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Aspiring Landscape Architect & Puzzle Solver Extraordinaire

Kt M. Hamilton Academic Portfolio


Second Year

Third Year

Fourth Year

Fifth Year

02

First Year

ResumĂŠ/ About Me

Table of Contents

04 06 10 14 18


Resumé

Katie M. Hamilton 2152 Conner Cove Ln. Denver, NC 28037 704-796-6002 kmhamil2@ncsu.edu ktmhamiltondesigns.com

Education

North Carolina State University, Raleigh, N.C. • Bachelor of Landscape Architecture, May 2012 Prague Institute, Czech Republic • Study abroad program, spring 2010 Academic Recognition • N.C. State Dean’s List: 7 Semesters • NCSU Landscape Architecture Dept: Design Implementation Award ‘10-’11 Service Award ‘11-’12 Leadership Award ‘11-’12 • Student Advisory Committee for Landscape Architecture Dept. • Sigma Lambda Alpha Honor Society

Professional Experience

NC Conservation Network, Raleigh, N.C., May 2012 to Present Phone Banker • Calling North Carolina Voters and Discussing Environmental Issues WakeUP Wake County, Raleigh, N.C., March 2012 to Present Intern • Coordinate events and present at speaking engagements • Design promotional material • Attend public policy meetings to give feedback on local legislation Walt Disney World Resort, Orlando, Fl., May to Aug. 2011 Horticulture Professional Intern • Maintain landscape throughout the EPCOT region of the resort • Learn landscape maintenance techniques • Attend professional development classes including behind the scene tours and lectures with Disney Landscape Architects and Horticulturalists Duke Energy, Charlotte, N.C., May to July 2010 Student Contractor • Documentation of projects using Autocad • Development of graphics for in-house presentations • Use of an existing database to digitally organize and compile documents Christy’s Nursery and Landscape, Concord, N.C., March to May 2006 Sales Associate • Assist customers in proper plant selection for their needs • Create aesthetically pleasing bedding plant displays • Maintain quality of plants through proper care and attention

Service Experience

NCSU Habitat For Humanity Chapter Works Projects Officer 2011 - 2012 Fellowship Officer 2010 - 2011 Member 2009 - 2012 NCSU Student ASLA Association Service Committee Head 2011 - 2012 Member 2008 - 2012

Skills • • •

2

Computer Skills: Adobe Creative Suite 3 & 5.5; Autocad; MicrosoftOffice; ArcGIS, Google Sketchup, Google Earth, Solidworks Hand Rendering Surveying

Art to Wear 2009 Designer: Alyssa McNamara


About Me More Than A Resumé I am more than a resumé, and hopefully the following can give some insight into who I am as a person. I have a very curious personality. I love to explore and discover new places and new things. I like to explore by traveling to new destinations, but more than that I like exploring my own city. I absolutely love finding new places and things to do in my area. Too often people become complacent in their daily lives, and they never see the rest of the world around them outside of their routine. Why always go to a restaurant I know I like, when there are so many other restaurants I’ve never been to? My tendency to explore goes beyond exploration of place to exploration of things. I love learning how things work; I am not the type to break something figuring out how it works, but I like to look at something broken or watch someone fixing something. It’s always interesting to me to see how different pieces in a system fit together.

Want to know more? Go to http://www.ktmhamiltondesigns.com

This brings me to the theme of this portfolio. Puzzles! I am a huge puzzle enthusiast; I find puzzle solving to be one of the best ways to decompress. Puzzles are an escape from the stresses of the world with hours of mindless, stressless freedom. My enthusiasm for puzzles stems from childhood. Every summer my family would buy a couple puzzles and each of us would work on the puzzle in our own individual time. I always loved coming back to the puzzle and seeing that someone in my family had made progress with the puzzle. I love working with people. I am definitely a social person; I know a puzzle enthusiast and social person seems like a contradiction, but for me it’s not - that just seems to be how I balance my life. Getting to know people and how they work is always interesting to me. I am not going to lie; sometimes I talk too much for other people, but typically I am observant enough to notice.

3


First Year Residential Given What Decide Where • • •

Urban Park Design Programming Space Creation

My focus in the design was to create two distinct and opposing feelings in the space. On the West side of the site I created a place of serenity and reflection buffered from the surrounding urban environment. The use of organic lines, vegetation, and water features creates a relaxing space. On the East side of the site I created an “urban” feel. The use of hardscapes and hard lines throughout along with dense programming make this space extremely stimulating.

4

Urban

Community

Campus

Parks


Model Place Making Exercise Residential Urban Community Spring Freshman Year Chipboard

First Year Campus

Parks

From Point A to Point B and Back • •

Model Making Space Creation

While working on this project I was able to explore the properties of model making. I was also able to explore the effects of designed spaces on the human psyche. After exploring these subjects I was better able to understand the feelings different elements in the landscape evoke in a person. For example, a narrow elevated path feels dangerous without protection, but even a small fence can make a person feel much safer in the same conditions.

5


Second Year Residential Architect’s House • •

Transitions Outdoor Rooms

LakeMyHouse main goals for this project were to create a functional oreoutdoor Year living area, while taking inspiration from the architecture and the lake to create a pleasing aesthetic.

To help transition from the formal architecture to the lake, I enclosed the outdoor rooms with a hedge, and let the outer reaches draw inspiration from the waves on the shore.

6

Urban

Community

Campus

Parks


Plan View NCSU Brickyard: Harrelson Replacement Residential Urban Fall Sophomore Year Community

Second Year Campus

Parks A Park in the Brickyard • •

Space Making Identity Strengthening

For this project, I was able to create a place with a wide variety of spaces, which would in turn suit the needs of a wide variety of users. The use of different landforms such as depressions and hills allowed each space to be used by different groups for different purposes. By taking inspiration from the current paving pattern of the Dick Bell brickyard design, I was able to incorporate my design in the existing campus fabric.

Plan with Context NCSU BrickYard- Harrelson Replacement Fall Sophomore Year

Perspective Brickyard-Harrelson Replacement Fall Sophomore Year Colored Pencil on Bond

7


Second Year Residential

Urban

Community

Mixed Use Development • • •

Density Studies Building Design Parking Design

The design shown to the right is the culmination of a semester long study on density in community design for a developer. Throughout the semester I explored how to design the site using various forms of community design from low density lot layouts to a high density apartment complex. The design shown creates a more complete community; it incorporates lots for single homes, townhouses, and apartments, as well as a community center and retail area. Understanding the parking needs of differing densities allowed me to explore different ways to incorporate parking while minimizing the impact on community aesthetic. In this particular design much of the commercial and apartment parking is located underground or below a greenroof, minimizing the perceivable impervious space.

8

Katie Hamilton Final Project | LAR211 May 1, 2009

Campus

Parks


Second Year Residential

Urban

Community

Campus

Parks Mixed Use Development • • •

Floor Plan Design Programming Rough Grading

This project also gave me experience with programming and community development. Having to design the interiors and uses of buildings really helps to inform the landscape surrounding them. Hopefully an understanding of this concept will help me in the future when working with developers.

9


Third Year Residential Leela House • •

Permaculture Design Sustainable Community

The Leela house is set in Earthhaven Ecovillage, a sustainable living community in Black Mountain, North Carolina. I focused on creating an edible landscape that would serve as a great space for entertaining and community gatherings. The patio’s design of various size areas for congregating are meant to function well for parties that include activities such as dancing. My design was heavily inspired by permaculture; it focuses on creating zones, with the most intensely used zones being closest to the house, while zones further from the house need less attention. The planting plan is based off the seven layer forest concept, creating plant communities that coexist well. Overall, the research for this project and the understanding I gained of both permaculture design and the community fostered by permaculture made this one of my favorite residential projects.

10

Urban

Community

Campus

Parks


Third Year Residential

Urban

Community

Campus

Parks Murray Residence • •

Street

Alley

Deck Perennial Dense Grasses Evergreen Garage

Hammock Scale 1/8”=1’-0” 012 4

8

16

Dimensional Constraints Topographical Change

In order to break up the linear feeling of the lot, I divided the backyard with a small path and tall plantings along the back fence. Due to the changes in topography, sight lines were a major consideration in the design as well.

Murray Residence Perspective Aerial View

Murray Residence Perspective Back Yard From Steps

11


Third Year Residential Karlin Redesigned • • •

Collaborative Design International Design Urban Infill

This project is located in the Karlin district of Prague. The overall urban design was a group project in which the overall structure of the design was chosen. Each of the group members then went on to design specific sections of the design. Through this project I learned that streets and usage are the connecting tissues of a project. Understanding how streets meet and what different areas will be used for greatly affect the design for an urban area. Sight lines are also a vital consideration in urban design.

12

Urban

Community

Campus

Parks


Third Year Residential

Urban

Community

Campus

Parks

Analysis of Perception of Urban Spaces

13


Fourth Year Residential Process Documentation

Urban

Community

Campus

   Concept Statement  My concept for this park was to create a space for social  gatherings that would contain art installations that double as play  features. I also wanted to create a place that is pleasant for local  residents and employees to have lunch and take breaks. I created a  sense of enclosure that would hold a person in the space through the  manipulation of the grade to create depressions and dense plantings.

Sculptural Playground/Plaza View

14



Parks

Semi-Private Path Perspective

Sculptural Play Equipment Precedence

Stone walkway Material Example

Sculptural Playground/Plaza View

Patio/ Grotto Perspective

Decorative Railing Precedence/Inspiration

Retaining Wall Precedence/Inspiration




Fourth Year Residential

Urban

Community

Campus

Parks

Construction Documents Click on image below to view CD set.

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Fourth Year Residential Triad Connection • •

Collaborative Design Storm Water Management

Triad Connection is a master plan for NC State’s student housing department. The design was a group project in a studio concentrating on developing a master plan for future design-build studios. The design focuses on useful social spaces for students and stormwater conveyance. The design was collaborative, and production of the perspectives below was one of my concentrations in the project as well as combining documentation for the group.

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Urban

Community

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Fourth Year Residential

Urban

Community

Campus

Parks The Backyard Beat

The Backyard Beat

What Makes a Material Green?

Design Elements

Low Impact on Wildlife Habitat, Greenspace, Waterways, etc. Low Embodied Energy

                     -Adirondack Chair -Swinging Bench -Contouring Bench

The Backyard Beat

Life Cycle Assessment

Table 1 Cradle-to-Grave Inventory Summary for ACQ-Treated Lumber and WPC ACQ-Treated Lumber Life WPC Decking Life Per Per representative representative deck per year of deck per year of Infrastructure Processes Units Per Mbf use1/ Per Mbf use1/ Inputs from technosphere Electricity, at grid, US kWh 417 17 1,718 69 Natural gas, processed, at plant (feedstock) ft3 641 26 19,087 763 Natural gas, combusted in industrial boiler ft3 135 5.4 8,348 334 Diesel, combusted in industrial boiler gal 5.9 0.2 42 1.7 Liquefied petroleum gas, combusted in industrial boiler gal 0.15 0.0059 0.0049 0.00019 Residual fuel oil, combusted in industrial boiler gal 0.081 0.0033 1.2 0.049 Diesel, combusted in industrial equipment gal 1.6 0.065 0 0 Gasoline, combusted in industrial equipment gal 0.15 0.0058 0.22 0.0086 Hogfuel/biomass (50%MC) for heat energy lb 849 34 46 1.8 Coal-bituminous & sub., combusted in industrial boiler lb 0.097 0.0039 0.46 0.019 Truck transport, diesel powered ton-miles 476 19 3,785 151 Rail transport, diesel powered ton-miles 84 3.4 316 13 Barge transport, res. oil powered ton-miles 2.7 0.11 57 2.3 Ship transport, res. oil powered ton-miles 32 1.3 51 2.0 Energy (unspecified) MJ 2.8 0.11 0 0 Petroleum refining coproduct, unspecified, at refinery lb 0 0 254 10 Lumber-dry, planed bf 1,000 40 0 0 Wood fiber by-product lb 0 0 2,710 108 Landfill capacity ton 1.1 0.044 2.2 0.087 Inputs from nature Water gal 308 12 848 34 Bark from harvest ft3 5.3 0.21 0 0 Unprocessed coal lb 246 9.8 948 38 Processed uranium lb 0.00065 0.000026 0.0024 0.000097 Unprocessed crude oil gal 5.1 0.20 3.6 0.14 Unprocessed natural gas ft3 1,043 42 39,723 1,589 Biomass/wood energy Btu 0 0 0 0 Hydropower Btu 114,688 4,588 445,138 17,806 Other renewable energy Btu 13,156 526 33,132 1,325 Carbon (from air) lb 295 12 825 33 Outputs to nature (air, except where noted) CO2-fossil lb 1,116 45 4,957 198 CO2-non-fossil lb -544 -22 920 37 Carbon monoxide lb 3.7 0.15 3.5 0.14 Ammonia lb 1.815 0.073 0.0032 0.00013 Hydrochloric acid lb 0.22 0.0089 0.57 0.023 Hydrofluoric acid lb 0.020 0.00080 0.071 0.0028 Nitrogen oxides (NOx) lb 2.5 0.10 8.5 0.34 Nitrous oxide (N2O) lb 0.032 0.0013 0.026 0.0010 Nitric oxide (NO) lb 0.050 0.0020 0 0 Sulfur dioxide lb 5.7 0.23 44 1.8 Sulfur oxides lb 0.53 0.021 0.55 0.022 Particulates (PM10) lb 3.3 0.13 0.41 0.016 Volatile organic compounds lb 2.1 0.083 1.9 0.075 Methane lb 82 3.3 157 6.3 Acrolein lb 0.015 0.00061 0.00014 0.0000055 Arsenic lb 0.00014 0.0000056 0.00020 0.0000081 Cadmium lb 0.000025 0.0000010 0.000039 0.0000016 Lead lb 0.00024 0.0000098 0.00021 0.0000086 Mercury lb 0.000026 0.0000010 0.000044 0.0000018 Copper (to water) lb 0.00033 0.000013 0 0 Copper (to soil) lb 4.7 0.19 0 0 Solid wastes-landfill lb 90 3.6 4,463 179 Solid wastes-recycled lb 0.025 0.0010 0 0 Wood wastes-treated-landfill lb 2,132 85 0 0 Note: 1/ Functional unit is inventory item per representative deck surface (320 square feet) per year of service life, assuming a 10-year deck surface service life. Shorter service life will increase inventory values. Longer service life will decrease inventory values.

"  ! !!    of public record. "  !       !     system for different decking products "    !   !# !  

The Backyard Beat

Contour Bench: Seat Boards (2�x2�) 256ft x $.83/ft = $212.48 Furniture Fabric $ 4.89 2.66ft2 x $16.54/yd2 = Support I-Beams (4�) 4ft x $6.45/ft = $25.80 Support I-Beams (5�) 8ft x $8.40/ft = $67.20 Hardware 10% of Materials = $34.97 Contingency 15% of Materials = $57.71

$813.00

=

$126.00

=

$100.00

=

$178.75

$961.45

= $1,942.28

Total = $358.19

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The Backyard Beat

     throughout the landscape through the reuse of materials; make the deck seem grounded in the space.

= $1,505.70 = $1,177.14

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Total = $442.42

Adirondack Chair: Backing Boards (2�x4�) 119ft x $1.25/ft = $148.75 Seat Slats (2�x2�) 60ft x $.83/ft = $49.80 Arm Rest I-Beams (4�) 4ft x $6.45/ft = $25.80 Base I-Beams (5�) 7ft x $8.40/ft = $58.80 Hardware 10% of Materials = $28.32 Contingency 15% of Materials = $46.72

    of options for social engagement.

= $1,234.80 =

The Backyard Beat

Design Intent

= $6,851.70 =

In order to create a sense of cohesion in a collaborative design, I created a line of site furnishings that mirrored the style and materiality of a deck I designed for the NCSU Arts Village for the design build studios. Cost Estimate

The Backyard Beat

Cost Estimate Deck: Decking Boards 2,070ft x $3.31/ft Joists 1,084ft x $.75/ft Beams 168ft x $.75/ft Railing 80ft x $1.25/ft Seating 143ft x $1.25/ft Posts 147ft x $8.40/ft Waving Steel Walls 715.5ft2 x $1.34/ft2 ADA Handrail 105ft x $14.34/ft Hardware 10% of Materials Contingency 15% of Materials

Furniture Design Material Assessment

The Backyard Beat

Cost Estimate

Total = $497.98

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LCA Percentage Score

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PVC

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SilicateInfused Wood

Gr

Lifespan Bamboo

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Mold Resistant Pest Resistant

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Transportation Carbon Footprint Maintenance

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Installed Environmental Impact Sustainable Material

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Process Environmental Impact 10

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Transportation Carbon Footprint

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Process Environmental Impact

Maintenance

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Sustainable Material Installed Environmental Impact

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Pest Resistant Mold Resistant

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10 LCA Percentage Score

90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

25

Lifespan

1.5 1 0.5 0

Th

Rating

3.5 3 2.5 2

Example of Full Life Cycle Assessment

LCA of Decking Materials

Life Cycle Assessment of Decking Materials

Swinging Bench: Seat Boards (2�x4�) 48ft x $1.25/ft = $60.00 Arm Rest Supports (2�x2�) 2ft x $.83/ft = $ 1.66 Chain 11ft x $.40/ft = $ 4.40 Support I-Beams (5�) 39ft x $8.40/ft = $327.60 Hardware 10% of Materials = $39.37 Contingency 15% of Materials = $64.95

• •

Minimized Depletion of Natural Resources Poses Minimal Harm to Humans in All Phases of Lifecycle

" !       !     ! stage of its life

Cost Estimate

The Backyard Beat

Total = $14,890.82

 

   to materiality by using high contrast materials adjacent to one another.

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Fifth Year Residential

Urban

Community

Campus

Parks

Wake County Hospice Grief Garden • • •

Therapeutic Garden Designing with “leftover” space Planting Design Key Common Name 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Spring

Summer

Fall

Winter

Quanitity

Osmanthus delavayi Muhlenbergia capillaries Juniperus chinensis ‘Kaizuka’ Acer palmatum ‘Crimson Queen’ Corylus avellana ‘Red Majestic’ Rhaphiolepsis indica ‘Olivia’ Taxondium distichum ‘ Cascade Falls’

36 50 4 1 3 5 1

Concorde Japanese Barberry Crimson Pigmy Dwarf Japanese Barberry Blue Oat Grass Black Mondo Grass Hosta Jonquil Daffodil Weeping Japanese Red Pine Rosemary Black Elephant Ear Omeo Gum Golden Hinoke Cypress Devon Cream Japanese Falsecypress Dwarf Japgarden Juniper Rocky Mountain Juniper Blue Pfitzer Juniper

Berberis thunbergii ‘Concorde’ Berberis thunbergii ‘Crimson Pigmy’ Helictotrichon sempervirens Ophiopogon planiscapus ‘Arabicus’ Hosta spp. Narcissus jonquilla Pinus densiflora ‘Pendula’ Rosmarinus officinalis Colocasia esculenta Eucalyptus neglecta Chamaecyparis obtusa ‘Crippsii’ Chamaecyparis pisifera ‘Devon Cream’ Juniperus procumbens ‘Nana’ Juniperus scopulorum ‘Skyrocket’ Juniperus X pfitzeriana ‘Glauca’

36 14 22 150 8 30 5 8 4 1 2 2 12 3 10

23 Dwarf Norway Spruce

Picea orientalis ‘Nana’

Dwarf Japgarden Juniper Blue Pfitzer Juniper Red Lace-Leaf Japanese Maple Rocky Mountain Juniper Dwarf Norway Spruce Golden Hinoke Cypress Devon Cream False Cypress Blue Pfitzer Juniper

Purple Contorted Filbert Weeping Bald Cypress Blue Oat Grass Redbud Omeo Gum Rosemary Black Mondo and Jonquil Daffodil Hosta

1

Concorde Japanese Barberry Crimson Pigmy Dwarf Japanese Barberry

Pinky Muhly Grass Black Elephant Ear

Olivia Indian Hawthorn Hollywood Juniper

Weeping Japanese Red Pine

Delavay Tea Olive

0

Narrative: This garden represents the depression and reflection stage of grief. In order to emphasize these emotions and encourage healthy discussion during therapy sessions, many visual and tactile elements have been included. As guests approach this area of the garden they are forced to ascend a steep set of narrow stairs that represent the struggle of acknowledging a loss. Upon reaching the top of the hill, the guests is greeted by a sculptural gate that blocks the generator; the gate takes on the impact of the event with its concave form. This area has a wide path with bench surrounded by blue and purple evergreens that allows for a calm area of reflection. After passing the generator, the guests have a choice of paths, the one to the left leads to a pond or to the anger and bargaining area. The path to the right leads to a bench, where counselors can talk with patients about sculptural plantings. Two sets of shrubs will be planted as to have views through them, one set with a nice view and one set with nothing but a brick wall behind. This area is also filled with a ornamental grass that will sway in the wind, allowing patients to get lost in their thought. Getting lost in thought is a huge inspiration throughout the garden. Guests are encouraged to sit either by themselves or with a counselor and to look at the various textures in soothing hues and reflect on their life. There is also a reflective pool, which is dyed black to be even further reflective. Even the paving stones will be installed in such a way as to encourage contemplation; as patients are forced to pay attention to their cadence, they will have to slow down in certain areas of the garden due to the spacing of the stones. Overall this garden is meant to be a place for quiet contemplation and reflection, and hopefully paths of communication will open up as a result of this space of free thought.

Hospice of Wake County Grief Garden Depression and Reflection 18

Perspective of Sculptural Gate: Concave form represents the impact a death can have on an individual.

Perspective of Framing Shrubs: The two sets of hollywood junipers frame contrasting views; one set frames a view of nothing more than bricks, while another frames a view of a boulder and lush vegetation. This provides a good starting point for discussion.

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22

Latin Name

Delavay Tea Olive Pinky Muhly Grass Hollywood Juniper Red Lace-Leaf Japanese Maple Purple Contorted Filbert Olivia Indian Hawthorn Weeping Bald Cypress

5

10

20

30

Perspective of Seating Area: Multiple size benches allow for individual and group counseling, and benches facing in different directions allows for visitors to focus on different areas of the garden.

Katie Hamilton 10/11/2011 HS 416 - Planting Design A. Spafford


Fifth Year Residential

Urban

Community

Campus

Parks Cox Ave. Residence • • •

Sustainable Design Natural Play Planting Design

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Fifth Year Residential

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Community

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Parks

Capstone Project - Raleigh Multimodal Transit Hub and Warehouse District Redevelopment Plan • Case Studies • Critical Analysis For my Capstone Project I chose to design Raleigh’s proposed multimodal transit center. Having never designed a transportation center, I found it necessary to study similar projects around the world to understand possible programming.

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Fifth Year Residential

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Capstone Project - Raleigh Multimodal Transit Hub • • •

Analysis Stakeholder Relations Program Development

After analyzing built works similar to the multimodal hub proposed by the city, I analyzed the site and surroundings physically and culturally. I looked at the existing transportation facilities, circulation patterns, and the culture of the neighborhood of the proposed site. I also had more meetings with city planning staff and regional transit planners, and other stakeholders to understand the project goals. Based on the case studies, site analysis, and meetings with stake holders I developped a program for the site.

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Fifth Year Residential

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Capstone Project - Raleigh Multimodal Transit Hub and Warehouse District Redevelopment Plan • • • • • •

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Master Planning Plaza Design Streetscape Design Transportation Design Nightscaping Wayfinding

Nightscape of Martin Street


Fifth Year Residential

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Parks

Capstone Project - Raleigh Multimodal Transit Hub and Warehouse District Redevelopment Plan • • • • • •

Master Planning Plaza Design Streetscape Design Transportation Design Nightscaping Wayfinding

Based on my case studies, site analysis, and stakeholder reaction to possible alternatives I developped a master plan that connected the proposed multimodal transit center with the downtown business core. The plan also served to revitalize the warehouse district, respecting the past through the incorporation of warehouse doors, train tracks running through plazas, and designing for the future with high density residential development as well as a retail core near the train and bus station.

View of northern plaza from across the street

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Educational Portfolio