIVAL. The World’s Sexiest Darkest Crime Films. Saturday, December 1st, 8:00 pm at The Downtown Independent Theater 251 S. Main St., Los Angeles, CA 90012 LANNEFF.COM.

LEGAL Fictitious Business nAMe Fictitious Business name statement File no. 20122043930 The following person is doing business as: NUDE, 484 E. Cali-

fornia Blvd. #21, Pasadena, CA 91106, are hereby registered by the following registrant: Dennis Yu, 484 E. California Blvd. #21, Pasadena, CA 91106. This business is conducted by a limited liability company. Registrant began to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on October 12, 2012. NOTICE—This fictitious name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before that time. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et. seq. Business and Professions Code). Pub. 11/5, 11/12, 11/19, 11/26/12

DID YOU KNOW that Ten Million adults tweeted in the past month, while 164 million read a newspaper in print or online in the past week? Advertise in 240 California newspapers for one low cost. Your 25 word classified ad will reach over 6 million+ Californians. For brochure call Elizabeth (916)288-6019. (CalSCAN)

madison hotel Clean furnished single rooms. 24-hour desk clerk service. •Daily, $30.00 •Weekly, $109.00 •Monthly, $310.00 (213) 622-1508 423 East 7th St.

fictitiOus

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the LOFT expert!

Downtown since 2002

Singing, dancing, performing and fun! For boys & girls ages 3 and up!

SunshineGenerationLA.com 909-861-4433

MSRP $23545 Carson Nissan Discount $2457 Factory Rebate $1500 NMAC Captive Cash $500 College Grad Discount $600 Net Price $18,488

BUY FOR ONLY

18,488

$

net price

Lease for only

129

169

$

per month for 42 mos

Voted BEST Downtown Residential Real Estate Agent!

• Adjacent to Metro Gold Line • 1130 to 3025 square feet • Work downtown, enjoy no traffic! Call today 626.396.0800 or visit RaymondRenaissance.com

$0 Down $0 1st Mo. Payment

$0 Security Deposit $0* Due at Signing

Plus tax 42-month closed end lease on approved VW Credit., $0 due at signing. (Excludes title, tax, 1st mo. pymt, options and dealer fees). MSRP $17, with manual trans. $0 security deposit. Residual $9,783.80. $0.20/mile over 35,000 miles. # 390232. Offer ends 11-30-12

NEW ’13 Chevy Malibu LS Lease for only

199

$

125 N. Raymond Avenue Pasadena, CA 91103

per month for 36 mos

Sales and Marketing by Polaris Group. DRE License # 01499250.

Furnished single unit with kitchenette, bathroom. Excellent location. Downtown LA. Weekly rate $275 inc.

Monthly from $600 utilities paid. (213) 612-0348

Fully furnished with TV, telephone, microwave, refrigerator. Full bathroom. Excellent location. Downtown LA. Weekly maid service.

Monthly from $695 utilities paid. (213) 627-1151

is your teen experiencing:

• School problems? • Conflict at home or with friends?

Adolescent support group now forming Ages 13-17 low fee

Plus tax, 36 month closed end lease on approved credit. $0 Security Deposit. $2599 Due at Signing (Excludes taxes, title, other options and dealer fees). Based on MSRP of $23,150. Residual $13,427. $0.25 per mile over 20,000 miles per year. 1 At this Price. # F179489.

NEW ’13 Mercedes C250 Lease for only

299

$

per month for 48 mos

+ tax 48 month closed end lease on approved credit. $2399 due at signing excluding title, taxes, options, acquisition fees, dealer fees & first payment. Zero Sec. Dep. .25cents/mile over 10K miles/year. 5 to choose. MSRP $36255.

NEW ’13 Audi A3 2.0T TDI Lease for only

299

$

per month for 42 mos

call Marney stofflet, lcsW

(323) 662-9797

4344 Fountain Ave. (at sunset), suite A los Angeles, cA 90029

3.0L V6, White, Alloys, CD & more. CU0784R / A127666

NISSAN OF DOWNTOWN L.A.

RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE

20 Minutes from Downtown LA in Pasadena.

$7,795 2011 Nissan Cube ............................. Certified, White Pearl, Auto, 17K miles, C121756-1 / 212442 $12,895 2011 Nissan Sentra 2.0S .................. Certified, Red Brick Pearl, Low miles, Spoiler. CU827R / 651168 $12,995 2007 Ford Taurus SEL .......................

NEW ’13 Nissan Altima 2.5S

TheLoftExpertGroup.com

Spacious Modern Lofts and Live/Work Spaces from $499K - $899K.

CARSON NISSAN

888-845-2267 1505 E. 223rd St., Carson • carsonnissan.com

Plus 311 More New & Used In Stock & On Sale!

Lease for

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w w w.DTLAMOTORS.com

1 at this price, #C121370/295078

NEW ’13 Volkswagen Jetta S

Bill Cooper 213.598.7555

(213) 481-1448

Sunshine Generation

NEW ’12 Nissan Rogue

Plus tax, 39 month closed end lease on approved credit. $0 Sec. Dep. $5359 due at Signing. (Excludes taxes, title, other options & dealer fees). Residual $14,280. Model # 13113. $0.15/mile over 12,000 miles/year. 5 At this Price.

TM

(Note: The Downtown News does not perform filing services)

Children’s Performing Group

888-I-LOVE-LA (456-8352)

per month for 39 mos

(2 blocks west of San Pedro St.) Starting Jan. 1, 2011

DOWNTOWN L.A. AUTO GROUP

$

ANNOUNCEMENTS notices

Downtown News 19

DowntownNews.com

+ tax, 42 month closed end lease on approved credit. $350 Sec. Deposit. $4343.26 Due at Signing. Excludes taxes, title, other options and dealer fees Lease price includes Audi Loyalty Rebate. Residual $18,099.20. $0.25 per mile over 10,000 miles per year. 1 at this payment DA011080

NEW ’13 Porsche Panamera Lease for only

968

$

per month for 48 mos

Plus tax 48-month closed end lease offered to highly qualified lessees on approved credit. $5050 due at signing. (Excludes title, tax, 1st month’s pymt, options and dealer fees). $0 security deposit. Residual of $39,057. $0.20/mile over 10,000 miles/year. 1 at this offer #DL012425.

888-838-5089 635 W. Washington Blvd. • downtownnissan.com

$6,999 $13,999 Only 42,000 Miles!! Must see. (N130227-1 / 7N418393 2005 Nissan Armada SE ................... $15,999 5.6L V8, Silver/Blk, Leather, 38K miles. NI4111 / 5N706134 2002 Nissan Altima Sedan .................. Only 87K miles, Looks & runs great. N130239-1 / 2C197821

2007 Nissan Altima Sedan ...............

Plus 296 More New & Used In Stock & On Sale!

VOLKSWAGEN OF DOWNTOWN L.A. 888-781-8102 1900 S. Figueroa St. • vwdowntownla.com

$14,590 2009 VW EOS Convertible ............... Certified, Turbo, Blk/Blk, 18K Miles, Lthr. ZV1927 / 9V021835 $21,468 2011 VW Routan SE .......................... Certified, V6, 3.6L, Gray/Gray, 14K Miles. ZV1719 / BR718035 $21,994 2009 VW Jetta Calif Edit. .................. Certified, 2.5L 20V, Gray/Blk, 32K miles. ZV1931 / 9M151791

Plus 431 More New & Used In Stock & On Sale!

FELIX CHEVROLET

888-304-7039 3300 S. Figueroa St. • felixchevrolet.com

$12,995 Auto, White/Black, Only 16K Miles, 32 MPG. UC306 / BS624774 $13,995 2011 Chevy Equinox LT .................... Auto, Air, Blue/Black, ABS and more. F13065-1 / B6230343 $20,995 2010 Chevy Cobalt LT ....................... Auto, Air, Red/Black, 37 MPG, Low miles. UC331R / A7227947

2010 Chevy HHR LS ..........................

Plus 198 More New & Used In Stock & On Sale!

DOWNTOWN LA MOTORS 888-319-8762 1801 S. Figueroa St. • mbzla.com

Mercedes-Benz

$23,991 Certified, Steel Gray/Silver, Low Miles. 121564-1 / 9F261711 $27,991 2010 Mercedes GLK 350 ................... $29,497 Certified, 3.5L V6, Gray/Gray, 29K Miles. 5945C / AF324695 2009 Mercedes C300 ........................ Certified, Paladium Silver, Only 28K Miles. 6327C / F224972

2009 Mercedes CLK350 .....................

Plus 419 More New & Used In Stock & On Sale!

AUDI OF DOWNTOWN L.A. 888-583-0981 1900 S. Figueroa St. • audidtla.com

$29,814 2011 Audi A4 2.0T Premium ........... Certified, Turbo, 5849 Miles, White/Black. ZA10527 / BN049914 $30,994 2011 Audi A6 Quattro 3.0T .............. Certified, AWD, 15,659 miles, Gray/Blk. ZA10322 / BN028945 $45,980 2009 Audi Q5 Quattro ...................... Certified, Prem. Pkg., Gray/Blk, AWD. ZA10248 / 9A031839

Plus 116 More New & Used In Stock & On Sale!

PORSCHE OF DOWNTOWN L.A.

888-685-5426 1900 S. Figueroa St. • porschedowntownla.com

$41,898 2008 Porsche Carerra 4 .................... $58,981 Certified, White/Blk, Like New. P12385-2 / 88710489 2010 Porsche Panamera 4S ............. Certified, Dark Blue/Luxor Beige, V8, 26K Miles # AL064900 $77,892 2009 Porsche Cayman ...................... Certified, Silver/Beige, Auto, 18” wheels. ZP1543 / 9U761092

Plus 112 More New & Used In Stock & On Sale!


20 Downtown News

November 19, 2012

Twitter/DowntownNews

Industriel Continued from page 6 riously named Farmers Market Massacre, a 30-ingredient Bloody Mary mix of farmers market finds charred on the grill, pureed and garnished with the restaurant’s pickled vegetables. Food standouts include the goachetta, a de-boned goat that is rolled, marinated and braised. It takes five hours to prepare and comes with gnocchi, mint, olives and smoked red pepper sugo. “What you get on the plate is basically a head-to-tail piece of braised goat meat,” Antonishek said. “There’s no actual head on it, but everything else is there.” In the same vein is the rabbit pelmeni, a dish Antonishek described as Russian tortellini that was inspired by an old family recipe. It’s made with shiitake mushrooms, mascarpone cheese, truffle oil and, of course, rabbit meat. Hakobyan said Industriel is serving about 250 people a day, and expects that figure eventually to double. So far, no one has come in asking about the star with the smiley face. Industriel is at 609 S. Grand Ave., (213) 488-8020 or industrielfarm.com. Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com.

photos by Gary Leonard

The two-floor restaurant contains some unusual decor, including a cascade of bear-shaped honey jars and a wall-sized photo of a nude woman.

Downtown, it’s not just big business anymore!

Grand Tower 255 south Grand avenue Leasing Information 213 229 9777

Promenade Towers 123 south Figueroa street Leasing Information 213 617 3777

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Concierge ~ Pool / Spa / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Gas BBQ Grills ~ Recreation Room

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Pool / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Covered Parking

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove, Microwave & Dishwasher (most units) ~ Central Air Conditioning & Heating ~ Balconies (most units)

On-site: ~ Dry Cleaners / Dental Office / Restaurants

Now For Call n Specials Move-I

8 7 7 - 2 65 - 714 6

museum Tower 225 south olive street Leasing Information 213 626 1500

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove & Dishwasher ~ Central Air & Heating ~ Solariums and/or Balconies

On Site: ~ Convenience Store / Coffee House / Yogurt Shop / Beauty Salon

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Concierge ~ Pool / Spa / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Gas BBQ Grills ~ Recreation Room

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove, Microwave & Dish washer (most units) ~ Central Air & Heating ~ Balconies (most units)

It’s our business to make you comfortable... at home, downtown. Corporate and long term residency is accommodated in high style at the Towers Apartments. Contemporary singles, studio, one bedroom and two bedroom apartment homes provide fortunate residents with a courteous full service lobby attendant, heated pool, spa, complete fitness center, sauna and recreation room with kitchen. Beautiful views extend from the Towers’ lofty homes in the sky. Mountain vistas and slender skyscrapers provide an incredible back drop to complement your decor. Far below are a host of businesses ready to support your pampered downtown lifestyle. With spectacular cultural events nearby, even the most demanding tastes are satisfied. Downtown, it’s not just big business anymore. Visit the Towers Apartments today.

TOWERS T H E

A PA RT M E N T S

www.TowersApartmentsLA.com

MAID SERVICE • FURNITURE • HOUSEWARES • CABLE • UTILITIES • PARKING RESIDENCES: SINGLES • STUDIO • ONE BEDROOM • TWO BEDROOM

11-19-12  

Los Angeles Downtown News is a free weekly newspaper distributed in and around downtown Los Angeles.

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