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Exhibition Catalogue

our eARTh

global art exhibition responding to Climate Change & the Environment ‘S

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24 March - 23 December 2018 Kunsthuis Gallery presents 100+ selected artists from the Netherlands, Poland, Denmark, Czech Republic, Ireland, Germany, Japan, the UK, USA, Lithuania, Greece, Brazil, Argentina, Israel who will showcase work responding to Climate Change & the Environment. Kunsthuis Gallery will donate 5% sales commission to Friends of The Earth, an environmental charity campaigning for a safer climate. We offer an Art Payment Plan, please contact Cecile Creemers for information cecile@kunsthuisgallery.com Art work can be delivered locally and shipped nationally and internationally!

KUNSTHUIS

THE CONTEMPORARY ABSTRACT ART GALLERY OF THE NORTH

presents

our eARTh 2018 a truly inspirational planet


KUNSTHUIS

THE CONTEMPORARY ABSTRACT ART GALLERY OF THE NORTH Location Mill Green Farm, Brandsby road, CRAYKE YO61 4TT North Yorkshire @KunsthuisArt #OureARTh2018

www.facebook.com/groups/OurEarth2018


our eARTh 2018 a truly inspirational planet


How are artists, educators, curators and galleries responding to climate change? What forms of art and its mediation are evolving along with our understanding of the crisis? Can art communicate the impact of climate change and the environment more effectively than facts and figures? Kunsthuis Gallery believes so‌. Yorkshire, where our gallery is located, is witnessing the imminent threat of Fracking, a process which should not be underestimated following the toxic and radioactive nightmare seen in the US, Canada and Australia.

Artists showcase affecting work responding to the Environment and Climate change! Kunsthuis Gallery will curate an exciting exhibition of saleable work in the mediums of photography, ceramics, sculpture, illustration, painting, printmaking, drawing, textiles, glass, collage, digital and jewellery in order to showcase how artists are responding to this growing issue of Climate Change. We will be working with the Howardian Hills organisation (Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty) who will conduct informative talks at the gallery. We will also be fundraising for our chosen charity Friends of the Earth, the world’s largest environmental campaigning organisation in order to raise awareness with our visitors.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


As curators of this show, we believe the arts has a major role and responsibility to encourage and provide knowledge to our audiences towards the environmental sustainability that we need to protect life on our beautiful planet. We have selected works which inspire us. We want to create a vision to help motivate our audiences actions. We believe art is a powerful tool to achieve this, communicating awareness of what is going on around us. Kunsthuis Gallery is located in Crayke, North Yorkshire set in a 1.6 acre wildlife garden and on the boundaries of the Howardian Hills – an area of outstanding natural beauty. Due to the nature of our gallery’s location and ethos, we are extremely passionate about this subject. The gallery will showcase our 9 month exhibition from 24th March - 23rd December and will donate 5% sales commission to our chosen charity Friends of the Earth, an environmental organisation campaigning for a safer climate. The Opening event is 24th March 2018, 3-6pm. We invite artists and audiences to share positive stories about climate action, to take steps to provide deeper support for political leaders to legislate change and for us all to go green. In combination with this exhibition Kunsthuis Gallery also hosts 5 different shows in the new White Cube space, more info on our website www.kunsthuisgallery.com

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Adele Karmazyn

Ailsa Read

Ailsa Read

Ocean Whisper

Remote Edge

Uninhabited

Digital Photomontage

Mixed Media

Mixed Media

15” x 11”

40 x 40 cm

40 x 40 cm

£ 295

£ 225

£ 225

This particular piece is in response to the ever growing plastic waste in our beautiful oceans. As awareness grows the resentful feelings each time we throw packaging, buy a bottle of water or dispose of another plastic toothbrush grows and it is difficult to escape from this, but mindsets are changing and the throwaway culture has had it’s time.

This mixed media painting was inspired by the weather scudding across the north east coast of England on a cold windy February morning.

This mixed media painting was inspired by the remote margins of the land and sea, capturing the mood and unexpected excitement of the incoming tide.

I wanted to capture here the innocent and unaware child of the past and to educate, just as we are doing now with our children today. I wonder if we knew then what we know now, our oceans would not be plastic soup and our precious sea life creatures would not be suffering. If only the fish could have whispered a warning to the youth of yesteryear! On the bright side, its not too late!! Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Alan Montgomery

Alan Montgomery

Alan Montgomery

Deepwater Bog and poetic Crashing with Messengers

Deepwater Bog with Architecture and Unknown Voices

Deepwater Bog and the sound of crashing waves

Acrylic on Plywood

Acrylic on Plywood

Acrylic on Plywood

15 x 15 cm

15 x 15 cm

15 x 15 cm

£ 185 (set of all 3 paintings £500)

£ 185 (set of all 3 paintings £500)

£ 185 (set of all 3 paintings £500)

The late poet Seamus Heaney’s poems and their connection to my work is rooted in the land and its histories.

The late poet Seamus Heaney’s poems and their connection to my work is rooted in the land and its histories.

The late poet Seamus Heaney’s poems and their connection to my work is rooted in the land and its histories.

The current “Bog Cycles” series is a response in various media to questions arising from textual readings and philosophical underpinnings around language, art, and our place on the planet.

The current “Bog Cycles” series is a response in various media to questions arising from textual readings and philosophical underpinnings around language, art, and our place on the planet.

The current “Bog Cycles” series is a response in various media to questions arising from textual readings and philosophical underpinnings around language, art, and our place on the planet.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Alon Talmi

Amanda Lawton

Amanda Lawton

From the Series: We 4/18

Don’t deny climate change

Wind Solar Wave

Photo Direct Print behind Acrylic Glass

Rag Rug Wall Hanging

Rag Rug Wall Hanging

66 x 66 cm

66 x 66 cm

£ 400

£ 400

When I created this piece I was feeling frustrated that the world leaders-the people in charge,weren’t doing enough to combat the threat of climate change. In fact,a lot of people refused to believe it was happening. This was my reply to them.

This is a hopeful piece about a solution to the energy crisis and the use of fossil fuels. There are alternatives if enough brave people will invest time and money in developing them.

48 x 32 cm £ 830 Like other people in my generation, I don’t need proofs of global climate changes. I see it. In Israel, it is expressed in a decrease in precipitation and a longer period of dryness. People have many ways to resolve this problem. Nature hasn’t.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Anna Turner

Annie Coxey

Annie Coxey

Sint Maarten

Trees by the Riverbank

Flood Tracks

Mixed Media

Mixed Media

60 x 50 x 5cm

100 x 100 cm

100 x 100 cm

£ 650

£ 1,500

£ 925

My piece Sint Maarten was created in response to hurricane Irma in the Caribbean. The first hard edge line paintings I produced were originally inspired by the colours of the Mexican Caribbean coast and painted on hessian and linen. With Sint Maarten I have painted on plywood for the first time. Plywood is a material used not only on the yachts that frequent the Caribbean islands but also as protection to board houses up against the high winds. Using a pastel palette of colours mixed with some more vibrant shades that are reminiscent of the painted houses common in this part of the world. This is meant to be a reflective piece highlighting the beauty and universality of wood as a material and the light vibrancy of this colourful region so regularly devastated by nature with it seems increasing frequency and the delicate balance we are all a part of.

In my most recent exhibition - Water Marks, I explored the devastation of the 2015 floods in Kendal and Hebden Bridge. I spent time looking at the changes in the landscape and produced many sketches, captured drone footage and photographs based on these changes. I was inspired by the the washed up debris, the uprooted trees and the river bank destruction. The abstract paintings are a culmination of these studies and involve the use of drawing, collage and resin.

In my most recent exhibition - Water Marks, I explored the devastation of the 2015 floods in Kendal and Hebden Bridge. I spent time looking at the changes in the landscape and produced many sketches, captured drone footage and photographs based on these changes. I was inspired by the the washed up debris, the uprooted trees and the river bank destruction. The abstract paintings are a culmination of these studies and involve the use of drawing, collage and resin.

Acrylic on Plywood

side view

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Anthony D Kelly

Anthony D Kelly

Anthony Heywood

All Dried Up

All Tomorrows Weather

Pagoda

Digital Collage - Archival Pigment Print

Digital Collage - Archival Pigment Print

Mixed media- upcycled materialspaints glues varnishes clays ceramic

42 x 51.5 cm

42 x 51.5 cm

1.2m tall

£ 650

£ 650

£ 4,600

All Dried Up is a Digital Collage which questions the wisdom of the relentless drive towards maximizing fossil fuel extraction through Fracking and other new techniques at a time when profound ecological pressures are raising the spectre of Global Warming on our collective horizons. With the expansion of renewable energy technologies coming online, its time for us to shift our focus away from squeezing out every last drop!

All Tomorrows Weather is a Digital Collage which visualises the link between the Coal Burning and Mining activities we carry out on or underground and the resulting consequences for our Skies. As a result of carbon emissions our atmosphere is becoming warmer. Greater atmospheric temperatures result in a more energetic atmosphere, larger heat differentials from area to area and ultimately stronger winds and more extreme weather formations. Last year Hurricane Irma the biggest ever hurricane recorded over the Atlantic began tearing its way through the island communities of the Caribbean, before making landfall in Florida the following weekend. It was the second Megastorm to form over the Atlantic in three weeks which was in of itself unprecedented. Climate scientists are fearing this could be the new normal.

A primary aim in the research is to consider how our atmosphere is changing and evaluate how everything in the built environment is affected by and changed by both time and changes to our air, my research investigates ‘climate change’, I intend to create works which respond to to the current question on how our vital earth’s resources can be upcycled into within the sculptural context. My research seeks to deal with particular issues which will inform notions of value within the broader sculptural context. It is through the juxtaposition of image and material which informs and empowers what we see in the sculptures. It will make us re-evaluate and dare to reject complacency. The research is intended to evaluate how societies development has consequences and every action creates a cause and effect’ for example; acid rain, my works will create a body of research on this topic and it is intended to stimulate debate and culminate in exhibitions in different environments and contexts. I have focused on particular materials which are considered waste for example paper and ceramic materials, paints and building materials and timbers.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


B a r b a r a Schneider

B a r b a r a Schneider

B a r b a r a Schneider

BEATism – BEATitude

Beautify

Love & pursuit of Happiness

Pendant: re-design of an egg-beater, wood pearls, wire, chain (ready made)

Re- design of 1- British- Pound- Painting with plastic frame, found in a store in London in 1991/1992, metal rings

Pendant: Re-.design of metal pieces, wood pearls, chain (ready made)

3.2 x 2.5 inch/8 x 6 cm (pendant) £ 172

16 x 4 inch/40 x 10 cm (pendant) £ 195

4.5 x 4 inch/11.4 x 10 cm (pendant) £ 172

Fantasy is an amazing power ... SAVING our PLANET through CREATIVITY! Creativity forces new ways of thinking and living, the creation of pieces of art & new products and the development of better technologies. I am designer / multiple-media and textile artist and have a passion for the beauty.Some subjects and themes of my artworks are re-design, discussion of humanity and our modern life. The (wearable) artworks at Our eARTh 2018 are made of everyday items, objects, waste, newspaper and found objects. The paper mache is made of daily newspapers, dyed and painted. I like to experiment and re-design materials and everyday items, different objects, to use waste and found objects to realize a new work of art and to achieve a new meaning. More pieces available in the gallery.

B a r b a r a Schneider

B a r b a r a Schneider

Blue Dreams- Chain Pendant: re- design of newspaper

Baroque - Earrings Paper mache, metal brush

115 cm - stretch/elastics £ 205

11 cm (length) £ 97

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Barbara Shaw

Barbara Shaw

Barbara Shaw

Polar Bear

Arctic Seals

Arctic Poppies

Hand-stitched Textile Collage 2016

Hand-stitched Textile Collage 2016

Hand-stitched Textile Collage 2016

39 x 35 cm

74 x 66 cm

57 x 41 cm

£ 295

£ 650

£ 395

I ‘sketch’ with fabric, pinning, building, cutting and shaping the layers as the image evolves. I have used many shades of white for the Polar Bear as I wanted to capture the stark beauty of the Arctic terrain as well as how the creature is camouflaged.

I ‘sketch’ with fabric, pinning, building, cutting and shaping the layers as the image evolves. I have used shades of blue and green to capture the stark beauty and clarity of the Arctic water and dark materials for the seals.

I ‘sketch’ with fabric, pinning, building, cutting and shaping the layers as the image evolves. I wanted to capture the stark beauty of the Arctic terrain as well as how plants survive and flower in a very short Summer season; yellow poppies add a splash of colour in such hostile growing conditions.

My Arctic pictures reflect my concern for the threat to the fragile eco-system of one of the great wildernesses on the planet. By using carefully chosen and layered scraps of fabric and stitch, I have tried to depict this harsh environment and the interdependence of elements within it. As climate change is having a huge impact on this polar region my picture is relevant if it encourages discussion and action to halt destruction of this precious place. The image is in a deep frame so that looking at it is like looking through a window on to another world.

My picture on an Arctic theme reflects my concern for the threat to the fragile eco-system of one of the great wildernesses on the planet. By using many carefully chosen and layered scraps of fabric and stitch, I have tried to depict this harsh environment and the interdependence of elements within it. As climate change is having a huge impact on this polar region my picture is relevant if it encourages discussion and action to halt destruction of this precious place. The image is in a deep frame, so that looking at it is like looking through a window on to another world. Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

My picture on an Arctic theme reflects my concern for the threat to the fragile eco-system of one of the great wildernesses on the planet. By using many carefully chosen and layered scraps of fabric and stitch, I have tried to depict this harsh environment and the interdependence of elements within it. As climate change is having a huge impact on this polar region my picture is relevant if it encourages discussion and action to halt destruction of this precious place.


Becky Cornes

Ben Snowden

Ben Snowden

Under the Current

Always Close

Falling Leaves

Watercolour, acrylic, ink on canvas.

Mixed media on cloth

Mixed media on cloth and paper

17” x 21”

27 x 49 cm

38 x 88 cm

£ 360

£ 475

£ 735

Growing up by the sea, Becky’s paintings are often inspired by coastal landscapes, patterns within waves and the forceful energy of nature. She looks for patterns, both free flowing and geometric within their natural environments and paints in an intuitive way that enables her to focus on the juxtaposition between control and freedom. ‘Under the Current’ is inspired by patterns that exist only in a moment during tidal formations and captures layers that are revealed under the waves. It has been painted using acrylic inks and watercolours that enable the artist to create an organic movement that is energetic, carefully chaotic and responds to natural patterns produced by the paints, allowing them to slowly form during the process within abstract geometric boundaries.

‘Always Close’ is a work from my ‘Land, Sea, Sky’ series which I’ve been working on since 2016 tackling the natural world. This painting was created with enamel paint, household paints, graphite and spray paint on cloth.

‘Falling Leaves’ is a work from my ‘Land, Sea, Sky’ series which I’ve been working on since 2016 tackling the natural world. This painting was created with enamel paint, household paints, graphite and spray paint on cloth and paper.

My work explores the land, sea and sky in all their great power and beauty. The natural world is a wonderful and mysterious place, where creation is opposed by devastating destruction in a constant battle to find harmony. We need to respect mother earth and help her to grow rather than take until there’s nothing left!

My work explores the land, sea and sky in all their great power and beauty. The natural world is a wonderful and mysterious place, where creation is opposed by devastating destruction in a constant battle to find harmony. We need to respect mother earth and help her to grow rather than take until there’s nothing left!

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


detail

Ben Snowden

Brian Voce

Brian Voce

Jewels from the Sea

Sleepers (1)

Untitled

Mixed media on cardboard

Relief Print (Collagraph)

42 x 63.5 cm

26 x 26.5 cm (framed 50 x 50 cm)

Mixed media (Pencil, Wax Encaustic, Oil Paint)

£ 630

£ 250

‘Jewels from Sea’ is a work from my ‘Land, Sea, Sky’ series which I’ve been working on since 2016 tackling the natural world. This painting was created with enamel paint, household paints, graphite and spray paint on cardboard.

This print was produced from a hand-made plate as part of a series of artworks exploring the theme of genetics, seeds, and potentially unknown impacts on the environment. The work takes the circle as a trope (it can have many associations: egg, ova, cell, protector, womb, infinity, etc) but in my work it is a metaphor for the ‘perfect’ seed a genetically engineered ‘Pandora’s Box’. The title of the piece refers to the latent and hidden consequences such seeds may have on our environment and health, which we are yet to discover...

My work explores the land, sea and sky in all their great power and beauty. The natural world is a wonderful and mysterious place, where creation is opposed by devastating destruction in a constant battle to find harmony. We need to respect mother earth and help her to grow rather than take until there’s nothing left!

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

17 x 72.2 cm (framed 33 x 84 cm) £ 350 This work was produced part of a series of artworks exploring the theme of genetics, seeds, and potentially unknown impacts on the environment. The work takes the circle as a trope (it can have many associations: egg, ova, protector, womb, infinity, etc) but in my work it is a metaphor for the ‘perfect’ seed a genetically engineered ‘Pandora’s Box’.


Cat Chiu Phillips Entertain I VHS and cassette tapes 92 x 183 cm £ 1,000

Brian Voce Spillage (Cold Dark Matter) Oil on canvas 143 x 143 cm (framed 150 x 150 cm) £ 1,500 This work is part of a series motivated by issues regarding the modification of plants and animals for food production, and the chance production of new ‘chimeras’. The work takes the circle as a trope in my work it is a metaphor for the ‘perfect’ seed a genetically engineered ‘Pandora’s Box’. I’m interested in exploring the way very simple geometric systems based on manipulating circular repeats may combine unexpectedly, to produce complex and unexpected outcomes through alignments of overlapping geometries creating images evoking ideas of ‘new and imagined’ flora and fauna. The title of the piece refers to the latent and hidden consequences such seeds may have ‘in the field’ through their interaction with associated plants and animals on our environment and potentially our health, which we are yet to discover...

Entertain is a project that is entirely crocheted from discarded audio and visual products. Initially created for the City of Las Vegas City Hall it is inspired by the city being billed as the “Entertainment Capital of the World”. The project is a playful take in handling the inevitability of technology. VHS tapes, cassette tapes, slide projectors and other modes of technology have become outdated items; casted off and found in scrap piles or second hand stores. Entertain transforms these obsolete materials into a playful and imaginative work but offer a perspective of its foreseeable futile existence. It is an upcycled project that juxtaposes the handmade to the machine-made and junk into an aesthetic entity. It initiates a dialogue regarding abundance, electronic waste, and frivolity of advanced technology. It is fitting for the exhibition Our eARTh because it creatively displays the crisis and impact of waste particularly, e-waste.

Kunsthuis Gallery will donate 5% sales commission to Friends of The Earth, an environmental charity campaigning for a safer climate. We offer an Art Payment Plan, please contact Cecile Creemers for information cecile@kunsthuisgallery.com Art work can be delivered locally and shipped nationally and internationally!


Cathryn Shilling

Cathryn Shilling

Cathryn Shilling

Diorama – Mirror of the Forest

Diorama – Dive In

Diorama – Terra Incognita

Kilnformed glass with dichroic on a ceramic base

Kilnformed glass with dichroic on a cast bronze base

Kilnformed glass with dichroic on a ceramic base

45 x 20 cm

45 x 25 cm

45 x 25 cm

£ 4,250

£ 4,450

£ 4,250

The tropical rainforest canopy, is a rich source of terrestrial biodiversity. Offering protection from harsh storms, winds, strong sunlight and heavy rain, it is home to unique flora and fauna. My modern Diorama are formed by compiling multiple layers of fine glass cane in a complex, compelling and evocative way. Mirror of the Forest, is a visual representation of the nature of a unique and beautiful place that is being destroyed at an alarming rate.

Oceans cover about seventy percent of the Earth’s surface and are integral to life and influence both global climate and weather patterns. The Indian Ocean is the third largest and the warmest in the world. There is evidence since 1900 of a continuous rise in temperature due to human activity that is affecting the marine ecosystem, endangering fish as well as well as whales, dolphins and seals. The Indian Ocean is has a history of maritime trade dating back seven thousand years and today connects Europe with Africa, Asia and the Middle East. In 2010 a new environmental threat was discovered in the Indian Ocean Gyre, an enormous patch of plastic rubbish covering over five million square kilometres. As this vortex circulates the ocean from Australia to Africa and back, the sun breaks down the plastics releasing toxic chemicals into the food chain and puts marine mammals at risk of entanglement. It is also thought that ninety percent of sea birds have some form of plastic in them.

The Antarctic Peninsula is a remote and primordial place. A vast and pristine landscape of mountains, calving glaciers, hanging ice cliffs, huge tabula icebergs, sea ice and the deep ocean. Antarctica is the last natural frontier on Earth, having never been inhabited, yet providing an extraordinary habitat to an array of wildlife such as penguins, seals and seabirds. Since 1961 it has been protected by the Antarctic Treaty System, which bans military activity, nuclear weapons testing, industrial development and waste disposal. However there is predicted warming of three degrees across the continent over this century which will lead to loss of sea ice affecting the Antarctic ecosystem and melting ice shelves that will cause global sea levels to rise.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Cathy Needham

Cathy Needham

Cathy Needham

Tendrils Bowl

Fronds Bowl

Seaweed Swirl Bowl

Textile ( wet felted with stitch and beadwork)

Textile ( wet felted with curly wools, semi-precious stones and beadwork)

Textile ( wet felted with semi-precious stones and beadwork)

23 x 10 cm

25 x 10 cm

25 x 14 cm

£ 95

£ 95

£ 95

I am fascinated by the delicate looking yet tough nature of the Carrageen Moss type seaweeds often found in tidal rock pools as well as further out to sea. This piece was wet felted with merino wools then embellished with embroidery and beads. I am pushing the boundaries of how thin, but still self-supporting, I can make a felt piece including spaces that allow light through much as sunlight penetrates to the sea floor through the weed. In many parts of the world seaweeds are used as a food, either foraged from the wild or even farmed. They are also harvested for the production of Carrageenen widely used for its gelling, thickening and stabilizing properties for food products, paints and cosmetics. So it is important to keep our shores clean, pollution free and not denude them of seaweeds that provide habitats for sealife, as well as these many human uses.

This delicate bowl was wet felted using merino & curly wools and embellished with embroidery and semi-precious stones. It is inspired by the Bladderwrack form of seaweed often found around our shores. To thrive all seaweeds (macroscopic marine algae) need salt or brackish water, sufficient light for photosynthesis and firm attachment points to grow from. They fix onto a surface, usually rock or pebbles with an attachment called a ‘holdfast’. The frond consists of a ‘stipe’ or stem structure and a ‘blade’, a flattened leaf like structure. Sometimes, as with Bladderwrack, there is also an air bladder to enable the upper part to float and grow up from the sea floor towards the surface light. Bladderwrack was traditionally used to produce iodine used for various medical treatments as well as for fertilizer. Therefore it’s important for us to preserve and manage our shoreline to prevent overuse and pollution of this ecosystem.

This bowl was wet felted using merino wools & silk fibres then embellished with beads and semi-precious stones. It is inspired by Kelp seaweed that grows in large areas of the polar and temperate shallow oceans around the world. They are highly diverse, but most well-known are the giant kelps which form massive forests growing up from the ocean floor. They are the most dynamic and productive ecosystems on earth providing shelter and food for numerous species of sea life, including thousands of species of fish, invertebrates, mammals and seabirds. Sea Otters provide a crucial role in keeping sea urchins in check, stopping them from completely denuding the seaweed forest. The towers of kelp can also be damaged by storms, excessive sedimentation, overfishing and pollution. The forests influence oceanographic patterns and provide us with many products so it’s in our best interests to preserve them and keep their habitats in balance.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Cheryl Tully

Cheryl Tully

Cheryl Tully

Air

Water

Fire

Ceramic, Stoneware, Slip & Glazes

Ceramic, Stoneware, Oxide & Glazes

16 x 35 cm

16 x 34 cm

Ceramic, Stoneware, Slips, Underglaze & Glazes

£ 355

£355

The Air Sculpture is comprised of stoneware clay slabs pressed into egg cartons and then cut and reassembled to create the form which has been influenced by her use of packaging in the construction process. The colour considers the impact of our consumption on our air quality, for large and small creatures alike. This sculpture was produced as a table centrepiece and could also be used outdoors as a bird bath.

The Water Sculpture is made from stoneware clay slabs pressed into egg cartons and then cut and reassembled to create the form which has been influenced by her use of packaging in the construction process. The colour choice shows the contrast of calm and stormy and reflects on how our weather systems are changing. The tube vases are functional and also consider the depths of our seas and our visible impact even at the furthest reaches of our planet.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

21 x 44 cm £ 295 The Fire Sculpture is made from stoneware clay slabs pressed into egg cartons and then cut and reassembled to create the form which has been influenced by her use of packaging in the construction process. The colours shows the earth on the move within, changing and evolving. This sculpture was produce as a table centrepiece and could also be used outdoors as a bird bath.


Chris Ruston

David Lyon

“Burning This Cold Library of Ice” (David Buckland)

Wastescape 2

Unique Artist Book, Watercolour Paper, & Ink.

Acrylic and found objects on board

W10 cm x H15cm. (Closed) Accordion Book Structure opens to max W36cm x H 15cm

38 x 61 cm

£ 250 This Artist Book was made in response to a piece of found text. (from an article by David Buckland, Cape Farewell Project). Glaciers around the world are retreating at an unprecedented rate. Aside from the rich diversity of life forms which live in these extreme environments, ice holds the ancient history of our atmosphere. It is an invaluable record giving us a glimpse into the deep past. Using a concertina fold, the book opens to reveal pages saturated in inks. An ‘icy core’ in the centre gives way to watery marks suggestive of our rising sea levels. Within these blue pages areas of ‘text’ are cut away symbolising the vital information we are loosing as the ice dissolves. We are in the process of losing a unique history of our planet which once gone can never be regained.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

£ 300 The landscape is symbolic - an idea of place not place itself. A landscape made of the reckless decades of plundering the earth for it’s riches and in turn poisoning the very ecosystem that sustains us. Acrylic paint is built up in layers which is scratched into and, in some areas, filed down to reveal previous layers and objects embedded into the surface. There is allusion to digging into the surface, as one might dig into the earth, to reveal what lies beneath. The sun is also setting over the wastescape, a symbolic dying of the light - and of course the best sunsets are light refracted by just the right amount of pollution.


David Lyon

David Lyon

David Sault

Wastescape 3 - Scorched Earth

Wastescape 4 - The Deep

Weathered Sea Groynes

Acrylic and found objects on board

Acrylic and found objects on board

Photograph

47 x 62 cm

44 x 60 cm

50 x 40 cm

£ 300

£ 300

£ 95

Again a landscape that is no specific place. Employing the layering of acrylic paint and embedded objects that have weathered but, in filing back the rust, reveal jewels of shiny metal that reflect the fiery sky above. We have littered those places that it would seem impossible to do so but this is compounded by the pollution of the atmosphere in the burning of fossil fuels. We are “burned by the fire we make” ( an Adrian Belew song whose lyrics are the perfect environmental protest song). The ’Scorched Earth’ of the title is also a reference to the ‘military strategy that aims to destroy anything that might be useful to the enemy (food sources, water supplies, transportation, communications, industrial resources, and even the locale’s people) while it is advancing through or withdrawing from a location.’ (Wikipedia), enabling another layer of meaning.

A non - specific landscape but one that seems to have focused on a more confined area. The scanning of a sea bed or the surface of a planet with restricted amounts of light? The use of a very limited colour palette emphasises the low light levels and the seeming inaccessibility of the place, whilst the embedded objects are trapped in the surface partly revealed in sculptural relief. From the surface of the moon to the the deepest oceans - where people go, waste accumulates. (Recent research revealed that up to 234 plastic particles have been found in just one litre of melted Arctic sea ice).

This image was taken as part of a series of monochrome coastal photographs shot in North Yorkshire as an attempt to explore this area of coastline. Over the next generation the UK coastline will alter dramatically as sea levels begin to rise as part of climate change. The area in which this image was taken is Spurn Head, which is predicted to submerge beneath the sea.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


David Sault

David Sault

Dawn Ridsdel

Misty Tarn

High Water on the Ouse

Biosphere – wind and rain bottle

Photograph

Photograph

50 x 40 cm

50 x 40 cm

Earthenware, slip decorated, gold lustre

£ 95

£ 85

This image is part of a series of monochrome photographs exploring the form and seasonal change of the British landscape. The form and size of small lakes like this one will change over the next generation as the UK is predicted to become subject to an increased amount of rainfall.

This image forms part of a series of textured colour images I made whilst walking the waterways of North Yorkshire. Each image in the portfolio is a colour photograph of a waterside location which has been digitally combined with a photograph of a textured or hand-painted surface to produce a richly textured imagined interpretation of the original scene. Most waterways of the UK are predicted to alter during the next generation of climate change.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

21 x 50 cm £ 350 Biosphere - The future scares me because as a species we are so greedy and wasteful that as a result nature is dying all around us and we let it happen. The earth simply cannot sustain the way we are living. My current work examines our complex relationship with the earth and the imperative to protect the environment from harm. Representing the biosphere in abstract surface decoration I have tried to capture the ecological systems and elements that support life. The two pieces here represent the wind, rain and the action of water caught in a bottle, and the land of the earth held in a bucket; human ways to carry our responsibility for the earth. I hope to celebrate the vitality and beauty of life on earth and the systems that sustain it, and encourage people to reflect on our impact on the planet. The earth is beautiful. Look how beautiful it is - and you have a place here. It is amazing.


Dawn Ridsdel

Day Bowman

Day Bowman

Biosphere – earth bucket

Fast Moving Trains 11

Cooling Towers 1

Earthenware, slip decorated, silver plate handle, gold lustre

Mixed media collage on paper

Mixed media collage on board

34 x 40 cm

34 x 40 cm

£ 560

£ 560

These small collage works were part of a collaborative venture The Urban Wastelands Project between Ian Knox, film-maker, Transglobal Underground and Day Bowman that toured various galleries during 2012/13.

These small collage works were part of a collaborative venture The Urban Wastelands Project between Ian Knox, film-maker, Transglobal Underground and Day Bowman that toured various galleries during 2012/13.

In these small collages we are invited on a journey where fleeting glimpses from a car or train window or departing ferry reveal quays, warehouses, vacant lots, cooling towers, gasometers and wasteland detritus jostling for space and creating an architecture known, ignored or forgotten.

In these small collages we are invited on a journey where fleeting glimpses from a car or train window or departing ferry reveal quays, warehouses, vacant lots, cooling towers, gasometers and wasteland detritus jostling for space and creating an architecture known, ignored or forgotten.

‘Embracing geo-political issues of mass-transmigration, The Urban Wasteland Project is a compelling journey through the tough forgotten corners of our marine and urban wastelands that is both brittle and beautiful’. Jenny Blyth 2013.

‘Embracing geo-political issues of mass-transmigration, The Urban Wasteland Project is a compelling journey through the tough forgotten corners of our marine and urban wastelands that is both brittle and beautiful’. Jenny Blyth 2013.

21 x 35 cm £ 300 Biosphere - The future scares me because as a species we are so greedy and wasteful that as a result nature is dying all around us and we let it happen. The earth simply cannot sustain the way we are living. My current work examines our complex relationship with the earth and the imperative to protect the environment from harm. Representing the biosphere in abstract surface decoration I have tried to capture the ecological systems and elements that support life. The two pieces here represent the wind, rain and the action of water caught in a bottle, and the land of the earth held in a bucket; human ways to carry our responsibility for the earth. I hope to celebrate the vitality and beauty of life on earth and the systems that sustain it, and encourage people to reflect on our impact on the planet. The earth is beautiful. Look how beautiful it is - and you have a place here. It is amazing.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Day Bowman

Debbie Vowden Aminian

Deborah Mitchelson

Wharf Study 5

Symbiotica

Bottles I

Mixed media collage on canvas

Painting, mixed Media

26 x 30 cm

Mixed media – papier mache, acrylic paint, handstitch/weave, hessian and vintage doilies

£ 750

57 x 46 cm

£ 225

These small collage works were part of a collaborative venture The Urban Wastelands Project between Ian Knox, film-maker, Transglobal Underground and Day Bowman that toured various galleries during 2012/13. In these small collages we are invited on a journey where fleeting glimpses from a car or train window or departing ferry reveal quays, warehouses, vacant lots, cooling towers, gasometers and wasteland detritus jostling for space and creating an architecture known, ignored or forgotten. ‘Embracing geo-political issues of mass-transmigration, The Urban Wasteland Project is a compelling journey through the tough forgotten corners of our marine and urban wastelands that is both brittle and beautiful’. Jenny Blyth 2013.

£ 495 This piece was produced in response to some studies I made of lichen and their habitat. Lichen only exist by two organisms (fungi and algae) working together. It is this mutually beneficial pairing that allows them both to thrive. Lichen have been used since the last century as Bioindicators - Lichen respond to changes in the environment particularly air pollution and other toxic pollutants and radioactive metals. The title Symbiotica is a reflection on this close, long-term relationship between these different species and a lament on humans unwillingness/ inability to emulate these mutually respectful relationships.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

32.5 x 23.5 cm

A million plastic bottles are bought around the world EVERY MINUTE. Only half of them are recycled. This statement was the inspiration for my “Bottle” paintings. My interest in maps led me to looking at place names in the United Kingdom that included the word “bottle”. The landscape is being littered with plastic and glass bottles. Plastic seeps out into liquids and pollutes the seas and rivers. This is affecting sea-life and the environment generally.


Deborah Mitchelson

Deborah Mitchelson

Deborah Sfez

Bottles II

Bottles III

Thirst I

Painting, mixed Media

Painting, mixed Media

Digital Photography

32.5 x 23.5 cm

32.5 x 23.5 cm

40 x 40 cm

£ 225

£ 225

£ 825

A million plastic bottles are bought around the world EVERY MINUTE. Only half of them are recycled.

A million plastic bottles are bought around the world EVERY MINUTE. Only half of them are recycled.

This statement was the inspiration for my “Bottle” paintings. My interest in maps led me to looking at place names in the United Kingdom that included the word “bottle”. The landscape is being littered with plastic and glass bottles. Plastic seeps out into liquids and pollutes the seas and rivers. This is affecting sea-life and the environment generally.

This statement was the inspiration for my “Bottle” paintings. My interest in maps led me to looking at place names in the United Kingdom that included the word “bottle”. The landscape is being littered with plastic and glass bottles. Plastic seeps out into liquids and pollutes the seas and rivers. This is affecting sea-life and the environment generally.

We never think of the need of water if we havn’t experienced Thirst, But try to imagine that water has disappeared from our planet, do you think life would be possible for us Humans? Water, is such a natural entity for us, that we never pay attention to its existence or quantity. What would happen if it became rare like Diamonds or Gold? All our values would change. Life would become rare because Water, like Air, is an essential material of life for us Humans and for Animals and vegetations.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Deborah Sfez

Diana Terry

Diana Terry

Thirst II

Mountain Range 1

Mountain Range 2

Digital Photography

Etching overprinted with Chinese black ink

Etching overprinted with Chinese black ink

32 x 45 cm

32 x 45 cm

£ 250

£ 250

As part of a walking holiday in the foothills of the Himalayas we ascended to 4000 metres. The expedition was very special as we were the only clients led by four Sherpas and a guide. I also lost the batteries to my camera so drawing regularly to have a record of our trip. These I have used many times developing them into large works and etchings. I aim to capture the essence of the place and record my experience. The glaciers of he Himalayas are called the water towers of the world. They are visible early indicators of global warming and the local people and guide were aware of how much they had shrunk. So ice melting is not only an artic/ Antarctic phenomenon. The glaciated melting in the Himalayas is said to affect 1.4 billion people mainly in the Indian subcontinent and China. >>

>> Even though there is not usually a monsoon in the high mountains that year the rains came in torrents. The rivers were very swollen and we had to transverse many difficult situations.The last river, a tributary of the Brahmaputra was raging at a speed over fifty miles an hour. I was persuaded to attempt to cross this river on foot as the Indiana Jones style bridge had been swept away. The Sherpas were holding me on either side but despite this a sudden surge in the flow caused all of us to be swept under the water. Fortunately we were being watched by dozens of people from the local village. They rushed in grabbed our rucksacks and dragged all of us out downstream. Clearly we were relieved but embarrassed. This was nothing compared to the 30,000 people killed in the monsoon in India that year. >>

40 x 60 cm £ 825 We never think of the need of water if we havn’t experienced Thirst, But try to imagine that water has disappeared from our planet, do you think life would be possible for us Humans? Water, is such a natural entity for us, that we never pay attention to its existence or quantity. What would happen if it became rare like Diamonds or Gold? All our values would change. Life would become rare because Water, like Air, is an essential material of life for us Humans and for Animals and vegetations.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Diana Terry

Diane Leach

Diane Leach

Mountain Range 3

Flow I

Flow II

Etching overprinted with Chinese black ink

Riverscape/ Acrylics

Riverscape/ Acrylics

51 x 76 cm

50.5 x 40.5 cm

£380

£230

A riverscape painted in acrylics showing the river Hull’s raised water levels encroaching into the surrounding vegetation. The day was dull but a cool light filtered through creating an interesting contrast between the water and the flooded plants. Unusually for me, I did not prepare the canvass with a textured base, I felt the stillness of the scene required a smoother gesso coating.

This beautiful and inspiring scene with its gentle flooding of the river bank belies the fact that flooding in this country and the rest of the world is often severe and devastating, this may be increased due to climate change. For the sake of the planet we should all be aware of global warming and climate change and strive to cut CO2 levels which are the highest in centuries.

32 x 45 cm £ 250 >> It was a very scary experience which brought home to me the power of nature and the effects of climate change on a personal level. Communicating this narrative in a series of etchings with overpainted ink portrays the events on a subjective and emotional level. Working in a series is an essential part of etching and I find that combining it with overpainted ink captures the drama of the image. This series is limited to twenty prints from the plate but as each is overpainted they are essentially one offs. I have also been working on larger oil paintings but find that the etchings contribute to my thinking and the development of my work.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Diane Leach

Diane Shillito

Diane Shillito

Flow III

All That Remains 1

All That Remains 2

Flooded river plants / Acrylics

Image on Cartridge Paper, inks and floral matter.

Image on Cartridge Paper, inks and floral matter.

70 x 52.5 cm

70 x 52.5 cm

£ 450

£ 450

My mothers’ love and sharing of knowledge about plants and bee pollinators have made them an integral part of my life. Their continued re appearance annually has provided a reassuring rhythm to my life, as each spring brings renewal and memories of each season ahead. I know where I am within the yearly cycle.

>> Can you imagine a world without the beneficial contribution of plants and flowers?

61 x 30 cm £200 A slightly abstracted view of flooded vegetation caused by the high water levels of the river Hull. The day was dull but a cool light filtered through creating an interesting contrast between the water and the flooded plants. Unusually for me, I did not prepare the canvass with a textured base, I felt the stillness of the scene required a smoother gesso base for my acrylics. This beautiful and inspiring scene with it’s gentle flooding of the river bank belies the fact that flooding in this country and the rest of the world is often severe and devastating and may be increased due to climate change. For the sake of the planet we should all be aware of global warming and climate change and strive to cut CO2 levels which are the highest in centuries.

However, rising temperatures are having an ecological impact on plants and their pollinators. In 2010/2012 plants flowered between 20/21 days earlier than usual due to the rise in seasonal temperature. At some point it may become too hot for plants to survive.. >>

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

All That Remains 1 & 2 are displayed as unnamed evidence. The images represent presence and absence in the different density of the inks and depth of impressions. We see only a trace, a memory of what once was, parts are absent and lost, as we view all that remains. This is synonymous with notions of scarcity and disappearing species from the planet.


Diane Watson

Diane Watson

Elena Putley

There is no away

A Drop in the ocean

Eternal Rain

Plastic/photography/digital print

Plastic/photography/digital print

Acrylic on board

60 x 60 cm

60 x 60 cm

54 x 45 cm

£ 200

£ 200

£ 300

‘A drop in the ocean’ and ‘There is no away’ explores the issue of ocean plastic. We are now producing nearly 300 million tons of plastic every year, half of which is for single use. More than 8 million tons of plastic is dumped into our oceans every year and much of this plastic get washed up on our beaches. My many dog walks along our beautiful north-east coastline have raised my awareness and concern of this environmental issue. The work comprises images of disposable plastic collected from coastal areas. Some of these are familiar such as bottle tops, broken spades, chip forks, cigarette lighters, beach toys and tampon applicators. The plastics are cleaned, collated and organised into themes - colour, size, frequency or shape, before being photographed. The aim is to expose and re-evaluate our relationship with plastic by reproducing in detail items we rarely give a second thought to.

‘A drop in the ocean’ and ‘There is no away’ explores the issue of ocean plastic. We are now producing nearly 300 million tons of plastic every year, half of which is for single use. More than 8 million tons of plastic is dumped into our oceans every year and much of this plastic get washed up on our beaches. My many dog walks along our beautiful north-east coastline have raised my awareness and concern of this environmental issue. The work comprises images of disposable plastic collected from coastal areas. Some of these are familiar such as bottle tops, broken spades, chip forks, cigarette lighters, beach toys and tampon applicators. The plastics are cleaned, collated and organised into themes - colour, size, frequency or shape, before being photographed. The aim is to expose and re-evaluate our relationship with plastic by reproducing in detail items we rarely give a second thought to.

This work is based on the ancient spiritual representations of time and changing seasons - spirals. Spirals are some of the oldest geometric shapes in ancient artworks, dating back at least to the Neolithic period. Spiral is a symbol of change, progression and development. Water probably is one of the most important and desired elements for us humans - forever changing and mutable and sadly we change it too. In this work I used various stencils, acrylic paints and spray paints.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Elena Putley

Elena Putley

Eleni Tsakalou

Land man. Sacrifice.

Luna

Reef Coral SOS

Collage

Oil on canvas

Coral sculpture, Parian Porcelain

55 x 55 cm

100 cm diameter

Heigths in cm: S = 19, O = 17, S = 21

£ 150

£ 750

S = £54

I bought a large number of old aerial photographs in the old book shop in Harrogate. They were amazing quality, black and white aerial photographs of Port Talbot Steelworks, with hand-written marks by cartographers who used them for surveying this piece of land. The land in these images looked so transformed, re-arranged and in a very bizarre way… beautiful. There is nothing beautiful about it and the Tata Steelworks is deforming the local environment, but the formal arrangements and the scale of this industrial “mark-making” reminded me of a large scale, ancient chalk figures such as the White Horse and other. We conquered the landscape but with very different intentions and different outcomes. Simplified images of humans, similar to Neolithic representations, were scanned and laser cut from the aerial photographs. I combined them with other found aerial photographs and various collage materials.

This is one of the several large round paintings or tondi, dedicated to the natural elements. They remind me of small planets - self contained and harmonious. I was intrigued by the circular shape and the idea of the circle or what it represents in art. I combined thick brushstrokes, thin washes, stencils and spray paints. I applied several layers of oil paint over the dry under-layers, refining colours and revealing textures.

S.O.S. CORAL BLEACHING S.O.S.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

O = £54

S = £58

Until recently it was thought that coral bleaching was due to pollution of the sea, it has now been proved that this damage to the coral reefs is directly related to the increase in the temperature of the sea water. Researchers say coral will find it increasingly difficult to build strong skeletons as the world’s oceans rapidly warm. Global-scale coral bleaching events are becoming more frequent and intense. These events are the direct result of global warming. Stony coral builds the iconic tropical coral reef networks that dominate many shallow-water environments, harbouring more than one-third of the oceans’ biodiversity and supporting more than one billion people through fishing and tourism.


Eleni Tsakalou

Ellen Paige Leach

Reef Coral SOS

East Coast

Coral sculpture, Parian Porcelain

Digital Photographic Glitch Matt Print (Triptych)

Various Corals available in a price range of £35 - £75

36cm x 36cm, framed per image £ 300

S.O.S. CORAL BLEACHING S.O.S. Until recently it was thought that coral bleaching was due to pollution of the sea, it has now been proved that this damage to the coral reefs is directly related to the increase in the temperature of the sea water. Researchers say coral will find it increasingly difficult to build strong skeletons as the world’s oceans rapidly warm. Global-scale coral bleaching events are becoming more frequent and intense. These events are the direct result of global warming. Stony coral builds the iconic tropical coral reef networks that dominate many shallow-water environments, harbouring more than one-third of the oceans’ biodiversity and supporting more than one billion people through fishing and tourism.

My work looks at the relationship with the landscape and the digital. The triptych portrays Bempton and Flamborough cliffs as falling pixels and although the chalk cliffs are one of the sturdier rock formations, a few miles down the coast the chalk turns to clay where the rising sea levels are rapidly eroding the coastline. The process of making an image malfunction has the power to highlight the fragility of nature in its purest form, it needs to be protected.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Emily Birkett

Emily Birkett

Emma McKenzie

Fleece (2017)

Pale (2017)

Fractured

Recycled Clothing (cushion)

Recycled Clothing (cushion)

Poetry Book (50 copies)

50 x 50 cm

50 x 50 cm

£ 8 per copy

£ 55

£ 55

All my work is created through recycling, promoting sustainability. I knit a range of large and small scale works which can stand alone or combine to create immersive installations. Due to using a craft-based skill which many already know how to conduct, it is perhaps replicable which in this circumstance, encourages others to be more environmentally aware because it is accessible. When viewers look at the work, hold the cushions and inspect the fabric, it demonstrates how they can be economical with their old fabrics, prevent textile waste and produce work which is not only useful but visually appealing, low cost with a small investment of knitting needles and scissors, limited, if not zero waste to make, and bound using a technique which can be used as many times as you wish.

All my work is created through recycling, promoting sustainability. I knit a range of large and small scale works which can stand alone or combine to create immersive installations. Due to using a craft-based skill which many already know how to conduct, it is perhaps replicable which in this circumstance, encourages others to be more environmentally aware because it is accessible. When viewers look at the work, hold the cushions and inspect the fabric, it demonstrates how they can be economical with their old fabrics, prevent textile waste and produce work which is not only useful but visually appealing, low cost with a small investment of knitting needles and scissors, limited, if not zero waste to make, and bound using a technique which can be used as many times as you wish.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

Fractured is a collection of micro poems and fragments drawing on daily interactions with nature. This work was inspired by the experience of running an eco-therapy creative writing class over the last two years at St Nick’s nature reserve in York. The aim of eco-therapy creative writing is to connect people to nature through a series of observations and sketches using words, to support wellbeing and recovery from mental health illness experience. Each poem is a small interaction with nature or an observation of a fracture demonstrating the constant struggle to balance modern life and technology with the natural world. I believe that interaction with our natural environment is integral to wellbeing and hope that this collection of poems inspires others to stand and take note of the natural world on a daily basis and to consider the environment when making lifestyle choices.


Francesca Busca

Francesca Busca

Francesca Busca

One

Raspberries

Stick your Plastic up your Ars

Ceramic on wooden board, direct method. 100% reused material.

Plastic and paper on thin metal board. 100% reused material.

35 x 35 cm

30 x 30 cm

Mosaic and mixed media: bark, smalti, marble, millefiori, plastic on wooden board, direct method. 98% reused material.

£450

£450

40.5 x 40.5 cm

Made entirely with ONE black and white material (broken plates), both colours showing in each piece. It’s yin and yang, just like in each one of us…

Milk carton lids sticking out their tongues to whoever thought they were destined for the bin…

£ 500 An example of how to upcycle disposable plastic leftovers. Plastic is quickly accumulating everywhere in our world and hardly dissolving, thereby dramatically contributing to the destruction of our ecosystem. But we CAN make a difference: SAY NO TO DISPOSABLE PLASTIC! And in the meantime, why not reuse what of it is already there… and stick it up your art?

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Francesca King

Francesca King

Freya Laetitia Stinton

Slow Boats

Clear Moon

Sea Snail

Set of 3 Hand built White St Thomas clay with maganise& red oxide and gun metal glaze.

Agate Clay on board

Watercolour on paper

28cm by 17cm (on the board)

38 x 30 cm

25cm long 10cm wide approx by 25-30cm tall approx

£ 75

£ 700

£ 90 each

Clear Moon is part of a series of work exploring the natural landscape using the responsive Agate clay as the raw material and guide. With the addition of natural foliage and inclusions of metal oxides, the piece transforms in the firing. I smooth the surface, glaze and fire again for the depth of the images to appear.

This is a painting of a tiny sea snail, measuring at around 3mm. This minuscule creature flaps its wing structures in a characteristic figure of eight pattern, because of this movement it is also called a sea butterfly. The ‘Limacina helicina’ has insect-like acrobatics, it is a predatory mollusc that makes webs of mucus to filter feed on small plankton. These snails are essentially gelatinous and fragile. They have a shell made of calcium carbonate, when they reach the end of their life they sink to the ocean floor and create a carbon sink. Sea snails are affected by both ocean acidification and climate change. Recently a species of sea snail called, ‘Echinolittorina punctate’ that used to reside in the south of the Mediterranean Sea are now living off the South Coast of France. The sea snails are on the move, marine creatures are reacting to the rising ocean temperatures.

This a story about the journey I took to find my tribe. The resonation of the pieces and response is the tide of the feeling involved. To cross the seas you must first find a boat.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Gareth Bunting

Gareth Bunting For a shopping mall Ink on paper, 150 x 170 cm £ 4,000

What silence brings Ink on silk 130 x 150 cm £ 4,000 ‘What Silence Brings’ is a large scale brush and ink drawing on silk, portraying a dark dystopian landscape which serves as a warning against today’s social political and environmental climate. In the forefront is a huge tortured and dying tree, bound in wires and segregated from the rest of the picture by a gigantic grotesque wall, an obvious symbol of humanities detachment from nature. Fractal patterns are found at all scales in this piece, from the branches of the tree, to the icebergs to the positioning of the people and buildings themselves, which reminds us that we are connected to our environment, and are at a crucial point history, in which we will either go with the grain of nature, or continue to fight against it to our own destruction as if we are somehow separate from it.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

For a shopping mall is a large scale ink drawing, created during an artist residency in Shanghai. It investigates the global age of the Anthropocene and the impact of humanity on the natural landscape, as well as the huge and rapid rise of China. It attempts to visualize a city in flux, with buildings continuously being built, destroyed and rebuilt again, with huge areas of incredibly valuable and important farmland and natural parks, being dug up and turned into ‘ghost cities’, which are found in their hundreds in China, they are often empty and contain no real homes, businesses or institutions, and just serve to further profit a small number of elite in the short term, with little regard for the future of these natural ecosystems, and areas of farmland which are crucial in feeding people.. Inspired by the traditional Shan shui style of Chinese landscape painting, with timeless beautiful mountains and clouds merging together, into gigantic dug out quarries, smoggy cityscapes, and a huge abstract form in the center of the piece representing a shopping mall. There is a narrative which flows along the lines and curves of the piece, which questions global social political and environmental issues, as well as my own identity as a westerner abroad. There is a stark contrast between the bold abstract forms, and the shan shui style organic fractal patterns and forms which serve to remind us that we are ourselves part of nature.


Gillian Holding

Gillian Holding

Gordon Senior

Capitalocene Man (2017)

Anthroposcene (falling) (2017)

Harvest Stone (Barley)

household acrylic on 300gsm paper

Bronze, sand and cement

183 x 150 cm

18 x 23 x 27 cm

clay, cardboard, string, fabric sculpted figure; plastic bin bag loosely filled with a week’s worth of recyclable clean paper and plastic packaging

50cm length figure on standard loosely filled bin bag £ 500 Capitalocene Man (2017) is one of a series of works realised in 2017 as part of an ongoing enquiry into the Anthropocene, the named current geological age of the earth primarily influenced by humanity (“anthropos“) and exemplified by worrying signs of climatic, ecological and environmental crisis. Most disturbingly, a global corporatecapitalist structure drains the earth of valuable resources and raw materials in its endeavour to maximise growth of markets everywhere. But there is no real accountability for the actions of this structure. In this artwork, the archetypal corporate man himself is unable to ultimately escape the consequences of unimpeded corporate power, and sits powerless of a sack of officially “recyclable” but paradoxically ultimately unrecyclable material, the result of years of soothing but ultimately useless attempts by local authorities to do something about paper and plastic packaging waste.

£ 3,500 Anthroposcene (Falling) (2017) is one of a series of paintings realised in 2017 as part of an ongoing enquiry into the artist’s pervasive sense of unease and disquiet in a society framed by global political upheaval, a corporate consumer culture exacerbating ecological and environmental concerns, and increasing social inequality. Only an uneasy and fragile equilibrium inhibits total descent into chaos. This painting was made on paper first off the roll: the vertical crease attests to a desire to not waste a scrap in production of work. The Anthropocene is the named current geological age of the earth, primarily influenced by humanity (“anthropos“). Yet the term is open to challenge. Is all mankind equally responsible? And perhaps more disturbingly, does attributing encroaching disaster to humanity allow for the hubris of mankind to think we can geo-engineer our way out of chaos? Is this the greater threat preceding our fall? Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

£ 900 The exhibited sculptures depict the seed heads of barley, wheat and annual meadow grasses. This work focuses on the importance to the natural environment of the evolution of grasses into food for animals and humans, and the continuing diversity of grasses and grains. Seed heads contain embryonic new plants and the potential to continue the life cycle of each species. The sculptures, which might be seen as symbols of fertility, invite the viewer to consider evolution, natural selection, and cultivation. This series of works is dedicated to the botanist and geneticist Nikolai Vavilov, his work in developing cereal crops, his collection of plant seeds and the development of the Leningrad Seed Bank.


Gordon Senior

Gordon Senior

Hazel Cowen

Harvest Stone (Wheat)

Grass Stone (Annual Meadow Grass)

Scarred Earth I

Sand and cement

Bronze, sand and cement

Print and Collage on paper

30 x 28 x 19 cm

28 x 24 x 24 cm

43 x 43 cm

£ 650

£ 750

£ 250

The exhibited sculptures depict the seed heads of barley, wheat and annual meadow grasses. This work focuses on the importance to the natural environment of the evolution of grasses into food for animals and humans, and the continuing diversity of grasses and grains.

The exhibited sculptures depict the seed heads of barley, wheat and annual meadow grasses. This work focuses on the importance to the natural environment of the evolution of grasses into food for animals and humans, and the continuing diversity of grasses and grains.

Seed heads contain embryonic new plants and the potential to continue the life cycle of each species. The sculptures, which might be seen as symbols of fertility, invite the viewer to consider evolution, natural selection, and cultivation.

Seed heads contain embryonic new plants and the potential to continue the life cycle of each species. The sculptures, which might be seen as symbols of fertility, invite the viewer to consider evolution, natural selection, and cultivation.

This series of works is dedicated to the botanist and geneticist Nikolai Vavilov, his work in developing cereal crops, his collection of plant seeds and the development of the Leningrad Seed Bank.

This series of works is dedicated to the botanist and geneticist Nikolai Vavilov, his work in developing cereal crops, his collection of plant seeds and the development of the Leningrad Seed Bank.

Scarred Earth I evolved through a process of printing tearing, reworking and arranging papers of varying thicknesses. The process of monoprinting is developed intuitively and the results are indeterminate. The resulting prints of this rather chaotic approach are selected, torn, and arranged to give reference to a geological landscape. This painterly approach is contained within a graphic, ordered composition giving a sense of borders and boundaries. By using papers of varying thicknesses and contrasting tones I hope to convey an impression of both strength and fragility. All though my work is abstract it is my passion for the landscape and the fascinating varied geology which determines my imagery.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Hazel Cowen

Hazel Cowen

Helen Howard

Scarred Earth II

Melt

Corrie, melt waters

Print and Collage on paper

Oil and Oil Pastel on Canvas

Ceramic, raku fired

43 x 43 cm

60 x 60 cm

31 x 29 x 12 cm

ÂŁ 250

ÂŁ 400

ÂŁ 350

Scarred Earth II evolved through a process of printing tearing, reworking and arranging papers of varying thicknesses. The process of monoprinting is developed intuitively and the results are indeterminate. The resulting prints of this rather chaotic approach are selected, torn, and arranged to give reference to a geological landscape. This painterly approach is contained within a graphic, ordered composition giving a sense of borders and boundaries. The imagery on the left of the composition is a reference to something revealed within the surface and also acts as a link between the two areas of the composition. By using papers of varying thicknesses and contrasting tones I hope to convey an impression of both strength and fragility. All though my work is abstract it is my passion for the landscape and the fascinating varied geology which determines my imagery.

The painting Melt has evolved out of a process of layering, removing and manipulating the paint. The initial random and often chaotic brushstrokes of the initial stages of the painting are simplified. It is a slow process and the results can be indeterminate. The layering of the paint in muted tones and the scraping off are used to give the texture of compacted snow and ice. The lines and marks drawn in oil pastel add an extra dimension to the work, and give an impression of something revealed, an interruption in an otherwise subtle image. By using a very restricted palette of muted whites and greys I am hoping to convey a feeling of stillness, of a calm, pristine but very fragile landscape. Although my work is abstract it is an emotional response to the problem of climate change.

Description: This work was made in response to the increased volumes and impact of melt-waters on the landscape. It explores the fragile ecosystems struggling against rising water levels and the volatile boundaries between earth, sky and precipitation. It is a study of a landscape in flux. The clay is a mixture of white St Thomas and craft crank, the vessel is hand-built and raku-fired.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Helen Howard

Helen Howard

Helen Howard

Skye, sea, mist, mountain

After the Flood

Dawn Breaking

Ceramic, raku fired

Ceramic, raku fired

Ceramic, raku fired

22 x 22 x 19 cm

12 x 12 x 12 cm

11 x 11 x 9 cm

£ 350

£ 125

£ 85

Helen Howard

Helen Howard

Flooded Corrie Ceramic, raku fired 9 X 16 X 14 cm

All that Remains Ceramic, raku fired 12 X 11 X 11 cm

£ 80

£ 125

Description: As the planet warms, ice shelves collapse into the oceans and weather patterns are increasingly volatile. The landscape is impacted by rising sea levels as storm surges threaten low lying regions and intense rainfall threatens fragile ecosystems. This work was made as part of a series addressing the shifting boundaries between sea, land and sky. The clay is a mixture of white St Thomas and craft crank, the vessel is hand-built and raku-fired – an elemental process involving fire, smoke and water.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Holly Holder

Ian Brooks

Ian Brooks

Deep Emotion

Approaching Tristan da Cunha

Mixed Media (watercolour, acrylic, acrylic ink)

Etching 1/10

Iceberg in Cumberland East Bay, South Georgia

54 x 54 cm £ 500 This piece was inspired by the Polar Icecap melting and still the world is ignoring global warming, whilst small islands the Pacific and Indian Oceans, even European cities are now flooding. This is a reminder of our commitment to Mother Earth. It is our personal responsibility to do all can, however small it may seem, if everyone in the world did one small thing it would make a huge difference.

Image: 14x30cm/Frame: 39x52cm £ 350 The island of Tristan da Cuhna is the most remote inhabited island on Earth, with a population of under 300. This image derives from photographs snatched while working on the British Antarctic Survey’s research ship the James Clark Ross as it approached the island for a brief visit while en route from the Southern Ocean back to the UK. A large part of the islanders income is from fishing the local crayfish, a variety unique to the island’s coastal waters, and sensitive to environmental change. The island is volcanic, and often, as here, shrouded in cloud. The bright fall of rain contrasted with the shadowed island behind was captivating. My first sketches were made from the photograph while still on the ship, but it was 2 years before I finally decided how to approach it as an etching.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

Etching 2/10 Image: 12x40cm/Frame: 35x60cm £ 395 The island of South Georgia lies in the Southern Ocean, several days sailing to the east, and a little to the south, of the Falkland Islands. As the climate warms, the glaciers on the island are retreating visibly. Icebergs calving off the glaciers float slowly out to sea, sometimes grounding themselves and slowly melting until small enough to float free again. The iceberg shown here was grounded for some months opposite King Edward Point, in Cumberland East Bay, where the British Antarctic Survey has a permanent research station. It was calved off the Nordenskjöld Glacier, at the head of the bay. The glacier has retreated 1.5km in the last 80 years, 1km of that in the last 10 years.


Ian Brooks

Ian Middleton

Ian Middleton

Grytviken

Come in No.27 Your Time is Up!

Night Line

Etching 1/10

Patinated Bronze in Oak Mount

Image: 15x15cm/Frame: 37x35.5cm

40 x 40 x 7 cm

Cast ‘found and made objects, Patinated Bronze

£ 275

£ 5,750

Grytviken is a derelict Norwegian whaling station lying a mile or so along the coast from King Edward Point, within Cumberland East Bay on South Georgia. Few places are as evocative of man’s destruction of nature in the quest for profit. Silhouetted against the snow covered mountainside here are, amongst other buildings, several tanks, still with a few inches of whale oil in them, and a whaling vessel, deliberately grounded by sailing it into the shore. While such places have a rather grim history, they have the strange and fascinating beauty of many derelict industrial sites. The great Antarctic explorer Ernest Shackleton is buried in a small graveyard, a little way outside the whaling station, along with his shipmate, Frank Wild.

This wall relief sculpture is a response to two separate experiences many years apart: I remember while a student at Sheffield College of Art sitting in a park watching a very irate boatman on a boating lake yelling through a megaphone ‘Come in No. 27 Your Time is Up’, over and over again, completely ignored by no.27. I was reminded of this incident when moving some tadpoles in a jam jar to a safer place. It seemed an appropriate metaphor. I cast the sculpture at my studio, the tadpoles were cast individually and the sculpture bolted together.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

50 x 27 x 17 cm £ 4,750 Night Line references topical environmental and social issues and is assembled in the form or a monument. I have used scale juxtaposition and association to create a dream like image to entice and engage with the viewer. I’m sympathetic with Alberto Giacometti’s observation: ‘The object of Art is not to reproduce reality but to create a reality of the same intensity. The sculpture was cast during a recent Fellowship at Chelsea College of Art.


IJE

IJE

IJE

Tracing Time Layering Landscape vi: Summer Milieus

Tracing Time Layering Landscape x: Landscape of Shadowed Voices

Listen To The Earth Speak, Whisper, Tremor, Trickle & Leak

Acrylic / mixed media on canvas

Acrylic / mixed media on canvas

Acrylic on canvas

120 x 150 cm

80 x 80 cm

120 x 120 cm

£ 2,700

£ 1,300

£ 2,400

My paintings are my responses to direct encounters within the landscape; this one is the abundance that is summer, such as experienced in my garden. A combination of my human experience in the world and philosophical concepts. For me summer is “au milieu”– the in-between, full of potential for change, for becoming better; the to & fro between spring & winter. There are rhythms and smells, sights & sounds ablaze with life & potential. In making this piece I was like an insect amongst the flowers, busily moving from the blooms, to the shade of the border fences, in & out, over & under, ever changing, repetition, transduction, rhythms emerging. Diversity of planting, colour & scents, differentiation in spaces within our gardens is an important contribution to insect & wildlife flourishing in the “developed” world. Activity of insects & wild creatures should be encouraged, as should our involvement & interactions within these spaces – enjoy them, in all their gaudy glory.

My paintings are my responses to direct encounters within the landscape. Thinking about the energies that flow & generate life; the physical & mythological markings in, on & of the land - “voices” that travel through timelines telling of the past, present & future, telling of the shadowing upon it from the massification of human interactions, inventions, interventions. “Humans are tuned for relationship...This landscape of shadowed voices, these feathered bodies and antlers and tumbling streams-these breathing shapes are our family, the beings with whom we are engaged, with whom we struggle and suffer and celebrate. For the largest part of our species’ existence, humans have negotiated relationships with every aspect of the sensuous surroundings, exchanging possibilities with every flapping form, with each textured surface and shivering entity that we happened to focus upon... Every sound was a voice, every scrape or blunder was a meeting-with Thunder, with Oak, with Dragonfly. And from all of these relationships our collective sensibilities were nourished.” page ix (Preface), Spell of The Sensuous by David Abram.

My paintings are my responses to direct encounters within the landscape; thinking about the earth, the speed of change slow in the history of the planet & yet quickly in the history of humans and the planet. Humans have different cultural and individual values about this earth, how we interact with it and our impact upon it. I was thinking of tessellations, of gushing water, of folding time – space collapsing and compressing; expanding and extending, of the mythologies to explain geological processes. The pulse and rhythm of the earth being disrupted and the refrain inside my head, reminded me of a poem by Lemn Sissay called Different Drums (circa 1988) whose words still have relevance today.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

“Don’t be misled / By the slow / Rhythms / The depths and fathoms / The measure of sound / Keep your ears to the ground Listen to the earth speak / Whisper, tremor, trickle and leak / Gush, flow, splatter and seep / To awake you from your sleep / Your misleading / Breathing / Quoted you alive / But different drums know different / How long can you hide from the truth / Don’t be misled / By the dead slow / Rhythms of time.


Irena Kurowska

Irena Kurowska

Jacky Boutet

Land and Sea: disappearing land

Land and Sea: layers of meaning

Piano on the Roof

Oil on linen

Oil on board

Slate, Steel, Copper

50 x 50 cm

40 x 50 cm

120 x 45 x 40 cm

£ 450

£ 410

£ 750

Because of global warming the seas are rising and changing. The Yorkshire coast is particularly vulnerable to erosion as sea levels rise. Cliffs are collapsing and the sea is claiming the land.

Strata remind us of our history and heritage. Rock formations on land and by the sea hold our past. They speak to us of lives lived on ancient earth. They remind us that we are but guardians of this earth. That it is important to manage our time here in the interests of all living beings.

An outdoor organic sculpture made of reclaimed materials. This sculpture represents the balance and displacement between Man and Nature, creating a sense of ephemeral permanence and delicate equilibrium. Using discarded, reclaimed and found materials from around the open slate quarries of Snowdonia. Some of these materials have remained in their predominantly natural form, yet were once worked by human hands and would have been naturally reclaimed by the environment, hence representing the perfect cycle of life and balance between Man and Earth.

This land is our inheritance and the inheritance of generations to come. ‘For the gifts of life are the earth’s and they are given to all.’ Henry Beston

Let our legacy be one which we do not regret

Will the land that we walk in and love become a distant memory. Will we remember this land only through the mists of time.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Jan Bulley

Jan Bulley

Jan Bulley

Evanescent

Drift Erosion

Floodwater Rising

Acrylic and mixed media

Acrylic, mixed media and collage

Acrylic and mixed media

90 x 90 cm

45 x 45 cm

45 x 45 cm

£ 850

£ 350

£ 350

As the temperature of the oceans rise, seawater expands, resulting in rising sea levels. This is one of the most dramatic consequences of climate change, flooding land and infrastructure, particularly along coastal areas. Increasing water vapour in the atmosphere results in more precipitation and stronger storms. Weather extremes are increasing.

Sea-level rise is a key factor in causing coastal erosion and concerns about erosion risk have mounted in light of increased rates of sea-level rise predicted due to climate change. A large proportion of the coastline of the UK and Ireland is currently suffering from erosion. Using a variety of materials to evoke silt and dredging, this work was inspired by an aerial perspective of part of Spurn Point, East Yorkshire, which is slowly disappearing due to erosion. In 2013, as direct result of a high tide and rough storm, part of the peninsular at the tip of Spurn was ripped away and deposited some 80 yards away. Its geography is in continual flux.

“Water is the formless potential out of which creation emerged. It is the ocean of unconsciousness enveloping the islands of consciousness. Water bathes us at birth and again at death, and in between it washes away sin. It is by turns the elixir of life or the renewing rain or the devastating flood.” (Scott Russell Sanders, Writing from the Center)

This painting is my interpretation of a floodwater landscape so effected by recurrent flooding; now a place of beauty but with devastation lurking. Unable to sustain the ruined life submerged below.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

This piece was inspired by many many walks by my local river. I love to escape there, especially early in the morning to catch the daybreak; it is always a special experience to take in that atmosphere of water, light, sounds and reflections. I watch the river in its ever-changing guises; calm, shimmering, smooth, rippling or a torrent, gushing and spiralling past. In my mind, always, is its potential for flooding and the destruction that can cause. The recent increase in extremes of weather that have been brought about through more rapid climate change feel very close when I am there.


Jane Marsh

Jane Wilson

Jean Drysdale

Too Good to Lose

Sea Urchin

Seed Pod

Papier mache free standing screen

Textiles and mixed media

3D hand felted hollow form

155cm high approx. 100cm wide

30 x 30 cm

16 x 23 cm

£ 375

£ 500

£ 55

This is a papier mache free standing screen with three panels. It is painted in acrylics and depicts peaceful scenes of farmland, trees and flowers all familiar to a visitor to Ryedale. There are poppies in early summer, corn fields and swallows chasing insects at harvest time and a tree in autumn dropping it’s brightly coloured leaves.

Whilst living on a small Island in the Outer Hebrides I would often collect shells and beach junk after storms. I was dismayed by the abundance of plastics and debris that would be washed ashore on a daily basis. I used my findings in this piece. The form, pattern, texture and colours inspired by a sea urchin I found, photographed and sketched. The media including the beach junk I collected. I wanted to combine the natural with the unnatural, I used wools and fibres to hand felt and embroider the piece so that on first impression the viewer sees a recreation of a natural object. However on closer examination the unexpected and unnatural washed up glass, plastics, metals and ropes are revealed. I wanted to emphasize how marine wildlife has been detrimentally affected by everyday rubbish that has been both deliberately and carelessly disposed of at sea.

This is a hollow form, hand felted in a single piece from Masham and Blue Faced Leicester unspun rare breed wools. It marks the development of a theme inspired by woodland, part of a series of complex forms which include the titles ‘Cracked Earth’ and ‘Lichen’ and in which I aim to create organic, often highly textured forms which relate to the natural world.

On the back of the screen there is a more muted view depicting sunset, moonrise and the sun glare that sometimes happens in on clear days. Best case scenario means the screen is a pleasant reflection of the outside world and how our well being is enhanced by nature. A darker case may be that the screen is a reminder of what we have lost and its use is to block out the horrors of a landscape ruined by fracking wells and lorries thundering past.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Jean Drysdale

Jean Drysdale

Jessica Copping

Shore Lines

Green Landscape

Melting into the Distance

3D hand felted sculptured hollow forms (1 &2 )

2D felted wall piece created from silk and cotton textile on fine wool base

Egg tempera and graphite on board

Shore lines 1: 52 x 12 cm

£ 115

31 x 32 cm

Shore lines 2 : 31 x 32 cm £ 95

£ 260

‘Shore Lines’ consists of two hand felted sculptured hollow forms in white and brown Masham and Bluefaced Leicester unspun rare breed wools. Through these pieces I explore fluid forms inspired by waves. Hand felted wool in muted natural colours lends itself to exploration of the world around us. Each is worked to form a single piece of textile.

‘Green Landscape’ is a wall piece which based on an image of fields viewed from above. It’s inspiration comes from the vibrancy and patchwork of the cultivated landscape and an interest in the origins of the fibres that were used to create it. The piece incorporates natural fibres including multi-hued hand dyed cottons and silks on wool.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

15 x 15 cm £ 350 ‘Melting into the Distance’ depicts a lone bird flying towards a blinding horizon which illuminates a marsh where there once was human habitation, the remains of which are being slowly consumed by the water. The painting explores what may happen to humanity and our cities (in particular coastal) as a result of global warming far into the future. My imagery is not intended to be fantasy, rather it is predictive, grounded in scientific research into what the future destructive effects of climate change on the planet and human civilisation will be, as well as responding to apocalyptic visuals of recent cataclysmic events. My aim was to reflect on the possible long-term effects of humankind’s current way of living on the biosphere and what this means for humans to come.


Jevgenija Tkacenko

Jo Brown

Jo Brown

‘Stelmuzes Oak’

Shelter

Colonize

Linocut

Oils on canvas

Oils on canvas

45 x 46 cm

122 x 122 cm

40 x 40 cm

£ 180

£ 2,000

£ 650

Who is this thing, is it a king of the forest?

I made this work for an exhibition some time ago and it has not been shown since. it is abstract and gives the sense of an interior space surrounded by, perhaps, water and sky and a mysterious dark area that could suggest forest but could also communicate a sense of something dangerous.

I made this small painting as part of an on-going exploration in to the idea of ‘edge land’, and a perception of communal and open land being increasingly appropriated and enclosed for private use, a cause for concern and feelings of outrage.

Who are these beings, do they don’t know I have feelings? Trying to take over and deforest. They gradually spread out, now they are all about. Not realising I’m frightened to meet them. The king is no more, he has been shown the door. And the forest is now their kingdom. The doves fly away, they have had their day. It’s the end of the world as we knew it.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Jo Brown

Jo Wright

John Illingworth

Barrier

To The North Pole

Defeated

Oils on canvas

Lino Print

Photography

100 x 100 cm

Print size: 10 x 15 cm Framed size: 32 x 37 cm

40 x 50 cm

£ 1,800 I wanted to make a painting that is abstract, has rich impactful colour, makes a visual reference to barriers. There is ambivalence here. A barrier c an be a useful thing such as the Thames construction to prevent flooding of London, but can also be a deplorable structure to exclude peoples. The viewer makes her own interpretation.

£ 115 Jo is a keen wildlife watcher and environmentalist and has travelled extensively with her ecologist partner looking for the world’s rarest animals. She was drawn to the plight of the polar bear and designed this print to raise awareness about the consequences of the melting ice cap for the bears. Using a two block process, Jo inks each block using a gradient roll. The result is a subtle blend of colours ranging from light to dark. She donates a percentage of her own sales of this print to Canadian charity Polar Bears International.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

£ 240 On a recent visit to Glen Affric I came across this enormous fallen Scots pine and it reminded me of a fallen warrior defeated in battle. Even this huge tree can easily fall victim to pollution, disease and destruction brought about by the human race. Protecting these beautiful natural giants must be a priority.


John Illingworth

John Illingworth

Josie Llewellyn

Into Glencoe

The End of Coal

Marine Plastic – 07/03/17

Photography

Photography

40 x 50 cm

40 x 50 cm

Mass produced ceramic plates, ceramic decals

£ 240

£ 240

This is one of my favourite places on earth and when it is covered with snow, it reminds me that we must protect these wilderness places for future generations. Technology can not reproduce these beautiful places and we must protect them.

Watching the steam engine of the North Yorkshire Moors Railway make its way across the moors reminded me that we are moving away from polluting fossil fuels toward cleaner ways of producing energy for future generations.

20.5 cm diameter £ 28 each Humans are the only species on this planet that produce waste that nature’s digestive system simply cannot process. The concept of plastics being unable to fully break down, potentially existing in our earths geological make up for hundreds or thousands of years is a daunting futuristic scenario. Beaches in particular are significant sites of interest to me because they are a constantly changing synapse between land and sea, a hinterland. Each year thousands of tonnes of our waste is deposited into our oceans to be forgotten about but then for it to get regurgitated back onto our shorelines, along with plastic choked marine life. The ocean does not discriminate as to where it dumps its cargo. Plastic waste ends up on the furthest remote islands, our white sandy holiday destinations, tainting our landscapes and areas of natural beauty, no longer being able to be ignored and forgotten.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Whilst investigating the subject of plastic pollution and their lack of biodegradability it has led me to question my own ceramic practice. Clay, once fired, is much the same as plastic becoming perpetual objects that do not break down, lasting for thousands of years in our earths crust.

Jude D Brown

Jude D Brown

Magical Light

Keep Out

Acrylic on canvas

Acrylic on canvas

The world in which we now live makes everything easily accessible, but also turns everything into a disposable commodity. The ceramic practice has also fallen victim to this throwaway culture, there was a time when tea sets and tableware were lavish objects that reflected someone’s social status, cherished and widely coveted, passed down through generations. However, now in modern culture ceramics are readily available, with items being heavily mass-produced in other countries and imported, resulting in prices of ceramics becoming incredibly cheap and therefore expendable.

81 x 56 cm

81 x 56 cm

£ 850

£ 850

Towards the end of 2013 I was privileged to be involved in a volunteers programme in the Peruvian rainforest for the Crees Foundation, which is a Peruvian based not for profit organization, dedicated to supporting a sustainable Amazon through better understanding of the value of the rainforest and helping local people to access its resources in ways that are both profitable and that will preserve the forest for the future.

This painting is also from memories of my time in the Peruvian rainforest whilst on a volunteers programme for the Crees Foundation, which is a Peruvian based not for profit organization, dedicated to supporting a sustainable Amazon through better understanding. In the past this part of the forest had suffered from illegal logging but it has been protected for several years giving the forest time to take hold again and the animals and insects that lost their habitat will also gradually return. The plants are fighting for the little light that is coming through the canopy. It is almost impenetrable. We were given machete training to help us get through the forest. A good pair of walking boots would have been more comfortable but we wore wellington boots as it is a rainforest and often wet and muddy – also some protection against snakes!!

Marine Plastic – 07/03/16’ is a 60 piece ceramic installation, responding to mass-produced ceramics and plastics. It shows every piece of plastic that had been collected on the first beach clean I initiated. Every object was scanned into the computer, catalogued and made into ceramic decals. The canvas’s for these images lie in the form of white mass-produced side plates that cost just 50p each. Every image is exhibited with the same value and importance, whether it is a plastic straw or a mobile phone.

This painting came about through my experiences in the Peruvian rainforests – this particular location is in the primary forest, where it was high up so the light coming through was intense. There are different areas of the forest; the primary forest is where less illegal logging has taken place because it is not so easily accessed therefore there are still a few hard woods left. Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Julie Clark

Julie Clark

Julie Clark

Message in a Bottle

Plastic Planet

Melting

Sculpture - Glass, eco-resin, ink, recycled materials

Ink, eco-resin, recycled materials on wood

Mixed media (modelling paste, acrylic paint, ink, and resin on paper)

6.5 x 18.5 cm

20 x 20 cm

31 x 40 cm

£ 150

£ 170

£ 195

This piece is a response to, and interpretation of, the massive overuse and over-reliance of plastic and its effect on the ocean.

Following on from Message in a Bottle, as the world continues to increasingly drown in plastic, I explore the theme of a ‘Plastic Planet’.

There is a staggering amount of plastic being discarded in the sea, with reports of ‘a million plastic bottles a minute’ being bought, set to top half a trillion which will be sold annually by 2021 (Source: The Guardian).

Between 5m and 13m tonnes of plastic leaks into the world’s oceans each year, and by 2050 the ocean will contain more plastic by weight than fish (Source: The Guardian and Ellen MacArthur Foundation Research).

Inspired by deeply disturbing, yet eerily beautiful, images from reports of ice shelves and glaciers melting, this work is a response to the beauty and fragility of these important structures.

The plastic ‘bottles’ and remnants of plastic bags are suspended in a resin ‘sea’ within a traditional glass milk bottle. The aim is to highlight and explore this issue, to start a discussion about it, and to consider and encourage a return to glass.

With pristine seas now becoming a thing of the past I wanted to present a visual statement of this serious issue. This piece features a lightly fading and gradating deep blue sea with a plastic-studded globe, created from ‘found’, created, re-used and recycled items and a sea of eco-resin and ink.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

This piece was produced by building up layers of ink, resin and acrylic paint, interspersed with modelling paste, which has been scraped away in parts to echo the erosion that is changing the Arctic landscape and our seas today.


Julie Hutton

Julie Lawrence

Karen Dodd

‘Not a good time to be a Walrus’.

Low Water

Polyp Polyp

‘Earth Sphere’, hand built from white stoneware clay, glazed with blue stains and a White Shino. Finished with a rough cast pewter Walrus on a copper stand.

Oil on Board

Sculpted and stitched from recycled woollen blanket

12” x 12” £ 260 On the front line and dependent on the Arctic Ice flow sheets for breeding and rearing their young, these creatures are struggling to adapt and survive. Forced onto shore land, the Walrus was not designed for such a life, and suffers high mortality rates. ‘Finding the right place to rest on the melting ice flow is getting harder and harder’ (Blue Planet 2, BBC). Without a healthy arctic I fear that all life on earth will be forced to adapt to ‘finding a safe place to rest’.

20 x 25 cm £ 300 My work is concerned with the transient, ephemeral nature of an ever changing local coastline and the nature of felt experience. The intangible, liminal territory between self and the spatial environment is given material presence through paint, My response to place, therefore, is invested with spiritual, emotional, and intuitive intent, which counters the interactions of virtual realities, and logical thought which dominates contemporary culture. There is an underlying quest to re-define the self in terms of being attached to the world and the cultivation of ecocentric values.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

Framed 52.5 x 52.5 x 4.3 cm £ 900 Balanced between geometric grid and free flowing organic form, this piece responds to polyps emerging to feed on the coral reef, their beauty and the tragedy of the bleaching occurring on so many reefs today. They are withdrawn into themselves as a need for protection from increasingly volatile environmental changes; their bud like construction connotes the force of life and rebirth, a hope for the future if enough action is taken to redress our environmental imbalances


Karen Dodd

Karen Dodd

Kate Smith

Red Binding

Come, Go and Return

The One That Got Away

Bound and twisted in wool and cotton threads, shadow in indian ink

Weaving and binding in wool

Acrylic on canvas

Framed 52.5 x 52.5 x 4.3 cm

120 x 100 cm

£ 900

£ 650

Wool, a protective organic material, correlates with the corals calcium carbonate skeleton that forms reefs. This piece looped and tightly woven in cream is akin to the interdependent world of the reef, though constructed in the colour of bleached coral its rhythmic energy hints at the possibility of continuance of life, a hope for regeneration through dramatic change. Weaving and binding evoke the architectural dense structure of the reef, its form and natural processes, the piece draws attention to the importance of these huge communities that provide multiple functions in our ecosystem, including food and protection for sea life and our coastlines.

A running theme in my work is the sea-life of the North Yorkshire Coastline, particularly crabs and lobsters. My family fish for them, from small boats launched from a village on the coast, but the small scale fisherman are being forced out in favour of industrial scale fishing as rules and regulations are biased in favour of the more commercial boats. Because these fishermen have such large stores of equipment they can exhaust the stocks quickly by intensive fishing and it can take years for stocks to recover. This poses inevitable difficulties for the marine life, as well as the social implications of the loss of small scale fishing and tourism from these vulnerable communities.

Framed 30 x 30 x 4.3 cm £ 900 The act of binding here is a metaphor for the ongoing cycle of life and death on the densely built coral reef. A section of twisting is reminding us that time doesn’t stand still, the shadows become the blind eye we are turning to ecological devastation, the red a dual response to the environmental violence and powerful life force of the largest organism in the world.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Kaye Kent

Kaye Kent

Kaye Kent

Super Cool

Fish Net

Ladder

Mixed Media

Mixed Media

Mixed Media

60 x 60 cm

60 x 60 cm

60 x 60 cm

£ 495

£ 495

£ 495

During a visit to Kampong Phluk floating village in Cambodia, I was struck by the simplicity of what life is like to be part of a working river-dwelling community, where houses on stilts hover over the waters edge and every aspect of traditional rural life which is under threat from over fishing, hydroelectric power and climate change, depends on the river.

‘Fish Net’ is a snap shot of a hard working daily life for villagers living on the flood plain, which has to correspond with the annual flood cycle, whereby for four or five months they are submerged by water. Laundry and fish are drying out and house plants decorate the floating platform of this stilt house, along with bundles of fishing nets. This work is a tribute to what people with so little have built for themselves.

My subject for ‘Ladder’ continues the theme of stilt houses, in which often more than one family live together. Piles of logs are stored on roughly constructed platforms beneath the main room and partitions of tarpaulin and corrugated metal intersperse the wooden poles and tall stilts, which are exposed during the dry season when the river is low. Re-interpreting snap shots of this adaptable, communal existence in the small-scale is integral to my work.

This is the first piece I produced on this theme, taking inspiration from a stilt house I photographed where tarpaulins and laundry were all drying out in the sun. I wanted to capture the beauty of floating platforms cobbled together from logs, corrugated metal, rope and tarpaulin into a miniaturized version, incorporating 3-D elements which are foraged, recycled or given a new use in this context. ‘Super Cool’ is made from hand-painted fabric, cardboard, sticks, coco liner, magazine and dolls clothes/accessories, collaged with sections painted in acrylic on board.

An integral part of my creative process is sourcing unusual and interesting things. Each element has been carefully chosen for its shape, pattern and texture to create the composition, incorporated with individual details. These are intended to be playful and unexpected, inviting the viewers close observation and questioning. This piece has been created with hessian, vintage wallpaper, twine, food packaging, sticks, photography, magazine, dolls accessories and aquarium plants. Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

With this piece also, my aim is to create a playful glimpse into this human microcosm of river dwellers and the beauty of their weather-worn world, using an eccentric combination of every day materials and objects including sticks, cardboard, wallpaper samples, fabric off cuts (hand painted, waxed, transfer printed), magazine, sticks, twigs, hessian, dowel, dolls accessories and barbeque skewers.


Kelly Thiel

Kelly Thiel

Kerry Fox

Rose Wall Tile

Poppy Wall Tile Ceramic with metal pins 20 x 20 cm £ 95

Dirge for the Ancients

Ceramic with metal pins 20 x 20 cm

Mixed media painting 90 x 70 cm

£ 95

£ 550

As I grow older, I feel more and more concerned for our earth. As a child, I was taught to garden and love Mother Earth, but my childhood innocence did not realize that others do not always share the same love. As a parent now, I am trying to teach my children to love the earth, yes, but also to care for it. I want them to be better stewards of the earth and give them the power to find ways to heal our earth. My artwork is part of that – by donating part of the sales to Friends of the Earth, I feel like I can do a little to help. Whenever I sketch, I almost always start with floral designs; now I am able to create those floral designs in clay as wall sculptures.

Dirge for the Ancients ; A homage that mourns the passing of North Yorkshires rich beautiful heritage as the Fracking companies move in .......................... Layers of media, tissue paper, scrim, oils, inks, acrylics and emulsion building the layers of time. Hidden within the cliff face runes, cup markings and references to the past. A textural painting evoking mourning through a storm of centuries and the rain and windswept headland.

Kelly Thiel Chrysanthemum Wall Tile Ceramic with metal pins 20 x 20 cm £ 95 Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Kerry Fox

Kit Boyd

Kit Boyd

Obelisk in Winter

Man on a Laptop (after Samuel Palmer)

Another World

Mixed media painting

Etching

Etching & Aquatint

40 x 40 cm

38 x 32 cm

44 x 34 cm

£ 220

£ 200

£ 300

Obelisk in Winter; A response to what will be if we carry on with destructive practices, desolate and barren, cold landscape void of growth with a solitary obelisk standing as a monument to what was.

Man on a Laptop started life as a pencil drawing on a postcard for a charity auction in aid of the Campaign to Protect Rural England, where I worked for many years. Using Samuel Palmer’s figure from The Valley thick with Corn, I turned his book on it’s side so it became a laptop and created a new idyllic landscape in which to place him. However, in the distance is a wind farm, a power station and a satellite dish. I had just moved to mid Wales when I created this, and it was a reaction to the beauty around me, while at the same time communicating through modern technology, which seems harmless enough but has an unseen environmental impact through energy usage.

This is a landscape created completely from my mind’s eye and is in response to the song Another World by Antony and the Johnsons. In the song Antony sings about how we will “need another world, as this one’s nearly gone”. The song and my picture are an elegy for all the things on earth we will miss when they are gone. The figure in my landscape idyll is on a path to the hills and is pausing on a bridge between this world and the next.

Layers of acrylic, ink. Scrim, tissue paper, bleach, and oil pastel, washed and dripped as the past fades from the landscape making way for the desolation of the cold barren winters. Leaving the briefest of outlines of the landscape that was once full of abundance

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Kit Boyd

Krystyna Spink

Laura Howarth

Man on a Laptop (Early Morning)

Mother Nature

Disappearing Coastline

Etching & Aquatint

Acrylic on canvas

Oil and cold wax on panel

38 x 32 cm

55 x 65 cm

47 x 47 cm

£ 200

£ 1,600

£ 550

Another in the Man on a Laptop series, this again is inspired by Samuel Palmer. In Early Morning, a sepia drawing from the 1820s in the Ashmolean Museum, Palmer places a group of people sitting talking under the iconic tree. In my version they are replaced by a man on a laptop. The image explores the idea of modern isolation in a rural landscape that still exists close to our major towns and cities, but which still allows us to communicate without meeting another human being in person.

In this painting Mother Nature stands on our earth holding a clock in one hand and a barometer in the other. The clock represents the time of our earth which is running out, due to pollution and global warming.The barometer represents the earths changing weather which is becoming more and more aggressive. As the years go by these weather changes are killing plants, trees, animals and human beings. The earth Mother Nature stands on is using so much power, that the lights can be seen from outer space. More building work goes on in the world while forests are being cleared to plant crops, graze animals and build even bigger cities. The painting shows how a huge tree wraps around Mother Nature as if begging for help. Its leaves have fallen and it is barely alive. The real world is slipping away, being replaced by a virtual one.

I produced this work because of my love for the British coastline (inspired particularly by the Dorset coast) and because of my concern about rising sea levels and the dangers of disappearing coasts.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

The work is produced slowly and gradually by building up layers of oil paint and cold wax medium with squeegees and pallette knives, scraping away to reveal earlier layers as well.


Laura Howarth

Laura Howarth

Lee King

Daybreak – After the Deluge

Tree of Life

Hare in rain

Oil and cold wax on panel

Ecoprint Collage

Glass

56 x 66 cm

90 x 70 cm

32 x 44 cm

£ 550

£ 550

£ 400

I produced this work in response to my love of light and of quiet landscapes lakes and rivers and their banks. But increasingly, overflowing rivers and flooding have introduced new perils for the world and risk changing our environment radically. This work is a celebration of beautiful skies and waterways but a warning too.

I produced this work as a celebration of trees and the life-giving qualities they possess. Trees are often endangered and need to be looked after and cherished by human beings for their beauty and life-giving properties.

Following a period of ill health I was housebound for a long number of years. During this time I lost connection with the natural world and in turn with my confidence and identity. Part of my recovery has been about rebuilding a connection with nature and being able to step into green spaces again. It has been important to notice even the small things such as the changing colour of leaves, birds on the trees outside my home. I am concerned that as a whole we are losing contact with nature which is so important to wellbeing. My work is a reflection of my recovery and a way of exploring the small moments of noticing and the interactions with the natural world. It is my hope that my work will inspire others to take notice of the natural world and to step outdoors into wild spaces.

The work is made with oil paint in earth colours and cold wax medium, applied with squeegees and pallette knives. Gradually the surface has been built up, added to and finally smoothed to produce a flat and silky finished surface.

This work was produced by soaking and pressing rusted metal with autumn leaves to release their tannin in to the paper which was then used for the collage.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Lesley Zijlstra-Eyre

Erosion Collection

This is a unique collection of art jewellery that has been specifically created for the Our eARTh exhibition. Top soil contains huge quantities of carbon in the form of organic matter. Erosion of this upper surface through natural means or by farming and deforestation activities, leads to vital carbon stores being lost and its release in the form of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide being a major contributor to global warming.

Lesley Zijlstra-Eyre These unique collections of art jewellery have been specifically created for the Our eARTh exhibition. More pieces are available in the gallery!

This collection of art jewellery from recycled 925 silver draws our minds to the growing concerns of global soil erosion. Created using the method of reticulation; a random event that occurs within the structure of metal through repeated heat treatment. This treatment renders the metal vulnerable, almost to destruction, (melting), sympathetic to the terrain it represents. All items are hallmarked by Waarborg Holland, Gouda.

Coral Collection

This is a unique collection of art jewellery that has been specifically created for the Our eARTh exhibition.

Erosion Collection Recycled Silver Necklace 80cm £ 375 Recycled Silver Pendant with green peridot stone on snake chain £ 150 Recycled Silver Ring with green peridot stone

£120

Recycled Silver Studs, 10mm

£ 65

Recycled Silver drop Earrings, 15mm and 30mm drop

£110

As a major indicator to the health and welfare of our oceans, “coral reef die-off” or bleaching is escalating year on year. Raised ocean temperatures, caused by climate change and extreme environmental events, threaten the stability of tropical coral reefs, which are slow to adapt to increasing water temperatures. This has potentially shocking implications for reef species and the communities that these reefs support. This collection of art jewellery draws our attention to the vulnerabilities of our global coral reefs brought about by raised ocean temperatures. It is created from etched recycled 925 silver. All items are hallmarked by Waarborg Holland, Gouda. Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

Coral Collection Recycled Silver Pendant on Silver Snake chain 45cm

£ 165

Recycled Silver drop Earrings, 40mm drop

£ 190

Recycled Silver Ring

£190

Recycled Silver Studs, 12mm

£ 95


£ 125

£ 160

Lucy Stevens

Lucy Stevens

The Swithland Wood Recordings

Oil Spill

12-inch vinyl EP

Digital illustration

1m x 45 cm in frame

55 x 55cm in frame

£ 550

£ 380

A collaborative project to inspire new music and visualise birdsong working with musicians Rishii Chowdhury (tabla) and Roopa Panesar (sitar). To produce a 12-inch vinyl EP, with a digitally illustrated printed sleeve, recorded at Swithland Wood in Leicestershire and inspired by 12 native birds. “Lucy’s project is great because it will bring together experts from different fields to influence the creation of artworks which invite the audience to look at the natural world around us in a different way,” Peter Knott, Area Director, Arts Council England.

A digital illustration, produced with a particular focus on the misuse of water, and the effects of oil spills on wildlife. The work was commissioned by Artcore as part of ‘The Web Of Water’, an international art project presenting different attitudes and takes on water; its use and misuse; and critical importance on Earth. The composition explores the explosion caused by the BP Deepwater Horizon Disaster in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, which spilt 210 million gallons of oil during prime mating and nesting season for bird and marine species.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

£ 160

£ 160

Lyn Glazzard and Tom Lundsten Enamel on silver, engraved, hallmarked Price range £ 125 - £ 345 This collection of Jewellery is based upon sketches of pebbles collected along the coast of North Yorkshire. The designs were developed in collaboration in Tom’s workshop in Denmark and completed in Lyn’s workshop in Yorkshire. The Pebbles that inspired this were formed in prehistoric times and have been eroded by the action of the North Sea rolling them backwards and forwards between these two land masses.


£ 185

£ 275

£ 175

£ 275

£ 205

£ 345

Lyn Glazzard and Tom Lundsten Enamel on silver, engraved, hallmarked Price range £ 125 - £ 345 This collection of Jewellery is based upon sketches of pebbles collected along the coast of North Yorkshire. The designs were developed in collaboration in Tom’s workshop in Denmark and completed in Lyn’s workshop in Yorkshire. The Pebbles that inspired this were formed in prehistoric times and have been eroded by the action of the North Sea rolling them backwards and forwards between these two land masses.

Madeleine Phiri

Madeleine Phiri

From Shipley to Bargau

From High Wycombe to Dewangen

(from the series Where the Sun Goes to Sleep)

(from the series Where the Sun Goes to Sleep)

Photography Solargraph (12 months exposure)

Photography Solargraph (12 and 14 months exposure)

13 x 18 cm (each) £ 220 (each) £ 410 (set of 2)

13 x 18 cm (each) £ 220 (each) £ 615 (set of 3)

This series of work has been created by the weather. I used recyclable film canisters to make my own pinhole cameras. The cameras were left outside and in all weather conditions for a minimum of 2 days and up to 14 months. Different seasons and different countries display a variety of weather conditions, which affect the negative inside the camera. Heat, damp, rain, wind… alter the state of the negative and create a unique look to each photograph. For example, Solargraphs taken in a similar location during the same time period display a very similar tonal range. Furthermore, due to the long exposure, only static objects are captured i.e. a landscape or cityscape. But in particular, the movement of the sun is tracked in each Solargraph to celebrate life on this planet. The sun connects all life on this earth, in other words: we all benefit from the same sun to sustain us. Where the Sun Goes to Sleep captures this life-giving star.

This series of work has been created by the weather. I used recyclable film canisters to make my own pinhole cameras. The cameras were left outside and in all weather conditions for a minimum of 2 days and up to 14 months. Different seasons and different countries display a variety of weather conditions, which affect the negative inside the camera. Heat, damp, rain, wind… alter the state of the negative and create a unique look to each photograph. For example, Solargraphs taken in a similar location during the same time period display a very similar tonal range. Furthermore, due to the long exposure, only static objects are captured i.e. a landscape or cityscape. But in particular, the movement of the sun is tracked in each Solargraph to celebrate life on this planet. The sun connects all life on this earth, in other words: we all benefit from the same sun to sustain us. Where the Sun Goes to Sleep captures this life-giving star.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Madeleine Phiri

Malcolm Welford

From Havana to Ngapali Beach

Emergent Futures 11

(from the series Where the Sun Goes to Sleep)

Photography Solargraph (3 days, 1 week, 3 weeks and 10 months exposure) 13 x 18 cm (each) £ 220 (each) £ 1,025 (set of 5) This series of work has been created by the weather. I used recyclable film canisters to make my own pinhole cameras. The cameras were left outside and in all weather conditions for a minimum of 2 days and up to 14 months. Different seasons and different countries display a variety of weather conditions, which affect the negative inside the camera. Heat, damp, rain, wind… alter the state of the negative and create a unique look to each photograph. For example, Solargraphs taken in a similar location during the same time period display a very similar tonal range. Furthermore, due to the long exposure, only static objects are captured i.e. a landscape or cityscape. But in particular, the movement of the sun is tracked in each Solargraph to celebrate life on this planet. The sun connects all life on this earth, in other words: we all benefit from the same sun to sustain us. Where the Sun Goes to Sleep captures this life-giving star.

1000x Pots to form large scale structure. Pots sold throughout exhibition. Over time the skyscraper is deconstructed and ‘reused’ and ‘recyled’ through user particicapation. £3 per pot Emergent Futures 11 asks the questions, can the sum of buildings parts be more than just inanimate objects (bricks) and can these objects represent a building that can be deconstructed over time and readily recycled back into the society that they represent? The premise is that we not only need to be more efficient with building materials, but that we need to work harder to build from systems and components which society can readily, easily and ultimately want to reuse. In many ways the contemporary skyscraper is a symbol of mans greatest technological and structural achievements. It is also the perfect example of a modern day “carbon guzzling machine” which is not only costly to maintain, but also incredibly difficult to recycle and reuse. In this work I replaced the brick of our global architectures with a humble Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

hand-made pot. The pot is not only innovative as a constructional material due to its material efficiencies (being a wafer thin structure), and capacity to support weight relative to its own mass, but is also uniquely beautiful; representing our individual humanity and responsibility to the environment as a global citizen. Unlike our usual experience of ceramic art whereby we are not allowed to touch – This piece pushes the consumer out of their comfort zone, and gives them the opportunity to not only interact with the sum of the buildings parts (the pot); but accidently allows for a progressive ‘deconstruction of architecture’ through want and desire for reuse, not just passive demolition. The consumer is left with not only a social responsibility to take care of each of the pots, but has to reconsider their second life’s a functional vessels upon leaving the gallery.


Mark Leadbetter

Mark Leadbetter

Mark Leadbetter

Move to Trash

Careful to All Animals

Drowned Fungus Gnats

Oil and emulsion on canvas

Polyurethane resin sculpture

Pen and ink on paper

12” x 12” per canvas

11 cm diameter sphere

Framed A4

£ 80 (each)

£ 180

£ 60

Long fascinated with wildlife - from childhood experiments into food deprivation on a Tamagotchi, to my recent article in the NHM’s newsletter (http://www.nhm.ac.uk/content/dam/ nhmwww/take-part/volunteer/volunteernewsletter- spring-2016.pdf) - and following the warm reception of two works in the KH Summer Exhibition 2017, I have three new pieces to share. Intensely process-driven, drawing, painting, and sculpture depicting the food chain. Fly, spider and bird.

Long fascinated with wildlife - from childhood experiments into food deprivation on a Tamagotchi, to my recent article in the NHM’s newsletter (http://www.nhm.ac.uk/content/dam/ nhmwww/take-part/volunteer/volunteernewsletter- spring-2016.pdf) - and following the warm reception of two works in the KH Summer Exhibition 2017, I have three new pieces to share. Intensely process-driven, drawing, painting, and sculpture depicting the food chain. Fly, spider and bird.

Long fascinated with wildlife - from childhood experiments into food deprivation on a Tamagotchi, to my recent article in the NHM’s newsletter (http://www.nhm.ac.uk/content/dam/ nhmwww/take-part/volunteer/volunteernewsletter- spring-2016.pdf) - and following the warm reception of two works in the KH Summer Exhibition 2017, I have three new pieces to share. Intensely process-driven, drawing, painting, and sculpture depicting the food chain. Fly, spider and bird.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Marta Wapiennik

Martin Staniforth

Martin Staniforth

Burned

RENEW!

PRODUCE MORE!

Digital Photograph

Screenprint

Screenprint

30 x 40 cm

34 x 43 cm

34 x 43 cm

£ 75

£ 225

£ 225

Series of digital photographs under this title is about human behavior that changes the environment. When I saw that one of my neighbors illegally burned the grass next to my parents’ house I decided to use it as a background. Glass was a natural choice because it is created in high temperatures. It gives reflections as well as transparency that gave me a wide range of visual effects. The mirrored sky is supposed to symbolize our consciousness and awareness.

As the population of the world goes ever upwards (from under 2 billion a hundred years ago to over 7.5 billion now) it becomes increasingly obvious that there will be a limit to what the planet can cope with. My work juxtaposes the natural process around creating more humans with the side-effects of current human existence. This image includes photography taken on a remote beach in Costa Rica, where turtles come to lay their eggs. The style of the screenprint echoes productivity posters that could be found in factories during the 1940s and later, as if creating more things is what life is all about.

As the population of the world goes ever upwards (from under 2 billion a hundred years ago to over 7.5 billion now) it becomes increasingly obvious that there will be a limit to what the planet can cope with. My work juxtaposes the natural process around creating more humans with the side-effects of current human existence. This image includes photography taken on a remote beach in Costa Rica, where turtles come to lay their eggs. The style of the screenprint echoes productivity posters that could be found in factories during the 1940s and later, as if creating more things is what life is all about.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Mia de Azevedo

Mia de Azevedo

Mim Robson

Greenwood

Magic Garden 8

String

Limited edition original digital print/ archival inkjet print on paper

Limited edition original digital print/ archival inkjet print on paper

Framed 42 x 42 cm

Framed 58 x 50 cm

Found materials, land art, photography. Plastic string and rope. Limited edition, Framed.

£ 390

£ 370

Greenwood is an imagined scene based on fondness and genuine concern, and rather closer to a dream than to reality. Once upon a time the hedgehogs were roaming the Earth with the dinosaurs. Today, although voted Britain’s most loved and emblematic wild animals, they are a more and more elusive presence, a species heading rapidly towards extinction, and a casualty of manmade environmental degradation and decline. The hedgehogs’ sad story has turned out to be yet another entry into a long list of collateral damage suffered in recent times by our natural world in the name of social and economic progression. Meant to engage the viewer with the idea of wildlife conservation ‘Greenwood’ is an optimistic take, a visual reference to a safe haven as in a place of unspoiled normality where the hedgehogs can potter about freely and forage all night long without any fences, cars, or pest-controlled crawlies for food to harm and decimate them.

Magic Garden 8, with its aspect of over saturated colour suggestive of intense heat, and the unique and eerie pareidolia effect insinuating a ghostly presence, depicts a vivid and evocative scene that is open to interpretation. In the context of an environmentally themed exhibition such as ‘Our eARTh’ this piece could be regarded as a visual metaphor for a nature gone out of balance, and it should say something about rising temperatures and possible related consequences. Whether it pertains to some sort of exotic crepuscular mystique or to an oncoming wildfire - here the viewer might construe several perceived meanings - this somewhat unsettling scene has the allure of an uncanny and surreal place.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

A3

£ 110

In May 2017, 38 million pieces of plastic waste were found on the uninhabited Henderson Island in the South Pacific, one of the world’s most remote places and a UNESCO World Heritage Site, where creatures such as hermit crabs are now literally living in our waste. I often find myself responding to such distressing and worrying stories by turning away from them. This photograph is part of a piece of work which combined found materials and land art, which I created in part to re-engage myself with its unsettling subject. This section focuses on some of the plastic string and rope pieces, and plastic tapes which I found during just one hour on the beach. This temporary artwork was created to exhibit visually the extent of plastic and other litter in our seas and beaches, in spaces we regularly visit locally for pleasure, and in which litter is frequently unseen or ignored.


Mim Robson

Mim Robson

Myka Baum

Line

BottleTops

Burn Baby Burn

Found materials, land art, photography. Plastics, papers, metals, rubber. Limited Edition, Framed.

Found materials, land art, photography. Plastic bottle tops. Limited Edition, Framed.

Archival Digital Print

A3

£ 110

This photograph is the complete piece of work which combined found materials and land art. The artwork is made up of 38 plastic bottle tops, two cigarettes, one bottle of nail varnish, two plastic pieces of pipe, one bottle of lighter fluid, one plastic lighter, two miscellaneous pieces of textile, one plastic bottle, one plastic drinks carton, two tin drinks cans, two miscellaneous pieces of metal, five plastic straws, five pieces of polystyrene, two pieces of rubber ball, one paper sandwich box, sixteen pieces of plastic string/rope and seventy miscellaneous pieces of plastic – a total of 152 pieces of litter, which I found during just one hour on the beach. This temporary artwork was created to exhibit visually the extent of plastic and other man-made litter in our seas and beaches in spaces which we regularly visit locally for pleasure, and in which litter is frequently unseen or ignored.

A3

£ 110

In July 2017, yet another vast plastic “garbage patch” was found floating in the Pacific Ocean, estimated to be larger than Mexico. Many of the plastics have now broken down into minute particles which not only prove impossible to clear up but also enter into our marine life and ultimately our food systems. Having successfully ignored this information and other similar stories for some time, due to disgust, fear and shame, I decided I wanted to look more directly at plastic waste on my own shoreline. This temporary artwork combining found materials and land art is made with the 38 plastic bottle tops which I found (amongst 114 other things) during just one hour on the beach in North Yorkshire. It was created to exhibit visually the extent of plastic and other litter in our seas and beaches in spaces which we regularly visit locally for pleasure, and in which litter is frequently unseen or ignored. Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

64 x 64 cm £ 500 Intentionally bold, Burn Baby Burn aims to shout out loud about the plight of our planet. It was created for the exhibition Fiddling While Earth Burns, a group show by the Royal College of Art’s Climate Action Collective, led by renown artist/activist Peter Kennard to coincide with the COP21 meeting in 2015. The image was made by quite literally wiping out Earth - from a silk screen. The resulting unstable image was frozen photographically, moments before it vanished entirely. The chosen colours add a sense of alarm to an image that speaks of a hurting, bleeding and shifting planet.


Niamh Harte

Nick Claiden

Nick Claiden

Karst

Throwing Swiftly

Infinite Wave

Glazed high fired ceramic with wild plants

Painted, foiled glass and wire

Foiled Glass

41 x 28 x 22 cm (hxwxd)

35 x 24 x 15 cm (hxwxd)

£ 690

£ 390

Throwing Swiftly contrasts the human grounded on the earth with swifts which very rarely come to earth. It explores our relationships with the birds of the air, which appear to be completely independent of us but in fact are all too impacted by human activity.

Infinite wave represents the evolution of life from the sea to the sky and the dependence of birds on the sea. This is a flow that happens despite us but on which we are having a dangerous impact. Infinite wave represents the evolution of life from the sea to the sky and the dependence of birds on the sea. This is a flow that happens despite us but on which we are having a dangerous impact.

25 x 17 x 21 cm (hxwxd) £ 350 Karst evokes a limestone landscape in miniature, the over and underground systems of erosion, grikes, grooves and caves. In Ireland we have the Burren region, and in England karst pavements are found in the Yorkshire Dales. Over time limestone dissolves and plants take hold in the shelter of these spaces. Plants are opportunists. Last summer in the city of Dublin I saw a homeless young man holding a plastic cup. His cup contained soil, and he was planting tiny seedlings in the cracks of the pavement. He was gardening his space, the city streets. My wish is that we allow plants to thrive in the cracks in the pavement, along the road verge, the patio slabs and roofs. That we stop spraying weed killer when fresh growth pushes through tarmacadam. That we change our perception of these aberrant weeds, and soften and blur the artificial boundary between ‘nature’ and ‘town’.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Nick Claiden

Nicola Lambert

Norma D Hunter

Towers of Yorkshire

Coral collection

Trending

Painted, fused and foiled glass

Textile brooch accessory

Paper

37 x 15 x 11 cm (hxwxd)

8.5 x 5 cm

£ 360

I am passionate about keeping our oceans healthy and productive, not only for ourselves but for generations to come. Coral reefs are naturally diverse but they are also fragile ecosystems. This productivity and diversity has allowed humans to live safely along beach shorelines, protected from strong ocean currents and waves, allowing them to harvest fish and other marine products. Despite the benefits that coral reefs provide to humans, in the past 25 years, human activities and environmental change, have caused so much damage to coral reefs that in many places, the fragile ecosystem has already been destroyed. When coral dies, the entire ecosystem around it transforms. Fish that feed on coral, use it as shelter, or nibble on the algae that grows amongst it, die or move away. The bigger fish that feed on those fish disappear too. The cascading effect does not stop there. Birds that eat fish lose their energy source, and island plants that thrive on bird droppings can be depleted. People who rely on reefs for food, income or shelter from waves – some half a billion people worldwide – lose a vital resource.

Towers of Yorkshire is an exploration of the relationship and impact of man on the natural environment. It is linked by seagulls, which of all birds have thrived and adapted to our impact on the environment.

£ 20 (each)

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

70 x 50 x 6cm £ 350 Following the geologic timescale and the evolution of life on earth, I have taken a satirical look at our present age and how we are currently evolving and where technology is leading us. I have used the ancient art of origami, using recycled paper to craft the piece, a slow, hands on method to produce unique individual representations in a world of mass produced disposable plastic.


Ola Dabrowska

Pauline Rigby

Penny Metcalfe

Basis

Blue Dogs of Mumbai

Layers of Hopefulness

Cement, wood

Watercolour, ink and Gouache

Acrylic paint on canvas

10 x 10 cm (each)

30 x 41 cm

1x1m

£ 200 (set)

£ 190

£ 550

‘Basis’ focuses on the simplicity of life and the return to the basics. The creation process itself is more important than the final outcome. Objects created by joining, moulding and carving are made slowly and precisely with the pleasure of creating them. It is a celebration of opportunities and abilities we have and we able to use against this “ready-made” and consumerist world.

An article regarding dogs turning blue in Mumbai, India caught my eye. It seems that a factory which uses a blue dye for cloth, leaked its chemicals into the water supply. In turn the dogs drank the water, which seeped into their skin and fur, giving them the blueish tone. It is likely to be a common blue dye which gives an optical brightening effect to cloth. I used watercolors as the main medium, as it reflects the transference of the chemical through the water course. I studied Indian miniature paintings to explore the mediums used (watercolours and gouache), and the style of a flattened perspective. I feel that big environmental disasters are well known and reported , but sometimes it is the smaller issues, closer to home that have a very high, and in this case very visual impact and the native wildlife.

This work was produced in response to natures miraculous ability to move effortlessly from season to season. It celebrates the new gentle warmth in spring soil and the amazing potential for growth and fertility that the earth provides. It’s celebrating the unseen seeds that are scattered below the surface of the ground and the layers of goodness and water and that will all combine together to sustain growth. It’s a positive statement that there is abundance and immense potency in our earth.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


detail

Penny Metcalfe

Penny Metcalfe

Peter Gudynas

Water Source

Horizon

Crushed Cars (Form and Transformation)

Acrylic paint and pastels on paper

Acrylic paint on paper

Archival Inkjet Print (LE of 25)

70 x 50 cm

70 x 50 cm

Framed 72.5 x 123.5 cm

£ 260

£ 270

£ 2,200

Having been brought up in Derbyshire, my childhood memories of walks on the Moors is a massive inspiration and reference point. Images of monumental stacks of granite and rocks becoming more and more a feature of my work. This painting is a response to the scattered rocks of the Moors and the beautiful bright mossy stones interspersed with dark pools of peaty orange water.

This painting is in response to the warmth and beauty of our countryside. The colours are gentle, warm and positive reflecting the nurturing and beneficial qualities of nature. I find that being in the natural landscape or in the garden has such a positive and beneficial effect on our health. Interacting and being in the outdoors I think is essential to our mental wellbeing. In my art I aim to convey a sense of optimism and affirmation.

I have used digital photography and post production retouching techniques to create this concept montage composition. A panoramic grid-like wall of rusted crushed cars, compressed into rectangular metal bales and piled up high, hinting at a sense of an ever-growing monolithic structure. Once gleaming and coveted technology symbolising consumer desire, the cars have been transformed into elemental form, reduced to crushed corroded metal, affected by the passage of time, awaiting to be recycled or reclaimed by nature. My intention here was to create a visual metaphor referring to the built in obsolescence of the automobile and demise of the combustion engine, a cautionary forewarning of ‘autogeddon’. An exploration of a prevailing dystopian condition, a personal elegiac reflection upon ambivalent notions of historical and future progress - the incomprehensible and irrational pursuit of exponential economic growth when confronted by the agencies of environmental and climatic change on a planet of finite resources.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Rachael Fletcher

Rachael Fletcher

Rachael Fletcher

Fading

Deteriorating

Melting

Paper cut card and foam board

Paper cut card and foam board

Paper cut card and foam board

52 x 42 x 4.5 cm (hxwxd)

35 x 22.5 x 10 cm (hxwxd)

35 x 22.5 x 10 cm (hxwxd)

£ 300

£ 250

£ 250

This piece was hand cut from various sheets of card and then pieced together and placed in a floating frame to show the many different layers. The idea behind the piece is to showcase the beauty of our planet’s wild animals and the very real danger of their extinction. I chose to show the face of the living creature juxtaposed alongside the skull of the animal to show an extreme contrast between the two states of being: life and death. The WWF endangered species list contains a number of different breeds of tiger alongside many other wonderful animals which are at risk of being lost forever unless something is done.

Part of a set of three laser cut dioramas. The images are largely inspired by the Al Gore documentary An Inconvenient Truth and focus on the issues discussed throughout. This piece was made using various pieces of laser cut card which have been layered together to create a 3D scene. Depicting Kilimanjaro and its surrounding area, the aim of this piece is to show the dangers of global warming and its effects on our planet. This piece was part of my final year university project ‘Existential Threats’ for which I created three gifs showing the ice gradually melting with numerous changeable layers.

Part of a set of three laser cut dioramas. The images are largely inspired by the Al Gore documentary An Inconvenient Truth and focus on the issues discussed throughout. This piece was made using various pieces of laser cut card which have been layered together to create a 3D scene. The image shows a polar bear looking out onto the melting ice caps and the idea is to show the effects of global warming on our planets natural habitats. This piece was part of my final year university project ‘Existential Threats’ for which I created three gifs showing the ice gradually melting with numerous changeable layers.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Rachel Sudworth

Rachel Sudworth

Rebecca Lisle

Red Earth

Spring Mist

The Answer in Their Eyes

Mixed media on canvas

Oil on canvas

Salvaged wood/mixed media

75 x 75 cm

75 x 75 cm

45 x 18 cm

£ 695

£ 695

£ 300

My work is inspired by memory and experiences in wild places, so while this painting is not of a specific location, it hopefully captures the viewer and draws them in. I like people to see something personal in my work, perhaps a reminder of an experience they have had in a wild location, of stumbling across something special... even on their own doorstep. It reminds me personally of little areas of woodland or hedgerow, which while small, are a hugely important part of the ecosystem, and are always under threat from our demand for cheaper food through large scale farming.

I find that getting away to a truly wild location is good for my soul. Something powerful happens when you are just surrounded by open and unspoiled space. I firmly believe that getting out in nature and respectfully experiencing wild landscapes is something everyone should have the privilege to do, in fact, I think it is a human necessity to be in touch with the land. Losing touch and understanding of how nature works, the gifts it gives, and how we are part of the fragile balance should be everyone’s concern. I wanted to paint a piece which recreates the feelings I have when I am in a special location, that sense of quiet, of gently belonging in the landscape, making no impact, just being there, absorbing, appreciating. The colours and marks are deliberately delicate, to illustrate the quiet and what I think is the special nature of remote places.

Since I never throw anything away, and nor does anyone in the family, every drawer in every room in our house is overflowing with beads, springs, broken jewellery, plugs, buttons, lego etc. I have lived with these objects for years and to me, these oddments naturally form faces just waiting to be put together. In this sculpture, THE ANSWER IN THEIR EYES, which I made in response to Kunsthuis Gallery’s open call, I wanted to build a tower, like a lighthouse, covered with faces. Each side, even the top, holds a face with eyes that watch. I imagine the eyes are observing what we are doing with our earth; there is nowhere to hide. They perhaps also hold the answer to not wasting things. If the piece sells, I would like to donate my artist’s share of the sale price to Friends of The Earth.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Rebecca Lisle

Rebecca Lisle

Richard Heys

The Other Side of Madness

Elemental Brown

Morning Drift

Salvaged wood/beads

Salvaged wood/mixed media

Acrylic on canvas panel

30 x 25 cm

60 x 60 x 15 cm

50 x 50 cm

£ 550

£ 525

£ 590

The wooden dowels I used for this sculpture are actually Chinese broomsticks. I don’t know what they were doing in a shed in Northumberland, but apparently they are too short for the UK market and were looking for a home. The broom handles make fantastic shapes when glued and sanded and of course have the added advantage of being unwanted. I made The Other Side of Madness in response to a visit in 2017 to Flanders Fields where both my great grandfather and his son were killed on the same day in the battle of Passchendaele. The Belgian war museums had exhibits of bullets and weaponry. Farmers still dig up unexploded WW1 bombs; I saw them propped up at the gates, waiting to be removed. Bones get turned up too. The sculpture is something broken, beautiful and complete in itself. It appears to emerge from somewhere else and arrive fully formed.

The wooden dowels I used for this sculpture are actually Chinese broomsticks. Apparently they are too short for the UK market and were looking for a home. The broom handles can be cut lengthways or as I did here, crossways. As I work on the project the shape changes and evolves. The wood itself dictates how I respond to it. When glued and sanded the dowel takes on a new life. And of course there is the added advantage that no one else wants the stuff. There is nearly always a skip between my house and the shops and I cannot pass one without looking inside. I take things from beside dustbins. A box of about 50 wire coat hangers was left on the pavement, so I took the lot and used some of them to make the centre of this piece. I like to reinvent a use for unwanted objects. In different lighting, shadows cross the shapes, highlighting the negative spaces and the 3 dimensional aspect.

The three paintings I am submitting explore the many faces of water. The first, Morning Drift, has a quiet reflective atmosphere. With its cool colours, minimal gestural movement built up predominantly with horizontal brush and squeegee strokes, this gentle work mirrors calm waters. Also in the sense of creating the feeling of reflective calm.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Richard Heys

Richard Heys

Richard Parsons

Spring Flood

The Islands at the Worlds End

XMorse - Globe

Acrylic on prepared board

Acrylic on alu di-bond

Framed digital print

84 x 110 cm

61 x 92 cm

86 x 86 cm

£ 990

£ 1,200

£ 500

The second, Spring Flood, explores the theme of global warming, ice shelf collapse, fast flowing rivers crisscrossing our melting glaciers and ice sheets. The painting explores warm and cool colours, transparent and opaque layers and glazing, in order to create a complex, vibrant surface with hidden depths and rippling rhythms.

The Islands at the World’s End is a piece which I have wrestled with for four years, I find it compelling and unsettling, always restless, no matter what I do. It takes up the theme of the sea between the fabled Western Isles, and the submerged lost land of Lyonesse, off Land’s End. In this piece I was also dreaming into the ‘Old Ways’, the outer Hebrides and the ancient sea lanes covering millennia of drifting traditions and hard won knowledge of the sea, of generations of sea farers. The colours within and beneath the waters hint at the depth of knowledge and traditions of ancient cultures, the fragility of human culture and the furious passing of time.

The evidence that meteorologists and climate scientists are presenting tells us that Climate Change is happening at an unprecedented rate. It is one of the biggest challenges that we as a species face, or have ever faced. The concepts that I deal with in my art work are conveyed through the use of abstract, graphical representations of words and phrases, what I call “Codecs”. This piece combines a picture of the globe behind a representation of Morse Code, with the visible (but fading) bars of the globe spelling out “SOS” – dot-dotdot, dash-dash-dash, dot-dot-dot – probably one of the most well-known coded phrases ever. The fading bars and the darkness between them illustrate that the Earth’s resources are being used up and that time is running out. The Earth is telling us that it is in danger – crying out for our help. It’s up to us whether we choose to listen.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


detail

Rosie Sherwood

Russell Bailey

Ruth McCabe

Untitled (from Mapping in an Ever Moving Now)

Tipping Point

At risk: beautiful, barren

This photograph is a digital photomontage combining polaroid and medium format film photography.

Collage and Mixed Media

Watercolour on paper

72 x 62 cm

29 x 57 cm

£ 495

£ 295

Inspired by a short cut on a site visit through a works yard. The composition uses elements from the yard to convey how our desire to use, modify, develop and maintain our environment creates incongruence – how the pursuit of a ‘better life’ can have undesirable consequences – a ‘mess’ for someone else to deal with? The paradox that creative and destructive go hand in hand – that we have the capacity for both. Our shadow is always with us. It is significant that such consequences are often ‘hidden from view’ – hence my desire to portray them, to invite the viewer to pause thoughtfully and reflect… Is this a ‘tipping point’? Are we at a ‘tipping point’ in our history? I have incorporated collage elements in this that were on their way to landfill – to turn waste into something else…..and thereby make a statement with space for personal interpretations.

About 3 miles away from my home, the River Blyth mudflats near the east coast, is an area of great apparent beauty: beauty which disguises the fact that the saltmarsh there has largely been eroded. Suffolk Wildlife Trust manage this site but have come up against bureaucracy.

50 X 50 cm

£ 500

This photograph is part of on-going series Mapping in an Ever Moving Now. It is a digital photomontage combining polaroid and medium format film photography. Mapping in an Ever Moving Now explores our relationship with the land; exploring memory, sensory experience, conservation and the artist as an alternative form of cartographer. The project will eventually include a collection of works for different places around the world, each collection forming a map of a specific area or place. This particular image is from the first chapter of this project, which explores the splendour, awe and fragility of the South West Coast Path. It is first completed photographic image from this chapter of the project. As part of this chapter of the project I am undertaking a yearlong artists residency with the Marine Biology Institute to gain a fuller understanding of the area and its challenges.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

I have responded to this expansive mirror of massive skies, hoping also, in my palette and form, to reflect that it is a beauty which is being lost. Powerful tidal flow erodes the remaining marsh. Coir matting rolls, if permitted would slow the outgoing tide, supporting the deposition of silt for saltmarsh regeneration. Several damaging years have gone by in this impasse: a sad story of bureaucracy hindering progress.


Ruth McCabe

Ruth McCabe

Ryoko Minamitani

Hope: transformation after devastation

The beauty of mud!

Cosmic hamony

Watercolour on paper

Watercolour on Two Rivers paper

57 x 57 cm

39 x 29 cm

Mixed media painting (sand, pigment, acrylic, pen) on canvas

£ 425

£ 195

Close to the coast at Aldeburgh, an area of freshwater marsh on the banks of the River Alde was being prepared as an Avocet breeding ground when, overnight on December 5th. 2013, a tidal surge ‘exploding’ through the earthen sea wall, inundated the marsh with sea water. 4 years on, creative effort and trust in nature, is allowing the area to function well as an intertidal (saline) habitat. Islands set up for the Avocets help the accretion process take place round their edges.The remaining sea wall slows the tidal flux, protecting this process. The marsh is now one of the largest unmanaged inter-tidal habitat creation projects in the UK, an exciting demonstration of nature’s powerful ability to transform. Hope indeed!

Accretion of silt above sea level is vital to allow saltmarsh plants to grow. I painted this piece on Two Rivers 700lb hand made paper, ethically produced in the UK in a heritage mill. Using a portrait format, and choosing pigments which granulate, especially on the NOT surface, I hoped to mimic the downward deposition of silt. The rich, deep colour palette reflects this deepening of nutrient-rich deposits. Letting the paint run freely, waiting for layers to dry, building gradually, and working with the strength of this wonderful paper, for me resonates with the ‘OureARTh’ theme. If we take care, have patience, we can work with nature’s own creativity and restore life and beauty to Our eARTh.

Layers of pigment, each left to dry naturally, like the tide flowing out, reflect the slow build up of layers of silt. Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

1x1m £ 1,250 We are the Earth, not on the Earth. I feel that our body is small version of the environment, and leading a healthy body-mind relationship, automatically creates a caring attitude towards the natural world. My paintings are mainly made by natural materials that form the Earth and the Universe, such as sand and natural pigments. The themes of my art works are inspired in nature and always represent the perceptions of the environment. I present the painting titled ‘Cosmic harmony.’ It aims to make humans aware that harmony in the environment depends on achieving harmony in ourselves. I truly believe that having a peaceful and harmonic mind significantly contributes at least to humans become aware of the effects of climate change. Changing people’s mind positively is changing the Earth positively.


Sally Lister

Sally Lister

Sally Parkin

Arctic Seas

Melting Ice Caps

Torn nature/ snow in june

Mixed Media

Mixed Media

Collage print

84 x 71 cm

72 x 58 cm

31 x 41 cm

£ 650

£ 550

£ 250

‘Arctic Seas’ gives the viewer a feeling of swirling seas, melting snow and a changing world. This effect is created by the use of oils and mixed media manipulated to create a luminosity and translucency in the painting. This is a response to the environment and landscape, highlighting the fragility of our world, the importance of recycling and the battle against climate change.

‘Melting Ice Caps’ suggests to the viewer swirling snow storms and howling winds created by the manipulation of mixed media. Lines, colours and shapes interweave and interplay between overlapping colour planes. The melting ice caps are a barometer of our neglect of the world due to our lack of recycling and management of the environment.

This piece uses part of the poem which refers to the confusing of the white blossom on the hawthorn bushes with snow gathering on the branches, snow which has fallen in a month not normally known for this type of weather. The original words have been printed and deliberately torn and then recycled and assembled with other pieces of printed and painted surfaces to construct a new image.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


£ 119

Sally Parkin

Sandra Tepla

Torn nature/seagull snow

Classic Collection

Collage print

Argentium Silver Earrings, Bangle, Cuf, Rings

32 x 34.5 cm £ 250 This piece also uses printed words as a starting point but this time the reference to snow I have interpreted as white shapes massing on an accumulation of left over pieces of print and drawing, reminding me of the large rubbish tips which, from a distance, are rendered beautiful by the presence of the flocks of gulls.

Price range £ 34 - £ 119

Before embarking on working as an ethical jeweller, Tepla specialised in studio jewellery across a wide variety of techniques and mediums.  Today she likes the challenge of working with the finest eco-friendly materials. Using classic metalsmithing techniques to realize limited editions and one-of-akind concepts, Tepla produces bodies of work exploring her fascination with the world and concerns the society faces today. Sourcing materials with consideration to their origin, the way they were produced and their impact on the  environment, human health and  wellbeingis of utmost importance.  Tepla aims to shift the idea of preciousness away from an object’s material valueto the concept and the experience of wearing it.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

The Classic collection is a limited edition of 6 core pieces hand sculpted in my East Sussex studio in Argentium silver. This modern sterling silver alloy consists of recycled silver, copper and germanium. The result is metal that’s brighter than white gold, sterling silver and platinum with high tarnish resistance and hypoallergenic and anti-bacterial properties. The collection was created as a challenge to produce minimalist design jewellery with few basic techniques, without the use of chemicals in an eco-friendly medium.


Sara Sault

Sara Sault

Sara Sault

Ash

Maple

Snowberry

Silk Scarf

Silk Scarf

Silk Scarf

38 x 180 cm

38 x 180 cm

38 x 189 cm

£ 49

£ 49

£ 49

For each scarf I made a series of multilayered offset monoprints, printing directly from plants grown in my garden or found locally, and combined them to build up the design, which is then printed onto 100% silk. The artwork was produced to show the intricate detail, shape and texture of leaves, showing how something so simple and ubiquitous has its own inherent beauty.

Ash As I continued to print with this particular sprig of leaves, the side leaves began to fall away, leaving only the sole surviving leaf at the end of the twig. It has its own beauty but also serves as a symbolic reminder of the potential damage to our common trees and their leaves as climate change progresses.

Snowberry This grows tenaciously in my garden, regardless of my best efforts to tame it. As climate change affects what we can grow in our gardens, this is an example of a plant that may survive the changes.

The ghostly layers of leaf images fading into the background represent the potential changes to, or disappearance of, plant life that we probably take for granted. Whether cultivated in our gardens or growing wild around us, the delicate beauty of these symbols of the natural world may become lost to us as climate change progresses. By printing with leaves, and showing their delicate structure, I hope that it might act as a reminder of what we may lose.

Maple A less common form of maple, the leaves were found in the street, presumably blown from a neighbouring garden. Although not a native plant, we are used to being able to plant a wide range of trees in our gardens but as our climate changes we may lose the ability to do this, and so also lose the enjoyment of its beauty.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Shelagh Atkinson

Shelagh Atkinson

Stathis Dimitriadis

Blue Mapping

Nature Forms

Acrostic

Screenprint unique

Etchings (sextet)

76 x 56 cm

129 x 120 cm

Ceramic assemblage, various clays and glazes

£ 950

£ 2,250 (or £400 each)

Blue Mapping is a screenprint working with process of layering up an image. I am always looking at the shape of the thing, allowing the contours to flow in and around it. The landforms emerge in this way and I ask the question are we as humans in the landscape not simply viewers of it. In all this I explore the little parts of the land which I inhabit There is a fragility of form in this bright world and we can revel in the colours and the true forms.

Nature Forms a series of six etchings exploring the rooted relationship with nature and the felt force in the environment. We get to glimpse the hauntingly beautiful, an expressiveness and vitality in such detail within this framework Are we looking at coded maps of the haunts of forms and/or a heartening message about our deep felt roots with our relationship with nature and the environment.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

16 x 16 x 72 cm (wxlxh) £ 820 This assemblage reuses shards from broken rings along with complete rings fired into a shape of a column. The rings were made at different point in times for other projects without finally making it, either because they broke or did not fit properly. In a way, they are unfinished sentences or fragments of words and syllables that I decided to arrange in a meaningful way. As an acrostic, their message comes from the order in which relationships build between the disparate parts. In my work, I follow a continuous cycle of making and unmaking reflecting earth’s natural cycles of growth and disintegration, of elemental parts growing into wholes which eventually break into building blocks to be used again and again.


Stathis Dimitriadis

Stathis Dimitriadis

Susan Harvey

Palomar

Creel

A Delicate Balance

Ceramic assemblage, various clays and glazes

Ceramic assemblage, various clays and glazes

watercolour, tempera pigments, pencil, gesso on paper

13 x 17 x 47 cm (wxlxh)

40 x 40 x 36 cm (wxlxh)

74 x 89 cm

£ 650

£ 780

£ 1,450

This assemblage reuses shards, broken ceramic parts and incomplete pieces fired together into a form of an ordered stack. The pieces were made at different stages of a project about ways of seeing. The structure alludes to a primitively constructed telescope, hence the name Palomar. As a conglomerate of disparate objects of obscure transparency, it gives a glimpse of a fragmented world which I try to make sense of. In my work I follow a continuous cycle of making and unmaking reflecting earth’s natural cycles of growth and disintegration, of elemental parts growing into wholes which eventually break into building blocks to be used again and again.

This assemblage reuses various rings, pieces and shards fired together into a ball-shaped jar. All these pieces were leftovers from various projects I undertook the last 4 years. They are built into an accidental container formed by discarded objects in the same way that the ocean builds conglomerates from the waste we produce. After years underwater, these assemblages regain a new identity becoming trap-homes for sea life. With my assemblages I want to question beliefs about purpose in our human endeavors and whether our priorities are more important than the ways of the natural environment. I seek to demonstrate that all we are doing is building blocks of limited life-span and that our most cherished cultural achievements are no better from a pebble or a rock.

My concern as a painter is to focus attention on our natural environment, its fragility and inherent beauty. The materials I choose to work with physically embody the essence of my chosen imagery; watercolour’s delicacy and fugitive nature; tempera pigments for their sense of connection with the earth; fresco, pencil, gesso, paper. ‘A Delicate Balance’ was made in early spring, a threshold in the cyclical year. It began with a sketchbook pencil drawing in Greece, progressing through the english landscape of my garden in Cumbria. Intricacy developed through close observation of the apple tree in bloom. The goldfinch was the first one that I had seen visiting the garden and the circling swallows anticipate their much awaited arrival. The colours chosen are simple and fresh, the materials embodying the fragility of the theme. All held in a delicate balance, dependent on our preservation of the environment we are intrinsically linked to.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Susanne Davies

Susanne Davies

Tom Lietzau

One Way And Another

One Way Not Another

Fukushima

Sculpture / Patinated Copper

Sculpture / Patinated Copper

Digital print

30 x 30 x 7 cm

30 x 15 x 15 cm

72 x 52 cm

£ 350

£ 350

£ 260

Susanne’s work is inherent to her personal background of being brought up in a mining town in South Wales and seeing the landscape ravaged by industry and subsequently by the loss of that industry, her focus is on the remnants and scarring of the surrounding landscape. Consideration to geometric forms which connect to industrial violation in areas of outstanding beauty is something that runs through Susanne’s work at all times.

Susanne’s work is inherent to her personal background of being brought up in a mining town in South Wales and seeing the landscape ravaged by industry and subsequently by the loss of that industry, her focus is on the remnants and scarring of the surrounding landscape. Consideration to geometric forms which connect to industrial violation in areas of outstanding beauty is something that runs through Susanne’s work at all times.

“Fukushima” was created in reaction to the nuclear disaster that happened in March 2011, when a tsunami hit the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in Japan, resulting in nuclear meltdown and a release of radioactive materials into the Pacific Ocean. The disaster is said to have been even worse than the catastrophe in Chernobyl from 1986, with much wider effects on the global environment. Years after the meltdown, scientists are still investigating the effects on fish, birds and plants, and the level of food contamination. Awareness of the effects of radiation is helping revise energy policies and spark debates on whether we need nuclear power. This is especially important in times of climate change and the discussion around alternative sources of energy.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

The artwork’s simple graphic form and minimalism aim to convey a clear message and raise awareness of the effects of radiation on the environment.


Ursula Ströh-Rubens

Ursula Ströh-Rubens

Walmeri Ribeiro

Bird in Tree

Winter Light

Sensitive Territories: Facing Gaia I

Smoked bowl, ceramic

Smoked vessel, ceramic

Photography

16 x 17 cm

14 x 11 cm

30 x 60 cm

£ 375

£ 340

£ 600

I create unique hand-built vessels which are first biscuit fired and then smoked. Over the years, I have developed an idiosyncratic way of “drawing with smoke”. I cover the pot with slip and incise lines which then are exposed to smoke.The slip is then removed and reveals dark, smoked lines on the surface of the pot.

I create unique hand-built vessels which are first biscuit fired and then smoked. Over the years, I have developed an idiosyncratic way of “drawing with smoke”. I cover the pot with slip and incise lines which then are exposed to smoke.The slip is then removed and reveals dark, smoked lines on the surface of the pot.

In search of new ways, possibilities and propositions, Sensitive Territories is based on performative practices as research, proposing that the experiences, emotional and cognitive operations, can lead us to new artistic forms for both the creation and to share knowledge.

This process results in the expression of a personal response to my experience of travels in Greece. There, the evidence of cultural origins, the land and its nature have greatly shaped my language. I relate these elements to the forms, structures and surfaces that develop during the process of building the pot.

This process results in the expression of a personal response to my experience of travels in Greece. There, the evidence of cultural origins, the land and its nature have greatly shaped my language. I relate these elements to the forms, structures and surfaces that develop during the process of building the pot.

Thus birds, trees, skies and land emerge out of slips, pigments and fire.

Thus birds, trees, skies and land emerge out of slips, pigments and fire.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery

Facing Gaia I was created during a performative immersion at Park Jarry in Montreal, it results of one month working in the same place: the artificial lake in the middle of the park. This work is talking about the artificial places created and carved out just for creating a comfortable place to live, and also it reflexes about the relationship between landscape, environmental and machines, human intervention and climate change.


Yvonne Marie Forster

Yvonne Marie Forster

Yvonne Marie Forster

Altered Perceptions I

Altered Perceptions II

Altered Perceptions VI

Mixed media/collage

Mixed media/collage

Mixed media/collage

43 x 43 cm

43 x 43 cm

43 x 43 cm

£ 165

£ 165

£ 165

These works are a response to the impact of industrialisation, industrial farming and pollution on bird and insect populations. The use of pesticides and changing patterns of land use has led to a decline of many insect and bird species. The abstracted form of this series of works Altered Perceptions explores and reflects industrial humanity’s abstraction of nature which ignores the interconnectivities that maintain the wellbeing of the whole. The series was inspired by Rachel Carson’s views on the effects of chemicals on wildlife and George Monbiot’s recent book How Did We Get Into This Mess? The works are mixed media acrylic paint, oil pastels, gold leaf and collaged materials with the phrase “humankind ...we are but one thread” embedded.

These works are a response to the impact of industrialisation, industrial farming and pollution on bird and insect populations. The use of pesticides and changing patterns of land use has led to a decline of many insect and bird species. The abstracted form of this series of works Altered Perceptions explores and reflects industrial humanity’s abstraction of nature which ignores the interconnectivities that maintain the wellbeing of the whole. The series was inspired by Rachel Carson’s views on the effects of chemicals on wildlife and George Monbiot’s recent book How Did We Get Into This Mess? The works are mixed media acrylic paint, oil pastels, gold leaf and collaged materials with the phrase “humankind ...we are but one thread” embedded.

These works are a response to the impact of industrialisation, industrial farming and pollution on bird and insect populations. The use of pesticides and changing patterns of land use has led to a decline of many insect and bird species. The abstracted form of this series of works Altered Perceptions explores and reflects industrial humanity’s abstraction of nature which ignores the interconnectivities that maintain the wellbeing of the whole. The series was inspired by Rachel Carson’s views on the effects of chemicals on wildlife and George Monbiot’s recent book How Did We Get Into This Mess? The works are mixed media acrylic paint, oil pastels, gold leaf and collaged materials with the phrase “humankind ...we are but one thread” embedded.

Catalogue Our eARTh 2018 exhibition - KUNSTHUIS Gallery


Kunsthuis Gallery will donate 5% sales commission to Friends of The Earth, an environmental charity campaigning for a safer climate.

We offer an Art Payment Plan, please contact Cecile Creemers for information cecile@kunsthuisgallery.com

Artwork can be delivered locally and shipped (inter)nationally!


OPENING TIMES April - October Wednesday – Sunday, 11am – 4pm November - March Friday, Saturday & Sunday, 11am – 4pm Annual Christmas closing times: see website for details CONTACT INFORMATION Mill Green Farm, Crayke, YO61 4TT, North Yorkshire Phone 07495 – 270007 All enquiries: cecile@kunsthuisgallery.com

The Art Shop In 2018, Kunsthuis Gallery opened its new and exciting space ‘The Art Shop’. The gallery is proud to present beautiful handmade items from a wide range of British and International Arts and Crafts makers. The shop will showcase contemporary interiors, a wide selection of beautiful jewellery, a diverse range of ceramics, sculptural work, photographs, prints, textiles and cards. Perfect for gifts, affordable and collectable art.

Gift vouchers available!

Café, Gardens & nursery The gallery shares its site with Dutch house Café, Gardens and nursery. A changing display of sculptures are a collaboration between Kunsthuis Gallery and the Dutch house Wildlife Garden. The plant nursery offers a wide range of quality grown plants. The Dutch house café provides delicious food and drink, a warm atmosphere and a changing display of art, curated by the gallery. Please check website for opening times & menu: www.dutchhouseyorkshire.com

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MAP

Located between Crayke and Brandsby

GETTING HERE The Gallery is 15 miles north of York and 2 miles from Easingwold. ACCESS We offer a free Car Park. The Gallery is fully accessible as we provide ramps for wheelchair access.

Gift vouchers available! www.kunsthuisgallery.com All information within this leaflet is subject to change; please find up-to-date information on our website.


A big thank you to all participating artists, volunteers, organisations, friends and family who have helped to realise this amazing exhibition.

Let’s nurture our planet and thank it for it’s amazing beauty!

Cecile Creemers

owner/curator Kunsthuis Gallery


our eARTh 2018 a truly inspirational planet


www.kunsthuisgallery.com

CatalogueOurEarth2018  
CatalogueOurEarth2018  
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