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Discover shopping, dining, living and doing business in Chula Vista.

There’s something for everyone!

membership & resource guide 2012 / 2013


contents

Welcome to the 2012/2013 Chula Vista Chamber of Commerce

Membership & Resource Guide S E C T I O N S

Welcome & Chamber Info

Invest in Chula Vista:

and County Supervisor

12 Invest in Your

5 Letters from Mayor 6 Chamber Staff

7 Letters from the

Chamber President and Past President

8 Chamber Board

11 Committee Chairs 11 Advertiser’s Index

Shop. Dine. Stay. Community

14 Places to Shop 15 Places to Dine 15 Places to Stay 16 Things to Do

Business

Community

22 Business Today

27 Education

20 The Early Days 23 The Future of

Business in Chula Vista

24 Business

Conservation Programs

25 Internet Resources

& Attractions

18 Annual Events

26 Community Profile

Living in Chula Vista

32 Healthcare

36 Affordable

35 Libraries and

Recreation Centers

36 Overview Housing

37 Communities 39 Retirement Opportunities

41 Guide to Green

Living in Chula Vista

44 Residential

Growth Forecast

The MISSION of Chula Vista Chamber of Commerce is to represent the business community in striving to preserve a working partnership of business and professional people that promotes, protects, and expands the free enterprise system, to enhance the members ability to conduct their individual businesses successfully, and to improve the economic stability of the community. The Chamber has many roles; one of the most important of those is to act as a catalyst: a common vehicle through which all segments of the community can work together with other agencies for the common good of the entire community. A better community means better business. Other roles of the Chamber include being a government relations specialist, an economic developer and planner, a tourist and new resident information center and a public relations practitioner. For more information on how you can be involved in the community or to request a membership packet, call us!

233 Fourth Avenue, Chula Vista, CA 91910 www.chulavistachamber.org (619) 420-6603 • Fax (619) 420-1269

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T H E

message from the mayor

F R O M

W E LC O M E

M AYO R

Dear Friends,

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As Mayor of Chula Vista, I look forward to the rewards and benefits of a world-class bayfront development, fouryear university and technology park and a revitalized urban core. As we work to accomplish these goals, the Chula Vista Chamber of Commerce plays an important role in our growing community by supporting existing businesses and recruiting new ones. Its support directly impacts the services the City provides residents and businesses.

S U P E R V I S O R

This challenging economic period in our city, state and nation requires proactive efforts. The Chula Vista Chamber of Commerce will help residents, business owners and city leaders recognize and embrace the opportunities that lie ahead. I commend the Chamber and its members for their support of key projects and issues that affect Chula Vista’s quality of life. Respectfully,

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Cheryl Cox, Mayor

C H A M B E R

message from the county supervisor Dear Friends:

S TA F F

As County Supervisor for the First District representing South County, it is my great pleasure and honor to recognize the ongoing efforts of the Chula Vista Chamber of Commerce to strengthen the business community in Chula Vista. Your leadership has continually demonstrated a strong commitment to economic development and improving commercial opportunities and quality of life for the people of our region. Throughout my tenure on the Board of Supervisors, I have had the pleasure of working in partnership with you on many occasions, to inform, educate and empower the community so as to make Chula Vista a business friendly climate. Your strong advocacy on behalf of area businesses and residents has made Chula Vista a growing and vibrant area that I am proud to represent. Best wishes for continued prosperity and success to the Chula Vista Chamber of Commerce and all its members. Sincerely, Greg Cox, Supervisor, First District

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chamber staff

Lisa Cohen CEO

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Marcy Weaver General Manager, Convention & Visitors Bureau

Debbie Cesena Administrative Assistant

Alicia Ontiveros Bookkeeper

Elena Monta単o Manager, Visitors Center

Janette Monta単o Information Specialist, Visitors Center

Selena Lopez Information Specialist, Visitors Center

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from the president

C H A M B E R

Dear Members,

P R E S I D E N T

It is my honor to serve this year as the President of the Board of Directors for the Chula Vista Chamber of Commerce. To reach this position, I have spent many years as a Director and Officer for this fine organization so I am well versed in the needs of our members and what we can to do help you to be successful.

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For nearly 90 years, the Chula Vista Chamber has been a vital organization. Each year, we grow in membership but we also expand our outreach to businesses and surrounding communities. This year will offer more of those opportunities. Three areas of focus I have identified for my year as president are; forward progress of our Chula Vista Bayfront, education as it relates to our business community, and continued enhancement of the Chamber’s relationship with the City of Chula Vista.

PA S T P R E S I D E N T

We are a strong organization but your involvement as a member will make us even stronger. Please consider becoming a member of one of our committees or at least visit a committee meeting to get more information. Committee options include Economic Development, Public Policy, Education, and Membership just to name a few. Finally, please don’t hesitate to let me know how our Chamber can help you make your business more profitable. Our mission is comprehensive in our efforts to preserve and promote free enterprise. Take advantage of our monthly mixers to promote your business and meet others in our vibrant business community. I look forward to working together with you to move our community towards greater prosperity and economic growth. Thank you for investing in your community by investing in our Chamber of Commerce. Sincerely, Lisa C. Johnson, 2012 President

from the past president Dear Members,

It was a great pleasure to serve as your President of the Board of Directors of the Chula Vista Chamber of Commerce for 2011. As stated in our mission statement, the Chamber strives to provide opportunities for our members to network and promote their services to the community at large. We encourage you to join us at the First Friday Mayor’s Breakfast, the second Thursday Chamber Mixer, the Annual Tradeshow or our Golf Tournament. You are also invited to join one of our many Chamber committees; Ambassadors, Public Policy, Membership, Economic Development, Education or others. Your membership and participation is an investment that will increase the success of your business. As business leaders, we must continue to work with our City leaders to achieve prosperity and strengthen the economic health of our City. We must partner with the City to stramline the permitting process to encourage business and economic growth. Always shop, dine, and invest in Chula Vista. Spend your money locally in Chula Vista, to keep it in Chula Vista — to help all of us. The Chamber of Commerce will continue to advance our goals of planning for the citizens of Chula Vista. We all need to work together to ensure the economic growth and success of our city and business community. Sincerely, Bob Bliss, 2011 President

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executive committee (and Tourism District Committee)

Lisa Johnson President 2012

Jerry R. Rindone President Elect 2013

Robert J. Bliss Past President 2011

South Bay Family YMC A

Board Member, 2nd District, San Diego County Board of Education; and former Deputy Mayor, City of Chula Vista

Steve Miesen Vice President Public Policy

Jay Norris Vice President Economic Development

Nicole Hohenstein Vice President - Tourism Marketing District / Hotel/Motel Committee

Allied Waste Services

First American Title & Escrow

Rober t J. Bliss, CPA

Pacifica Companies

Kevin Carlson Vice President Finance

Nor th Island Credit Union

William A. Hall Vice President Internal Affairs Por t Commissioner Emeritus / 4 Liberty, Inc .

tourism district committee

Victor Carrera

Ron Caton

Betty M. Chou

Jyoti Sarolia

Rufino “Pie� Roque

Catherine West

Best Western Plus Otay Valley

Highway Inn

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La Quinta Inn San Diego Chula Vista

El Primero Boutique Hotel

Travel Inn Chula Vista

Good Nite Inn

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Carlos Hermida HERCOR Hotel Urban Boutique


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directors

C H A I R S &

Bryan Fuller

Todd Galarneau

Chula Vista Elementar y School District

Fuller Ford Honda KIA

The Corky McMillin Companies

David Hoffman

Dr. Henry Kikunaga

Hoffman Hanono Insurance

Bonita Point Family Optometr y, Inc .

Martin R. Lodge

Kevin Marshall

Jaime Ortiz SGI Construction Management

Goodrich Aerostructures

Copy Link

Jyoti Sarolia

Claudia Valenzeula

Pablo Velez

Vagabond Inn & Highway Inn

SDG&E

Sharp Chula Vista Medical Center

B OA R D

Dr. Francisco Escobedo

The Securities Center, Inc .

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Jim Biddle

Executive Director Ex-Officio Third Avenue Village Association

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committee chairs

F R O M

W E LC O M E

C H A M B E R P R E S I D E N T & PA S T P R E S I D E N T

Dr. Francisco Escobedo Chula Vista Elementar y School District and

Dr. Edward Brand Sweetwater Union High School District

Education Committee

advertiser’s index Unified Port of San Diego

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Jay Norris

Goodrich Aerostructures

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First American Title & Escrow

Southwestern College

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Photo by Elsa

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Allied Waste Services

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North Island Credit Union

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Chula Vista Elementary School District

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Sweetwater Union High School District

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Scripps Health Center

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Chiropractic Care Center

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My Hometown Magazine

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Lordes Valdez First Bank

Membership Committee

Economic Development Committee

Steve Miesen

Nicole Hohenstein

Allied Waste Services

Pacifica Companies

Public Policy Committee

Hotel/Motel Committee

2012/2013

MEMBERSHIP

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RESOURCE

GUIDE

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invest in Chula Vista

Invest in Your Community

Did you know that by purchasing goods and services inlocal stores and businesses, you’re investing in your community? A small portion of the local sales tax consumers pay goes to the City. In fact, sales tax revenue accounts for about a quarter of the general fund. Those dollars help support Chula Vista’s public services, which include libraries, recreation centers, the street paving program and fire and police protection. We need to change our shopping habits to support our local businesses, and to protect our local services. Although residents have more choices than ever before, statistics show that Chula Vista’s consumers are spending less in their community than shoppers in other cities. On a per capita basis last year, Chula Vista brought in $106 dollars in sales taxes, far below the county average of $139. The numbers clearly indicate that local residents are doing some of their shopping somewhere else.

craft events are featured monthly, while the “Hometown Heroes” program recognizes and rewards community groups and organizations that support area youth. Many of these events are held in the mall’s new Macy*s West Court area which has become a popular, relaxing stopping point for customers as they browse throughout the center. The center hosts a wide range of community activities including musical and dance entertainment and free school-hosted events in both the Macy*s West Court and in the second level Food Court.

The EastLake Design District

San Diego County’s only one stop shopping for all of your home furnishings and accessories. Lush landscape, beautifully designed fountains and ample parking make EastLake Design District the ideal place for the entire family. The District has everything you need to furnish and decorate your home in one easy location from paint, rugs, appliances and furniture; you’ll find it all here.

Chula Vista Center

We are home to Eastlake’s own Brewhouse, featuring a premiere micro-brewery with a casual menu. The restaurant offers 260 seats, including a bar/lounge, large outside patio with 2 fire pits, 2 private dining rooms, a kid’s game room, and 14 plasma televisions. The Brewhouse features 8 of their own handcrafted beers, guest beers, a full bar, and wine list. Their menu covers everything from appetizers to items from their grill, their smoker, and their earthstone pizza oven. Enjoy!

Chula Vista Center is proud of its service to the community. Free children’s

Both establishments offer nightly entertainment and are open until 2 a.m. on weekends.

In partnership with the City of Chula Vista, the Chula Vista Chamber of Commerce’s new “Shop, Dine, Stay: Invest in Your Community” campaign is designed to encourage residents to spend money in their own city. Consider this: it’s easier to shop close to home; you’ll save gas and spend less time on the road in traffic. Chula Vista Center located at the corner of Broadway and H Street in west Chula Vista fea¬tures the only Sears store in the South Bay, with over 120 specialty shops and restaurants. Open Monday — Saturday, 10am — 9pm and Sunday, 10am — 8pm, Chula Vista Center has been proudly serving the South Bay area for over 45 years. Hours are extended even further during holidays and department stores and restaurants usually have alternative hours.

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For all you sports fans and bowling enthusiasts there’s the EastLake Tavern & Bowl. This 16,000 sq. ft. sports lounge has more than enough HD Flat Screens, 10 bowling lanes and plenty of room to keep the party rollin’! With an extensive menu, game room, pool tables and a fun and upbeat atmosphere, the EastLake Tavern & Bowl is fun for the whole family!

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Experience the ease and convenience of shopping and dining close to home. Save gas, save time, save money — and invest in your community.

The EastLake Design District is proud to announce its newest tenant, Kid Ventures, an indoor play village and parent café. Kid Ventures is the next generation in boutique-style indoor family play centers. Their fun and stimulating indoor play village is designed to stretch your child’s imagination in a healthy and safe way. For more information, visit www.eastlakedesigndistrict.com.

Otay Ranch Town Center

With more than 100 of the country’s top specialty stores, Otay Ranch Town Center is the first major outdoor shopping and entertainment center in the San Diego metropolitan market in more than 20 years. For the South Bay area, it completely redefines the manner in which public gathering spaces blend with fashionable, fun stores in a variety of restaurant choices and entertainment. Visitors can walk down urban, bustling, open-air , shop-lined sidewalks withonstreet parking, outdoor cafes and grand fountains. A pet-friendly setting and adjacent doggie park welcome 4-legged visitors, and the centrally located “Kaiser Permanente Chalk Garden” and popper fountain for children to make this destination especially one-of-a-kind. Sophisticated “California heritage” architecture—with attention to detail—creates a place that people will revisit to play, gather, linger, shop, and be entertained. Eclectic tastes are served by Macy’s, REI, Barnes & Noble, Apple, Sephora and White House Black Market, and H&M to name just a few. On the center’s east side is a specialty fashion and service village, featuring Gila Rut Aveda Salon, Coldwater Creek Spa and other unique fashions and services. To the north, AMC Otay Ranch 12 delights film buffs. Diners can choose from P.F. Chang’s China Bistro, The Cheesecake Factory, Sushi-Ya, Frida Mexican Cuising, King’s Fish House and many others. Otay Ranch Town Center is conveniently located 4 miles east of I-805 or just off the SR 125 at Olympic Parkway and EastLake Parkway. Otay Ranch Town Center is open Monday through Saturday from 10 am to 9 pm, and Sunday from 11 am to 7 pm. Hours are extended during the holiday season. The Otay Ranch Certified Farmer’s Market is open every Tuesday from 4-8 pm on Main Street. For additional information, visit www.otayranch towncenter.com or call (619) 656-9100. C H U L A

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The Shops at San Miguel Ranch

A true hometown jewel, residents can shop for groceries at Albertson’s after enjoying the relaxing atmosphere. The Shops at San Miguel Ranch’s patio provides a great setting to enjoy a fresh cup off Starbuck’s Coffee, while overlooking Chula Vista. If you’re not in the mood for coffee, enjoy one of a wide variety of restaurants. For more formal dining, visit Villa Capri Family Style Trattoria that features a complete Italian menu and full bar. The Shops have a number of services to help families enjoy everyday life — from dry cleaning to a nail salon, banking, and more! Since opening in May 2007, The Shops at San Miguel Ranch has demonstrated their commitment to the community by donating more than $20,000 back to local students. The center has hosted special events, bringing snow and love reindeer to Chula Vista during the holidays, and will continue to provide safe, family-friendly activities. The Shops at San Miguel Ranch is located at the cornner of Proctor Valley Road (East H Street) and Mount Miguel Road in Chula Vista.

Westfield Shoppingtown Plaza Bonita

This is the South Bay’s only enclosed, climate controlled shopping center here you’ll find more than 120 stores. In addition, the center features more than 20 eateries, such as OutbackSteakhouse, Applebee’s and Pat & Oscar’s. When you visit Westfield Shoppingtown Plaza Bonita, you’ll enjoy a unique shopping experience from the moment you arrive until the moment you leave. Just ask a shopping concierge about new, enhanced services, such as complimentary signature gift boxes, package carryout and expectant mother parking. Furthermore, amenities such as the Family Lounge and the Westfield Playtown are the perfect compliment to shopping. Westfield Shoppingtown Plaza Bonita is open Monday through Saturday from 10 am to 9 pm and Sunday from 11 am to 7 pm. Department store and holiday hours may vary. You can find them at I-805 at Sweetwater or Bonita Road, or Highway 54 at Plaza Bonita Center Way. For additional information, contact the Shopping Concierge Center at (619) 267-2850.

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Places to Shop

Chula Vista provides a wide selection of shopping opportunities throughout the city.

Shopping Centers

Movie theaters, dining and fast food, department stores, clothing stores, specialty shops, book stores, salons and more! Chula Vista Center 555 Broadway • (619) 427-6700 www.chulavistacenter.com Otay Ranch Town Center 2015 Birch Road • (619) 656-9100 www.otayranchtowncenter.com

Home Improvement/Décor Home improvement, home décor, dining and more! Chula Vista Crossings I-805 and Main St EastLake Village Marketplace Otay Lakes Rd and EastLake Pkwy EastLake Design District Otay Lakes Rd & Fenton Pkwy Rancho Del Rey Power Center East H St and Paseo Del Rey EastLake Terraces Olympic Pkwy and EastLake Pkwy

Autos/Dealerships

Shopping Plazas

Dining and fast food, specialty shops, groceries and more! Bonita Point Plaza Otay Lakes Rd & East H St The Marketplace at Windingwalk EastLake Pkwy and Birch Rd Canyon Plaza Telegraph Canyon Rd & Halecrest Dr Shops at San Miguel Ranch Proctor Valley Rd

Palomar Trolley Center Broadway and Palomar (SWC)

Terra Nova Plaza I-805 and East H Street

Heritage Town Center East Palomar and Santa Rita

EastLake Terraces Olympic Pkwy and EastLake Pkwy

Spotlight on Broadway 760 Broadway, between J and K

Village Walk at EastLake EastLake Pkwy and Miller Dr

Naples Center Naples St and Third Ave

EastLake Village Center Otay Lakes Rd and EastLake Pkwy

Third Avenue Village Third Ave between E and H Streets

Specialty Shopping

Palomar Square Palomar and Broadway (NWC)

Chula Vista Crossings I-805 and Main St

Dining and fast food, specialty shops, hobby stores and more!

South Bay Marketplace Highway 54 and Fourth Ave

EastLake Village Marketplace Otay Lakes Rd & EastLake Pkwy

Fuller Ford Honda KIA is among the county’s oldest retailers, currently employing over 200 people and are dedicated to the quality sales and maintenance of Ford, Honda and KIA products. Fuller offers a full array of automotive services including new and used vehicle sales and leasing, parts, and a service and body department. You can find more information on Thinkfuller.com.

Chula Vista sponsors the San Ysidro High School’s Baseball Fields, The Toyota Family Literacy Program, South Bay Meals on Wheels, and the San Diego Chapter of Scion Evolution just to name a few.

Since 1946, Fuller has played an active part in the South County, winning numerous awards and maintaining a high profile in countless local events and organizations. When it’s time to take care of any of your automotive needs, think Fuller and the Chula Vista Auto Park.

The Chula Vista Auto Park is located at the intersection of 1-850 and Auto Park Drive in Chula Vista. Currently it occupies over 40 acres and houses:

Toyota Chula Vista, has over eight acres of new and pre-owned vehicles. The “next level” is about providing an experience comfortable enough to recommend to family and friends.

Toyota Scion of Chula Vista Fuller Ford Honda KIA South Bay Motorsports

Toyota is proud to operate in the South Bay. Their donations benefit local schools and charities. Toyota

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EastLake Design District Otay Lakes Rd & Fenton Pkwy

Farmer’s Markets Chula Vista’s Third Avenue Farmer’s Market is certified and South County’s original farmer’s market! Purchase fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and plants directly from local farmers every Thursday from 3-7pm. The Third Avenue Farmer’s Market also features a wide variety of delicious international cuisine and handcrafted items. The Otay Ranch Certified Farmer’s Market boasts an incredible community of family farms that make this market a local Tuesday tradition for all. Come every Tuesday, 4-8pm on Main Street. Enjoy a market that’s easy to get to, with plenty of parking, and the freshest produce of the season grown by local farmers.

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Grocery Stores Bonita Point Plaza Otay Lakes Road & East H Street Naples Center Naples Street & Third Avenue Canyon Plaza Telegraph Canyon Rd & Halecrest Dr Palomar Trolley Center Broadway and Palomar (SWC) EastLake Village Center Otay Lakes Road & EastLake Pkwy Terra Nova Plaza I-805 and East H Street The Marketplace at Windingwalk EastLake Pkwy and Birch Rd Village Walk at EastLake EastLake Pkwy and Miller Drive Windingwalk EastLake Parkway & Birch Road


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Places to Dine

Drug Stores Bonita Point Plaza Otay Lakes Rd & East H St (NWC) EastLake Village Center Otay Lakes Road & EastLake Pkwy Broadway Broadway & I Street (NWC) The Plaza at Sunbow E Palomar St & Medical Center Dr Canyon Plaza Telegraph Canyon Rd & Halecrest Dr Terra Nova Plaza I-805 and East H Street Chula Vista Center Broadway & H Street Third Avenue Third Ave & Naples St (SEC) EastLake Terraces Olympic Pkwy and EastLake Pkwy

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From a romantic dinner to a quick bite; from decadent desserts to fresh salads; from creamy coffees to fine wines... they’re all here. for a list of popular restaurants, visit:

Best Western, Chula Vista 946 Broadway (619) 691-6868 Best Western Plus 4450 Main Street (619) 422-2600

HERCOR Hotel 692 H Street (619) 425-3862 Highway Inn 70 Broadway (619) 691-8118

Riviera Motel 372 Broadway (619) 422-1987 Travel Inn 394 Broadway (619) 420-6600

Best Western, South Bay 710 E Street (619) 420-5183

Holiday Inn Express & Suites 632 E Street (619) 426-2500

Traveler Inn & Suites San Diego South Bay 235 Woodlawn Avenue (619) 427-9170

La Quinta Inn 150 Bonita Road (619) 691-1211

Vagabond Inn 230 Broadway (619) 422-8305

www.chulavistaca.gov/ attraction/dining.asp

Big 7 Motel 333 Broadway (619) 422-9278

Places to Stay

Days Inn 699 E Street (619) 585-1999   El Primero Boutique Hotel 416 3rd Avenue (619) 425-4486 (800) 240-7059

In town on business or need a place to stay for guests? Chula Vista’s comfortable hotels and motels will make the visit enjoyable! Bay Cities Motel 864 Broadway (619) 420-2951 Best Choice Inn 778 Broadway (619) 476-9555

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Good Nite Inn 225 Bay Blvd. (619) 425-8200 Harbor View Motel 1089 Broadway (619) 422-2967

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Motel 6 745 E Street (619) 422-4200 Palomar Inn 801 Palomar Street (619) 423-8889   Palomar Motel 1160 Walnut Avenue (619) 457-2944   Ramada Inn - San Diego South 91 Bonita Road (619) 425-9999  

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Things to Do & Attractions Chula Vista offers a wide array of attractions and activities to entertain all year. Attractions

Living Coast Discovery Center The Living Coast Discovery Center (formerly the Chula Vista Nature Center) is alive! It’s a living, breathing, flapping, buzzing and splashing home to the unique animals and plants of Southern California. Six miles south of downtown San Diego, the Discovery Center sits on the 316-acre Sweetwater Marsh National Wildlife Refuge. The Center aquariums are home to Moray eels, Leopard sharks, stingrays, guitarfish and other marine life found in San Diego Bay. Rescued birds thrive at exhibits like Raptor Row and Eagle Mesa. Owls, pelicans, gnatcatchers and eagles are just a few of our resident native birds. The Living Coast Discovery Center is a 501(c)3 organization dedicated to providing environmental education on coastal resource conservation, and instilling a respect for nature and wildlife in people of all ages. They do this by providing interactive wildlife learning experiences. Curators and volunteer docents introduce guests to the way our native creatures live in their natural habitats. For over 20 years, the Center has hosted thousands of school children every year for field trips, science classes, scout events and other kidfriendly opportunities.

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Through the Endangered Species Breeding & Release Program, the Center partners with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, SeaWorld, San Diego Zoo’s Wild Animal Park, and independent biologists to captive - breed and release one of California’s most endangered water birds - the Light-footed Clapper Rail. Open every day. 1000 Gunpowder Point Drive (at the west end of E Street). (619) 409-5900 www.thelivingcoast.org

(619) 691-1860, www.chulavistamarina.com or www.chulavistarv.com California Yacht Marina, 640 Marina Parkway (619) 422-2595, www.cymchulavista.com

Cricket Wireless Amphitheatre Cricket Wireless Amphitheatre is an outdoor performing arts theater with reserved seating for 10,000 and additional seating for 10,000 on an attractively landscaped lawn. The amphitheatre is located just 17 minutes from downtown San Diego in Chula Vista. The Amphitheatre holds the title as San Diego County’s first large entertainment venue designed exclusively for the performing arts. This world-class event locale is perfect for large scale, yet intimate events. Set in an exceptional international location, one mile from the border of Mexico and the United States, this concert showcase features amenities in an environment that offers the best entertainment experience possible for the concert fan. Open year-round. 2050 Entertainment Circle (off Auto Park Drive) (619) 671-3600 Harbor/Marina Chula Vista’s scenic harbor offers spectacular views and easy access to southern San Diego Bay. The harbor includes two marinas, an RV park, and several restaurants. It is also home to Chula Vista Yacht Club and two waterfront parks. Various sport fishing, sight-seeing and whale-watching charters operate out of Chula Vista Harbor. Marina and RV Park, 550 Marina Parkway

Knotts Soak City USA San Diego County’s wildest water adventure park! Thirty-two water-logged acres packed with 22 of the most intense water rides imaginable -- all themed to the surf woodies and longboards of the 1950s San Diego coast! Open May through September 2052 Entertainment Circle (off Auto Park Drive) (619) 661-7373 U.S. Olympic Training Center An official U.S. Olympic Committee training facility dedicated to the development of America’s current and future Olympic athletes participating in nine sports including archery, rowing, canoe/ kayak, soccer, softball, field hockey, tennis, track and field, and cycling. See athletes training, take a free guided tour of the facilities and shop at the Olympic Spirit Store. Open year-round. 2800 Olympic Parkway (619) 656-1500 OnStage Playhouse Downtown Chula Vista’s only live community theatre with an up-close, intimate setting. The theater seats 60 playgoers, and produces six or more plays per year. If you’re looking to pursue your acting career (or you want to have fun), you may even choose to audition! 291 Third Avenue (619) 422-RSVP [7787]

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AMC Theaters Otay Ranch 12 2015 Birch Road Regal Rancho Del Rey 16 1025 Tierra Del Rey UltraStar Chula Vista 10 555 Broadway #2050

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Chula Vista Municipal Golf Course An 18-hole championship course with pro shop,

Movie Theaters

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which offers semi-private memberships, as well as daily fee play. Complete with a lighted practice facility, fully stocked pro shop, indoor grill, and outdoor event pavilion, EastLake Country Club is the premier golf and special event destination for South Bay, San Diego, and more. For more information on memberhsips and golf tournaments, or to schedule a tee time, please call or visit www.eastlakecountryclub.com. 2375 Clubhouse Drive, (619) 482-5757

San Diego Country Club 88 L Street (619) 422-8895 Private Club - Members Only

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Bonita Golf Club Located inthe serene Bonita Valley, Bonita Golf Club offers a par 71 golf course measuring 6,287 yards. This mature, well-conditioned layout provides a variety of challenges to both the experienced and weekend golfers at an affordable price. The fully staffed banquet room can accommodate up to 250 guests; one of the largest in the South Bay area. It’s ideal for wedding receptions and business seminars.

Golf Courses

EastLake Country Club Located in Chula Vista’s EastLake community, this is an 18-hole championship golf course,

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putting ad chipping greens, driving range, carts, snack bar, clubhouse, and restaurant. 4475 Bonita Road, Bonita (619) 479-4141

Otay Valley Regional Park The Otay Valley Regional Park (OVRP) is a multi-jurisdictional park that runs through Chula Vista. There are trails for hikers, bikers and equestrians. Those with a passion for angling will find peaceful fishing holes along the trails throughout the OVRP. Discover native plants and animals, and enjoy the great outdoors! OVRP Ranger Station, 2155 Beyer Boulevard (619) 424-0463

Salt Creek Golf Course This serene course brings traditional links style golf to Southern California’s natural terrain. Set on the gradual slopes of Mount Miguel, protected as state wildlife reserve, Salt Creek offers five sets of tees and generous fairways that deliver a demanding, yet exceptionally playable golf course, measuring 6,889 yards from the back tees and 5,505 from the forward tees. For further information or tee times, please call! 525 Hunte Parkway, (619) 482-4666

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Annual Events Around Town

Third Avenue Village Association

For additional information about the following events or specific dates, please contact (619) 422-1982 or visit www.thirdavenuevillage.com Cinco de Mayo Festival This annual festival is usually on the first Sunday of May. This flagship Third Avenue event includes live entertainment on four stages, authentic food from Mexico and around the world, local crafters and contests. Come join the 30,000 community members who enjoy the festival each year. Lemon Festival Celebrate summer at the annual Lemon Festival around the first Sunday in August. Third Avenue from E Street to Roosevelt will be transformed into a fun-filled festival with activities and attractions for children and adults alike. Lemon Festival celebrates Chula Vista’s heritage as the “Lemon capital of the world” and features live entertainment on 3 stages, hand crafters, international foods, contests and lemons galore. Village Vibes Concert Series Visit Chula Vista Memorial Park Bowl this summer, where you will enjoy free six open-air concerts varying from blues to salsa rhythms. Dance

to various music vibes at the Village Vibes Concert Series. All concerts are free! Just bring your lawn chair, blanket or mat, and get ready to spend your summer Wednesday nights with the companionship of you friends and family. Enjoy a different concert every week, dance and sway the night away with good Village Vibes. Wednesdays in July and August. Please check our website for specific dates! Taste of Third Avenue & Art Walk Take a self-guided walking tour of Third Avenue Village restaurants with art exhibits. You will get a chance to taste a variety of cuisines that will add flavor to your appetite. From Italian to Japanese food, take a stroll and find your next favorite restaurant and discover with your family and friends the many delights Chula Vista’s Third Avenue Village carries. Fall. Pet Fest & Doggy Dash A fun-filled event for pets and pet lovers! The event will feature a 1.5-mile Doggy Dash, entertainment, pet-related activities, obedience demonstrations, pet adoptions and more. Mid-June. Blast From the Past Car Show Plenty of classic cars and motorcycles are on display along Third Avenue in downtown Chula Vista. Summers. Please check our website for specific dates! Starlight Parade This annual event is the largest nighttime parade in the South County, with over 5,000 participants

each year. Special features will include carolers, delightfully decorated floats, local school marching bands, and, of course, Santa Claus! The new parade theme this year is “A Storybook Holiday”. Entries will be decorated in accordance with participant’s favorite childhood holiday stories and fables! Early December.

Living Coast Discovery Center For additional information about the following events or specific dates, please call (619) 409-5900 or visit www.thelivingcoast.org Where the Wild Things Are Food & Wine Classic Enjoy wine and food from world-class wineries and restaurants at the Living Coast Discovery Center in mid-May! Interact with wildlife and experience the fresh air in the great outdoors for this classy evening event. Partake in exciting live and silent auctions, listen to live music by local artists, and learn a few tips and tricks from celebrity chef demonstrations. Must be 21 to attend. Critters & Cocktails Unwind after work with cocktails and appetizers, friends...and a few feathers and fins! Mingle with people and animals, learn about our native wildlife, and have a relaxing evening at the Living Coast Discovery Center! Check the Center’s calendar online for dates or give them a call! Must be 21 to attend.


Chula Vista Community Collaborative For additional information about the following event or specific date, please call (619) 409-9412 or visit www.chulavistacc.org Day of the Child A fun filled day of activities and entertainment for children and their families. This is an opportunity for select local organizations and businesses to showcase their services and products, which contribute to building healthy kids and families. Spring time.

City of Chula Vista Fire Department’s Annual Open House An absolute blast for the whole family! Meet local heros, tour the fire station, watch amazing demonstrations, meet Cali the Arson Dog, ride the fire train, visit local vendors, get today’s latest saftety tips from experts, and watch out for surprise guests that could “fly in” throughout the day. Share some adventures with the Chula Vista Fire Department. October. For more information, call (619) 691-5029 or visit www.chulavistaca.gov/goto/fireprevention. Beautify Chula Vista Day Annual Beautify Chula Vista Day is a dynamic community cleanup event organized by I Love A Clean San Diego and the City of Chula Vista, and made strong by thousands of enthusiastic volunteers. This event has made an extensive impact on the city of Chula Vista, as dedicated residents have painted out graffiti, stenciled storm drains to warn against dumping, planted trees, and removed thousands of pounds of debris littering neighborhoods in Chula Vista. This event shows that huge results can come from volunteers that donate just one morning a year toward C H U L A

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Snores & S’mores Come enjoy a night under the stars with your family. Activities will include jumpers, arts & crafts, telescope viewing, a movie and more. Dinner and breakfast will be provided. All participants must bring their own tent! For more information, contact the Montevalle Recreation Center at (619) 409-1977 or visit www.chulavistaca.gov/rec.

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Lecture Series Nights Special speakers and presentations with activities for the whole family. Check our website for upcoming special speakers and topics!

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Day Camps The Living Coast Discovery Center offers safe, affordable and fun Day Camp programs year-round during school breaks for kids ages 4-14. Through animal encounters, games, arts and crafts, outdoor exploration, role play and career exploration, the world of our amazing native wildlife comes to life!

helping their community every October. For more information, please visit www.beautifychulavista.org.

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Overnight Adventures Overnight Adventures are a one-of-a-kind overnight experience at the Living Coast Discovery Center that include a full evening of fun activities and animal encounters finished with a movie and cozy indoor camping. The next morning, campers enjoy a continental breakfast and more opportunities to meet local wildlife up-close. Mysterious Midnight at the Marsh is the Center’s annual Halloween Overnight Adventure. Spooky animal encounters, a night hike through the marsh, a mysterious treasure hunt, creepy snacks and more are sure to put the howl in your Halloween!

Community 5K Fun Run/ Walk Walk, stroll or run at the U.S. Olympic Training Center for the Chula Vista Community 5k Fun Run/ Walk! The fun run is held on the center’s inspirational grounds where participants have the opportunity to run along side Olympians through the exclusive Olympic Village--all to benefit four local Chula Vista charity organizations. A community expo and celebration with food, fun and music will follow the race. For more details and registration information, log on to www.chulavistaca.gov/goto/ funrun or call (619) 409-5979.

Chula Vista Rotary For additional information about the following event or specific dates, visit www.winetastechulavista.com Wine Taste Chula Vista Experience an evening of fine wines, tantalizing cuisine and lively entertainment under the stars at the Annual Rotary Wine Taste Chula Vista. The Otay Ranch Town Center becomes a mouth-watering escape featuring countless house specialties from over 20 of Chula Vista’s most prominent restaurants. Awaken your palate with a variety of delicate white and robust red wines served up by San Diego’s top wine proprietors, or select from dozens of domestic and international brews from renowned microbrewers. For the food

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connoisseur that prefers a drink on the rocks, visit one of the elite distributors for that delicious specialty cocktail. Must be 21 to attend. Fall.

Chula Vista Tradition Christmas Circle A long-standing holiday tradition in the community, Christmas Circle, opens in midDecember and goes through Christmas. Walk or drive through this enchanting neighborhood decorated with displays of sparkling lights and festive ornaments. It’s located on Whitney and Mankato between First and Second Avenues, south of H Street.

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business

Early Days of Chula Vista

The United States claimed California following the Mexican-American war in 1847. Even though California became a state in 1850, land grants were allowed to continue as private property under American law.

We’ve come a long way!

The American Boom Forster continued to operate the ranch for ten years until he sold it to a French developer. The land was then again sold to the Kimball brothers in 1868 for $30,000. Frank, Warren and Levi Kimball intended to develop the land into productive American-style cities and farms. Frank Kimball is also responsible for bringing the Santa Fe Railroad to San Diego, with its first terminus in National City.

Let’s take a moment to reflect on Chula Vista’s past.

The Early Days The history of the area known as Chula Vista, can be traced back millions of years through prehistoric fossils of both land and sea types. Around 3000 B.C., Yuman-speaking people began moving into the area. Many of the Native American Indians in San Diego today are descendants of the Kumeyaay tribe who roamed here for hundreds of years. The Coming of the Spanish In 1542, a fleet of three small ships sailed into San Diego Harbor commanded by Juan Rodriquez Cabrillo. These explorations led the Spanish to claim the land. In 1795, Chula Vista became a part of a Spanish land grant known as Rancho del Rey or “The King’s Ranch.” When Mexico formed its own government in 1831, Rancho del Rey became known as Rancho del la Nation or National Ranch. The ranch encompassed the area now known as National City, Chula Vista, Bonita, Sunnyside and the Sweetwater Valley. Rancho del la Nation was used by the Spanish as grazing land for their cattle and horses until 1845 when it was granted to John Forster, the son-in-law of Mexican governor Pio Pico.

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Several directors of the Santa Fe Railroad and Colonel W.G. Dickerson, a professional town planner, formed the San Diego Land and Town Company. The company set out to develop lands of

in Chula Vista

the National Ranch for new settlers. They issued promotional material to attract settlers that read: “Upon the best part of this tract, 5,000 acres are being subdivided into five acre lots with avenues and streets 80 feet in width running each way, the steam motor road passing though the center. This tract, known as Chula Vista, lies but a mile from the thriving place of National City.” With this announcement, the boom of the 1880s was on. These five-acre lots sold for $300 per acre in 1887. The purchaser was required to build a home within six months on the parcel. By 1889, ten houses were under construction and land sales were excellent. And thus, the City of Chula Vista was created. A resident, James D. Schulyer, suggested the name Chula Vista for the town and the San Diego Land and Town Company adopted it. Chula Vista can be roughly translated in Spanish as “beautiful view.”

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A railroad was built to connect San Diego, National City, Chula Vista and Otay. This railroad, know as the National City and Otay Railroad, flourished for many years. On October 17, 1911, an election was held in Chula Vista to incorporate and the people voted in its favor. The State of California approved this Act of Incorporation in November. The Board of Trustees of Chula Vista held an election at the office of the People’s State Bank and E.T. Smith was elected President. Local farmers continued to grow lemons as their primary crop and used over eight packing houses in the city. However, terrible weather came to the area in the following years causing severe damage. Crops suffered from a severe freeze in 1913 and droughts in 1914 and 1915. The Floods of 1916 caused major damage with a break in the Lower Otay Dam causing millions of gallons of water to empty out in two and a half hours. Railroad tracks near Second Avenue were swept away, 23 homes were destroyed and more than 20 people were killed. C H U L A

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World War I and the Great Depression In February 1916, the Hercules Powder Company began the design and construction of a kelp processing plant covering a 30-acre plot of land in Chula Vista. Kelp was an ideal source of materials used in the production of explosives. The plant produced potash and acetone to make cordite, a smokeless powder used extensively by the British armed forces in World War 1. Hercules produced 20,838,000 kilos of cordite for the British government during the war, making it the largest kelp harvesting fleet in the world at the time. The plant was located on what is now known as Gunpowder Point currently the home of the Chula Vista Nature Center.

Post War Chula Vista After the war, many of the factory workers and thousands of servicemen stayed in the area resulting in the huge growth in population. During those years, numerous schools, homes, banks, restaurants, gas stations and shopping centers opened to accommodate the growing number of residents. The last of the citrus groves and produce fields disappeared as Chula Vista became one of the largest communities in San Diego. To learn more about the history of Chula Vista, please visit the Chula Vista Heritage Museum or check out the local history room at the Chula Vista Public Library.

Although the Great Depression affected Chula Vista significantly, agriculture still provided considerable income for the residents. In 1931, the lemon orchards produced $1 million dollars in revenue and the celery fields contributed $600,000. World War II World War II ushered in changes that would affect the City of Chula Vista forever. The principal reason was the relocation of Rohr Aircraft Corporation to Chula Vista in early 1941, just months before the attack on Pearl Harbor. Rohr employed 9,000 workers in the area at the height of its wartime production. With the demand for housing, the land never returned to being orchard groves again. The population of Chula Vista tripled from 5,000 residents in 1940 to more than 16,000 in 1950.

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The Orchard Period In 1888, the Sweetwater Dam was completed to bring water to Chula Vista residents and their farming lands. Frank Kimball became the State Commissioner of Agriculture and discovered citrus trees to be the most successful crop for the area. Chula Vista eventually became the largest lemongrowing center in the world for a period of time.

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With its favorable location, Chula Vista is an ideal location for both corporate giants and family-owned businesses.

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Business Today

Companies based in Chula Vista not only enjoy the convenience of nearby interstate freeways and airports, they also enjoy quick access to major shipping ports in the neighboring National City and San Diego. Moreover, Chula Vista offers many enterprising businesses the unique benefits of twin plant “maquiladora” facilities in nearby Mexico. Firms operating in Chula Vista can take advantage of the vast labor pool of resources on both sides of the international border.

The Role of the Chula Vista Chamber of Commerce The Chula Vista Chamber of Commerce was established in 1927 as a nonprofit nonsectarian and non-partisan organization. With its over 1,000 members, the Chamber’s mission is to develop a partnership between business and professional people that promote the free enterprise system. The Chamber believes that responsible economic development is vital to the future growth of our community; a responsible City government is necessary for a healthy business climate. The Chamber serves as the voice for over 1,000 local businesses that provide jobs, generate tax revenue, build infrastructure, and provide consumer services for Chula Vista.

Chula Vista’s business population and is growing. These small businesses stabilize our employment base and have contributed to the City’s economic engine for decades. Because of these factors, the City of Chula Vista is committed to creating a “businessfriendly” environment that encourages small business development and success. Over the past few years, several new business retention, expansion, and attraction programs have been spearheaded by the City. These programs have been implemented to support and promote the economic stability and growth of the small business community. The ABCs of Starting a Business This in-depth business resource guide identifies several important steps to starting a business in the City of Chula Vista. The resource guide is available at the City of Chula Vista Economic Development Office, 276 4th Avenue, Building 300. You can also download the guide from the City’s website at www.chulavistaca.gov. For more info, contact Craig Ruiz at (619) 691-5248.

The Chamber of Commerce publishes an online newsletter, News & Views, which informs members of programs, activities and events within the city. It also contains articles written by professional business leaders in the community. News & Views also includes briefs on legislation impacting the business community and major accomplishments of the Chamber of Commerce. Our members have been and will continue to be a key contributor to Chula Vista’s economy and help foster the growth of new business and commerce throughout the region. They also make significant contributions to the local economy, employing over 30,000 individuals in Chula Vista. The Chamber will continue to identify major issues affecting the community including economic development, redevelopment/revitalization, the bayfront, healthcare, transportation, education, and the environment.

Small Business Programs Chula Vista has grown significantly over the past several years, and the small business community has been a solid contributor to this growth. This business sector accounts for the vast majority of

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Early Assistance Program A business retention, expansion and attraction program designed to provide pertinent information on zoning, permit and other regulatory requirements, time frames and estimated costs, to assist the business owner with making informed decisions. Activities also include troubleshooting and permit expediting for key businesses. For more info, contact Miguel Tapia at (619) 691-5291. San Diego Regional Enterprise Zone The State of California Enterprise Zone Program was created to encourage business investment and job creation in economically disadvantaged geographic areas. The City of San Diego administers the SDREZ on behalf of the cities of Chula Vista, San Diego and National City and

the Port of San Diego. The primary benefits for businesses within the EZ are state income tax credits for hiring qualified employees and sales tax credits on purchases of qualified machinery and equipment. Employees hired through the EZ program also receive tax benefits on their State income taxes. For more info about eligibility requirements, area boundaries, etc., contact Craig Ruiz at (619) 691-5248. San Diego Regional Revolving Loan Fund (SDRRL) Program The Cities of San Diego and Chula Vista have matched a $1.5 million grant from the Economic Development Administration (EDA) to develop the SDRRLF. The $3 million fund operates in the two cities to provide small business assistance and generate neighborhood commercial district revitalization. The SDRRLF can supplement private financing of new or rehabilitated buildings, fixed machinery and equipment, working capital and soft costs in the Revolving Loan Fund project area. For more info, contact Craig Ruiz at (619) 691-5248. Small Business Development & International Trade Center The Southwestern College Small Business Development Center (SBDC) provides free one-on-one business counseling and technical assistance to entrepreneurs in San Diego County. The SBDC sponsors seminars, workshops, and technical training on small business topics. The SBDC’s Business Resource Center (BRC) offers the community a business library providing computers, publications, videos, computer resources and on-line information. To access our services, please visit our website at www.sbditc.org or call at (619) 482-6391. These centers provide a unique set of resources to assist start-up and existing businesses and help them achieve success. One-on-one counseling is available for existing businesses for a variety of issues, including: • Business plan review/sample plans • Access to business software/internet

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Chula Vista Major Employers

Youngevity United Parcel Service (UPS)

Businesses with 150+ emloyees

The Future of Business

In early 2009, the City of Chula Vista’s Development Services Department launched a V I S TA

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Chula Vista Elementary School District City of Chula Vista Department of Social Services Southwestern College Sweetwater Union High School District United States Border Patrol

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Elementary School District Municipal Government Social Services Agency Community College Secondary School District Government Agency

Retail Home Depot Kohl’s Macy’s Costco Sears Target WalMart

The Department worked with an Oversight Committee comprised of developers, business owners, community organizations, engineers, architects, and contractors to develop process improvement recommendations. On April 20, 2010 the City Council approved the initial phase of improvements to the City’s development review process.

Our training programs, seminars and workshops on small business and international trade issues are offered by industry leaders, experts, and innovators. A complete list of upcoming events is available at the calendar section of www.sbditc.org.

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Government

comprehensive review of the City’s development review process to determine improvements that could streamline it, increase transparency, improve public access, make it more predictable, and reduce processing costs.

• Databases • Entrepreneur Library series • Cash flow management • Financial analysis • Human resources management • Insurance requirements • Demographics • Site location • Advertising/public relations • Customer service • International trade expansion • Import/export regulations • Exporting to Mexico • Trade leads • Publications in English and Spanish

Health Supplements Delivery Services

The initial phase includes amendments to various sections of the Chula Vista Municipal Code (CVMC) related to development review administration procedures; parking regulations, and non conforming uses/structures, and administrative procedures for the subdivision of land. The amendments are being codified and will be included in the on-line version of the Chula Vista Municipal Code shortly. The amendments to the CVMC are effective as of June 3, 2010.

Construction Merchandise Department Store Department Store General Merchandise Department Store General Merchandise General Merchandise

approach for public participation during the development review process. The new process provides fairness and consistency to all development projects regardless of their geographic location while enhancing opportunities to engage the public early and often throughout the development review process. Internal processing changes have also been implemented to the initial stages of the development review process to ensure a smoother transition from the “informal” inquiry/preapplication/pre-submittal stage to the “formal” review of a project for compliance with the City’s policies, rules, regulations, and standards (pdf ). The Process Improvement Program is an ongoing effort. Subsequent efforts will include implementation of project management within the Development Services Department, automation improvements to support quality customer service efforts, and streamlining efforts in the construction permitting and inspection process.

The City Council also approved a new policy related to public participation. Council Policy #400-02 outlines a comprehensive citywide C O M M E R C E

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Hospital Elderly Care Facility Manufacturing Aeorspace Manufacturer Amusement Park Boat Repair Injection Molding Medical Research Aerospace Manufacturer Hospital Hospital Welding

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Long home to Goodrich Aerostructures, Chula Vista is attracting other large dynamic companies and major businesses with over 150 employees, both private and public, that have provided a vital economic stability for Chula Vista. Bayview Hospital/Mental Health Systems Fredericka Manor Retirement Community GCE Industries Goodrich Aerostructures Knott’s Soak City USA Marine Group Boat Works Nypro Profil Institute Ratheon Systems Scripps Health Sharp Chula Vista Medical Center South Coast Welding

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CLEAN Business Program

The Chula Vista CLEAN Business program is designed to help small businesses become sustainable, or “CLEAN.” The program certifies and promotes businesses that demonstrate environmentally friendly practices and conserve resources. Participation in the program is voluntary and free. A CLEAN business adapts its practices to conserve and use renewable resources and holds itself accountable for environmental and social impacts. It operates in a responsible manner and protects the environment whenever possible. APPLICATION. Review the certification criteria and checklists that can be found at www.chulavistaca.gov/clean. Complete the checklists by indicating the suggested practices your business would like to implement. Once implemented, fill out and submit an application and your completed checklists for review.

VERIFICATION. Allow program staff to verify the selected measures and track your progress by arranging for a site visit at your business. Call (619) 691-5122 and select #6 from the menu to set up a visit. Once certified, your business will be presented with a certificate and window decal. RECOGNITION. Submit a business description and a picture of your choice. These will be used on the Chula Vista CLEAN Business web page to advertise your business—at no cost!


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Free Energy & Water Evaluations

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As part of the City’s environmental leadership, businesses with storefronts or offices are required to participate in a FREE on-site energy evaluation of their facilities (Chula Vista Municipal Code Chapter 20.04). The energy evaluation, which is performed by City staff in about 30 minutes, must be completed in the calendar year when a new license is issued or every 4 years for an existing business license. Businesses are encouraged, but not required, to perform any energy-savings retrofits or improvements identified through the on-site evaluation.

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What are the benefits?

FREE assistance identifying ways to reduce monthly energy and water costs FREE energy and water rebate assistance and 0% interest financing options FREE compact flourescent light bulbs, “smart” power strips, or other devices FREE training on ways to easily track their energy and water costs Future notice regarding free services and rebates for their specific business Improve their competitiveness by lowering monthly utility costs

Sign up through the Free Resource & Energy Business Evaluation (FREBE) program’s online appointment calendar at www.chulavistaca.gov/clean.

Internet Resources Chula Vista’s preferred resources for highlights and community information:

South County Economic Development Council (SCEDC) www.sandiegosouth.com

CleanTECH San Diego www.cleantechsandiego.org County of San Diego www.co.san-diego.ca.us

San Diego Convention & Visitors Bureau www.sandiego.org

San Diego County Hispanic Chamber of Commerce www.sdchcc.com San Diego Daily Transcript (Business News) www.sddt.com

Allied Waste Services www.sd.disposal.com

Asian Business Association Chamber of Commerce www.abasd.org Bonita Business & Professional Association www.bonitacalifornia.org

Chula Vista Chamber of Commerce www.chulavistachamber.org Chula Vista Convention & Visitors Bureau www.chulavistaconvis.com

San Diego Regional Economic Development Corp. www.sandiegobusiness.org

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San Diego Regional Technology Alliance www.sdrta.org

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FedWorld www.fedworld.gov

Housing & Urban Development www.hud.gov

National Black Chamber of Commerce www.nationalbcc.org

National Center for Education Statistics www.nces.ed.gov

California Technology, Trade & Commerce Agency www.commerce.ca.gov

Department of Finance (Demographics/ Data Center) www.dof.ca.gov Employment Development Department www.edd.cahwnet.gov M E M B E R S H I P

Bureau of the Census www.census.gov

Department of Labor (Bureau of Labor Statistics) www.dol.gov

CA Taxpayers Association www.caltax.org

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American Chamber of Commerce Research Association www.accra.org Department of Commerce www.doc.gov

California Chamber of Commerce www.calchamber.com

Connectory (Buyer/Supplier Network) www.connectory.com

SanGIS (San Diego city and county maps) www.sangis.org O F

State Resources

CA Materials Exchange/CalRecycle www.calrecycle.ca.gov/calmax

San Diego Workforce Parnership, Inc. www.workforce.org

CLEAN Team (all things environmental) www.chulavistaca.gov/clean

UCSD CONNECT (high-tech/biotech resource) www.connect.org

CA EPA On-Line Business Permit Assistance Program www.calgold.ca.gov

San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce www.sdchamber.org

San Diego Union Tribute (daily newspaper) www.signonsandiego.com

City of Chula Vista www.chulavistaca.gov

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SDG&E www.sdge.com

State Board of Equalization www.boe.ca.gov

National Resources

California Dept. of Transportation (CalTrans) www.dot.ca.gov

San Diego Techology’s Perfect Climate www.techsperfectclimate.org

Chula Vista Elementary School District www.cvesd.k12.ca.us

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Third Avenue Village Association www.thirdavenuevillage.com

San Diego Business Journal www.sdbj.com

Local & Regional Resources

Labor Market Information www.labormarketinfo.edd.ca.gov

Sweetwater Union High School District www.suhsd.k12.ca.us

San Diego Better Business Bureau www.sandiego.bbb.org Community Connection www.chulavistaca.gov

Franchise Tax Board www.ftb. ca.gov

The Star News - Chula Vista www.thestarnews.com

San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG) www.sandag.cog.ca.us

My Hometown Magazine

Employment Training Panel (Training Programs) www.etp.cahwnet.gov

Southwestern College www.swc.cc.ca.us

Port of San Diego www.portofsandiego.org

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Occupational Safety & Health Administration www.osha.gov Patents & Trademarks www.uspto.gov

Small Business Administration www.sba.gov US Business Advisor www.business.gov R E S O U R C E

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community Living, learning and recreation

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full of opportunities

Combined with affordability and room for expansion, Chula Vista offers multifaceted opportunities to businesses and families alike.

Education

Public Secondary Education (Grades 7- 12)

Chula Vista is home to Southwestern College and National University and is within commuting distance to several four year universities and research centers, as well as numerous specialized training and education centers.

The Sweetwater Union High School District (SUHSD) is the largest secondary school district in California. The curriculum provides challenging courses that prepare students for college and/or careers. The four core content areas are aligned to state content standards and testing. SUHSD schools offer a variety of elective courses as well as programs for students with special needs. Specialized training through the district’s academy programs include – among others – travel and tourism, business leadership, criminal justice, biotechnology, and creative and performing arts. School to Career programs, clubs, athletics, visual and performing arts, and student government opportunities round out the educational opportunities in the SUHSD.

The City is developing plans for an innovative University Park and Research Center (UPRC) to be located on a 1500-acre site overlooking lower Otay Lake and adjacent to the U.S. Olympic Training Center. The UPRC will bring together the comprehensive resources of distinguished public and private universities, research institutes and laboratories, and related business and technology firms that will collaborate to provide an important regional resource for all of San Diego County and Northern Baja California.

The Adult and Continuing Education Program is an award-winning division of the SUHSD. It’s a model in the state because of its excellence in key areas: English as a Second Language (ESL) programs, vocational and professional skills development, literacy and other general education courses that help students prepare for a high school diploma or General Education Development (GED). Parent education and personal development courses are also offered.

A complete range of educational opportunities, from preschool to post graduate studies in both the private and public sectors are available in Chula Vista and the surrounding areas. Within the City boundaries, primary and secondary public schools are managed by the Chula Vista Elementary School District and the Sweetwater Union High School District.

Public Elementary Education (Pre-K - Grade 6)

The Chula Vista Elementary School District (CVESD) offers a wide range of challenging educational programs. The instructional program meets all state requirements and includes art, health, history, social science, language arts (reading, writing, speaking, listening), mathematics, science, physical education, and visual and performing arts. Partnerships with the U.S. Olympic Training Center and the Chula Vista Nature Center offer students unique study programs. The state provides an approved list of basic and supplementary textbooks. These, plus additional materials and school supplies, are provided by the CVESD. Each school has classroom libraries and a library/media center with at least 7,740 books. Nonprinted materials such as CDs, videocassettes, audiotapes, study prints, and kits are available to students, parents, and teaching staff. C H U L A

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Elementary and High Schools Overview Chula Vista Elementary School District

Serving students from Pre-K - Grade 6 (two charter schools also serves grades 7 & 8) 84 East J St., Chula Vista 91910 (619) 425-9600 • www.cvesd.org 28,000 students; 1,421 certified employees; 1,077 classified employees 45 schools including 6 charter and 10 Dual Immersion programs Student/teacher ratio: Grades K-3, 22 (or less):1 180 instructional days in a modified year-round format, with breaks aligned with area middle and high schools.

Sweetwater Union High School District

Serving students in grades 7-12 and adult learners 1130 Fifth Ave., Chula Vista 91911 (619) 691-5500 • www.sweetwaterschool.org 42,209 students in grades 7-12 10 middle schools, 1 junior high, 12 senior high, 1 continuation high, 4 adult schools, 1 alternative school (grades 7-12) Calendar year: Minimum 180 instructional days; one common calendar with CVESD

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Chula Vista Elementary School District  Your First Choice for a Quality Education  When you send your child to one of our schools in the Chula Vista Elementary School District, it feels right. Our staff members and administrators get it. Students are the priority in everything we do. Located between the City of San Diego and the United States/ M e x i c o International Border, the Chula Vista Elementary School District is a high performing, and frequently honored district for student academic achievement. How did we get here? We hired the best, and brightest educators and leaders. We trained them well. We held them accountable. We are continuously striving to ensure that our programs and curriculum enrich and support students as they become innovative, critical thinkers who readily adapt to a rapidly changing 21st century.

abilities of school administrators and staff members to come up with solutions that fit their unique challenges. In turn, the site-level decisionmakers are held accountable for their results. Success on such a large scale is not an easy feat. CVESD serves 28,200 students at 45 schools, including charter schools. A new school, Enrique S. Camarena, will open in July 2013. Our enthusiasm is limitless for the new school year. We are building a better future one student at a time.

CHARTER SCHOOLS

That’s why four District schools were recently honored for excellence by the National Center for Urban School Transformation. That’s why nine District schools were recognized as 2012 California Distinguished Schools. That’s why more than half of our 45 campuses made the 2011 California Business for Education Excellence Honor Roll. The Honor Roll schools were selected after an extensive analysis of student achievement data for every public school in California.

CVESD has a proud history of nurturing the charter school movement. The District views charter schools as an opportunity for research and development of innovative educational practices. The District’s expectation is that freedom from California Education Code rules and restrictions will foster high academic achievement for students. In fact, these are the premises on which charter school law was written. Currently, there are six charter schools in the District: Arroyo Vista, Chula Vista Learning Community (CVLCC), Leonardo da Vinci Health Sciences, Discovery, Mae L. Feaster, and Robert L. Mueller. Four of the six charter schools also enroll middle school students, and one— CVLCC—has expanded to high school.

AN 861 API DISTRICT

DUAL IMMERSION PROGRAM

The state uses the Academic Performance Index (API) to annually rate districts and schools on a scale of 200 to 1,000. The state target is 800. CVESD’s API score of 861 is at an historic high for our system.

The Dual Immersion Program is a language-oriented program designed to build fluency in both Spanish and English. Native Spanish and Englishspeaking children have the opportunity to develop their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in both languages. There are 16 schools that will offer a Dual Immersion program in the 2012-13 school year:

The across-the-board successes help illustrate the benefits of our decentralized approach. The Board of Education and the Superintendent trust in the

“EVERY CHILD IS AN  INDIVIDUAL OF GREAT WORTH”  

Arroyo Vista Charter

Liberty

Chula Vista Learning Community Charter *

Loma Verde

Clear View

Los Altos

Discovery Charter

Salt Creek

EastLake

Silver Wing

Harborside

Valle Lindo

Anne and William Hedenkamp

Valley Vista

Heritage

Veterans

*A school-wide Dual Immersion program Visit us at cvesd.org or follow us onTwitter @cvesdnews or view news-style posts and more at our District news blog.


University of San Diego (USD) 5998 Alcala Park San Diego, CA 92110 (619) 260-4600 www.sandiego.edu

Higher Education Southwestern College 900 Otay Lakes Road Chula Vista, CA 91910 (619) 421-6700 www.swc.cc.ca.us

Since 1961, Southwestern College has helped more than 500,000 students achieve their higher education goals. With more than 320 degree and certificate options, Southwestern College is an affordable investment in your future educational and economical success. The nationally recognized International Trade Center provides business counseling and technical assistance for businesses looking to expand south of the border. Entrepreneurs can find resources and networking assistance at the college’s Small Business Development Center. And the $389 million Proposition R bond measure is creating opportunities to invest tax dollars locally.

National University 660 Bay Blvd. Chula Vista, CA 91910 (619) 563-7415 www.nu.edu

The University of San Diego is a private Catholic institution that includes the College of Arts & Sciences, School of Business Administration, School of Education, School of Law and Hahn School of Nursing and Health Science. The University offers over 50 graduate and under¬graduate degrees.

Point Loma Nazarene University 3900 Lomaland Drive San Diego, CA 92106 (619) 849-2200 www.ptloma.edu

An institution of the Church of the Nazarene, PLNU offers undergraduate degrees in the Colleges of Arts & Sciences, Social Sciences & Professional Studies, and Education. Graduate programs are offered throughout California including at the main campus in San Diego.

University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 532-2230 www.ucsd.edu

National University has several campuses in the San Diego area. Chula Vista’s campus offers a variety of undergraduate, graduate, teaching credential, and extended learning programs as well as online degree options. National University’s evening and weekend courses and flexible scheduling provide excellent educational opportunities for the local business community.

One of only 10 campuses in the University of California system, UCSD has six undergradu¬ate colleges, and awards masters and doctoral degrees in a variety of specialized disciplines. Research and development programs are extensive at UCSD.

San Diego State University (SDSU)

California State University, San Marcos

Part of the 23campus California State University system, SDSU awards bachelors, masters, and doctoral degrees in numerous disciplines and maintains a strong research program.

CSUSM, one of the 23 California State University campuses, offers both undergradu¬ate and graduate programs in the College of Arts & Sciences, College of Education and College of Business Administration.

5500 Campanile Dr. San Diego, CA 92182 (619) 594-5200 www.sdsu.edu

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333 S. Twin Oaks Valley Rd. San Marcos CA 92096 (760) 750-4000 www.csusm.edu

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“Hope Within” Find this sculpture at the corner of J Street and Bay Boulevard.


Transforming the Future

(advertisement)

with Sweetwater Schools

Sweetwater offers a one-of-a-kind promise to students participating in the Compact for Success—guaranteed admission to San Diego State University. Beginning this school year, every 7th grade student in the Sweetwater District will be assigned an iPad tablet computer as their primary learning tool allowing students to take tests, do homework and communicate with their teachers. All eight of Sweetwater’s comprehensive high schools in Chula Vista were named Silver Medal winners, placing them among the top nine percent schools in the nation in the annual ranking of schools by U.S. News & World Report. Sweetwater’s District Robotics Program won the Inspire Award from the Classroom of the Future Foundation for their innovative after-school clubs at 15 middle and high schools. Sweetwater schools dominated the San Diego County Academic Decathlon competition. Olympian High took the title and earned third place in the State. A flourishing Visual and Performing Arts Department offers middle and high school students high-quality instruction in music, drama, dance, digital and graphic media arts. Ten Sweetwater schools exceeded the 800-point target score on the Academic Performance Index—Bonita Vista Middle, EastLake Middle, Granger Junior High, National City Middle, Rancho del Rey Middle, Bonita Vista High, Eastlake High, Olympian High, Otay Ranch High and Sweetwater High. Three Gates Millennium Scholars – Anselmo Fuentes,

Mar Vista High; Andre King, Eastlake High; and Jose Olivas, Castle Park High are 2012 graduates. Principals Jose Brosz (Otay Ranch High) and MaryRose Peralta (Granger Junior High) were named Administrators of the Year by the Association of California School Administrators. Palomar High Principal Griselda Delgado was named Administrator of the Year by the California Continuation Education Association. Sweetwater is preparing all students to be college and career ready upon graduation. Through Middle and High School Redesign, the district is offering specialized programs that blend college-prep academics with career/ technical instruction targeting high-demand career fields.


Healthcare

Chula Vista boasts outstanding healthcare facilities staffed by exceptional healthcare profes¬sionals. From curing a toothache to having a baby, you are in very capable hands with Chula Vista’s medical community.

Scripps Health Chula Vista Offers a World of Healing Quality healthcare is important to a growing community and Scripps Health Chula Vista is home to outstanding medical facilities staffed by exceptional professionals. SMHCV patients, medi¬cal professionals and staff represent many cultural and ethnic backgrounds that offer a world of car¬ing, expertise and choices.

Scripps Health Chula Vista counts with a wide variety of services including a 24-hour emergency department with 24 fully equipped rooms; 24 intensive care beds that include six cardiac care beds and recently renovated lobby and laboratory. SMHCV also offers advanced imaging services such as MRI; special women’s ser¬vices including bone density scanning and digital stereotactic breast biopsy; rehabilitation services; comprehensive cancer services; and surgical ser¬vices including orthopedics and neurosurgery. As one of the two campuses which form Scripps Health, Scripps Health Chula Vista is now part of a 700-bed hospital making it the largest hospital in San Diego and one of the 10 largest in California. Scripps Health Chula Vista’s 2007 accolades include the “Top Doctors in 2007” des¬ignation from San Diego Magazine to 16 Scripps Health Chula Vista physicians. Scripps Health Chula Vista continues to make investments in state-of-the-art equipment offering the latest in healthcare to our community. These include a new Magnetic Resonance system with short-bore ideal for claustrophobic patients and the installation of the Picture Archiving and Communication system (PACS) which allows physicians to access images through any PC. A new Cardius 3 nuclear medicine camera gives physicians the ability to perform myocardial rest and stress studies in one day rather than the usual three. With the installation of the new PlatinumOne DSA system, SMHCV’s angiography suite now pro¬vides exceptional image quality and ease of use, and a robust real-time angiography image processing feature set for advanced high-

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resolution digital quality. The state-of-the-art system facilitates a completely filmless operation and DICOM communications offering numerous time-saving and cost-reduction benefits, as well as outstanding image quality, reliability and ease of use. It also enhances image resolution that provides crucial information to the radiologist treating the patient. It includes an enhanced Innovision 12-bit digital CCD camera, an acquisition station and a full fluoroscopic and real-time angiographic image-processing package offering a greater range of services to patients. As part of Scripps Health Chula Vista, the Well Being Center located at 311 Del Mar Ave. in Chula Vista offers preventative health and wellness programs, parenting programs and support groups open to all members of the community. Last year alone, it provided community health education and support classes to more than 8,000 individuals. These classes include the, “Meet the Doctor” sessions in which participants enjoy a presentation on various health topics followed by a question and answer session from the leading physicians in the area. Support groups and pro¬grams sponsored by the Well Being include breast feeding classes, Cerebral Palsy, Diabetes, Epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, Stroke Treatment and Recovery and more. The Center has also educated approximately, 14,000 hard-to reach women in the South Bay community on the importance of breast health outreach and education. Several of these women were connected to mammograms and further screening. More than 2,000 youth participated in mul¬tiple “youth into health careers” activities (e.g., summer camps, mentoring, health and career tours, and health presentations).

Clinic. A new clinic has now opened serving Southwest High School. Scripps Health Chula Vista contin¬ues its commitment to meeting the health care needs of our community. It recently opened the newly renovated Maternal Child Health unit. New mothers can now enjoy this special event in a heart-warming atmosphere complete with new artwork and flat screen television sets. Scripps Health is part of Scripps Health, a San Diego-based health care system, founded in 1924 by philanthropist Ellen Browning Scripps. Scripps Health was again named the favorite among San Diego Union-Tribune readers in the Best Hospital category of San Diego’s Best reader’s poll for 2006. In the ten years that the reader’s poll has been conducted, Scripps has taken the first in the Best Hospital category nine times. For the fourth consecutive year, Scripps was named to the AARP Best Employers list, as a top company in the nation for mature workers. Scripps has also been named one of the country’s 100 Best Companies by Working Mother magazine three years in a row because of flexible scheduling, health benefits and programs for fami¬lies and working mothers. For more information regarding Scripps Health and Scripps Health Chula Vista, please call 1-800-SCRIPPS (1-800-727-4777) or via the web at www.scripps.org.

Sharp Chula Vista Medical Center

As South Bay’s most comprehensive medical facility, Sharp Chula Vista Medical Center delivers high-caliber care designed to meet the needs of the community. Renowned as a top-quality provider of cardiac and cancer services, Sharp Chula Vista provides the medical services that South Bay residents rely upon and strengthens this commitment by offering a selection of specialty services, including a spine and neurosurgery program, bloodless medicine and surgery,

The Scripps Family Practice Residency Program based at SMHCV is a unique community-based program in the South Bay that focuses its resources on the care of the underserved population. Residents have provided medical services to more than 350 local high school youth at the Palomar High School w w w . c h u l a v i s t a c h a m b e r . o r g


health care and hospice resources through Sharp HealthCare.

pulmonary rehabilitation and weight-loss surgery. A wide range of physicians, from neurosurgeons to open-heart surgery specialists, choose to admit more patients to Sharp Chula Vista than any other hospital in the region. These physician specialists collaborate with a highly trained team of caring nurses and other health care professionals to provide compassionate, patient-centered care. Sharp Chula Vista patients have access to some of the most advanced medical equipment available, from open-bay magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) to the latest in nuclear-medicine camera technology. This equipment allows physicians and other specialty staff to quickly and accurately diagnose patients and begin identifying medical and surgical care plans by providing clearer images than were ever before available in the South Bay. As the region’s leading provider of cardiac health care, Sharp Chula Vista offers comprehen¬sive cardiac services, including open-heart surgery, cardiac catheterization, angioplasty, coronary stenting and vascular surgery. Sharp Chula Vista was the first local hospital to provide endoscopic vein harvesting, a minimally invasive procedure that assists with bypass surgery and in addition performs “off pump,” or beating-heart bypass surgery, a leading technique that can result in improved outcomes and shorter hospital stays.

An advanced surgical team provides South Bay residents with the surgical solutions they need. For patients with acute or chronic spine pain caused by injuries or degenerative conditions, Sharp Chula Vista’s spine program specializes in treating back and neck pain with a range of surgical solutions. A weight-loss surgery program at the hospital provides a medically recommended method of permanent weight loss for those with 100 or more pounds to lose. For these and other surgeries, the hospital possesses specialty equipment, including a Jackson operating table, which allows surgeons to operate from both the front and the back of the body in one surgery, as well as an image-guided surgery navigation system, which allows surgeons to precisely pinpoint the location that needs to be operated on. Combined with other diagnostic tools, clinical evaluations and physician expertise, patients can make more informed choices about surgery. Over the years, Sharp Chula Vista Medical Center has continued to expand programs and ser¬vices in order to meet the changing needs of our growing community. Chula Vista Medical Plaza, located on the hospital campus, offers patients convenient access to an array of outpatient surgical and diagnostic imaging services, all under one roof. Both the intensive care unit (ICU) and the

emergency department were remodeled in 2003 to allow for more patients and to provide a more comfortable health care experience. To choose a physician affiliated with Sharp Chula Vista, sign up for a class or learn more about our programs and services, please call 1-800-82SHARP or visit www.sharp.com.

Bayview Behavioral Health Campus of Paradise Valley Hospital According to the National Institute of Mental Health, people with depression are four times more likely to have a heart attack than those without a history of depression. Located at Moss Street and Third Avenue in

Sharp Chula Vista maintains a community hospital cancer program, which is the only fully certified by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer in the entire South Bay Region. Treatment services include a radiation therapy center that became one of the first in the region to offer intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), one of the most advanced methods available for the treatment of certain cancers. A multidisciplinary team of physician specialists and hospital staff provide focused care for patients living with cancer. Hospital services include cancer surgery, a medical oncology nursing unit, infusion therapy, nuclear medicine, mammography, and nutritional and social services. Patients also can access clinical trials, home

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For more information call 1-800-585-2767.

The Veterans Home of California, Chula Vista

Located on a 30-acre site off Telegraph Canyon Road, adjacent to Sharp Chula Vista Medical Center, the Veterans Home of California in Chula Vista (VHC-Chula Vista) is the only Veterans Home located in coastal, urban Southern California. With views of the Pacific Ocean and downtown San Diego, VHC-Chula Vista’s location provides residents with numerous cultural and recreational opportunities. Completed in May 2000, VHC-Chula Vista is a 400-bed long-term care facility providing options for Domiciliary (Independent Living), Licensed Residential (Assisted Living), and Skilled Nursing Facility Care. Employed physicians provide medical care in both the licensed outpatient clinic and the skilled nursing units. Acute care is provided at either the La Jolla VA Medical Center, or at the adjacent Sharp Chula Vista Medical Center.

Sharp Rees-Stealy patients can pay their bills, request or cancel primary care appointments and request prescription refills online. There are five urgent care centers open daily and pediatricians are available to care for sick children every day as well. Sharp Rees-Stealy is going electronic which means all patient information will be available to providers at the click of a mouse. In addition, radiology is going to a picture archiving and communications system (PACS) so that X-rays may be viewed quickly and images sent electronically to wherever they are needed.

A 2007 Malcom Baldrige National Quality Award Recipient, Sharp HealthCare is San Diego’s most comprehensive health care delivery system. It is recognized for clinical excellence in cardiac, cancer and multi-organ transplants, as well as orthopaedics, rehabilitation, behavioral health and women’s health.

Recreation Centers Chula Vista Woman’s Club 691 G St

(619) 691 - 5083

Heritage Park/Center 1381 East Palomar St

(619) 421 - 7032

Montevalle Community Park (619) 691 - 5269 840 Duncan Ranch Road

Sharp Rees-Stealy is a multi-specialty medical group who is proud to celebrate 85 years of service. They provide comprehensive primary and specialty care services at two locations in the South Bay. Sharp Rees-Stealy Otay Ranch, located at 1400 East Palomar Street, offers dermatology, family medicine, internal medicine, laboratory services, nutrition, OB/GYN, ophthalmology, optometry, pediatrics, a pharmacy, physical therapy/ rehabilitation, podiatry, radiology, speech therapy, surgery and urology. Located at 525 Third Avenue, Sharp Rees-Stealy Chula Vista offers cardiology, endocrinology, family medicine, internal medicine, laboratory, nephrology, neurology, occupational medicine, orthopaedics, otolaryngology (ENT), a pharmacy, physical therapy, radiology services, rheumatology and urgent care. O F

Otay Ranch Branch 2015 Birch Road, Suite 409, (619) 397-5740

Loma Verde Pool/Center 1420 Loma Lane Pool: (619) 691 - 5081 Recreation Center: (619) 691 - 5082

Sharp Rees-Stealy in the South Bay

C H A M B E R

South Chula Vista Branch 389 Orange Avenue, (619) 585-5755

Please call your closest center for hours or more information.

Veterans seeking admission should call 1-888857-2146 or write to: Veterans Home of California, Chula Vista Attn: Admissions, 700 East Naples Court, Chula Vista, CA 91911

V I S TA

Civic Center Branch 365 F Street, (619) 691-5069

Sharp Rees-Stealy accepts most health insurance plans. For more information, call (858) 499-2600 or visit www.sharp.comisrs.

Veterans desiring to be considered for admis¬sion must be residents of California, age 62 or older (or younger if disabled), and have served honorably in the U.S armed forces.

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O P P O RT U N I T I E S

C O M M U N I T Y

Chula Vista, Bayview Behavioral Health helps people from childhood through their senior years learn the most effective ways to confront problems such as anger, grief, depression, anxiety and loss. We are distinguished by our crisis intervention services, chemical dependency programs and inpa¬tient and outpatient services. Our free, confiden¬tial evaluations are offered 24 hours a day.

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Libraries

The Chula Vista Public Libraries are located in Chula Vista, California, and are comprised of three dynamic state-of-the-art libraries delivering information, books in English and Spanish, videos and CDs, and community programming to the City’s residents nearly every day of the year. All Chula Vista Libraries provide access to reference sources and updated information on library events, furthering our commitment to provide users with the latest information through innovative technology. Please call your closest branch for hours or more information.

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Norman Park Center 270 F St

(619) 691 - 5086

Otay Recreation Center 3554 Main St

(619) 476 - 5325

Parkway Center/Gym/Pool 385 Park Way Center: (619) 691 - 5083 Gymnasium: (619) 691 - 5084 Pool: (619) 691 - 5088 Salt Creek Park 2710 Otay Lakes Road

(619) 585 - 5739

Veterans Park/Rec. Center 785 East Palomar St

(619) 691 - 5260

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living

in Chula Vista

Chula Vista means “beautiful view” in Spanish and, indeed, the city lives up to its name. Located just seven miles from downtown San Diego and seven miles from the Mexican border, the city is at the center of one of the richest economic and culturally diverse zones in the United States. With a population of 230,000, Chula Vista covers 50 square miles and is bordered by the Pacific Ocean on the west and mountains on the east. As the second largest city in San Diego County, Chula Vista has quickly become a special destination for tourists. One of the nation’s few year-round U.S. Olympic Training centers is located here. Visitors can shop at the region’s newest lifestyle center, take in an outdoor concert at Cricket Wireless Amphitheatre, or make a splash at Knott’s Soak City USA. And there’s more- top-notch golf courses, a scenic marina, the Chula Vista Nature Center, beautiful parks, and an endless variety of dining, shopping, business and leisure opportunities. Excellent planning has been Chula Vista’s hallmark. With its six lane boulevards, north/south toll road, and both master planned and established communities, the City continues to provide the best in living choices. From estate homes to affordable housing, Chula Vista has something for everyone. 0ne stop in Chula Vista is all it takes to see what makes Chula Vista one of the fastest growing and most successful cities in the country. Green grass parks with bright and fragrant flowers, seemingly endless rolling hills, majestic mountains rising toward clear blue skies, a peaceful bay that houses boats of all shapes, sizes and speeds, are what makes Chula Vista distinctively special. The nation’s best home builders have made Chula Vista one of the most sought after places to live and play. The master plan concept popular throughout much of California and other parts of the country was perfected in Chula Vista. Distinct communities such as East Lake, Rancho del Ray, Rolling Hills Ranch, and Sunbow illustrate just how successful this concept can be.

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These communities, located amidst lush landscaping and striking native Southern California palm trees, demonstrate the depth of planning and detail required to provide residents with a comfortable and positive lifestyle. There is an ongoing commitment to providing public facilities - parks, public service’s and schools - within these communities.

Affordable Housing

The City of Chula is committed to developing and implementing a variety of proactive and innovative affordable housing opportunities for all residents and has an excellent track record in doing so. Through partnerships between the City, property owners, housing developers and nonprofit community-based agencies, the City has developed exemplary programs designed to assist in meeting the housing needs of low and moderate income households. Some of these programs include: • First Time Home Buyer Program: can include mortgage credit and additional incentives for the home buyer • Owner-Occupied Improvement Program: grants and loans are available for lower income owners • Affordable Housing Production: predevelopment, new construction, and rehabilitation financing opportunities are available as well as assistance to homeless shelter/service providers. New construction and rehabilitation of rental housing, new construction of townhouses and condominiums for first-time home buyers, transitional living housing, homeless shelters, and projects for special needs housing groups have all been established through the City of Chula Vista’s Affordable Housing Programs. Current and upcoming affordable housing developments include: • Brisa del Mar Village: Located at 1689 Broadway, consists of 106 2-4 bedroom rental units as well as 15,000 square feet of retail space.

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H O M E

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The nation’s best home builders have made Chula Vista one of the most sought after places to live and play.

• Seniors on Broadway: Built by the MAAC Project; located at 826 Broadway, offers 41 rental units to very low income seniors.

away from numerous restaurants and the fashionable Otay Ranch Town Center.

• The Landings: Chelsea Investment Co. was approved to develop an additional 143 affordable rental units to complete The Landings II on a site adjacent to the first phase. The City contributed $2.4M in HOME funds and $4M in Redevelopment Agency Low and Moderate funds. 3-bedroom attached homes by Brookfield/Shea/Otay at Winding Walk in eastern Chula Vista. Call (858) 526-6561.

With Otay Ranch’s many outdoor amenities and village-style design, residents regularly run into neighbors as part of their ordinary routine. Residents also turn out by the hundreds for community wide events, such as the annual Easter Egg Hunt, Otay Ranch Day and Holiday Tree-Lighting Ceremony.

• Mar Brisa: TriMark Pacific developed the Mar Brisa townhome project to provide first-time home buyer opportunities for 70 low-income and 45 moderate-income buyers in satisfaction of the San Miguel Ranch Master Plan Community obligation. All units were sold in late 2006.

Otay Ranch currently offers a variety of condominiums and town homes in Hillsborough, a village with inviting French Country architecture. Hillsborough Swim Club, a private swim club for residents, the 7.5 acre Santa Venetia City Park and Veterans Elementary School are all located within its centralized village core. New homes are also selling in Montecito Ridge, an enclave of 361 singlefamily homes located on a ridge overlooking the 280-acre Wolf Canyon. Residents will also be able to enjoy many of the amenities being planned nearby at Otay Ranch’s newest village of Montecito, scheduled to commence home sales in 2008.

Sedona: Provided first-time home buyer opportunities for 32 low-income buyers in satisfaction of the Rolling Hills Master Plan Community obligation. Trolley Trestle: This project was completed in December 2000 at 746 Ada Street in the Southwest Redevelopment Project Area. It provides 11 transitional housing units for children transitioning out of foster care programs. It is operated by South Bay Community Services.

Communities

The 800-acre Montecito village is planned to feature a traditional town square/village center with an elementary school, two city parks totaling 14 acres, mixed-use residential housing and two commercial areas with more than 250,000 square feet of shopping, entertainment and community facilities. Anchors are expected to include a major supermarket, drug store and specialty food store, all serving Montecito and adjoining villages.

Abundant amenities and beautiful homes make Otay Ranch a great address! Close-to-home amenities in a pedestrian-friendly setting are the hallmark of Otay Ranch. Private swim clubs, walking trails, abundant parks and technically advanced schools — all within walking distance of most home — create an inviting small town experience. The community is also just minutes

Montecito’s architecture will be modern adaptations of what is known as Santa Barbara style — a fusion of Mediterranean, Spanish, Moorish and early California designs — that has become one of the most beloved architectural styles in the world. Many of the shops will face onto the street with inviting display windows and canopies or arcade entrances.

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a place to call home


As with previous villages in Otay Ranch, Montecito is planned to feature a wide variety of home sin many price ranges. People attracted to the Otay Ranch lifestyle will find everything from carefree townhomes and condominiums to executive-style homes. Information on all of Otay Ranch’s available neighborhoods, including floor plans and virtual tours, is available on the community website at www.otayranch.com. Natural resource preservation is another important aspect of the Otay Ranch plan. For every acre of development in Otay Ranch, 1.18 acres is dedicated to the Otay Ranch Nature Preserve. To date, more than 3,500 acres have been set aside for the preserve, with The Otay Ranch Company dedicating the bulk of the land. The preserve is planned to ultimately encompass over 11,000 acres, creating valuable open space and wildlife habitats for future generations. One stroll through the streets of EastLake and you’ll sense the feeling of “home”. There’s something in the air there. It began in 1986 when they opened their first neighborhoods on 3,200 acres of land in the city of Chula Vista. They had a vision to create a community that has everything a family would ever need — schools, parks, stores, business centers — within a single area. Most importantly, they wanted to create a community that’s safe, serene and supportive of healthy, happy living. EastLake is minutes from freeway connections to downtown San Diego, Lindbergh International Airport, Los Angeles, and Mexico. The country-like living has suited residents well. In fact, EastLake has been voted San Diego’s best new home community in The San Diego UnionTribune reader’s poll every year since 1997. And it keeps getting better with

their newest neighborhoods: EastLake Vistas and The Woods by EastLake are a culmination of years and years of design and development — combining everything they know in two remarkable neighborhoods. The Woods turns the idea of a master-planned community into an art form.

Master-planned Communities (see map below)

A Bonita Long Canyon

B EastLake

C Otay Ranch

D Rancho Del Rey

E

Bella Lago

F

Rolling Hills Ranch

G Sunbow

H Telegraph Canyon Estates

I

Terra Nova

J

San Miguel Ranch

Chula Vista

E

(City border is shown by white outline.)

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J A

I

D

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H

C

B


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Seniors/Retirement

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Seniors have a variety of choices in Chula Vista.

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Fredericka Manor

Canterbury Court

At Canterbury Court Senior Apartments seniors can enjoy the pleasures of independent living and the benefits of regularly scheduled organized social activities; one and two bedrooms, stove and refrigerator furnished in each apartment; air conditioning and heating; small pets permitted; quiet and convenient location — easy access to 5 and 805 just south of 54, as well as on the bus line. Call (619) 585-8585 for more informaton.

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Fredericka Manor is the largest retirement community in the South Bay and has provided top-notch services and care to seniors for more than 97 years. Situated on 24 acres of garden campus, this lovely community has over 304 resi¬dential units including apartments, a penthouse in an seven story high rise, a variety of charming campus homes, and a 24/7 clince available to all of our residents. Additionally, the campus has a care center with a capacity of more than 170 beds. Call (619) 205-4115 or toll free 1-800-310- 4696 for further information.

Norman Park Center

The award-winning Norman Park Center serves seniors and adults throughout the city. The center is located next to historic downtown Chula Vista at 270 F Street in Chula Vista and is operated by the City of Chula Vista Recreation Department. The center offers a variety of exercise classes, recreational activities, and a fitness center. There are also many opportunities for volunteer service. Support services such as free legal services, and Meals on Wheels are located on the second floor. For further information call (619) 691-5086.

Atria Bonita

Atria Bonita Assisted Living provides inde¬pendent and assisted living services in a beautiful three-story, Mediterranean-style building nestled in the center of Bonita’s quiet country setting bor¬dered by those trails and golf courses. With easy freeway access, an array of shopping, churches, banks, restaurants and medical facilities are in close proximity. Our 130 studio and onebedroom

Seniors on Broadway

Seniors on Broadway Limited Partnership was awarded HOME funds to construct 42 affordable senior housing units in the Southwest Redevelopment Project area at 825 Broadway. The maximum rents range from $360-$600 per month, based on the intent to serve extremely low-income seniors. The project was completed in December 2007. Seniors on Broadway won the San Diego Housing Federation’s Award for 2008 Housing Project of the Year for Less than 50 Units. The project has partnered with the adjacent charter school for a “Generations Together” program that provides intergenerational exchange between senior residents and the elementary school students. A collaboration between MAAC and SeniorNet created a computer lab and computer training for residents, school children, and the community.

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green living

Your guide to a CLEAN Chula Vista and tips on how you can get involved. Your Community.

Chula Vista is a great place to live, work and enjoy life. It takes commitment from all of us to maintain the well-being of our community for future generations.

Your Environment.

The City of Chula Vista CLEAN Team is committed to sustaining a clean, healthy environment for people, as well as the native plants and animals that live here, too.

Your Choice.

Become more environmentally conscious! The choices you make every day can help support a healthy, clean environment.

Apartment/Condo Tips

Living in an apartment or condominium complex is a step in the green direction! Grouping housing units together naturally conserves resources. It does not take nearly the same amount of lumber, building materials, and landscaping to build 300 units as it does 300 individual homes. Green living tips for multi-family residences vary slightly from homeowners who can easily choose to upgrade their own property. They may not have the control to make modifications, but they do have the ability to make a big difference by following these tips: • Stop Junk Mail - Reduce paper waste by taking your name off junk mailing lists. Start with prescreened credit card applications by calling (888) 5-OPTOUT or visit www.OptOutPrescreen.com to stop receiving these applications for five years. • Lighten Up - Replace three frequently used light

bulbs with compact fluorescent bulbs (CFLs). This will save approximately $60 in energy per year. • Go Natural - Make your own natural cleaners without the use of harsh chemicals that drain into our soil and seas. Find recipes online at www. naturalcleaningrecipes.com. • Water Watch - Get creative with the way you conserve water. Wash your fruits and vegetables in a pan of water. When you are finished you can use this same water to water your plants. Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle no matter where you live. The choice is yours.

Visit your Library!

Need help finding resources to help you and your family “go green and clean” at home or at work? Look no further than your public library! Find many resources to start you on the path to green living such as:

• Easy Green Living: The Ultimate Guide to Simple Eco-Friendly Choices for You and Your Home by Starre Vartan • Gorgeously Green: 8 Simple Steps to an Earth-Friendly Life by Sophie Uliano • Healthy Child, Healthy World: Creating a Cleaner, Greener, Safer Home by Christopher Gavigan • Live an Eco-Friendly Life: Smart Ways to Get Green and Stay That Way by Natalia Marshall • True Green @ Work: 100 Ways You Can Make the Environment Your Business by Kim McKay • True Green Kids: A Kids Action Guide to Earth Care by Marybeth Lorbiecki For more information visit your local library, or check us out at www.chulavistalibrary.com.

CONTRIBUTORS: City of Chula Vista: Storm Water Management Section, Environmental Services Division, Conservation, Chula Vista Public Library; Audubon Society; Chula Vista Garden Club; Clean Energy; High Tech High Chula Vista; I Love a Clean San Diego; Otay Water District; REI; Southwestern College Small Business Development Center; Sweetwater Authority; Tijuana Estuary; Wakeland Housing and Development Corporation C H U L A

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Green Building Chula Vista has a long and successful history of leadership in environmental programs, including the development of Green Building Standards. “Green Building” involves the design, construction materials and operational methods of buildings to promote resource conservation, energy efficiency, and good indoor air quality. Chula Vista’s Green Building Standards, recommended by the Climate Change Working Group, will be a complement to the City’s other environmental programs. Since November 2009, all submitted building plans must comply with the new standards, including new residential and non-residential construction, additions, and remodels. Appropriate building materials and products are readily available and comparable in cost. Builders will be able to market their products and improvements as being energy efficient, water conserving, recycling-friendly and more. Information about Chula Vista’s Green Building Standards can be found at www.chulavistaca.gov/ goto/sustainability.

water conservation efforts and investments in drought-proof water resources (such as desalination and recycled water). Customers are still encouraged to review their water use both inside and outside the home to ensure that water is being used wisely. Water saved now is stored and helps minimize future demands to further conserve. The City collaborates with the two water providers to conserve water throughout the community by providing water-saving information, promoting incentive programs for water-efficient upgrades, distributing free indoor water savings kits (see Energy section), and offering free home water evaluations through the NatureScape program (see Green Gardening section). Here are some ways to save water and reduce your water bills: Indoor Water Use • Install a high-efficiency toilet which uses only 1.28 gallons per flush • Don’t use your toilet as an ashtray or wastebasket • Only run your dishwasher and clothes washer when fully loaded • Install water-saving showerheads that use 2 gallons per minute or less • Shorten your shower time and turn off the water while brushing your teeth or shaving • Install water-saving faucet aerators that use 1.8 gallons per minute or less • Purchase appliances and water-efficient products with the EPA WaterSense logo Outdoor Water Use • Use a broom instead of a hose to clean patios, driveways, and walkways • Water your lawn and landscaping before dawn or after dusk • Adjust sprinklers to avoid overspray and run-off • Replace traditional irrigation sprinklers with rotating spray nozzles

Water Conservation

• Install a weather-based irrigation controller

Consecutive years of drought conditions, diminished water storage levels, and regulatory restrictions on water deliveries from Northern California have combined to severely limit water supplies around California. The regulatory restrictions are expected to affect water supply reliability in the years ahead, therefore making it essential for residents and businesses to increase conservation immediately. Both of Chula Vista’s two local water providers, Sweetwater Authority and the Otay Water District, are currently at a Level 1 voluntary “Supply Watch.” Under Level 1, all customers are strongly urged to voluntarily reduce water consumption by 10%. So far, both agencies have been able to avoid a mandatory water shortage declaration thanks to its customers’

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• Add 3” of mulch around plants and trees to reduce evaporation • Select low water use, California-friendly plants

Storm Water

Do you know what happens to the excess water when you wash your car in the driveway? It flows down the street and into a storm drain, carrying soap and other pollutants with it. All storm drains in Chula Vista flow into nearby rivers and streams, which eventually lead to San Diego Bay. Water in storm drains does NOT get treated before it flows into the ocean like wastewater in the sewer system does! It is so important that we make an effort to prevent water pollution in

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our everyday home activities. The choices you make will help your environment and protect the natural resources that we all enjoy.

Ways to Save The City of Chula Vista in partnership with San Diego Gas & Electric® (SDG&E®) offers a wide range of energy-efficiency programs, services, and rebates to help residents and businesses lower their energy use. The City provides no-cost onsite energy evaluations and distributes compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) and indoor watersavings kits (including a low-flow showerhead and faucet aerators) at certain community events. Here are some ways to save energy around your home or office and reduce your energy bills: • Set thermostat at 78ºF in the summer and 68ºF in the winter; use ceiling fans to circulate air. • Use curtains to block outside sunlight during the summer or trap heat during winter months. • Wash and rinse clothes in cold water. • Replace light bulbs with CFLs or LEDs. • Turn off or set timers for lights. • Use a power strip with a timer to ensure that TVs and computers are fully off. • Purchase appliances and equipment with the EPA’s ENERGY STAR® logo. In addition, residents and businesses can take advantage of a number of energy-efficiency programs, including the Summer Saver program. Summer Saver participants can earn an annual bill credit up to $194 for reducing the use of central air conditioning on select hot summer days. Visit sdge.com/residential/ or sdge.com/business/ for information on Summer Saver and other energyefficiency programs. For more information, contact the City of Chula Vista’s Department of Conservation & Environmental Services at (619) 409-3893.

Bring Your Own Bag

Plastics are part of our everyday lives and it is hard to imagine life without them. Unfortunately, our society’s dependence on disposable plastics creates serious environmental issues. In California, we use 600 plastic bags per second and only 4% are being recycled. This means a staggering number of plastic bags end up in our landfills or clog our waterways. Annually, $300 million is spent on litter clean up and $1.7 billion is spent to restore waterways that are clogged with plastic bags and trash. What can you do? B.Y.O.B. - Bring your own bag. Use reusable canvas or cloth bags and keep


Bring a valid California driver’s license, I.D. or a recent utility bill with a South Bay area address. The co-pay is $5 per visit and is limited to 15 gallons or 125 pounds per vehicle.

Green Gardening

Want to use your yard to save water, reduce your carbon footprint, and fight pollution? • Mulch keeps the soil evenly moist by preventing evaporation so you don’t have to water so much. It also reduces weeds—which steal water! • Hardscape with container plants for greenery and color. Consider removing grass from your yard, as it requires a lot of water. • Vegetables and fruits are like grass—most of them are water-intensive, but raising your own eliminates emissions and fuel use caused by transporting those you buy at the store. • Use California-friendly or native plants. California-friendly means plants that do well in our Mediterranean climate of hot, dry summers; cool, wet winters; and alkaline soil. Reserve just a few spots for exotics. You’ll save water and fertilizer, not to mention work! Find out more about gardening from the Chula Vista Garden Club at www.californiagardenclubs. org. For native plants, check the California Native Plant Society website at www.cnpssd.org.

WaterSmart Landscaping

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NatureScape

Wildlife

The City of Chula Vista promotes WaterSmart Landscapes and other “green” gardening practices through its NatureScape program. By participating in the program, you can get your property certified as an official “Backyard Wildlife Habitat” through the National Wildlife Federation (NWF) and help Chula Vista become the largest city in California designated as a Community Wildlife Habitat Area through NWF! For more information, contact the Department of Conservation and Environmental Services at (619) 409-3893.

Sharing Nature With Your Children

The Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve (or Tijuana Estuary) is in Imperial Beach, just south of Chula Vista. The Estuary is managed in part by California State Parks and is a member of Children & Nature Network (C & NN) www.childrenandnature.org. C & NN encourages parents to have their children spend more time in nature. Children who spend time outdoors have better physical well-being, fewer behavioral problems, a better understanding of the value and importance of natural resources, increased cognitive functioning and are happier! Here are a few suggestions for spending quality time in nature: • Take your family on a short hike in one of Chula Vista’s many open space parks. Allow the children to make their own discoveries. • Take your 7-12 year old to a free environmental after-school program like Jr. Rangers at the Tijuana Estuary (Thursdays, 3:30 pm).

Did you know that San Diego County is a nationally recognized biodiversity hotspot, hosting more than 200 threatened, rare, or endangered species? Chula Vista is home to one of the County’s most spectacular wildlife oases, the San Diego Bay National Wildlife Refuge. This refuge supports impressive numbers of resident and migratory birds and is an especially important habitat for several endangered species including the California Least Tern, Light-footed Clapper Rail, and Belding’s Savannah Sparrow. These species need your help to survive and thrive in an ever-changing urbanized landscape. Here are a few ways you can help: • Join our crew of dedicated volunteers in restoring important nesting habitat. Visit www.sandiegoaudubon.org/email.htm to sign up for our volunteer email list. • Help wildlife at home by growing native plant species that provide food and shelter for birds and butterflies. The Otay Valley Regional Park (OVRP) is located in the southern part of San Diego County. Get a relaxing sense of well being as you experience this beautiful natural habitat. The park is rich in natural history, with many protected, native plants and animals. For more information, visit www.ovrp.org.

• Take your child on a tour at the Tijuana Estuary or Chula Vista Nature Center; you can learn about nature together. • Participate in the second Saturday volunteer stewardship events at the Tijuana Estuary. You can learn and serve together. • Download the Nature Clubs for Families Toolkit from the C&NN website and start a Nature Club with neighbors and family friends. • Join the Children in Nature Network for more ideas about direct experiences in nature (email admin@childrenandnature.org). • Read Coyote’s Guide to Connecting with Nature, by Jon Young, Ellen Haas, and Evan McGown, to learn how to help revive your child’s kinship with nature.

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Residents can also dispose of household hazardous waste at the Household Hazardous Waste Collection Facility on Wednesdays and Saturdays, 9 am - 1 pm (except Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day holiday weekends). The center is located at 1800 Maxwell Road in Chula Vista. No appointment is necessary. Acceptable materials include paints, batteries, pesticides, fuels, fertilizers, oils, pool or photo chemicals, electronics, sharps/ needles, and fluorescent light bulbs.

The Water Conservation Garden at Cuyamaca College has nearly five acres of beautiful themed gardens that showcase native plants, vegetables, and how-to displays. Admission is free. Visit www.thegarden.org for more information.

Tijuana Estuary Visitor Center (301 Caspian Way) in Imperial Beach is open Wednesday - Sunday from 10 am- 5 pm, and the trails are open sunrise to sunset. Visit www.tijuanaestuary.org for more information about the Junior Ranger program, Saturday and Sunday tours, and volunteer event schedule. Enjoy your WILD adventures!

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• Get your kids involved with environmental programs, such as REI’s Promoting Environmental Awareness in Kids (PEAK) Program that teaches them how to enjoy nature and be environmentally responsible.

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money watering grass that doesn’t seem to grow? Transform it into a WaterSmart Landscape, which combines water efficient design, state-of-the-art irrigation, climate appropriate plant selection, and best management practices to create a beautiful and sustainable environment that’s ideally suited for San Diego County’s mild, Mediterranean climate.

them in your car. Not all items require a bag--just say, “No, thank you.”

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Residential Growth Forecast: 2012-2016 Introduction As a component of the city of Chula Vista’s Growth Management Program, the city’s Development Services Department provides annual residential growth forecasts for up to five years in the future. This year’s growth forecast covers the period from November 2011 through December 2016. As part of the city’s annual growth management review process, the growth forecast is provided to assist city departments and other service agencies in assessing potential impacts that growth may have on maintaining compliance with quality of life threshold standards associated with each facility or improvement listed below: 1. Air Quality 2. Drainage 3. Fire and Emergency Medical 4. Fiscal 5. Libraries 6. Parks and Recreation 7. Police 8. Schools 9. Sewer 10. Traffic 11. Water The Chula Vista Growth Management Oversight Commission (GMOC) annually sends out the growth forecast and compliance questionnaires to city departments and service agencies, soliciting information regarding past, current and projected compliance with the quality of life threshold standards for the facilities and improvements listed above. The responses to the questionnaires form a basis for the GMOC’s annual report, which includes a set of recommendations to the City Council regarding maintenance and/or revisions to each of the city’s threshold standards. Recommendations may include such actions as adding or accelerating capital projects, hiring personnel, changing management practices, slowing the pace of growth, or considering a moratorium. The City Council ultimately decides what course of action to take. To prepare the growth forecast, the city solicits projections from developers and builders, which encompasses residential projects that have been or are undergoing the entitlement process, and could potentially be approved and permitted for construction within the next five years. These projects are under the city’s control with respect to the standard entitlement process time frames. As such, these numbers do not reflect market conditions outside the city’s control.

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Commonly referred to as the growth management or GMOC forecast, it is important to note that the housing market is influenced by a variety of factors outside the city’s control, and this forecast: • Does not represent a goal or desired growth rate • Is what may occur given a set of assumptions • Is produced by the City and not necessarily endorsed by home builders • Represents a “worst-case” or more liberal estimate to assess maximum possible effects to the city’s threshold standards. Last year’s growth forecast estimated that 367 building permits would be pulled for single-family units in 2011. As of November 14, 2011, 312 permits have been pulled. For multi-family, 754 units were forecasted, and 335 have been pulled. Nearly all of the building activity continues to be in the master planned communities in eastern Chula Vista. Increased residential infill and redevelopment in western Chula Vista continues to be slow, as projects that were originally planned for 2012-2014 have been postponed for at least another year. This includes two small multifamily projects (17-25 units) on Moss Street and Broadway, and a 167-unit multi-family project on Third Avenue. Residential development of the Bayfront is not projected to occur until 2017. Should other projects emerge, they will be reflected in future forecasts.

Forecast Summary Over the next twelve months ( January – December 2012), as many as 1,349 housing units could potentially be permitted for construction in eastern Chula Vista, with 12 projected in western Chula Vista.

reviews, subdivision maps, and building plans. The forecast is predicated upon the following five assumptions: 1. That public policy regarding development remains otherwise unchanged; 2. That the Growth Management Program’s threshold standards are not exceeded; 3. That the housing market corrects within two years; 4. That entitlement processing for the Otay Ranch areas subject to recent Land Offer Agreements is completed as anticipated; and 5. That projects follow a normal project regulatory processing schedule.

Eastern Chula Vista As noted earlier, most of the growth forecasted continues to be in eastern Chula Vista, where several different companies, particularly in Otay Ranch Village 2, own property. In Otay Ranch Villages 2, 7 and 11, entitlements for the 2012 projected single- and multi-family developments have been secured by various developers, including Baldwin & Sons, JPB, KB Homes and McMillin. Entitlements are also in place for Eastlake’s Summit and Olympic Pointe, as well as Bella Lago, Rolling Hills Ranch and San Miguel Ranch. Until 2013, the majority of building activity is

In the five-year forecast period (calendar years from 2012 through 2016), eastern Chula Vista may have as many as 5,537 housing units permitted (averaging 1,107 annually), and western Chula Vista may have as many as 363 units (averaging 73 annually). This totals 5,900 units citywide, with an annual average of approximately 1,180 housing units permitted per year. Using more aggressive development figures in this forecast allows the City of Chula Vista to evaluate the maximum likely effect this growth will have on maintaining the quality of life, and the ability to provide concurrent development of necessary public facilities and services. The following discussions and figures describe the context, conditions and assumptions behind the forecast, and are provided to further qualify that this forecast is a “worst case” planning tool and not a prediction or specific expectation.

Forecast Information Projections are derived primarily from approved development plans, and estimated project processing schedules for project plan w w w . c h u l a v i s t a c h a m b e r . o r g


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This report focuses on the forecasted residential units as the primary indicator to measure future population increases. Western Chula Vista (as evidenced by U.S. Census data) has been undergoing growth in the form of demographic changes as the average household size increases; however, such growth is difficult to track on a year-to-year basis and is not reflected in this report’s future population forecast. projected to occur in Eastlake and in Otay Ranch Village 2 (see Table 1). In 2013, McMillin is projecting 180 multi-family units for its Millenia project (formerly known as the Eastern Urban Center), with 401 more units in 2014 and over 500 additional units between 2015 and 2016. In 2014, building activity is projected to commence and continue for several years in Villages 8 and 10. As of December 2011, the remaining capacity for residential units that could be permitted in eastern Chula Vista is approximately 20,959, based on the city’s 2005 General Plan. If 5,537 units were permitted over the next five-year forecasted period, 15,422 units would remain. At that rate of growth, the capacity could potentially be built out around 2030. However, potential General Plan amendments in the future could result in additional units added to the inventory of housing units, thereby extending the build-out timeframe.

Western Chula Vista Western Chula Vista has not shown significant increases in housing since the city’s growth management program was instituted in the late

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1980’s. This situation is slowly changing, with growing interest in infill and redevelopment and density increases updated in the 2005 GeneralPlan and the Urban Core Specific Plan (UCSP). Reflective of development interest in western Chula Vista, several projects have been completed there in recent years, particularly along Broadway. At this time, as shown on Table 2, 363 units are projected over the next five years, with the largest development being the 167-unit Creekside Vistas project on Third Avenue.

Residential Construction History The number of building permits issued for housing units in Chula Vista has fluctuated from a few hundred units a year to over 3,000, with an average of approximately 1,238 units per year over the last 30 years. Several market cycles have occurred, including recessions of the early 1980’s (averaging 330 units/year) and 90’s (averaging 693 units/year) and a downward trend in the number of units permitted between 2005 and 2009. The number of units is currently on an upward trend, with the number doubling from 2009

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The California State Department of Finance estimates that Chula Vista has an average of 3.21 persons per household. Assuming that this estimate remains valid over the next five years, and assuming a 4.91% vacancy rate, Chula Vista can expect a total population of approximately 266,126 persons by the end of 2016. This is based on the following: • The California State Department of Finance (DOF) estimated Chula Vista’s population on January 1, 2011 as 246,496; • An additional 531 units were occupied from January 1, 2011 to November 2011; and • An additional 5,900 units may be permitted between November 2011 and December 2016. This is only a rough estimate for planning purposes, as the vacancy rate, persons per unit factors, and the number of actual units completed may vary.

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Between the years 1996 and 2001, the number of building permits issued for housing units steadily increased from about 1,000 units to the peak 3,525 units. A significant part of this is attributable to the onset of construction in Eastlake, Otay Ranch and other eastern Chula Vista 5 Five-Year Growth Forecast, November 2011 master planned communities. During the construction boom years from 2001-2006, the average annual number of units receiving permits for construction was approximately 2,200.

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(275) to 2010 (500), and 647 units being issued in 2011, thus far (see Figure 3). A record 3,525 unit permits issued in 2001 represents a peak of residential permits that is not likely to return.

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