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APRIL 2013 | L3MAGAZINE.COM

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THE VETERAN

BURRO BANTON

THE MUSICAL MINISTER

RICARDO CLARKE WELCOME THE SUN

JAH SUN TAMU CHAMBO & A VEGAN PICNIC URBAN MASALA OFFERS METROPOLITAN STYLE MUSIC CHARTS AND MORE!

SNOOP LION

RETURN OF THE KING


LIFE

L3MAGAZINE.COM IS NOT JUST A MUSIC MAGAZINE IT’S LIFE, LOVE & LYRICS

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WELCOME

REMEMBERING DONNA SUMMERS

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

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THE EVERGLADES

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THE EVERGLADES

THE EVERGLADES HEIKE DEMPSTER

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trip to the Everglades should be part of everyone’s South Florida experience so I finally took the time to get familiar with these subtropical wetlands firsthand via an airboat ride. The Everglades, a unique ecosystem, occupies 733.6 square miles between Orlando and the Florida Bay. The sawgrass marshes, cypress swamps and mangrove forests have been designated a wetland of global importance since the 1970s and efforts are being made to restore and preserve this natural gem and ensure the survival of many endangered species. When thinking about the Everglades the first thing that comes to mind is probably alligators. It was quite an exciting experience to observe the “King of the Everglades” aka the American Alligator in its natural habitat, often much closer than anticipated. We were basically greeted by a 6 foot long alligator next to the ticket booth but I took the animal to be a sculpture until I walked past a second time, and to my surprise, saw it opening its eyes. Alligators relax next to benches meant to invite tourists to have a seat and seem unperturbed by excited children and camera flashes. Photos by ROBERT DEMPSTER

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THE EVERGLADES

The alligators roam astoundingly freely in the ecotourism parks, which provide guided tours and airboat rides. I was told they do not attack humans unless they are poked or touched. According to our guide alligators tend to be wary of adult humans and generally will not attack “an animal� significantly bigger or taller than themselves. While my guide seemed quite knowledge, I would be lying if I told you that I found this even remotely reassuring. Suffice it to say, my eyes were wide until I was safely on my way home. The flora and fauna of the Everglades is diverse and unique to South Florida. The wetlands are home to more than 1000 plants and many species of birds, snakes, lizards, turtles, frogs and snails. Some more unexpected inhabitants are the rabbit, bobcat, manatee, black bear and the Florida panther. Unfortunately, with a population of less than 50 animals sightings of the panthers are rare and decimated habitat, inbreeding and high levels of mercury in its prey are a putting this mammal at risk for extinction.

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THE EVERGLADES

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THE EVERGLADES

An airboat ride is an ideal and fun way to discover the Everglades. The tour guides are knowledgeable about the history, environment, flora and fauna. The roaring trip across the saw grass marshes and through the shallow water streets lets you observe animals and get close to nature without much artificial manicure often seen in Florida. I took an airboat ride at the Everglades Safari Park. For more info check out http://www.evergladessafaripark.com/

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THE EVERGLADES

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APRIL 2013 | NO. 020 CEO & EDITOR-IN-CHIEF VP & CHIEF CREATIVE OFFICER PUBLISHER ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

NATASHA VON CASTLE DOMINIQUE RAPHAEL L3 GROUP OF COMPANIES - KEVIN SMALLS PAIGE HARRIS

EDITORIAL MANAGING EDITOR & LIFESTYLE EDITOR CONTRIBUTING EDITOR & CARIBBEAN AFFAIRS EDITOR CONTRIBUTING EDITOR & MUSIC EDITOR TRAVEL EDITOR MUSIC REVIEW EDITOR BEAUTY EDITOR COPY EDITOR SENIOR WRITER CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

ALLIE MASON TRICIA SPENCE TRE CARN SAIDAH GOMEZ JILL MAHONEY LONDYN NIKOLE XAVIER RAPHAEL STARLEETAH BROWN HEIKE DEMPSTER, MARCUS WELLER, NIYAH MYC, KARLA ASHLEY, ANASTASIA SARADOC, AEYOLA GEORGE, MIMI MAMICHULA, MARCO, ZAKADA MILTON, LANRE DAVIES, KERRY K. TAYLOR, KENDON POLAK, JENNIFER MENSTER SHENEA ‘PIA’ JORDINE INTERNS EDWARD BISHOP, ALICIA KEMP, JONATHAN NEWTON ART

ART DIRECTOR SENIOR DESIGNER ART ASSISTANT RETOUCHER INTERACTIVE WEB DEVELOPER

SANDRA HERNANDEZ SANCHA DESIGNS JAMALL THOMPSON JEROME MABINI TENIKA JONES

ADVERTISING ADVERTISING & PROMOTIONS MANAGER CHRISTINE HALL ADVERTISING ASSISTANT TERESA MAGLOIRE CIRCULATION CIRCULATION/MARKETING DIRECTOR RICHARD NEILSON SINGLE COPY SALES MANAGER NIGEL COLLINS

“L3” (ISSIN 1020-2000) is published monthly (Jan, Feb, Mar, Apr, May, June, July, Aug, Sept, Oct, Nov, Dec) by L3 Group of Companies, 123 blank street, Scarborough, ON L1R2H2. Reproduction without permission is prohibited. Copyright © 2011. Title “L3” registered CAN Patent and Trademark Office. Printed in Canada. MANUSCRIPTS AND ART: The Publisher assumes no responsibility for return of unsolicited manuscripts, art, photos or negatives. SUBSCRIPTION INQUIRIES (CAN) 1-289-217-2800 or l3magazine@hotmail.com. SUBSCRIPTION RATES and Possessions: 14.95 CAD/Year plus applicable taxes. SUBSCRIPTION PROBLEMS call 1-289-217-2800 or email l3magazine@hotmail.com.


WELCOME

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Making a Difference You have the power to make a difference. Whatever you see as being wrong, or whatever you feel needs to be improved, you are the difference that it needs, but there’s a catch! As glamorous and well intended and braga-doe-shus as it sounds, making a difference is not easy; in fact, making a difference is harder than not taking making a difference at all. Making a difference means all eyes on you, the expectations, the daggers and the comments. The plotters, the would-be thieves; the haters and the snakes in the grass all lie in wait to take or destroy the difference you are trying to make ‌ BUT! You are blessed! Blessed to do whatever it is you are inspired to do, you will receive gifts that act as tools which in turn build your difference to and in the world. Your difference may begin as a small gesture, and will grow to feed thousands in time. Not only will you grow to feed thousands, your story will be shared and will become the blueprint in others lives so they too can travel on the same path after you. This month, L3 highlights a few people who dared to step out to make a difference being Snoop Lion, Jah Sun and Ricardo Clarke. In time, we hope to include your story in our pages! As always, throw your comments >>> @NatashaVonC

Natasha Von Castle

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LIFE

WAY S TO R A I S E Y O U R C R E D I T S C O R E

4 WAYS TO RAISE A BAD CREDIT SCORE SHEIRESA NGO FOR BLACKENTERPRISE.COM

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fter struggling for years with credit issues, you’ve put a plan in place to develop a budget, pay your debts on time, and spend wisely. You’re doing all you can and you’re ready for a fresh start, but your credit score is still not where you’d like it to be. What now? Here are a few tips for getting an added boost to your credit score.


WAY S TO R A I S E Y O U R C R E D I T S C O R E

1. Ask for an increase in your credit line. Your credit utilization ratio — the percentage of available credit you’re using — accounts for 30% of your FICO score. By increasing the amount of unused credit, you can raise your score. However, before you do this, ask whether the issuer will run a credit check. Note that if your credit-card issuer requires a credit check before granting an increase, you could possibly lower your score. When a potential lender requests a credit report (due to you voluntarily applying for credit), this is considered a “hard” inquiry, and it might cause you to lose roughly five points from your FICO score. If you have a short credit history (few accounts) and several hard inquiries have been made over an extended period of time, you’re more likely to lose a few points. But if you have a long credit history, and relatively few hard inquiries, you may not be affected at all. A “soft” inquiry, which is when you pull your own credit report, does not affect your credit score. 2. Check your credit report. It’s been said over and over by financial experts, but it’s an important piece of advice that many people don’t follow. In a recent study, the Federal Trade Commission found that as many as 42 million Americans have errors in their credit reports. And some who had credit reporting errors corrected saw their score change by as much as 25 to 100 points. If you haven’t seen your credit report lately, go to annualcreditreport.com to get it right now — it’s free.

1. Pay off your balances. Another way to increase 4. your credit utilization ratio is to completely pay off your debt. In addition, having more available credit will cause potential lenders to view you as less of a credit risk. A word of caution: If debt settlement is part of your “get-out-of-debt” plan, be aware that forgiven debt that is more than $600 is viewed by the IRS as miscellaneous income. Consequently, it will be reported to the IRS and you will receive Form 1099-C, Cancellation of Debt. The amount on this form must be included on your tax return as taxable income. That means that you’ll be expected to pay taxes on the forgiven debt. (However, there are some exclusions, such as debt discharged in bankruptcy and some mortgage defaults as outlined in the Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act). So keep an eye on your mail.

3. Apply for a secured credit card. If you don’t have a credit card, perhaps due to discharging debt in a chapter 7 bankruptcy, you can rebuild your credit this way. A secured credit card requires you to make a cash collateral deposit with the issuing bank. This amount becomes your credit line. After you’ve made timely payments for about one to two years, you might be eligible for an upgrade to an unsecured card. But before you look into this option, make sure that the bank reports payments to all three of the major credit reporting bureaus (Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion). Try to find a card with low fees and favorable terms. For help finding a card that’s right for you, check out Bankrate.com’s handy list of secured credit card issuers. L3MAGAZINE.COM | APRIL 2013

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L I F E S T Y L E B U S I N E S S V S . S TA RT U P

WHY A LIFESTYLE BUSINESS COULD BE A BETTER FIT FOR YOU THAN A STARTUP

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still remember my first morning living in Bangkok back in 2010. It was 50 degrees warmer than it was back in my hometown of Portland, and when I walked outside, I saw an elephant walking down the street. An elephant; on the street! When was the last time you experienced something as unexpected as an elephant on the street? I bet it’s been awhile. Some 9 to 5 jobs are fulfilling, but all too often, we find ourselves looking for other options that allow us to experience more freedom in our lives. I quit my job as a financial analyst three years ago for this very reason. But instead of switching careers, I decided to build a lifestyle business. During the past few years of working for myself, one question that seems to come up repeatedly is “Are you like a startup?” The answer, no; not like a startup.

SEAN OGLE FOR BRAZEN CAREERIST.COM

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L I F E S T Y L E B U S I N E S S V S . S TA RT U P

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L I F E S T Y L E B U S I N E S S V S . S TA RT U P

Lifestyle Business vs. Startup The primary purpose of a lifestyle business is to make a certain level of income that will allow you to live the lifestyle you desire. Lifestyle businesses vary in size, and they’re often run by only one person. Since that person’s main goal is to create a lifestyle, most of these entrepreneurs aren’t looking to scale the business quickly. In contrast, startup entrepreneurs usually take a new idea, or a unique spin on an existing idea, and try to scale the business as quickly as possible. This often means searching for funding and eventually looking to sell for a big payday. If you’ve been considering an alternative to your employment situation, don’t assume the startup route is your only choice. Lifestyle entrepreneurship, which could allow you to leverage your current skills while being in full control of how the business operates, might be a smarter option. The Entrepreneurial Clash Startup entrepreneurs and lifestyle entrepreneurs share many of the same fundamental goals: • Quest for freedom • Working to make a difference in the world • Wanting to make money Yet for some reasons, these two worlds don’t tend to get along. I can’t tell you how often I go to an event or cocktail party where I’ll meet someone in the startup world, tell them what I do, watch them roll their eyes and then look for the most convenient exit out of the conversation. The fact is, however, for most people, a lifestyle business is not only more feasible, but also a better fit. So, why is a lifestyle business likely a better fit for you than a startup or traditional job? Let’s take a look: Actual Freedom—Not Just Perceived Freedom One common trait every single entrepreneur has is the quest for freedom and autonomy. We want to be our own boss, jet off in the middle of a Tuesday if we feel like it and have full control over the trajectory of our lives. What often happens in the startup world is that founders unknowingly create a bonafide 9 to 5 for themselves—although it’s usually more like a 6:30 to 9:00. The quest for autonomy becomes overshadowed by a burning goal to become the next Instagram—which, let’s face it, probably won’t happen. Jun Loayza, who has successfully raised more than a million dollars for various startups, recognized this and left his current company to enter the lifestyle world. When you’re the only employee, it’s much easier to do what you want. If a friend invites you out to the golf course on a Wednesday morning, you can go, because you dictate when you work and when you play.

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L I F E S T Y L E B U S I N E S S V S . S TA RT U P

Ability to Make a Difference in the World Everyone wants to believe they will change the world. Every other startup these days has that in their mission statement. This declaration can mean any number of things. Some startups, like Facebook for instance, have legitimately changed the way the world operates. But you don’t have to be Facebook to do that. Perhaps your version of changing the world involves a much smaller group of people. If I reach my goal of helping 50 people get out of their day jobs this year, that’s 50 worlds changed—which is significant in my mind. Regardless of the size of your business, I’ll take a change with depth over breadth any day. Making Money What entrepreneur doesn’t want to sell their company and make millions? The problem with this traditional startup path is that the deck is stacked against you. According to the Small Business Administration, only about one-third of businesses make it to the 10-year mark. I’m willing to bet the majority of those that don’t meet the following criteria: • They make their founders a decent salary. • They’re tough to sell. Yes, you can make money with a startup; we all know people who have. But how many times have they failed on the way to getting there? And how many months of ridiculous hours have their founders had to put in to get there? More importantly, how many got the big payday they were searching for? Not many. With a lifestyle business like freelancing, information product creation or software development, you can be profitable right from the beginning. You get to decide how much overhead you want to take on, and best of all, you can do it from anywhere. Dane Maxwell has made more with his software and information services than most startups could ever hope to make in their lifetimes. I’ve done SEO consulting, built an HDR photography business and created a community of entrepreneurs that I’ve managed from from China to Bali and even Jordan. In a startup capacity, I’d be lucky to visit any of those places for a week before I’d need to be back in the office. Which Path is Right for You? Is there a right or wrong choice between a startup or lifestyle business? Absolutely not. You have to decide what’s right for you. But while your friends are slaving away at their exhausting startup jobs, you could be traveling and enjoying your life right now.

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INFLUENTIAL WOMEN

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T R E S E M M E ’ S K E R AT I N S M O OT H

THE BEAUTY OF TRESEMME’S KERATIN SMOOTH JENNIFER MENSTER

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he one things we wear every day, and receive the most comments on, especially if you’re a female is your hair. From color to style to upkeep, people always have something to say, especially when it looks bad. Our friends at Klout sent us TreSemmé’s Keratin Smooth product line which we tested, and the results are impressive ... it’s like treating your hair to a spa appointment! The shampoo, which is white and thick like cream, lathers easily and is almost like conditioner in that it coats every strand of hair, cleaning from root to tip. Similar can be said of the conditioner. Because of the keratin infusion, the conditioner remains on the hair, even after rinse which acts as a shield of protection from the heat of styling and the dryness of winter. The heat protection shine spray is the icing on the cake before we set blow dryer and flat iron to our hair. Cherry (our office administrator), Natasha and I each tried the product and each of us had the same results. Given that our hair texture represents 3 different ethnicities, we were all impressed that our hair response was that of being shiny, silky and smooth! Most product lines do not cater to ethnic women’s hair so we are especially impressed that TreSemmé’s Keratin Smooth is a product all ladies can use and have the same satisfaction. With TreSemmé, your hair is pampered.

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T R E S E M M E ’ S K E R AT I N S M O OT H

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Available Exclusively in Canada

Buy You YOLO Rasta Bracelets Now! 2-Lined Music Hut - Malvern Town Centre TreaJah Isle Records & Tapes - 1514 Eglinton Ave. W. Twitter: @2LINEDMUSIC | @TreajahIsle 26

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FASHION

REELISM VS. REALISM

Ashley Madekwe of Revenge: Ring My Bell

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REELISM VS. REALISM

REELISM VS. REALISM EDWARD BISHOP

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ou ask yourself each New Year how to stay current with the monthly trends revolving in media. Over decades we’ve seen how fashion and film of all sorts simultaneously coexist, showing prime examples of how to mix individuality with a stylistic approach. Most know “Vogue” is not the center of the universe, so in reality, knowing that Dolce & Gabbana may have photo-sourced the Catholic Church’s Vatican wall for their Fall 2013 Collection is not pressing. The real question is: Where do we look in media to find the proper balance of Style and Entertainment? If renting a home next a matriarch family who destroyed your life as a child, by framing your father as a terrorist, having him killed and you committed to a mental institution interest you, then I would suggest your first media pick would be ABC’s Revenge. Co-star, Ashley Madekwe definitely seems to be molding her character’s image uncommonly and of course positively, as her own personal blog demonstrates similar looks seen on the television show. The name of the blog is Ring My Bell (Cue Anita Ward, anyone?). There you will see Ashley has taken a liking to the still sought after Isabel Marant sneakers. The starlet’s overall look fuses a variety of eras which blend by various colors, prints and shapes.

Girls (Jemima Kirke, , Allison Williams, Lena Dunham, Zosia Mamet) L3MAGAZINE.COM | APRIL 2013

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REELISM VS. REALISM

My second media pick would have to be HBO’s Girls, starring Lena Dunham. The show’s soundtrack and clothes are fascinating. Unlike Revenge, Girls gives a far more downtown and realistic vibe when it comes to style. The show is raw, humorous and spontaneous, but it all works with the well-developed character personas. Think Sex and The City in Brooklyn about 20-30 years ago. Designer, Cynthia Rowley even made an appearance at the Premier Party. Marnie Michaels played by Allison Williams is a character to keep your eye on in this quirky drama as her style is far more conservatively chic. Or, if preferred, Jessa Johansson played by British born actress, Jemima Kirke gives a hip London meets Williamburg aura to the well acclaimed show. These are indubitably two of the strongest personalities on the show and it is seen in the way they’re attired. Like me if you are disappointed in The Carrie Dairies, focus your attention right here to get the dose of Sex and The City you’ve been yearning. My last pick is far more literal. However it gives you a chance to see a nurturing side we have yet to experience with supermodel, Naomi Campbell. The Face is hosted by photographer, Nigel Barker (former co-judge of America’s Next Top Model). Three renowned models pick a set of girls for their team and the coaches mold them to be the face of ULTA Beauty, one of the fastest growing beauty retailers in the United States. Coaches; Karolina Kurkova, Coco Rocha and of course the legendary, Naomi Campbell are also in a competition amongst each other, making this show not just about the contestants alone. Tempers will flare and things get heated. In the midst of the drama all three coaches bring their A-Game when it comes to wardrobe in an array of high-fashion for our eyes to feast.

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REELISM VS. REALISM

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URBAN MASALA

URBAN MASALA OFFERS METROPOLITAN STYLE CONTRIBUTED

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ew York Fashion Week represents a melting pot of conceptual fashion ideas shared not only in a country of mixed cultures, but the city itself has profoundly mixed cultural roots. This is why the fashion line Urban Masala is so apropos for metropolitan markets such as New York.

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URBAN MASALA

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URBAN MASALA

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URBAN MASALA

Urban Masala, represents the mix of cultures and lifestyles in urban centers across America. There are many cultures that can identify with the eclectic mix of patterns applied to the garments. Much of the line features one-of-a-kind elements where the shape repeats but the content changes. The Designer, Sehar Peerzada creates clothing which are designed as ensembles, but are sold as separates that can be mixed and matched to the wearers taste. This is a design feature that has significant economical benefits as well as aesthetic benefits to the customer. The line makes for an ideal vacation wardrobe that offers separates which are versatile and easy to layer, mix and match. The Urban Masala collection incorporates handmade, non-seasonal fabrics from around the world; as well as unique shapes of pants, tops, jackets, shawls and dresses --which are easy to fit and comfortable to wear. The line was intentionally created using elastic waists; with few zippers or buttons for sized fitting to be less of a definitive issue. “Urban Masala is a cultural hybrid collection because it brings the ethnic mix to a level where it is wearable, not as costume but as everyday wear. Many people won’t wear ethnic clothing because it’s perceived as a costume. As a form of cultural expression you’re not obligated to wear the complete cultural dress anyway. Because we are in an era where corporate culture is not supportive of cultural dress as everyday wear, people tend to take a little dab of culture and apply it to contemporary dress. This is something I noticed when I sold full mud-cloth coats through Nordstrom some years ago. Mudcloth was my entree into Nordstrom Department Stores. The coats sold well, so I know that there is a market for cultural hybrid fashions,” states Peerzada. Urban Masala offers women alluring dresses without women being sexually over exposed. Peerzada proudly defines her approach to aesthetic design as being “old school” because she likes ensembles that are matching, as does her customer base. Typically, the younger generation consciously purchase separates; and looks to mix different designer pieces. The Urban Masala fashion line is a new moniker for what Peerzada has always created using hand block printing on non-seasonal fabrics. The line is intended for a broad customer base that identifies with a cultural hybrid approach to achieve a modest metropolitan style.

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D E S S E RT W I T H TA M U C H A M B O

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D E S S E RT W I T H TA M U C H A M B O

PLANNING A SPECIAL EVENING MEANS PLANNING A SPECIAL MENU WHICH WE HAVE FOR YOU...

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D E S S E RT W I T H TA M U C H A M B O

L3’S ENTREE MENU SELECTIONS WITH TAMBU CHAMBOTT

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D E S S E RT W I T H TA M U C H A M B O

PAN SEARED TOFU IN BLACK BEAN & GARLIC SAUCE Marinate for tofu

2 cups of vegetable broth 2 bay leaves ½ of a scotch bonnet pepper finely chopped (for extra heat use seeds as well) 1 ½ tbsp. of grated ginger

Directions

Marinate 1. Mix all of marinate ingredients together and heat until warm. Place tofu and marinate mixture into a Ziploc bag and refrigerate overnight.

1 tsp. sesame seed oil 1 tsp. vegetable oil 1/4 cup of water 1 tsp. mirin 1 tsp. arrowroot flour 2 tsp. black bean-garlic sauce 1 420 g. of firm tofu cut into 4 steaks 2 inches thick

Black bean & garlic sauce 1. Mix ¼ cup of water, mirin and arrowroot flour in a small bowl. Add black bean sauce and stir until smooth. 2. Heat sesame seed oil & vegetable oil in a large nonstick frying pan over medium-high heat. Add tofu and sear on both sides until golden brown. 3. Add sauce and coat both sides of tofu, cook until sauce thickens. Serve immediately, sprinkle with sesame seeds.

POTATO SALAD

Directions

Black bean & garlic sauce

Vegan mayonnaise 1-cup canola 1/2-cup soymilk Salt (to taste) 1-1½ tsp. lemon juice

Vegan mayonnaise Combine all ingredients except lemon juice in the food processor or blender, blending until smooth. Slowly add the lemon juice until the mixture thickens and tastes as desired. Add salt to taste then refrigerate.

Potato salad

Potato salad Break spinach leaves into small pieces, combine all ingredients and refrigerate. Serve chilled.

GRILLED CORN

Directions

4 large Yukon potatoes, peeled, chopped and cooked 1 large carrot, peeled, cut into small cubes and cook 2 cups of spinach(rinsed) 1-1½ tbsp. of flaxseeds

8 ears of corn 1/2 cup Almond butter 1 tsp. lemon juice 1 tsp. lime juice 1 tsp. lemon rind 1 tsp. lime rind 1/4 tsp. cayenne pepper Salt and pepper, to taste

Grilled Corn 1. Heat grill to medium. Remove outer husks from 8 ears of corn. Rub corn with olive oil and grill, turning them often, until kernels burst easily when pressed, 15 to 20 minutes. 2. Using a hand mixer, in a small bowl, mix together almond butter, lemon and lime juice, lemon and lime rind, cayenne pepper and salt and pepper to taste. 3. Spread on grilled corn while it is still hot.

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MOISTURIZER TIPS

ADVERTISE WITH US Contact Rohan ‘Dillinger’ Beckford to have your ad placed in L3 Magazine! Phone: 289.217.2800 (Canada) | 347.370.6829 (U.S.) Twitter: @Mangoheadilings 44

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MARKETING

M A R K E T I N G

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MARKETING

INDEPENDENT ARTIST

WHAT IT TAKES TO BE A SUCCESSFUL DIY INDEPENDENT ARTIST JAMIE LEGER

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o you ever feel like modern society is like a million screaming kids with A.D.D. unleashed at a Chuckie Cheeses? We’re just bouncing off the walls, interrupting each other, there’s no order, we just go and fling ourselves into the next unconsciously interesting experience... A successful artist was just an artist who did the right things, the right way, and didn’t quit. I’ve never met a dumb musician; seriously. So is it the structure, the discipline, or the determination? Create value and then creatively tell people about it. I know you have it in you. I know you’ve heard it before. I know you’ve gotten lots of ideas, but I also know you didn’t execute on those as fully as you know you could have. It’s alright because I understand the problem. It’s very simple, and is the cause for almost everyone not having everything they want, ever.... FEAR! It is uncomfortable to put yourself out there! To confidently promote yourself, and even to ask people to buy your stuff! Now, I get it. I’m also not somehow immune to this, nor am I trying to make you feel bad or press down on a tender wound. My friend, you have got it! We need you to contribute, to inspire, to make people feel again, and experience all of the simple and profound beauty that you resonate through your stories, your music, and from your soul. So, let’s address the problem.

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INDEPENDENT ARTIST

The problem is with focus: The primary problems I’ve noticed as a trend with my clients

(Experts and MusicPreneurs) almost always stems from one of three root issues. I believe it’s a matter of not paying enough conscious attention to the things you are doing, and also not paying enough attention to the feedback you are getting. Because in almost everything you do, if you are paying closing enough attention, you can see how what you are doing, is getting you the results you are getting. You know how to do the thing so if you do the thing better, then you get better results. The problem is that we can get ahead of ourselves sometimes, and that takes us away from being completely present, and then you compound that with the infinite minutia and time-sucking-mechanics, it’s no wonder why we are all running around but not going anywhere. It’s like a muscle that is slowly fatiguing, and needs to be strengthened again. There are really only a few things you should be focused on doing as an Independent Artist that wants to build a long-term career making music. 1. Creating Great Music. 2. Building and Engaging your Fan-base. 3. Making sure your business is profitable any way you can (be creative as that’s what you do best). In a mostly intellectual, yet fascinatingly conceptual discussion between Steve Lawson and Andrew Dubber over at New Music Strategies (pretty awesome guys and definitely worth listening to), they discussed a bit about the various platforms for independent artists and music promotion online. I was intrigued by their depth of knowledge and intelligent thought in regards to each platform they explained, and provided some tremendous insight. These guys are really on the up and up in regards to the future of digital technologies and innovative platforms and ideas for the new music industry. I will be following them a bit more closely from now on. Myspace failed because they didn’t embrace the culture they were inherently creating, and because their focus was not on the most important thing, they ultimately became almost obsolete. They could still make a comeback though... doubt it, but anything is possible right? So Facebook took over and became what Myspace should have been. Facebook, according to their analysis, appears to be on the same track though and has failed to recognize the path that they’re on as a data harvesting company selling ad-space to the highest bidder. It’s just not a smart business model from a standpoint of user satisfaction, and user satisfaction is everything. But hey I’m a musician, we’re about contribution and authenticity, that’s not always profitable, but it always feels right. In terms of a music and fan building platform, neither of them are doing it right. Thus, even though as an independent artist you should still have a presence inside their “walled garden,” it’s important for all of us to understand that your space is your domain.

L3MAGAZINE.COM | APRIL 2013

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MARKETING

INDEPENDENT ARTIST

FOCUS on THAT! Find new topics to write about that your audience is interested in, finally produce that video you’ve been meaning to make, and keep focused on making your site the best experience you can for your fans. Not only is it more difficult for you to go and complete a simple task, especially online, without some irrelevant distraction stealing your attention with the potential to spiral off on a whole new tangent, and suddenly asking yourself after 3 hours, “what did I just do?” Or, “wait a minute, what was I trying to accomplish in the FIRST place?” As this is a time waster for you, just think about what a potential time suck and whirlwind of thoughts this is causing for your fans and potential new audience. It’s like a torrent of streaming communications literally careening like a freight train into and through your brain, and then refracting off into thousands of tiny ideas all deflecting in different directions. Our brains aren’t made to handle this, so how we unconsciously adapt is by reverting to a more primal this deserves my attention, or it doesn’t mindset. How can you deserve our attention? The solution is still creative engagement. The problem is that most of us still don’t have a handle on the basics yet, still haven’t fully adopted social media, or established your unique voice that attracts and keeps fans talking about you and sharing your stuff within their networks of friends. Nonetheless, innovative guerilla marketing strategies at this point may be a tad too far out of reach for many, as we have to crawl before we can walk, and walk before we can run. Given you’ve got everything else right, i.e. you are making great music, the reason for such average results, is in doing average stuff with promotional efforts. Seriously, if you want it bad enough or even if you don’t, you can easily sit down right now without any distractions at all, and brainstorm a way to reach that goal you haven’t quite been able to yet. Remember, don’t overlook the fundamentals. Simple is powerful if you focus. A successful artist was just an artist who did the right things, the right way, and didn’t quit.

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INDEPENDENT ARTIST

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LIFE

AVAILABLE NOW ON ITUNES! Grab your copy here today!

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L 3 M A G A Z I N E . C O M | J U LY 2 0 1 2


MARCIA GRIFFITHS

&

TANYA STEPHENS

WANT LOVE KIRKLEDOVE RECORDS

DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION

AVAILABLE NOW ON ITUNES! Grab your copy here today!

L 3 M A G A Z I N E . C O M | J U LY 2 0 1 2

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LOVE ADVICE

MR APRIL 2013

RAPHAEL Location: Toronto Occupation: Model | Music Artist | Music Enthusiast More news on Raphael coming soon! L3MAGAZINE.COM | JUNE 2012

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L

O

V

E

L 3 M A G A Z I N E . C O M | J A N UA RY 2 0 1 3

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LOVE

I N T E R N AT I O N A L A F FA I R S

INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS DJs WE LOVE TO HEAR SPIN AND YOUR EARDRUMS WILL FALL IN LOVE TOO! OLIVA LEWIS

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I N T E R N AT I O N A L A F FA I R S

DJ MAJESTIC Kristoff Jesus Jerome Ng Wai is.... DJ Majestic! Affectionately known as “Maji,” he hails from the beautiful twin island republic of Trinidad & Tobago. From the piano to the drums, Maji not only excelled at any musical instrument that he put his hands on, but proved himself to be somewhat of a prodigy. Over the years, Maji developed his skills and a great appreciation for music and now goes by the name; DJ Majestic. DJ Majestic is not your average disc jockey; he is highly versatile and a seasoned veteran in Hip Hop, Jazz, Rhythm & Blues, Salsa to name a few. Now residing in Washington DC, DJ Majestic’s musical background, styles and mixes consists of Soca/Dancehall/ Reggae. As multifaceted as Maji’s style and mixes are so too is his fan base, as he has managed to tap into each demographic reaching both the young hip and urban crowd and the older and more mature listening public. Currently aligned to Poundaz Entertainment Group and Teamsoca.com one can expect great things from this highly talented, dynamic and versatile musical combustion engine as he aspires to not only be a household name but a legend as those before him. Connect with DJ Majestic on Twitter >>> @majitheone ~ and ~ Podcast: www.djmajestic.podomatic.com

L3MAGAZINE.COM | APRIL 2013

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LOVE

D I G I TA L D OW N L OA D S

DOWNLOAD

L3’S

1 2 3 4

8

MICHIE MEE

9

“The Girl is Mine”

“Bad Gyal Bubble” “Come Shock Out”

KONSHENS

JAH CURE 15 “Thank You”

KING ALI BABA FT. OCTAYNE

16

EVII FT. NATEL

DELLY RANX 17 “Got It Forever” CBLOCK 18 “Wifey”

“Ah So Mih Tan”

CALI P

10

JESSE ROYAL

11

CHAM

12

CHAM

13

“Don’t Give Up”

14

“Stop Sign”

“Sweetest Thing”

“This Morning”

6

“Stripper Pose” “Lawless”

“Around the World”

FAZE FT. PATRICE

“Can I Have You”

SHABBA RANKS

AMMOYE 19 “Baby It’s You”

BUGLE

DEMARCO 20 “Love For Mama”

“Who Win The War”

KONSHENS

NEW CHUNE ALERT!

Miss O “Money Pull Up”

Charts are based on the most active DJ downloads via the L3 Music Distribution service.

L3MAGAZINE.COM | APRIL 2013

IBA MAHR FT. JAH MALI

“The Time is Now”

“Superstar”

BUSY SIGNAL

5 7

58

MORGAN HERITAGE


RIDDIM SELLERS

TOP

HOTTT DANCEHALL RIDDIM SELLERS IN CANADA Compiled by Jah Chozen from TreaJah Isle Rcords and Tapes

1

DJ SMURF MUSIC

2

UIM RECORDS

3

TECHNIQUES

4

FLIP MONEY RECORDS

5

LIV UP PRODUCTIONS

RADIO ACTIVE RIDDIM JUPITOR RIDDIM ANIMAL INSTINCT RIDDIM RAW CASH RIDDIM ASPHAULT RIDDIM

HOTTT REGGAE RIDDIM SELLERS IN CANADA

1

MAXIMUM SOUND

2

DIGENIUS RECORDS

3

BAMBINO MUSIK & JUSBUS NATION

LEGGO DI RIDDIM MOVING RIDDIM

GYAL SEASON RIDDIM

4

SILLY WALKS DISCOTHEQUE

5

MR. G MUSIC

HONEY POT RIDDIM SOULMATE RIDDIM


RICO VIBE’S TOP 10 VIDEO PICKS FOR

TOP 10 CHARTS

APRIL

Compiled by Rico Vibes

1

KONSHENS FT, DARRIO

2

ALISON HINDS

3

PROTOJE

4

TARRUS RILEY

5

BUSY SIGNAL

L3MAGAZINE.COM | APRIL 2013

“GYAL SIDDUNG” “FALUMA MAKELELE” “KINGSTON BE WISE” “SORRY IS A SORRY WORD” “REGGAE MUSIC AGAIN”

6

AMMOYE

7

TIFA FT. SPICE

8

LADY SAW

9

KONSHENS

10

“RADIO”

“WHY YOU MAD” “HEELS ON” “COUPLE UP”

KAYLA BLISS “LITERAL LOVE” KONSHENS “COUPLE UP”


SOCARIFIC SELECTIONS

AMERICIAN TOP 10

1

MACHEL MONTANO HD & KERWIN DUBOIS “POSSESSED”

2

SUPER BLUE “FANTASTIC FRIDAY”

3 BLAXX “LEH GO” GARLIN 4 BUNJI “DIFFERENTOLOGY”

RHYTHM INTERNATIONAL’S MC FIRE KYLE TOP 10 SOCA Compiled by Rhythm International’s MC Fire Kyle

5

MACHEL MONTANO HD

6

BUNJI GARLIN

7

MACHEL MONTANO HD

8

5 STAR AKIL

9

SWAPPI

10

RAVI B

“THE FOG”

“SAVAGE”

“FLOAT” “PARTIER”

“CHA-OS”

“PRESCRIPTION”

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FIRE.KYLE Twitter: http://twitter.com/mcfirekyle L3MAGAZINE.COM | APRIL 2013

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WARD 21’S

DANDYMITE!

CONTRIBUTED

D

ancehall has reached the point that most will conclude Ward 21 can do no wrong and the Dandymite riddim makes that point. Returning listeners to the core sound of heavy beats and ‘B’ side versions of a record, the Dandymite riddim is stripped down to the bare essentials allowing for artists to ride the riddim with ease. Taking the lead is Dancehall Diva, Tifa whose song “Hypocrite Smile” wastes no time getting to the point and letting fans know that Jah’s blessings flow and that flow will never slow! Spice tells the masses to “Keep on Talking” while drawing the analogy that they should watch TV and not the female powerhouse. Veteran performing artist Mad Cobra says “Nuttin Nuh Hard” as he DJ’s lyrics about ‘bad man’ and the results that come in life if people choose a life of violence. On a lighter note, Elephant Man aka The Energy God says one girl in a particular is a “Hot Gyal Fih True” which we predict will be an anthem for the hot girls attending Dancehall sessions. Honorebel mentions go to March Chin, Point O, Camar, CK and Darrio. L3’s rating is 3.9 out of 5

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NEW RELEASES

IKLEKTIK RIDDIM

REINCARNATED

INCREDIBLE

SCRIPTURES RIDDIM

SOULMATE RIDDIM

STOP THAT RIDDIM

STREET SOUL RIDDIM

PRAYING FOR JAPAN

PUSH COME TO SHOVE RIDDIM

Don Corleon Records

Jugglerz Records

Snoop Lion

Mr. G Music

Armagideon

Logiq & DJ Outkast

Irie Ites Records

Pure Music Productions


LOVE

MUSIC REVIEW

THE

HONEY DEW RIDDIM

T

he Honey Dew Riddim is the new production by Andrew ‘Andrew Khool’ Johnson and Rhoan ‘Ric Zheron’ Bromfield for Andrew Khool Inc. and Bran-Nu Entertainment. The riddim features well established vocalists Bryan Art, Bushman, Capleton, Jah Mason, Lutan Fyah, Ruth-Ann Brown and Teflon, and additional artists will be added in weeks to come. The official release of the riddim comes in May, but we were treated to a pre-release which serves the Reggae enthusiasts well. Built to a solid Roots Reggae riddim, topics in song range from problems with a spouse to everyday livity to solid meditations when times are difficult. Producer Ric Zheron says, “The riddim is very melodic, with a beautiful bass line and horn section that compliments the exotic strings and steady lead guitar. The presence of the horns, makes a powerful statement, like a burst of flavors with the keys allowing everything to flow smoothly, hence it being ‘Honey Dew’.” A pre-release mix of the HoneyDew Riddim is available on Youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8vtScACS35g&feature=youtu.be L3’s rating is 3.5 out of 5 CONTRIBUTED

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MUSIC REVIEW

L3MAGAZINE.COM |APRIL 2013

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LOVE

MUSIC REVIEW

GHETTO YOUTHS INTERNATIONAL’S

SET UP SHOP! CONTRIBUTED

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MUSIC REVIEW

W

hen we first heard Damian Jr. Gong’ Marley’s song “Set Up Shop,” we were excited because we were sure that right around the corner would be a new album from the Gong-Zilla. We were right and we were wrong! Deciding to share the musical pie with all in his camp, Jr. Gong and brothers Stephen Marley decide to turn the international anthem into the name of a compilation disc that features some of the best talent with sounds of Roots Reggae, Dancehall and a little soul. The 14 track album, released internationally via iTunes, showcases the talents of artists such as Black Am I (whom we featured in the February issue of L3 Magazine), and features familiar voices such as those of Wayne Marshall, Christopher Ellis, Jah Cure, Bugle, Bounty Killer, Buju Banton, Akon, Tarrus Riley and T.O.K. Not too bad! The song that features Buju, “My Conclusion,” is a vintage sound that could have easily featured the legend Bob Marley. In this case, we gladly take the voices of Akon and Stephen Marley who ask us to picture “my face as I start a revolution.” Additional point worthy notes include mention of Jo Mersa and Daniel ‘Bambaataa’ Marley, the third generation of Marley performers who boldly step into the shoes of, and walk the path of the greats that came before them being grandfather and father. They don’t disappoint. Fans will love what they hear but may be disappointed to not hear new material from the son of Ska and Rocksteady legend Christopher Ellis. Though “End of Time” sounds new, every time we hear it we’re reminded that it is 3 years old. We predict that this album will be in contention for a Grammy not because of the Marley name, but because of the direction in which this collective of artists’ moves Reggae, Roots Reggae and Dancehall, and their embrace of the traditional fundamentals with new voices. L3’s rating is 4.5 out of 5 Track listing 1. Set Up Shop - Damian “Jr. Gong” Marley 2. End of Time - Christopher Ellis featuring Stephen Marley & Jah Cure 3. Samson Strength - Black-Am-I 4. Move Dem - Julian Marley featuring Bugle 5. Dont Change Your Number - Christopher Ellis featuring Bay C of T.O.K. 6. Affairs of the Heart - Damian “Jr. Gong” Marley 7. Bad So - Jo Mersa 8. Go Hard - Wayne Marshall featuring Damian “Jr. Gong” Marley , Aidonia , I-Octane , Assassin , Bounty Killer and Vybz Kartel 9. My Conclusion - Stephen Marley featuring Akon& Buju Banton 10. Comfortable - Jo Mersa 11. Dem Neva Mek It - Damian “Jr. Gong” Marley 12. Treat You Right - Daniel Bambaata Marley 13. Modern Day Freedom - Black-Am-I 14. In Dependence - Damian “Jr. Gong” Marley, Wayne Marshall , Tarrus Riley, T.O.K.

L3MAGAZINE.COM | APRIL 2013

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LOVE

LOVE ADVICE

2-Lined Music Hut Malvern Town Centre 31 Tapscott Road 416-264-3999

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LOVE ADVICE

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LOVE

ON BLAST

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ON BLAST

KARDI TIVALI!

LOVER’S ROCK WITH A BAD MAN TWIST!

K

ardi Tivali is an artiste, producer and songwriter, and so much more! With early acceptance of his roots and culture, inspiration of the most High and being motivated by good musicians of all times, the elders and true originators of Reggae and Dancehall music, Tivali’s love for music began at age 5. Anointed by the light of true knowledge of the Creation, Kardi Tivali righteously accessed the power and right to give orders, make decisions, and enforce obedience with his calm, cool and militant persona as a child growing up. He began pursuing music while attending one of the Island’s premier high schools, Kingston College where he mainly hung out at Enrapture Productions and Vendetta Studio. There he developed great command of his voice, putting it to song and moving crowds. The pseudonym Kardi Tivali was attained due to the musicians not being afraid to share his views on rights and wrongs as reflected in the lyrical content of his songs and his awareness of the Jamaican Government’s “massacre” of thousands of Rastafarian children, along with other innocent civilians of our people in the 1959 - 1963 Back-O-Wall (now Tivoli Gardens) and Coral Gardens Incidents, the attacks by the Crime Management Unit in 2001 and the 2010 West Kingston unrest. As a professional Reggae musician, Kardi has performed at clubs, festivals and venues throughout Jamaica. Tivali has collaborated with Pinchers, Half Pint, Yellow Man, Kiprich, Alozade, Twins of Twins, Lawgiver, Rich Ras, Merciless and Munga among many others. Tivali’s latest Dancehall anthem, “Dark n Stubborn” produced by Suspectz Productions has propelled his career to new heights, leaving music critics begging for more. On the other side, Kardi’s Lover’s Rock hit “Let Me Love You,” performed over the classic Studio One riddim I’m Still in Love With You made popular by Alton Ellis for Studio One in 1967, has received a plethora of radio support in Canada, the US, the Caribbean and the UK. Connect with the artist on Twitter >>> @karditivali

CONTRIBUTED L3MAGAZINE.COM | APRIL 2013

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LOVE

ON BLAST

HE IS

DANJAH RUS!

F

rom St. Thomas, Jamaica, to now living in Chicago, DainJah Rus has found his groove and is making his presence known in the Reggae and Dancehall scene! Winner of Best International Artist of the Year (Afro Entertainment Awards), nominated Best Reggae Entertainer of the year for 2011 and 2012 at the Chicago Music Awards, DainJah is known for his musical sets and fiery lyrics that hit with such ferocity, it’s evident that he’s more than passionate about the words he speaks. Dainjah Rus proclaims, “This is “ReBEL Music, you must live it and feel it!” After the release of his “Dainjah Rus 16” mixtape (produced by Solid Records) he quickly garnered a huge following. Currently promoting the lead single off the mixtape “Dainjahrus Love” featuring Montana, he’s gearing up for a very busy summer. Expanding his work internationally, Dainjah Rus recorded a single with European rising Pop star Sonny which resulted in the song “Passcode.” The song including its energy and vibe, moves people in the clubs in London and throughout the UK and has shot to #4 on the UK Billboard charts. Dainjah Rus says a remix is sure to follow. Focusing on both the national and international music scenes, Dainjah Rus vows to stay committed to being successful. “I’m an artist who is hungry and I feel very few others can out work me” says Dainjah Rus. ” With a degree in engineering he’s chosen to put his career on hold to focus on his goal of becoming a world recognized, recording artist. “It’s more than just music, its more than a just a dream; it’s in my blood to do.” As an unsigned artist with hopes of signing to a major record label he’s preparing for the release of his debut album and continues to look forward to dazzling audiences with live, spell binding performances. Connect with the artist on Twitter >>> @dainjahrus

CONTRIBUTED

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ON BLAST

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L Y R I C S


SL SNOOP LION RETURN OF THE KING NATASHA VON CASTLE

Photos by Jeff Vespa & Terry Richards

T

here’s a natural mystic flowing through the air, and if you listen carefully now you will hear … the roar of Snoop Lion who marks the return of the King. I admit that when I first heard that Snoop Dogg has now become Snoop Lion, I criticized the move and even went so far as to say that his actions would mislead the people. When he said he is Bob Marley reincarnated, I was definitely on edge. For my view on Snoop misleading the people; I was wrong. I was very wrong. For being tight about Snoop being Bob reincarnated … well, that is understandable right? Bob is after all our Reggae King. There is more heart in Snoop Lion, an untainted Rastafarian committed to the faith, than there is several Rasta’s I know who talk the talk but don’t walk the walk. One calm Friday afternoon, Snoop Lion and I sat down for a one on one. There were no limitations with my questions, instead there was a genuine open-ness to hear my concerns on behalf of fans and the Reggae community. After this interview, I can confidently say that if Snoop Lion continues on the path he’s on, which I think he will, there will be a revolution for many … and it will be televised. Getting to know Snoop Lion…


L3: The Reggae community respects your Hip Hop catalog. When you decided to perform Reggae did you expect to have a receptive audience namely from the Caribbean? SL: You know my initial thought wasn’t just about one group of people but the world in general and making music for the whole world that they can appreciate and enjoy and learn from. It’s good that the Caribbean is receptive. I didn’t expect it, but I appreciate it as the music I’m making is for them and for the world. At what point did you know you wanted to perform Reggae? Did it begin before arriving in Jamaica or did it come with your awakening that it is time now to become a Rasta? Well over the years you can hear that there has always been that Reggae influence and there has always been that element in my music. There is a feeling I get when I listen to Reggae and I wanted that to come through in my music, so, it’s always been there and now it’s ready to come out. It’s not just my trip to Jamaica or becoming a Rasta, it’s something that’s always been inside me and around me and is coming out now. I had to make a new album, and I had to decide if I want to do a Hip Hop album or a Reggae album and the time just felt right. The time is for a Reggae album. With the spirituality of it all and the mentality and the musical side, now is the time for Reggae. My Love for Bob Marley, and his love for the world; my relationship with his family, I feel so connected, and I feel like I’m one of his sons so I had to do this. When you made the decision regarding performing in Reggae, you told your Wife first, then who did you tell next? It was a face to face conversation I had with the Marley’s. It was Rohan, Damian and Stephen. They were travelling and I think they were working on a dub, but I went to their room to tell them what I was going to do. I wasn’t really asking for their blessing, I was more telling them what I was going to do. I was so happy and excited to be able to tell them that I had finally reached a point of my career where I’m able to do a whole record where it’s going to be a dedication to their Father, not trying to mimic him, but instead share with the world what I get when I listen to Bob Marley. I just want to add on to where he left off. Your single “Here Comes the King” allowed us to hear you perform with a patois accent. Not too bad! How did you feel performing in the dialect? Well as I say it’s always been near me; I’ve always been doing it but just didn’t know why I was doing it. For example some of the Rasta’s that I’ve met have said that when they first heard Snoop Dog, they thought I was a Rasta because the sound was so there already. For me to do a whole song, or a whole album was natural because it was always there. Reggae has always been around me and I tapped into that channel. When you make Reggae and you’re expressing love it forces you to leave all the other stuff. No rap … just Reggae.


“THERE’S A FEELING I GET WHEN I LISTEN TO REGGAE AND I WANTED THAT TO COME THROUGH IN MY MUSIC...IT’S ALWAYS BEEN THERE AND IT’S READY TO COME OUT.”


Hence the song “Here Comes the King” where we hear ‘we’re at war with an army of haters / and when we kill them we just smoke them like papers….’ Exactly because we focused on the righteous as opposed to the politics. Like back in the days if someone said something to me that was negative, I might have gone to war lyrically with them, but now I just flip it off and not say anything about it because I’m conscious and aware of what I have to do and because I want the world and the people who listen to my music to not be bothered by the haters but just be focused on what they have to do. Good music is what we have to do. You have support from Mavado and Popcaan and the song and video “Lighters Up” sees the three of you perform together. Has there been additional support coming forward and has that support surprised you? You know what, this whole music industry has been a surprise. I don’t think about it like that in terms of being surprised; I just make the music for those who want to have it, and I don’t worry about the rest. I make music and I feel like it should be a part of you, the people who listen so that’s what I focus on. Your biggest supporter on the Reggae side is Rohan Marley. When did the two of you meet and what caused your relationship to move from professional to become bredrins? Rohan Marley is a really good friend of mine. We became really good friends over the past couple of years. He’s been really supportive especially with me becoming a Rasta. He’s a cool cat (Snoop shows genuine appreciation for Rohan). Your visit to Jamaica has been shared in the media extensively. What aspect of your trip do you feel is important but was not reported in the media? Me going to the Maroons and being a part of the people and experiencing where they live and their culture and learning about the strength of Nanny of the Maroons and what they as a people mean to Jamaica in terms of history. The media didn’t really talk about that too much, but that was really important to me. Also, me going in to Tivoli Gardens and being so well received then going back to the Mind Gardens program. Those things were important … real important, and it’s not so much where I went but the impact it had on me which inspires me musically.


On the surface, Mind Gardens is about food, and cultivating land to feed the poor in Jamaica. That’s the obvious. Underneath that, we feel your real motivation with Mind Gardens is to cultivate healthier minds literally and giving disadvantaged children an opportunity to see their mind for what it really is … a garden that can produce anything it sets its mind to. How close to being accurate are we in our thinking? Most definitely! You hit the nail right on the head! Sometimes it’s not about talking about it, it’s about doing it and giving the people what they need so they can do what is a gift to them and they can go on and become great things. If I told them that was what I really wanted to do (develop the Garden that’s in their minds), they may have been skeptical, but when you put everything in their hands and let them grow their own, they see the practical which is growing their food, and they see the spiritual which is to develop who they are the talents they have. We can talk about the ‘woulda, coulda, shoulda,’ but my actions are very loud, and like you just said, I want them to explore and cultivate their mind. I don’t want them to just think of it as food; I want them to see the business opportunity that this will become; the importing and exporting of their products and how that benefits the community. We can’t be living in a time of those who have from those who don’t have. It’s time to give everyone fishing rods and take them to the sea and teach them how to fish and teach them how to create a business. That’s what Mind Gardens is all about. I don’t want to give you fish, I’d rather teach you how to fish so on a bad day you can still eat! And to bring everything back to you being influenced by Bob Marley, on a spiritual level, I think he would be proud of you to know that you’re not going to Jamaica to exploit, but to really cultivate the garden that’s in the mind. You know what, I have to agree with you. That’s what Rohan Marley told me. He expressed to me, imitating his Dad’s voice ‘if Bob Marley was here right now he would smoke one with you and say yes Snoop, you’re right on and just push on.’ The way in which he said it made me feel like if I were to pass away and legacy is what it is and my son is a part of the next, Snoop Dogg or Snoop Lion and someone was influenced by me like that, I would want my son to say yes ‘my Dad would support what you’re doing.’ A kid knows his Father better than anyone else, whether it be friend, brother or whatever, that’s an intimate relationship so for Rohan to say what he said, I felt really good and I feel really good.


“I LOVE WHAT I SEE AND I SEE NOTHING BUT MY FUTURE AND THE LEGACY I’M GOING TO LEAVE BEHIND AND IT’S A GREAT FEELING.”


Your evolution from Gang Banging to Music to Business Mogul and now becoming a Rasta has been inspiring. You let your guard down, and allowed all of us to come ‘in.’ Were you prepared for how well your movie Reincarnated was going to be received, especially after its debut at the Toronto International Film Festival? No. The public already had certain information about me; admitting I was a drug dealer, admitting I was a gang banger; just admitting to everything and opening up and letting the world in meant that people would see the real me and not a front. I have allowed everyone to be a part of the journey. The love that I have received was greater than the negative. I am at the point now that I am aware. I am conscious. There were things I couldn’t say as a young rapper or didn’t know how to say, but now I do. We see you sitting on top of the mountain. You’re smoking your spliff. You see the hills and valleys. From your vantage point of where you are now, how is the view? I love what I see and I see nothing but my future and the legacy I’m going to leave behind and it’s a great feeling. You have a wise man who can finally see, and who is passing on the knowledge so many more will have the same insight. I don’t need to wait until I’m an old man, I’m passing on the insight now. The name of the magazine is L3 and each L has a meaning. The first L is for Life, the second for Love and the third for Lyrics. What general advice can you give our readers on Life, Love and Lyrics?! Life; enjoy every moment of it because you never know when it’s going to end. It’s a blessing to be able to have one. Love; without one, one doesn’t know how to (love). The only way to conquer hate is with Love. We have to be more loving. Love the fact that you’re here; love life. Lyrics; are a reflection of who you are from the depths of the soul and it’s what you can give others with compassion. Connect with Snoop Lion and add his website to your favorites >>> http://snooplion.com/


RC THE MUSICAL MINISTER

RICARDO CLARKE HEIKE DEMPSTER

No matter where we are in life, we all need a pick me up from time to time, and this time, that pick me up comes through the musical ministry of Ricardo Clarke‌. HD: Tell us about your journey as an artist! RC: What is so amazing about what is happening now with the music is that I never really saw myself as a musical artiste. I grew up around music for so long, been exposed to it for so long that I think I took it for granted and it was not until I got an opportunity to work with kids in the community that I saw the impact of music. As I began to explore I realized that music is interrelated in our lives so much. We learn the ABC in melody and even the books of the Bible in Church I remember learning that with a temple. I believe all of that has assisted me in my journey as an artiste.


What was one of the most special experiences with a fan? The best experience I have ever had with a fan was one time when I received some fan mail. I was reading a letter from somebody who began to tell me about his vocational journey. He was on this job and he just felt like maybe he needed a turn in his life and he felt like he was wasting a golden opportunity to improve his circumstances and he began to tell me how he went back to school. He was just writing me to inform me that one of my songs inspired him to make the most of an opportunity but more importantly that he was on his last leg, the last semester of college. He went back to school to pursue a degree in medicine and he was becoming a doctor and that was a lifelong dream for him. Honestly, that completely floored me. I was speechless. I would say that that is arguably one of the best experiences I have ever had with a fan. Please tell us about your new single “Don’t Count Me Out” You know, in life, between expectation and manifestation, things happen. You have these plans, you have these dreams, you have these goals and in between waiting for that to appear unfortunately life can happen. You can have a set back and unfortunately we tend to equate our existence on where we are. I wrote this song “Don’t Count Me Out” just to remind people that sometimes, even if you are down and out, never count yourself out. I love the quote from H. Jackson Brown, who simply says this: Even when I am the underdog I still write a victory speech. I am encouraging everyone out there, hey, do not ever count yourself out. Write your victory speech today. What can you already tell us about your forthcoming album? The new album is wonderful. It is an amazing piece of work. I took an opportunity for the last few months just to record it and it has a very, very positive tone. I feel it is the album that gives you that spark, that jump. If you are having a bad day or if you are going through a dry spell and you are not seeing the results and you need that inspiration and that motivation to carry on with your plans and your dreams, then you can pop that new album in and from start to finish you will receive motivation. Who did you work with on the album in terms of production and collaborations? With this album I took more time to collaborate with persons that I have worked with before, persons who we have had wonderful success with before. Definitely we revisited the studio and I was also working with some of those guys who produced “Not Settling” and “Wasting No Time.” Certainly, it was a great opportunity to reconnect with those guys and their body of work. On this album we are featuring some new guys. I had an opportunity over the last two years to collaborate with great producers out of London, Lock Down Productions. Big shout out to Lock Down Productions out of the UK. I got an opportunity to work on two tracks on the album from their production team so certainly it has been amazing in that regard.


What are some of the topics you explore in your new songs? In terms of the subject matter we got songs like “For a Reason,” basically talking about how people could come in and out of your life for a reason and if they are gone, hey, you know they are gone for a reason. Don’t sweat the small stuff. We got songs like “Your Pain is Purpose” just reminding you to see the bigger picture in it all. Basically, this album covers topics that would help you rebound and to recover and to make that comeback. I am telling you, we are making that comeback in 2013! Don’t count me out! What is the story behind the forthcoming single you just mentioned, “For a Reason?” I loved recording that song! The story behind that is, sometimes, when people leave even though we want them to stay they are gone for a reason. When you are reaching towards something higher and you are qualifying yourself for something bigger and greater it disqualifies some people and unfortunately, for them, and remember this; if they are gone, they are gone for a reason. It is one of those songs encouraging us to let go and not be afraid of seeing the greater and letting go of that thing that’s holding us back. You are actively involved in charities and youth programs, Why is this important to you and what have you planned further? In my view it’s always important to give back while you have the influence and the relevance to do so. It has been important to me because, you know, someone gave to me. Someone deposited in my life and I feel that as I have grown it is my responsibility to do the same in terms of where we will be going this year and in the months to come, we are going back into the schools. We have more than 200 schools in the Bahamas. 150 of them I think are public schools and it is always our desire to reinforce what they are learning and support what the educational system is trying to do. We always want to encourage our students to live a productive life and to encourage them that even if they have a setback and even if they are down and out, don’t count yourself out. What else do you have planned for 2013? Definitely we are going to be back in the school and we are going to even partner with some institutions of reformation, whether it’s a program treating someone for drug abuse or for physical abuse. We are going to be partnering with any type of institution that is dealing with reformation and restoration of humanity in the Bahamas. Right now, it’s all about “Uprising Volume III: Don’t Count Me Out.” We are going to be touring, we are really going to focus on that this year. We are going to be touring throughout the Bahamas and we will be hitting up the Turks & Caicos Islands, the USA, Canada and also, we are going to be in some places in Europe for the first time. We are finalizing a lot of things in that regard. We are also going back to the UK. Hopefully we are going to get our message across and that’s our focus for 2013 and beyond. “Don’t Count me Out,” we are going to be pushing that message really strong. Where can we all get your new album? The album is going to be available everywhere. Amazon, iTunes and it is going to be available for the first time on Google Music so we are doing our best to ensure that it’s everywhere, it’s easy, it’s accessible. Download the album! Connect with Ricardo Clarke on Twitter >>> @ricardotheceo


BB THE VETERAN

BURRO BANTON SHENEA ‘PIA’ JORDINE

W

hen given the opportunity to sit down with veteran musicians that Jamaica and the world have come to see, know and respect, it’s only fitting we greet them with great appreciation. Reggae and Dancehall veterans are the trendsetters and foundation on which younger generation artists have built their careers on, and in many cases, have been influenced by. The veterans have made their name, and by extension will never be out of the industry hands down because of their sound, style and lyrical content. We sometimes ignore our history but the truth is, it’s the epiphany of a carbon copy of what music is today. Every so often, an artiste comes around who is destined for greatness; Dancehall veteran Burro Banton is one such artiste. Donovan Spaudling, aka Burro Banton is the product of the ghetto who hails from Kingston, Jamaica. A dedicated and inspired artiste that readily acknowledges the power and all-empowering music has on his life, and being guided by it which led him to his career. The beginning was 1976 when he first entered a talent contest at Skateland in Kingston. Burro Banton broke the barriers of becoming a crossover artiste with countless number 1’s but his single “Boom Wah Dis” and “Badda Dan Dem” made international charts as well. He continues to record commercially successful music, including the recent “Badder Den Dem” which is featured in the videogame Grand Theft Auto iv. When I thought about a veteran, Burro Banton was definitely on top of my list. Burro, was very accommodating and we did the interview at Q45 Studio on Dunbarton Avenue. This studio mind you is the studio where veteran artistes hang out and produce great music….


“THE FIRST TIME I EVER TRAVELED OUT OF JAMAICA WAS TO CANADA. I DEEJAYED IN CANADA, I SPENT THREE WEEKS AND CAME BACK TO JAMAICA.”


SJ: Where did the name Burro Banton came from? BB: Well, the name Burro really started from when I was in school, that was my nickname. The Banton now, is one night I was deejaying on a sound called Gemini in Hannah Town and you know how those areas can be ‘mix up!’ They were the ones gave me that name. So what are you exactly a deejay or a sound man? I’m a deejay, you know like how American would say rapper, but originally most man who you call deejay is a man is somebody who will be on the radio or spin records so in Jamaica, the rapper business is to be a deejay. Describe your first time recording? My first recording I ever did was in 1975, Burro begin to deejay his first song “Who a da General Now.” General Ecko (an artiste Burro admired and was highly respected before he died) was the man, the general at the time, and I want to know who was going to take over from Ecko when I did that song. Your first tour, was it your first time travelling? No, touring now; I never really toured because you have to make your name in Jamaica first, and I wasn’t really a recording artiste in my time. I use to deejay on sounds like Gemini , Volcano, Killamanjaro and Stereo Mars. In those days you had to make your name there, then you get to travel. What really allowed me to go on tour was the cassettes! When people recorded the music in the dances back in the days, they sent it to what we call foreign land which would be Canada, England, Japan; all over. You have Jamaicans living in American, Europe, UK and at the time cassettes use to send around even more than records; this was like in the late 70s early 80s. Which country did you first perform in? The first time I ever travel out of Jamaica was to Canada, I deejay in Canada, I spent three weeks and came back to Jamaica. How was the reaction of the people? Well at the time “Ah We Run The Thing” was popular! I was a youth at the time. But the performance was good and the people enjoyed the performance and it was an experience. It’s the same when you hear about Vybz Kartel and Mavado. What I experienced is the same thing they’re experiencing. If you look at some of the other younger artists, you see they use the name ‘Banton.’ A lot of youth were inspired by me and how I DJ, just like ho I was inspired by man like General Ecko and so on. Speaking of new artiste what to do you think about the new artiste coming up? Tommy Lee, Mavado, Konshens, Popcaan and Kartel? Well hear me, style changed from back in my days; I don’t fight any youth because, the truth is I was a youth that’s how I got the name Burro Banton. One thing though, I just want to tell these young youths is that the music needs to become more cleaner and get little more school work out of the music to teach the next generation that’s coming up.


How difficult is it for you to maintain your status as a veteran artiste in the current music industry? The truth is you have to change with the time, look how I dress; I dress like a little 16 year old, because I have to be know what the 16 year old is in. I don’t go to school again; so the new words, the new slang, is coming out of school and I’m going to want to know the new slangs to keep up with what’s going on. These youth said they are ‘tappa tap’ but I couldn’t be the ‘tappa tap!’ Anything the youth say out of school you have to try pick it up and go around it take it. What is the most popular misconception that people have to say about Burro Banton? The brother nose big (laughs) but apart from that I’m flawless. You never hear anything about Burro apart from I have long lyrics, nothing else! Do you have a family? Yes, I live with my wife and kids. How was it for your kids knowing that their daddy was popular and is a big artiste? That’s the next thing again they forget the rights, because in the streets I’m Burro Banton but at home I’m ‘daddy’ they don’t care really about the Burro Banton thing at home it’s not really push too much in my household its only a daddy thing. They already know who I am. Everything is on the internet; I can’t tell my youths that I’m a superstar. My son is his own superstar because he looks over Mavado and Kartel’s fence but a lot of their music doesn’t really play in my house but I get a lot of beating about it. How has your wife did handled you being a superstar? Well she worse because she don’t even know that I’m Burro Banton. She don’t party, she don’t go dances. My woman goes to church, and funny enough it’s the nicest combination because in my house nobody scream; because it’s one and one. One hand washes the other and two of them wash our face (Burro laughs) so when you can combine together and let everything jell and flow, that’s the key. What was your childhood experience like? What kind of family did you grow up in? Well the truth is I grew up in Grants Pen, and I had it rough. I use to sleep on gambling tables and in the gullies. I was in the streets and I made the streets (he screws his face and laughs). There was nothing pretty was about it, but it’s now I’m seeing what pretty came out of it. If you even look at me I can’t even smile because growing up I never leant how to do that when I was a youth. How can people keep up to date with what you’re doing? They can go to my Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/burro.banton.10 so they’ll be up to date with what I’m doing. What advice can you give readers on Life, Love and Lyrics? Live life to the fullest and live it with Love. As for lyrics, I’m full of that, so listen to my music … you’ll get plenty lyrics!


JS WELCOME THE SUN

JAH SUN TRICIA ‘ZJ SPARKS’ SPENCE

I had missed a call from an unknown number and when I checked my voicemail, it was a message from a voice I did not know, however, when the caller revealed his identity and the fact that he was in Jamaica, I just knew I had to make it my mission to finally meet him and interview this Reggae Ambassador. I rushed from one meeting to link up with Jah Sun. He along with Tim Cash were in the middle of a video interview (he was doing the circuit) and just full of life. Tim a wildly popular yet unassuming Video Director was grinning from ear to ear. When the interview was over Jah Sun gave me a big embrace. Decked out in a black and white Addidas track outfit, a Brown tam with a Lion emblazoned on the front and sporting some fancy rasta color shoes, he was radiating an immense amount of energy. We wasted no time into launching into a very sober interview.


TS: I actually had never heard of you until you voiced on the Kush Morning Riddim. For those persons who are not familiar with your works, who are you and where are you from? JS: My name is Jason, so the transfer to Jah Sun became very simple eh nuh. I am originally from Austin, Texas, but I relocated to California about 10 years ago when I wanted to start my Reggae career. Before that I was a Hip Hop emcee, a rapper eh nuh. Things were going well for me in that field, in that genre and I was rapidly growing in my city, but then I discovered the genius of Bob Marley eh nuh. It was just an instant activation of growing my dreadlocks, learning about Rasta livity, Jamaica and just the whole vibe. I have been on that path ever since. What was it about Bob Marley that ignited your interest? Wow (he sighs). Bob is Bob enuh. He was just an iconic, amazing human being. Growing up in America enuh, I feel like we are such a new country cut off from our history and the public school system and the Government is such a brain wash education, you know what I mean? When I first heard Bob Marley music, I don’t know, it was like the first time that I felt an experience that was real, deep and true because we live in such a pop culture in the USA enuh; its just lights, cameras and action and smokes and mirrors and Hollywood. It was like I never had the chance to feel true spirituality and a connection to culture, history and something global. Upon discovering Bob Marley it just opened up my heart and activated my awareness and that is why I began my journey as Jah Sun. So you moved from Hip Hop to Reggae music and you moved to California; what was your first recording that launched you on the scene and who did you work with? You know I just made the decision to jump into Reggae, barely knowing how to sing or how to write songs because as I say as a rapper you just flow and it does not have a whole lot of melody and it’s a different application of songwriting. I just decided to jump in, in about 2004, and my first album was called ‘The Height of Light’. I reached out to several Jamaican artistes to try to learn and to ketch a vibe and I had the pleasure of working with Yami Bolo, Luciano, Junior Reid, Lutan Fyah, Prezident Brown; I just immersed myself in the business and that was the first album and I was fortunate. The first album had great success and I sold many copies. One of the songs was nominated by L.A. Music Awards as Single of The Year. I had some success in some commercial markets as well and some Hollywood films picked up some of the songs. Which films, do you remember? It was the MTV hit series Laguna Beach, they picked up my song Fire Dance. That was also the song nominated as Hip Hop Single of the Year by the L.A. Music Awards. There was Fuel TV and a couple of others. So for me, that was a reaffirmation that I was on the right path. I knew that I still had a lot to learn and that I was just beginning my trod, but it felt like the right thing to do and I have stayed with it ever since. What brings you to Jamaica? You know what, I feel that as a Reggae Musician you have to come to Jamaica. This is the source, this is the Mecca for Reggae music; so I just came here to learn more and to show the people that I am not just trying to take a ting. I want to be here and give back and be with the people and learn from the people. I am also here shooting videos with Richie Spice for my new album. I am here with Tim Cash from Far From Earth Films. Today I am going to shoot a video with Kabaka Pyramid, big artiste enuh. On this album we also have Chronixx, I also have Sizzla … I feel it is important for an artiste outside of Jamaica to stay close to Jamaica and Jamaicans and to keep the link strong so I always try to work with Jamaican Producers such as Twelve 9 Records (co-producer of Kush Morning Riddim and Sparkling Riddim) and I have to big up the artistes them same way. That is why I am here, to try to build up my career and learn as much as I can.


How long will you be here? For about another week and then I have to go back to the States because I am about to embark on a US tour with Dubtonic Crew, I am honored to be on that tour. Where are some of the places that you will be touring? We are going to be touring North and South California, Oregon, Washington, Montana, Colorado, Utah, New Mexico; we are going to be on the road for about a month together and then I go to Europe and tour. Let me ask you this because we have a lot of potential artistes and artistes in Jamaica who want to try Reggae and are trying Reggae, but they feel despondent because they keep hearing Reggae is dead; you, however, are still making music and are embarking on a tour not only in North America, but also in Europe. Tell me, what’s the formula for making it work? You know, gosh, as the great Quincy Jones once said, I just don’t even know if there is even a formula, but the one thing that I do know is that if you plant a seed and you continue to water it, it will grow and it will bear fruit. I think the secret is don’t get discouraged and never give up, believe in yourself and just know that there is only one you and that uniqueness and originality makes it possible and makes you special. So just keep on keeping on eh nuh. As an outsider looking in, who are some of the Reggae acts that you see great potential in, emerging acts or young acts? Right now for the up and coming artistes, I really have to rate the Zinc Fenc Family enuh, Chronixx a young guy who is only like 21 or 22, who I mean anything that he touches just shines, I rate Kabaka Pyramid, but I am also loving to see a resurgence of bands. Bands like Raging Fyah, The Dubtonic Crew, Rootz Underground, it’s a real joy to see players of instruments coming back together, bands like Live Wyre. There were a lot of bands that were in the background, that were backing bands for a long time and I’m loving the fact that they are coming to the front and pursuing them ting. What’s the power of Reggae music? That is the thing right there. Reggae music is a global phenomena. You can go anywhere in the world from US to Europe to Japan all the way to the hills of Tibet up in The Himalayas and you will find people with Reggae music, Bob Marley music and to me it is the most powerful thing on the planet right now. It has the potential to shift the paradigm, to activate people’s awareness and open hearts and empower people. Reggae music is the greatest weapon in the world right now to fight down ignorance and oppression. The power is there, you just have to listen to it and immerse yourself in it and you will see that it’s a natural mystic blowing in the air. What do you have to tell the readers of L3 Magazine? Keep love in your heart and let love be your guide. Keep an eye out for Jah Sun, mi deh pon a mission. Connect with Jah Sun >>> Twitter.com/jahsunmusic | Facebook.com/jahsunmusic


I N

T H E

M I X

DJ ECOOL

MADE IN NAIJA

2011 CULTURE MIX DJ KARIM

SENDPACE

DOWNLOAD NOW http://www.hulkshare.com/ft4vqxftr9q8/?force=1


L3 Magazine | April, 2013 ft. Snoop Lion / Snoop Dogg