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The Soul of Park City—The Silver Lining

PARK CITY

®

Winter • Spring 2018-2019


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No Federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property. This is neither an offer to sell, nor a solicitation of offers to buy, any property in those states where such offers or solicitations cannot be made. Not available to residents in the State of New York. WARNING: THE CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF REAL ESTATE HAS NOT INSPECTED, EXAMINED, OR QUALIFIED THIS OFFERING. Illustrations are artist’s conceptual renderings only and are subject to change without notice. Amenities depicted herein are anticipated but not guaranteed and may not be completed by seller. Neither seller nor seller’s agents assume responsibility for the accuracy of the information contained herein. Buyers should review the purchase agreement and other offering materials provided by the seller prior to signing any contract to purchase a unit. ©[CPRC17 LLC ]. Unauthorized use of the images, artist renderings, plans or other depictions of the project or units is strictly prohibited. A member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates.

The project described herein (the “Project”) and the Residential Units located within the Project (the “Residential Units”) are not developed or sold by KT HOTELS, LLC or any of its respective affiliates (collectively, “Pendry”) and Pendry does not make any representations, warranties or guaranties whatsoever with respect to the Residential Units, the Project or any part thereof. CPRC17 LLC uses the PENDRY brand name and certain other Pendry trademarks (collectively, the “Trademarks”) in connection with the sales and marketing of the Residential Units in the Project under a limited, non-exclusive, non-transferable and non-sublicensable license from Pendry. The foregoing license may be terminated, in which case neither the Residential Units nor any part of the Project will be identified as a PENDRY-branded project or have any rights to use the Trademarks.


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PARK CITY PARK CITY 12 WELCOME

What’s Inside

Publisher’s Note About the Cover Words From the Editor The Park CityStyle Team Visitor’s Guidepost

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18 70

THE SOUL OF PARK CITY: THE SILVER LINING The Idea Man Ski Hard, Work Hard, Repeat High Flying Legend The Joy of Joy

30 CALENDAR OF EVENTS 32 INSPIRE

88

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All Abilities Welcome Park City Charmer Thinking Big for Arts and Culture 4 Nonprofits That Inspire

HIGHSTYLE PROFILES An Ode to Barns Finding Flow The Dynamic Duo

48 BASECAMP

54 84

78 78

The Future of Nordic Fly High, Ski Fast Women in Flight Backcountry Ski Beta Think Outside the Chairlift

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MOUNTAINSTYLE LIVING

History, Home, Heritage Park City Shines On Soul: Historic Park City Glitz: Deer Valley Resort Ease: Canyons Village Is the Ski Bum Dream Still Alive?

72 DINING

Breaking Bread With Brent Park City Dining Listings

78 NIGHTLIFE

Music for the Soul The Soul of the City New Wine in Old Town 6 of the Best After-Hour Hot Spots

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PARK CITYSTYLE CATALOGUE

Lead With Your Sole


LIVE HERITAGE

With deep family roots in Park City and 19+ years of real estate experience, Page is passionate about preserving Park City’s iconic open spaces and landmarks. The Armstrong Barn holds fond childhood memories. Page understands the micromarkets of the Thaynes and Iron Canyon neighborhoods allowing her to provide both buyers and sellers an exceptional experience.

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801.671.9761 pagejuliano@gmail.com summitsothebysrealty.com This material is based upon information that we consider reliable, but because it has been supplied by third parties, we cannot represent that it is accurate or complete, including price, or withdrawal without notice; square footage is an estimate only. ©MMXVIII Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. An Equal Opportunity Company. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Copyright© Summit Sotheby’s International Realty 2018.


PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Welcome to the premiere issue of Park CityStyle Magazine

F

or the past 30 years, I’ve built my life and career around skiing and the lifestyle it affords—from ski instructor and alpine ski race coach to publishing mountain-town magazines. I have been blessed to have lived, worked, and played in Vail, Telluride, Jackson Hole, and now, part-time, in Park City. Over the years, there’s one thing I have discovered without a doubt: mountain folks have a genuine nature about them; and Parkites (Park City locals, old and new) are truly some of the nicest folks I’ve had the pleasure of knowing. When our team of local writers, photographers, market coordinators, and friends began to brainstorm themes for our inaugural issue of Park CityStyle, it was obvious we needed to tell the story of what keeps the soul of Park City intact—its denizens. Over dinner parties and lunch meetings, discussion circled around Park City’s rapid growth, the pros and cons of new resort ownerships, and traffic, but we all agreed Park City had not lost its soul, and we wanted to tell that story. I can’t thank enough all the wonderful individuals, my wife, and our talented team who helped launch the premiere issue of Park CityStyle Magazine. We hope you enjoy these stories as much as we enjoyed putting them together. –Jeff Bush Owner/Publisher

About the Cover

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hen Park CityStyle started putting together ideas for people who embodied the “The Soul of Park City,” Joy Tlou was at the top of nearly every list. After moving to Park City almost 25 years ago, Joy has become a fixture of the community and is well-known by many of the locals. This photograph, taken in his home, shows a glimpse into one of the souls that make Park City the unique and remarkable town that it is. Read more about Joy, his passions, and his road to Park City on page 28. To see more of Angela’s work, visit angelahowardphoto.com.

PARK CITY PARK CITY

PARK CITY PARK CITY Publisher Jeffrey C. Bush

Creative Director Kristal Franklin Senior Account Executive Jill McGlashon Managing Editor Evie Carrick Advertising Sales Connie Tyler Gillian Hunter Social Media Madison Webb Management Consultant Mark Mullins Market Consultants Meghan de Bruijn Sharon Backurz Erin Hirtle Jeff Good Writers Ashley Brown, Darby Doyle, Steve Phillips, Tiffini Porter, Ted Scheffler, Natalie Taylor

The Soul of Park City—The Silver Lining

®

Photographers Deborah Dekoff, Angela Howard, Gillian Hunter

J.C. Bush Creative Media, LLC P.O. Box 684 • Wilson, WY 83014 (307) 699-5190 email: jeff@jcbush.com jcbush.com • ParkCityStyleMag.com Winter • Spring 2018-2019

Award-Winning Publisher Certificates of Excellence Western Publications Association Maggie Awards Best Overall Visitor’s Guide Best New Consumer Publication Best Table of Contents Printed by Publication Printers, Inc.

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Copyright© 2018. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher.


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PARK CITYSTYLE TEAM

Park City Today AND THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE IT GREAT

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ark City is growing, and with growth comes change.. The problem is, no one really likes change—especially at first. But when you take a moment to look back at the history of this land and the people who’ve lived here it’s clear that change—while difficult and not always fair—is inevitable. We featured the people in the pages ahead because they each do their part in helping us navigate this change. Some, like Randy Barton

and Bonnie Ulmer are charged with keeping the soul of Park City intact. They’re the old timers, the movers and shakers, the people who’ve remained in Park City during its growing pains. Others, like Sharon Backurz and Brian Richards have brought new energy and community to Park City, uncovering the silver lining that comes with change. Steve Phillips, a writer for Park CityStyle who’s lived in Park City since the ’80s, said it best on page 20, “One thing

is certain: The soul of Park City remains. Our town has weathered growth and change, but the silver lining is found in the energy, creativity, and passion of the people who live here.” I hope you finish this issue feeling inspired by the people who’ve remained steadfast and optimistic in the face of change, and ready to contribute your own bit of soul to this EVIE CARRICK Managing Editor special community.

Evie is a grammar and spelling fanatic who has worked with J.C. Bush Creative Media for over 10 years. She studied journalism at the University of Denver and publishing at New York University. You can see more of her work at EvieCarrick.com.

–Evie Carrick

Meet Our Team

KRISTAL FRANKLIN

TED SCHEFFLER

DARBY DOYLE

ASHLEY BROWN

STEVE PHILLIPS

Writer

Writer

Writer

Writer

Kristal founded Kristal Graphics in 2004. Her knowledge of marketing and her design aptitude has landed her numerous clients throughout the West. She has worked as the creative director with J.C. Bush Creative Media and their many publishing ventures since 1999. When Kristal gets a little free time, she loves travel, golf, camping, and spending time with friends and family.

Originally trained as an anthropologist, Ted is a seasoned food, wine, and travel writer based in Utah. Prior to moving to Utah, Ted lived on four different continents. Yes, it’s a cliché, but Paris is his favorite city. He enjoys cooking, travel, skiing, and music, spending an inordinate amount of time tending to his ever-growing herd of guitars, amplifiers, and vinyl.

Award-winning food writer, cocktail historian, and recovering archaeologist Darby covers the gamut of Utah’s gastronomic and natural wonders. When she’s not at her keyboard, she’s puttering in her garden, skiing, hiking, duck hunting, or fly-fishing with her husband, Mike, their two teenage sons, and their Labradors. Follow Darby’s cocktail, culinary, and outdoor adventures on Instagram @darby.doyle and Twitter @aBourbonGal.

Steve has lived in the Park City area since the 1980s. He worked for the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources for 30 years as a public relations officer. Since retiring, he’s worked as a freelance writer and actor. He’s an avid mountain and road biker, runner, kayaker, and hot air balloon pilot.

Ashley is a Utah native. Wilderness conservation is a key component to her writing and recreational interests. To fuel her stories and to find inspiration, she climbs rocks and mountains, snowboards and splitboards, takes journeys into the quiet wilderness, and practices a yogic lifestyle to help her integrate into our human-constructed society.

Dana Klein©

Creative Director

NATALIE TAYLOR

TIFFINI PORTER

ANGELA HOWARD

DEBORAH DEKOFF

GILLIAN C. HUNTER

Writer

Writer

Photographer

Photographer

Photographer

Natalie has been freelance writing for local magazines for nearly three decades, and in that time has met some of the most talented, creative, and interesting people in the state. A hot springs enthusiast, she enjoys soaking in natural mineral water, hiking with her beloved (albeit marginally trained) pooch, and writing poetry.

Born and raised in Utah, Tiffini is an art lover, hiker, foodie, and traveler. In both her writing career and personal life she loves connecting with creative people who are willing to experiment and explore new ideas. A dedicated arts and culture advocate, Tiffini has served on numerous nonprofit boards and committees and is excited to share stories about Park City’s vibrant arts scene.

Angela is a nationally published photographer who lives in Utah but travels abroad to photograph commercial projects, special events, editorials, and food photography. A native Utahan, she feels most at home in the mountains and loves the snow. In addition to photography, she enjoys traveling, food, road trips, and hanging out with her husband, kids, and pups.

Deb grew up with a passion for visual artistic expression, so it’s no wonder she’s been toting cameras as an additional appendage for 40 years. When not photographing portraits or food, this former Floridian educates students, runs a breast cancer support group, and lifts weights.

Gillian’s photography career is driven by connection & she describes her work as Soultography. She seeks to capture what’s at the heart of her subject. She grew up on the slopes of Park City & her heart belongs to Utah. When she’s not creating she’s skiing, practicing yoga, riding horses, or hiking with her hubby Brad & doggie Aria. Follow on Insta @gillianhunter

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VISITOR'S GUIDEPOST

Park City FACTS AND STATISTICS Time zone: .............................. MST UTC-7 (Summer MST UTC-6) Park City founded: ................................................................1869 Park City incorporated: .........................................................1884 Park City 2018 population: ..................................................8,378 Park City elevation: ...................................................... 7,000 feet Average snowfall: ........................................300-400 inches/year County: ............................................................................ Summit Zip codes: ...................................................84060, 84068, 84098 Mountain range: ............................................................. Wasatch Highest peak: ....................................Mount Nebo at 11,928 feet

PARK CITY MOUNTAIN

# of ski runs: ...............................................................................341 # of chairlifts: ...............................................................................41 Skiable terrain: ........................................................................7,300 Base elevation: ........................................................................6,800 Peak elevation: ......................................................................10,026 Resort closing date: ..................................................... April 7, 2019 Year opened: ....................................... 1963 as Treasure Mountain Owner: .......................................................................... Vail Resorts Multi-resort pass partnership: .......................................... Epic Pass

DEER VALLEY RESORT

# of ski runs: ...........................................................................103 # of chairlifts: ............................................................................21 Skiable terrain: ....................................................................2,026 Base elevation: ....................................................................6,570 Peak elevation: ....................................................................9,570 Resort closing date: ................................................. April 7, 2019 Year opened: ........................................................................1981 Owner: .............................................. Alterra Mountain Company Multi-resort pass partnership: ....................................... Ikon Pass

WEATHER (in Fahrenheit)

USEFUL PHONE NUMBERS

Area code: ..................................................................................435 Emergency: ................................................................................911 Road conditions: ....................................................(866) 511-UTAH Park City hospital: ...................................................(435) 615-5301 Park City police: .......................................................(435) 615-5500 Central reservations: ...............................................(800) 453-1360 Park City Mountain: ................................................(435) 649-8111 Deer Valley Resort: ..................................................(435) 649-1000 Salt Lake City Airport (SLC): .....................................(801) 575-2400 Park City Transit: .....................................................(435) 615-5301 Park City Chamber of Commerce: ..........................(435) 649-6100 16 ParkCityStyleMag.com |

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Johnny Adolphson©-shutterstock.com

Climate: .............................................................. humid continental Winter average high/low: ...................................................... 35/14 Spring average high/low: ....................................................... 54/28 Summer average high/low: .................................................... 79/46 Fall average high/low: ............................................................ 58/30 Record high: .................................................96.5 (recorded in July) Record low: ................................................ 6 (recorded in January)


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Adventure_Photo ©-istock.com

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THE SOUL OF PARK CITY THE SILVER LINING

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WORDS Steve Phillips

HERE IS A SOUL TO PARK CITY THAT IS PERHAPS OLDER THAN THE TOWN ITSELF. OLD AS THE NATIVE AMERICANS WHO SUMMERED HERE FOR CENTURIES, OLD AS THE RANCHERS WHO GRAZED CATTLE 150 YEARS AGO, OLD AS THE MINERS WHO SOUGHT SILVER IN THE GLORY DAYS.


“THERE IS TREASURE HERE AND ALWAYS HAS BEEN.”

Gillian Hunter©

Whispers of days gone by echo still, cautionary tales of boom towns born in the late 19th century rising and, inevitably, falling. But our town was lucky. After the silver played out, after the town flatlined, Park City discovered a new kind of treasure amid the tailings of that bygone era. A phoenix rising not from ashes, but from snow. Silver and snow, a magical alchemy. Resurrection came when desperate locals and gutsy investors rolled the dice on a risky, farsighted gamble—to build a ski resort near the base of Main Street. Developers named their nascent Park City ski hill Treasure Mountain (no surprise) when it opened in 1963. Four years later it was re-dubbed Park City Mountain Resort (PCMR). Throughout the ’60s and early ’70s, aging, unemployed miners still sparred with ski bums and hippies for bar stools in the few shabby bars on Main Street. Sagging houses, empty lots, and weeds littered town. Oh, and dogs— lots of dogs. You really had to watch where you stepped. A renegade local politician by the name of O.D. McGee once ran for mayor on the tongue-in-cheek platform, “More dogs on Main Street!” 20 ParkCityStyleMag.com |

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The establishment of PCMR spurred the local economy and marked the beginning of the town’s rebirth. The ever-popular Park City Arts Festival set up shop on Main Street in 1970, drawing artists and visitors from all over the country, further sweetening the town’s coffers. A burgeoning arts and culture scene gained momentum in 1976 with the opening of the original Kimball Arts Center. In 1983, the fledgling Sundance Film Festival came to town, marking a huge turning point in the town’s evolution. When the 2002 Winter Olympics came to town, Park City ascended proudly to the world stage. And a series of other major developments helped make the town a world-class destination and a wonderful place to live: the Olympic Sports Park, where world-class winter sports athletes come to train and compete; Mountain Trails Foundation, which has created the world’s first “gold medal” trail system for mountain bikers, trail runners, and hikers; the Egyptian Theatre and Eccles Center, major venues that draw the biggest names in music and entertainment; Mountain Town Music, a summer series of free concerts; Park Silly Sunday Market, a summer tradition; the National

Abilities Center, where children and adults with disabilities, as well as America’s wounded warriors, come to recreate themselves; and, in the next couple of years, the Park City arts and culture district. In the 50-plus years since PCMR was established, our town and the ski resorts have endlessly transformed themselves. Generations have come and gone, dreams fulfilled and denied, fortunes lost and found in our magical mountain town. Through it all, as in life itself, change has been the only constant. William Kranstover, who moved to town in 1971 to ski and hang out with friends, got his real estate license in 1974. “I’d sell a house in Old Town for $10,000, make $600 for myself, and ski for a month,” he remembers, noting, “those homes go for about $2 million now.” Kranstover, today a renowned Western artist, says the town is virtually unrecognizable compared to five decades ago. “It’s sort of like seeing an old lover who has left you,” he muses. “This place has changed and it will never be the same. I don’t see that as a bad thing. I still love walking up and down Main Street and I stay because, for me, it’s always been about the mountains.” Tom Clyde was the city attorney in the early ’80s. He’s also written a weekly column for the local paper for many years and scripts “Park City Follies,” the wildly popular annual fundraiser for the Egyptian Theatre that lampoons all things Park City. “There’s little left of the Park City that attracted me in the ’80s,” he says. “It’s an entirely different place. In a lot of ways, it’s better—a more mature and well-rounded community. There is still a passion about the place. Nobody lives here by accident.” Cheryl Soshnik, who ran the Park City ambulance service for 15 years in the ’80s and early ’90s, lives in a historic Old Town bungalow. She


THE SILVER LINING

laments the demise of the locals’ lifestyle that drew her here. “In the 1980s we were mostly ski bums or restaurant servers. The big thing was to ski and socialize while making enough money to pay for our Park City habit. We’re still trying to live a lifestyle that we’ve lived for 40 years, where quality of life and friends are more important than money,” she says. Bob Buswell moved to Park City last summer. He joins a growing cadre of professionals who work remotely. “Even with the new growth, Park City is still impossible to beat,” he says. “Every outdoor activity is really no further than just outside your front door! Unsurpassed skiing, biking, and hiking trails, golf, tennis, and fly fishing, all encapsulated within the most breathtaking environmental beauty,” says Buswell. One thing is certain: The soul of Park City remains. Our town has weathered growth and change, but the silver lining is found in the energy, creativity, and passion of the people who live here. In the premiere issue of Park CityStyle Magazine, you’ll read about several other “Parkites,” who make this town so special. • Randy Barton, whose innovative ideas and boundless enthusiasm have helped shape the town for decades. He’s virtually woven into the fabric of Park City. • Bonnie Ulmer, a near legendary bartender who’s been in town for almost 40 years. She’s won the competitive Park City Cocktail Contest multiple times with luscious concoctions like her Spicy Watermelon Rose Spritzer or Blueberry Mojito. She’ll serve you one of her fabulous creations at the Royal Street Cafe in Deer Valley. • Olympian Fuzz Feddersen, a pioneer in freestyle skiing who was inducted into the U.S. Ski & Snowboard Hall of Fame in 2014. His innovative Flying Ace Productions trampoline shows have delighted audiences throughout the country and nurtured many Olympic hopefuls.

Don Miller©-istock.com

• Joy Tlou, the singing half of the duo Joy & Eric, who lights up local audiences with his soulful voice and vibrant personality. Born in Zimbabwe, Tlou has called Park City home for 25 years. Though there have been massive changes since Park City began its rise from oblivion so long ago, the town remains a vibrant and exciting place to live. There is treasure here and always has been. And for nostalgic Parkites who long for the good old days, take heart. One thing hasn’t changed after all these years: We still have dogs, lots of dogs! Only now they have their own parks. n ParkCityStyleMag.com |

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THE IDEA MAN

THE SILVER LINING

HELPING TRANSFORM PARK CITY FOR DECADES

“I LOVE THIS TOWN AND I HOPE I’VE MADE A DIFFERENCE HERE.” – RANDY BARTON

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WORDS Steve Phillips | IMAGES Angela Howard

HEN RANDY BARTON ARRIVED IN PARK CITY IN THE EARLY 1970S, HE FOUND A SLEEPY, FUNKY LITTLE MINING TOWN WITH GREAT HISTORICAL CHARACTER, FULL OF CHARACTERS. AGING, UNEMPLOYED MINERS JOSTLED WITH SKI BUMS FOR ELBOW ROOM AT BARS ON MAIN STREET. LOCALS CALLED IT “A DRINKING TOWN WITH A SKIING PROBLEM.” PARK CITY WAS FILLED WITH WEEDS, EMPTY LOTS, AND DOGS, BUT BARTON SAW ONLY OPPORTUNITY.

A natural-born entrepreneur and virtual idea factory, he’s always seen the world through rose-colored glasses. No, really. The tinted vintage spectacles are his trademark and mirror his positive attitude on just about everything. The fledgling “Parkite” promptly started his own business, Clearwater Enterprises, taking on any job that came his way, from selling Christmas trees, to cleaning movie theatres, to landscaping. In 1977 he opened his first Sconecutter restaurant after perfecting a deep-fried scone recipe that scored big with Utahns raised on

the stuff. Soon, Sconecutter was a chain, with locations throughout the Salt Lake Valley, including one in Park City. In the late ’70s, Barton eagerly joined a band of local community actors doing shows at the old Kimball Art Center and other locations. Soon after KPCW, the town’s listener-supported radio station, went on-air in 1980, he joined as a volunteer DJ. Barton celebrated his 40th birthday in the early ’90s by penning and performing his one man show, “Lordy, Lordy, Look Who’s 40!” at the Elk’s Club on Main Street. The innovative

musical was the first of his live-video interactive productions, which now include “Rembrandt,” “Handel,” and his most recent, “Sinatra.” In 1997, he created and hosted his popular “Park City Faces” show on Park City Television. Barton went on to found Mountain Town Stages (now called Mountain Town Music) in 1999. He built stages throughout town and began programming free concerts, creating memorable fundraising events like the Cow Ballet, the Majestic Jester contest, and the Main Street music crawl. The free concerts remain wildly popular among locals. In 2005, Barton returned to his first on-air love, KPCW radio, and has been hosting “The Local View” show every weekday afternoon since. In 2009, Barton came up with a bold, but risky idea to save the ailing Egyptian Theatre on Main Street, and was given 90 days (with no guaranteed salary) to make it happen. By creating the Pharaoh Club, and zany weekend events like “Are We Not Men” and the PC Ping-Pong Championships, he brought the theatre back from the edge. Soon, he was named managing director, the position he holds today. His latest goal is making an expanded Egyptian Theatre and youth theatre studio a reality. After over 40 years, Barton remains bullish on Park City. “I think the town gets better every decade,” he says. “I think every new person who comes here to ‘ruin’ our town actually makes it a better place. I love this town and I hope I’ve made a difference here. A lot of my crazy ideas have been realized right here in Park City. You know, ideas are like children— you want them to grow and succeed.” n ParkCityStyleMag.com |

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“I CAME TO VISIT PARK CITY WITH NO INTENTION TO MOVE OR LIVE HERE.” – BONNIE ULMER


THE SILVER LINING

SKI HARD WORK HARD REPEAT

CRAFTING PARK CITY LIBATIONS SINCE 1979

“I

WORDS Darby Doyle | IMAGES Angela Howard

’M A ‘DAY 1’ DEER VALLEY EMPLOYEE,” SAYS LEGEND-LEVEL PARK CITY BARTENDER BONNIE ULMER. SHE’S A FIRM BELIEVER THAT THE COMMUNITY’S UNDERLYING “WORK HARD, PLAY HARD” ETHOS IS AT THE CORE OF WHAT KEEPS HER COMING BACK TO THE ROYAL STREET CAFE AFTER A BRISK DAY OF SKIING, EVEN AFTER DECADES OF SLINGING DRINKS. THAT, AND “IT’S ALWAYS BEEN A BIG APRÈS SKI CULTURE AT DEER VALLEY,” SHE SAYS WITH A GRIN.

THE FAMED COCKTAIL Recipe courtesy of Bonnie Ulmer

Deer Valley Blueberry Mojito Yields: 1 drink Ingredients: 1 handful mint 1 teaspoon granulated sugar ¼ wedge of lime ½ to ¾ cup fresh (not from concentrate) lemonade 1 ounce premium light rum (Bacardi Silver brand suggested) 2 tablespoons fresh or frozen blueberries (one tablespoon smashed to create some juice) Splash of club soda ½ ounce premium dark rum (Myers’ brand suggested) Sprig of mint (for garnish) Slice of lime (for garnish) Ice Instructions: In a tall, 16-ounce Collins glass, add mint leaves and sugar. Squeeze juice from the lime wedge into the glass. Mash the ingredients with the back of a spoon or a wooden muddler until the mixture is fragrant. Fill the glass with ice. Add lemonade until the glass is 2/3 full. Add a splash of soda, then add light rum and blueberries and stir. Slowly pour dark rum into the drink so it floats on top. Garnish with a sprig of mint and lime and serve.

In 1979, Ulmer, a California native, graduated with a degree in therapeutic recreation from San Diego State University and decided to travel before locking down a job. “I came to visit Park City with no intention to move or live here. I was just in Utah to explore: hiking, biking, skiing, whatever. As long as I could be outdoors,” says Ulmer. Immediately hooked on the Park City lifestyle, she started waiting tables and bartending on Main Street, noting that at the time, housing was both easy to find and relatively affordable for the average ski bum. Ulmer also kept tabs on the construction of a new resort on the old locals’ hill, Snow

Park. Correctly assuming the new Deer Valley Resort would need hospitality staff, Ulmer applied for a seasonal job. She started working on opening day, December 26, 1981, making her one of a small but mighty cadre of Deer Valley lifers. “Back in the day,” she says of circa 1980s Deer Valley, “we all knew each other, because it was a relatively small community. Owners, employees, local regulars, guests; we all skied together.” Although Ulmer’s not much of a drinker herself—her go-to refresher is a crisp hard apple cider—she enjoys being an instigator for people to try new things. “I love talking to customers and figuring out what they’ll love to

drink,” she says, with the caveat that she wants them to get back on their skis safely. “Even with metered pours,” says Ulmer of Utah’s current limit of 1 ½ ounces of base spirit, “we can make some really great cocktails.” Case in point: Ulmer’s contributions to local, regional, and national competitions have been frequent winners, including the famed Deer Valley Blueberry Mojito. Now celebrating her 37th year at Deer Valley, Ulmer still gets as much slope time as ever with her crew of family and friends. “It’s a lifestyle we’ve all chosen,” she says, noting her love for Park City and the ability to raise her kids in the mountains as the next generation of powder bums. “We make it work so we can be up here.” n ParkCityStyleMag.com |

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“I HEAR IT ALL THE TIME: ‘THAT WAS THE COOLEST THING I’VE EVER SEEN!’” – KRIS “FUZZ” FEDDERSEN


THE SILVER LINING

HIGH FLYING LEGEND

HELPING ATHLETES WHILE PUTTING ON A SHOW

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WORDS Darby Doyle | IMAGES Angela Howard

COULD WATCH THEM JUMP ALL DAY,” SAYS KRIS “FUZZ” FEDDERSEN AS DOZENS OF AERIALISTS LAUNCH THEMSELVES OFF STEEP ANGLED RAMPS, EACH SKIER MAKING A COMPLEX SERIES OF FLIPS AND TWISTS BEFORE LANDING WITH A SPLASH IN THE BUBBLING STATE-OF-THE-ART POOL AT UTAH OLYMPIC PARK (UOP). AS HE’S BUSY COORDINATING THE LAST SHOWS OF THE SEASON, WE MULTITASK BY SITTING ON THE DECK ABOVE THE POOL DURING OUR INTERVIEW, WITH FEDDERSEN’S SIDE COMMENTARY OF “OH, NICE ONE!” AND “GREAT JUMP!” UNDERLINING HIS UNFLAGGING ENTHUSIASM FOR THE SPORT. IT’S DOWNRIGHT CONTAGIOUS.

It’s no exaggeration to say that Feddersen is a living legend in the sport of freestyle skiing. He pioneered early techniques and tricks, and helped introduce freestyle as an Olympic demonstration event in 1988. He competed in the 1992 and 1994 Olympic Games, and earned over 30 podiums on the World Cup circuit during his career. Feddersen also coached

the 1998 U.S. Aerial Ski Team to two gold medals, and was inducted into the U.S. Ski & Snowboard Hall of Fame in 2014. And yes, he’s appeared in a few Warren Miller films along the way. “The sport has changed a lot through the years,” says Feddersen, noting that the 1988 demonstration events included moguls,

aerials, and—wait for it—ski ballet. By the 1990s, competitive ski ballet had lost traction, but moguls and aerials became core events; in this century, ski cross, half-pipe, and slopestyle have been added to the mix. Recognizing the crowd-pleasing potential of freestyle sports, Feddersen and his teammate Trace Worthington produced and choreographed the first water ramp aerials show at the Lake Placid, New York Olympic training facility in 1987 to immediate acclaim. Next, they developed the concept to include trampoline shows and even constructed a float with a trampoline to perform aerials in parades. “People go wild,” says Feddersen of the typical response. “They see these guys on skis and snowboards doing crazy tricks and they go nuts.” They started jumping at the current UOP location in 1993, and in 1998 incorporated Flying Ace Productions to showcase athletes’ skills at the Park City site and all over the world. “It’s all about pizazz and flair,” says Feddersen of the Flying Ace shows, which he used to perform in but now emcees. Up to 20 athletes are involved in each performance, jumping off the ramps in quick succession accompanied by pumping music, lights, acrobats, and even fireworks for some big-ticket private clients. “I love the ‘show’ element in this sport,” says Feddersen. “Our shows are like a rock concert. People get rowdy.” For both the audience and the athletes the Flying Ace model is a win-win. “Athletes get the opportunity to perform and earn money,” to help finance their training and competition fees, “and we put on a spectacular show.” He can’t imagine being based anywhere other than Park City with its unique access to the U.S. Ski & Snowboard Team. “The facilities are phenomenal, and there’s big talent here.” But mostly, Feddersen digs the opportunity to share his love for freestyle with new audiences. “I hear it all the time: ‘That was the coolest thing I’ve ever seen!’” n ParkCityStyleMag.com |

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THE SILVER LINING

THE JOY OFJOY MEET PARK CITY’S SOUL MAN

“THINK OF HIM AS THE UNOFFICIAL MAYOR OF PARK CITY.”

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WORDS Ted Scheffler | IMAGES Angela Howard

F YOU’VE HAD THE PLEASURE OF HEARING THE MUSICAL DUO JOY & ERIC AROUND TOWN THEN YOU’VE HEARD JOY TLOU’S ANGELIC SINGING VOICE, ACCOMPANIED BY ERIC SOPANEN’S EQUALLY GORGEOUS GUITAR PLAYING. AND EVEN IF YOU’VE NEVER SEEN THE DUO PERFORM, YOU PROBABLY ALREADY KNOW TLOU. THINK OF HIM AS THE UNOFFICIAL MAYOR OF PARK CITY. IT WOULD BE HARD TO FIND ANYONE MORE AFFABLE AND OUTGOING; HE’S WICKEDLY QUICKWITTED BUT RARELY WITHOUT A BIG, BROAD SMILE. APTLY NAMED, JOY IS A JOY.

The road to Park City wasn’t a straight one for Tlou. Born in Zimbabwe (then Rhodesia) to a politically active family during tumultuous times, his uncle found himself incarcerated on Robben Island with a well-known prison mate: Nelson Mandela. Relocating to Iowa with his family when he was very young, he says, “We were basically escaping the version of apartheid that was happening back at home. My

father was quite political and on a list of people being ‘scooped up’ by the authorities.” So Tlou would grow up mostly in Iowa and perhaps would still be there languishing in the Hawkeye State, had not love intervened. “My girlfriend at the time was moving to Utah to do a postdoctoral fellowship,” he says. “I followed her out here just in time to find out that we weren’t dating anymore.” Dumped. But her

loss was Park City’s gain, as Tlou chose to stay here, quickly landing a job at Salt Lake Community College, where he is currently Director of Public Relations. Reminiscing about his early days in Park City and the two-lane, pot-holed road that led into town circa 1994, he says laughingly, “I keep remembering that when I moved here everything below the train station and the Town Lift was, basically, a gravel pile. The Grill at the Depot at the bottom of Main Street was virtually the end of civilization!” I’ve often thought of Tlou as the soul of Park City and, for a while, he really was that. He originally hooked up with Sopanen in a band called Soul Patrol, which would play frequently at venues like J. D. Mulligan’s. “We were a big, 12-piece band with a horn section,” Tlou remembers. “But the guy who owned Mulligan’s loved us and would cram our huge band into that small space.” In addition to being a much-sought-after singer, Tlou is also a killer cook. There are many around town who know it’s akin to winning the lottery to attend a gastronomic soiree at his Mountain View Drive “compound.” That’s where he creates delicious, eye-popping, Instagram-worthy dishes like his Utah strawberry ceviche with golden balsamic vinegar and citrus agave gastrique, shallot and herb goat cheese, seasoned panko crumble, celery greens, and black and red pepper flakes. Yes, that’s just one dish! It’s a mighty long way from Zimbabwe to The Beehive, but for those who love Joy Tlou— and who doesn’t—we’re stoked that the soul man chose to make Park City his home and playground. n 29 ParkCityStyleMag.com |

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS

10 Can’t Miss Highlights IN AND AROUND PARK CITY

WORDS Ted Scheffler | IMAGES Angela Howard, Courtesy Park City Mountain

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HERE IS PLENTY OF ACTION DURING WINTER AND EARLY SPRING IN PARK CITY, BE IT ON OR OFF THE SLOPES. BEST OF ALL, MUCH OF IT IS FREE (OR AT LEAST CHEAP). WHETHER YOU’RE A LONGTIME LOCAL WHO NEVER MISSES THE POND SKIMMING CONTEST, OR A FIRST-TIME VISITOR LOOKING FOR SOME FUN AND ENTERTAINMENT, HERE ARE 10 PARK CITY HIGHLIGHTS YOU WON’T WANT TO MISS.

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NYE 2019: BLACK & WHITE MASQUERADE, DECEMBER 31: This year’s annual Black & White Masquerade at Park City Presents Live features NYC’s renown DJ Ross One, who normally holds residence at venues such as LIV Miami, Drai’s Las Vegas, and 10AK New York. Don’t let the ball drop at midnight without being there!

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SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL, JANUARY 24-FEBRUARY 3: Drawing thousands of celebrities, wannabes, and everyone in-between, the Sundance Film Festival turns Park City into the place to see and be seen for 10 busy days. Jump in and join the fun; there are plenty of free activities, seminars, live music performances, discussions, and screenings in addition to ticketed events.

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SNOWFEST, DECEMBER 22-JANUARY 6: Snowfest at Park City Mountain is 16 days of holiday celebrations featuring live music, visits by Santa leading up to Christmas, ice sculptures, s’mores making, and many more fun activities. Located in both the Park City Mountain Village and Canyons Village every day.

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2019 FIS WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS, FEBRUARY 1-10: The planet’s finest freestyle and freeski athletes converge on Utah for the FIS World Championships held at Deer Valley Resort, Park City Mountain, and Solitude Mountain. Among the attractions will be big air competitions at Canyons Village, moguls and aerials at Deer Valley, and snowboard and ski halfpipe events at Park City Mountain. Don’t you dare miss the eye-popping action!

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IT GETS BETTER PROJECT WITH SAN FRANCISCO GAY MEN’S CHORUS, FEBRUARY 9: The world’s first gay men’s choral group makes a stop in Park City to perform their uplifting music at the George S. & Dolores Dore Eccles Center in tandem with the spoken-word performance of the It Gets Better Project. It’ll be a night of positive vibes and empowering words and music.

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2019 IBU WORLD CUP BIATHLON, FEBRUARY 14-17: Soldier Hollow Nordic Center is hosting the International Biathlon Union World Cup Biathlon Tour, marking the first major biathlon competition at Soldier Hollow since the 2002 Winter Olympics. General admission tickets are a mere $5 and family passes are $15. It’s a great bang (sorry) for your buck! SILVER SUMMITS CHALLENGE, MARCH 2: Do you have the right stuff? Can you cover 7,300 acres of terrain on your skis and hit seven summits at Park City Mountain in a single day? If so, register for the Silver Summits Challenge and conquer Jupiter Peak, Scott’s Bowl, Limelite, Dream Peak, Peak 5, Ninety-Nine 90, and Murdock Peak. You’ll certainly have earned the aprés celebration to follow.

PINK PARK CITY, MARCH 23: During the second annual Pink Park City, Park City Mountain will be covered in pink decorations, host pink parties with live music and great food, and will feature hundreds of pink-clad skiers joining together to help conquer cancer. Proceeds will support research at Utah’s Huntsman Cancer Institute.

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SPRING GRUV, MARCH 23-APRIL 7: Park City Mountain’s Spring Gruv is a 16-day party that includes free concerts, tons of fun, and the infamous Pond Skimming Contest (April 6). In the latter, contestants dress up in funky costumes and attempt to cross a 100-foot pond on a snowboard or skis. It’s a Park City springtime ritual that you don’t want to miss.

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JETHRO TULL - 50TH ANNIVERSARY TOUR, APRIL 4-7: Presented by the Egyptian Theatre, original Jethro Tull band members will perform four shows in celebration of 50 years of Jethro Tull (yes, we feel old, too). “Locomotive Breath,” anybody?


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INSPIRE

“THE SKILLS AND CONFIDENCE PARTICIPANTS AND THEIR FAMILIES GAIN BY LEARNING ABOUT RESILIENCE, SEQUENCING, AND SAFETY IMPACT THEIR LIVES OUTSIDE NAC.” – AMANDA BASELER

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ALL ABILITIES WELCOME NAC EMPOWERS THROUGH SPORT

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WORDS Darby Doyle | IMAGES Wray Sinclair, Dave Obzansky, and Claire Wiley

HIS IS REBEKKA DILL. SHE’S OUR FAMOUS HORSE AND SHE IS 28 YEARS OLD,” SAYS NATIONAL ABILITY CENTER (NAC) RECREATION PROGRAMS SENIOR MANAGER AMANDA BASELER, AS SHE AND HALLE, A NAC PARTICIPANT, GROOM THE HORSE’S FLANKS.

We’re in the light and airy NAC equestrian barn just a few miles northeast of historic Park City. But as Baseler guides me through the ranch’s 26-acre facility, it’s immediately apparent that this center of accessible outdoor recreation is an all-abilities world apart. Case in point? Within minutes of spending time with

Rebekka Dill, Halle’s face has lit up and she’s sitting taller in her wheelchair while grooming the horse. Comments Baseler, “Core strength and muscle tone improve for so many participants with equestrian activities.” Furthermore, “These habits can transfer into having more confidence with everyday tasks.”

In addition to working as an equestrian actor in the film “The 13th Warrior,” Rebekka Dill—like all horses at the facility—completed rigorous behavioral testing and training before she started her gentle job at the NAC. The human crew at NAC includes over 100 professional, certified instructors and more than 1,900 ParkCityStyleMag.com |

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volunteers of all ages and abilities, many of whom are former NAC participants. Founded in 1985, the nonprofit provides programming for people of all ages, from beginners to Paralympic athletes. Globally recognized as a chapter of Disabled Sports USA and one of only 12 gold-level U.S. Paralympic Sports Clubs, the NAC is among the top 1 percent of adaptive recreation organizations in terms of size, scope, and breadth of programming. And they’re able to fulfill 100 percent of scholarship requests, to boot. It’s all thanks to volunteer involvement, fundraising events, grants, and donations. “It’s a pretty amazing place,” says Baseler of the NAC complex, which has indoor and outdoor equestrian arenas, climbing towers and ropes courses, and a bike maintenance shed with 280 conventional and adapted bikes. NAC recently merged with the outdoor-adventure nonprofit Splore, so activities like hiking, river rafting, and canoeing abound. The on-site lodge for out-of-town guests has 25 rooms, a kitchen and dining area, and a fitness room. Says Baseler, “People come from all 50 states and more than a dozen countries.” She notes they “Often have groups from the University of Utah’s National Center for Veterans Studies and Team Semper Fi,” along with Shriners Hospital and U.S. Paralympic athlete groups, to name a few. To meet growing program needs, the NAC is launching a capital campaign called “I Can” to increase their capacity and build out

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the campus. Plans include a revitalized and expanded equestrian center, recreation building, campsite, and more. As most Parkites have known for decades, activities aren’t relegated to the ranch. NAC participants zip down the slopes of Park City Mountain, Deer Valley, and Brighton using customized ski and snowboard equipment, mono-skis, outriggers, and guides for visually impaired riders. NAC events volunteer Dave Duzy taught adaptive skiing for 10 years in California before moving to Utah. “They’re all awesome,” says Duzy of the various programs he’s worked with. “But the NAC’s emphasis on getting kids to be self-sufficient is a life-changer for families.” Duzy, his wife Karen, and daughter Penni (now 13) have been involved with NAC for six years. Penni was born with a rare and usually fatal hole in her diaphragm and does not have many obvious outward cues to indicate her challenges. However, she needs supplemental oxygen tanks at high altitude and has balance issues and significant intellectual developmental delays. “She’s absolutely terrified of falling,” says Karen Duzy, “but she loves horses and will go on and on about taking care of them,” even if she’s too scared to ride some days. Penni, whose two older sisters were competitive ski racers, is thrilled to join her family on the slopes with the help of NAC. Dave Duzy recalls Penni’s first ski lesson: “She fell down every two feet and couldn’t get up. Her instructor, Mike,


who was in a mono-ski, was incredibly patient with her. She’d fall. He’d ski over, set his brakes, and lift her up. She’d fall again.” He continues, “Penni’s confidence, freedom, and mobility improvements have been life-changing for our family. We’re incredibly proud of all she’s done. It’d be impossible without the NAC.” NAC equestrian volunteer Krissy Senkier says that one of the biggest misconceptions about the NAC is that it’s only physically adaptive. “The NAC encompasses everyone,” she says, and that includes her own son Matthew (11), who is on the autism spectrum and has been a NAC participant for three years. Matthew and his 10-year-old twin siblings, Anna and Patrick, even attended Camp Giddy Up together. “It’s been so valuable for the twins to help other campers with all challenge levels,” says Senkier. “They get it that our family is unique, but we’re also normal.” Most importantly, she says, the whole family now feels like they have more freedom to try new things. “It’s not just recreation,” says Baseler, “The skills and confidence participants and their families gain by learning about resilience, sequencing, and safety impact their lives outside NAC.” From beginners to the elite, the NAC is working diligently to fulfill their mission of empowering individuals. As Baseler reiterates, “We would love to work ourselves out of a job by getting people out on their own with friends and family.” n

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INSPIRE

People are just drawn to her: her perpetual smile, her sincere interest in others, her boundless enthusiasm— she’s simply irresistible.


Park City Charmer SPREADING ENTHUSIASM AND INSPIRATION WORDS Steve Phillips | IMAGE Deborah DeKoff

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ULIANNA FAULKNER IS, IN A WORD, REMARKABLE. THE DELIGHTFUL 33-YEAROLD IS NOTHING SHORT OF MAGNETIC. PEOPLE ARE JUST DRAWN TO HER: HER PERPETUAL SMILE, HER SINCERE INTEREST IN OTHERS, HER BOUNDLESS ENTHUSIASM— SHE’S SIMPLY IRRESISTIBLE. Born with Down syndrome into a world with little knowledge of or tolerance for people with disabilities, Faulkner has transcended all expectations and become an accomplished and beloved Parkite. She’s a beacon for parents of children with disabilities. Faulkner moved to Park City with her family in 1991 at the age of six. It was a perfect fit. Naturally athletic and adventurous, Faulkner was soon a familiar face at the National Ability Center (NAC). She’s remained involved with the NAC for almost three decades, from volunteering in the office to helping out with camps at the center. Over the years she’s enjoyed horseback riding, skiing, bicycling, swimming, camping, and river running with the NAC. An accomplished downhill skier, Faulkner garnered a gold, two silvers, and a bronze medal at the 2006 Special Olympics. After graduating from Park City High School in 2004, Faulkner lived and worked in Park City for several years before moving to Madison, Wisconsin to attend Edgewood College. She lived off campus with roommates and a peer mentor during her five semesters of study there. In 2014, she returned to Park City and now lives independently with her roommate Anna. A confirmed workaholic, Faulkner currently holds down three jobs. Her favorite, she says, is her work as a barista at Lucky Ones Coffee, an innovative shop adjacent to the city library that’s staffed primarily by young adults with disabilities. Owned and operated by Parkites Katie Holyfield and Taylor Matkins, the shop’s mission statement focuses on “empowering individuals with disabilities by providing meaningful jobs that they love.” Faulkner also works at the Old Navy outlet and as a seasonal busser at Snow Park Lodge. In her sparse spare time, Faulkner attends Zumba classes and works out at the Basin Recreation Center. Uncommonly sensitive and intuitive, she places a high value on family. “It’s so important to me. My favorite time of year is Christmas so I can be with all my extended family,” she says. Faulkner loves meeting new people, striking up a conversation, joking, laughing, and giving hugs! Most mornings you’ll find her behind the espresso machine at Lucky Ones Coffee making luscious creations. Stop by and ask her for a chai latte. “It’s my specialty,” she smiles. n

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INSPIRE

Thinking Big for Arts and Culture PROJECT ABC UNITES, BRINGING THE ARTS TO THE FOREFRONT

WORDS Tiffini Porter | IMAGES Nan Chalat-Noaker

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OW DO ARTS AND CULTURE INFLUENCE YOUR WORLD? THINK ABOUT IT FOR A MINUTE, THEN FINISH THIS SENTENCE: “ARTS AND CULTURE … ”

SO, WHAT CAME TO MIND? MAYBE YOU THOUGHT ABOUT QUALITY OF LIFE, PERSONAL EXPRESSION, THE LOCAL ECONOMY, OR JUST PURE FUN? IN 2017, NEARLY 1,000 RESIDENTS OF SUMMIT COUNTY RESPONDED TO A SURVEY THAT POSED QUESTIONS ABOUT THE STATE OF THE ARTS IN THEIR COMMUNITIES. HERE ARE A FEW OF THE REPLIES: Arts and culture… …shapes our community identity. …helps us have empathy and compassion for differences. ...enables us to reach across geographical and economic boundaries. …transforms attitudes and lives. …is the soul of a community. Judging by those answers, arts and culture are vital to people living along the Wasatch Back, but there hasn’t always been a collective understanding around that. The 2017 survey was conducted by Project ABC: Art, Beauty, Culture, an initiative formulated by community leaders who came together to create a master plan for the future of arts and culture in Park City and Summit County. 38 ParkCityStyleMag.com |

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THE BACKSTORY Project ABC began when Randy Barton—director of Park City’s Egyptian Theatre and host of “The Local View” radio show on KPCW—observed that Summit County had invested heavily in open spaces and outdoor recreation, but that arts and culture organizations struggled without a similar level of commitment from business and government agencies. He founded Project ABC and set out to make the case that arts and culture are also essential and deserving of proactive support. “I was able to gather many arts and culture leaders and approached the city and county with a proposal to undertake this initiative and report back to them,” says Barton, and the momentum began to build. After hearing about the prevalent need for support in the creative sector, both Park City and

Summit County councils agreed that the matter deserved attention and appointed a liaison to help find a way forward. In early 2016, a steering committee composed of artists, philanthropists, and representatives from arts and culture nonprofits, businesses, and government was formed. Members soon found themselves making greater connections between their respective organizations. “Working on Project ABC has been an eye-opening experience,” says Carrie Westberg, senior event and promotions manager at Deer Valley Resort. “I have always been close to and interested in the arts. [But] not until I was asked to be a member on the Project ABC Steering Committee did I truly see the need and potential for a group to help bring arts and culture to the forefront of our community.”


Learn more about how you can help mold the future of arts and culture in Summit County. Visit projectabcsc.com to read the Project ABC Cultural Plan—aka the Roadmap—and get inspired. By the end of 2016, the committee had developed a working partnership with the Park City Summit County Arts Council (PCSC Arts Council), a non-government arts agency that has been advocating for the arts since the mid-80s. Hadley Dynak, former executive director for the PCSC Arts Council, emerged as a proponent of Project ABC and worked with Barton and the steering committee to raise funds to generate a formal master plan. That’s when things really got off the ground. TAKING ACTION “Almost every cultural organization in Summit County financially contributed,” says Jake McIntire, CEO of Union Creative Agency. McIntire was hired to manage the planning process and found the experience to be “unusually collaborative.” Project ABC collected data through surveys, stakeholder interviews, and community outreach activities. “It’s essentially a grassroots effort,” explains McIntire, adding that in his experience he hasn’t seen a process that engages such a wide variety of people and facilitates partnerships and bridges that would not have been built otherwise. In April 2018, the group released the Project ABC Roadmap, an extensive plan that lays out collective priorities, strategic recommendations, and visionary ideas for cultivating the arts and culture in Summit County. The report’s definition of arts and culture includes everything from public art installations, to ballet and symphony performances, to pottery classes and the county fair. Anything that features, “the local production and presentation of events, programs, and products based on creative ideas and cultural inspiration” fits the bill. While the steering committee and PCSC Arts Council continue to meet and gather information, the Roadmap is ultimately public property. It is available online and is meant to be used as a guide for anyone who cares to read it. If you are an artist, an established arts and culture advocate, or are looking to get into the creative scene, the Roadmap offers valuable insights about the shared goals and dreams of your Summit County neighbors. THE WAY FORWARD When asked how the Roadmap is having an impact, McIntire points to the plan itself, asserting that, “The planning process is arguably one of the most important elements,” as it brings people together around common ideals. That said, McIntire has also been privy to conversations around emerging projects inspired by Project ABC. He cites new professional development programs for artists, plans to study the economic impact of arts and culture, and talks about producing a cultural asset directory as examples. The overarching guideline is, “Think big but find small wins,” says McIntire. “It will take time for things to come to fruition, but we’re excited to see them start and are looking forward to seeing Project ABC catalyze more than we could have imagined.” n

escape THE ORDINARY AT A different PLACE

At Hyatt Place Park City, we do vacations differently. We offer free Wi-Fi, roomy rooms and our Gallery Kitchen ™ breakfast for World of Hyatt members — along with every modern comfort you deserve. Plus, you’ll be less than 1/2 mile from Canyons Village Base at Park City Mountain Resort, 4 miles to Historic Main Street’s dining, shopping, nightlife and 5 miles to Deer Valley Resort. So go ahead, do your vacation right and check out Hyatt Place Park City today.

BOOK YOUR stay AT HYATT.COM

4377 North Highway 224 • Park City, Utah 84098 • 435.776.1234 Hyatt and Hyatt Place names, designs and related marks are trademarks of Hyatt Corporation. © 2018 Hyatt Corporation. All rights reserved.

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INSPIRE

4 Nonprofits That Inspire LOCAL NONPROFITS REFLECT THE SOUL OF PARK CITY

WORDS Ashley Brown | IMAGE Jim Harris and Courtesy

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ARK CITY IS IN THE MIDST OF A GROWTH SPURT. TO BALANCE THE INFLUX OF PEOPLE AND DEVELOPMENT, THE COMMUNITY IS REACHING OUT TO SUPPORT NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS THAT FIGHT FOR CONSERVATION, RECREATION ACCESS, HUMANITY, AND COMMUNITY AWARENESS.

THESE ORGANIZATIONS AND OTHERS REPRESENT THE SOUL OF THE PARK CITY COMMUNITY.

MOUNTAIN TRAILS FOUNDATION

THE UTAH AVALANCHE CENTER (UAC)

This organization is committed to building, protecting, and maintaining trails for nonmotorized recreation. Driven by member donations, they preserve over 400 miles of trail, and in the winter, groom over 50 kilometers of track for fat biking and Nordic skiing. Mountain Trails Foundation provides recreation opportunities at no cost to the public and offers the space to enjoy a host of activities.

In collaboration with the National Forest Service, the UAC is responsible for providing snow condition data for backcountry travelers. The UAC creates a daily forecast that is accompanied by avalanche reports to reflect accurate regional avalanche conditions. The website and app are free, and the information is applicable for novice and expert users alike. The free “Know Before You Go” talks are a stepping-stone toward avalanche education and have brought avalanche awareness to 180,000 individuals.

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PEACE HOUSE

KPCW

Peace House is a refuge and beacon of hope for families who are affected by domestic violence and abuse. Peace House relies on donations of materials, financial contributions, time, and useful skills. People in abusive situations can arrive at Peace House with very little and receive the critical services that they need to move on and to start a new life free from fear. Currently, Peace House provides emergency shelter, case management, clinical therapy, advocacy, and prevention education and awareness at no cost. Upon the completion of the new Peace House facilities, these services will expand to include transitional housing and child care.

This public, community radio station educates Park City locals by broadcasting local news reports, NPR headlines, events, and a multitude of community service-based announcements. The “Lost and Found” on-air updates and the website’s community page have reunited many owners with lost pets and items. And the listener-fed traffic reports often include moose crossings.

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HIGHSTYLE PROFILE

An Ode to Barns FINDING THE SILVER LINING

WORDS Evie Carrick | IMAGE Deborah DeKoff

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OST PEOPLE DREAM OF MOVING TO A TOWN LIKE PARK CITY, BUT THAT WAS NOT THE CASE FOR TOM KELLY AND CAROLE DUH. IN FACT, THE START OF THEIR LIFE IN PARK CITY WAS A ROCKY ONE. THE YEAR WAS 1988 AND THE WISCONSIN NATIVES WERE NEWLYWEDS, READY TO START THEIR NEW LIFE TOGETHER IN COLORADO. AT THE LAST MINUTE, KELLY’S EMPLOYER, THE U.S. SKI ASSOCIATION (NOW U.S. SKI & SNOWBOARD), RELOCATED THE OPERATION FROM COLORADO TO PARK CITY, SCRAMBLING THEIR PLANS.

“I still feel that the heart and soul of Park City is seen in how this community protected its image and brand.” – Tom Kelly

Kelly remembers arriving in Park City during mud season, feeling “cantankerous.” It took about a week for him to realize the city’s lure, but the McPolin Barn purchase was what really made him fall in love with Park City. “I heard that the mayor [Brad Olch] was leading a charge to buy this barn. And I came home to Carole and said, ‘I don’t get it. Why would a city buy a barn?’ It didn’t strike us at the time that the entry corridor to Park City was totally rural and Olch had the foresight to protect the gateway to the city and that image that everyone knows,” remembers Kelly.

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The conservation movement revealed the heart and soul of the community, but was also a testament to the city’s preparedness, values, and ability to set and meet goals. After working with Olympians for 32 years as the vice president of communications at U.S. Ski and Snowboard, these are all qualities Kelly knows well. “The Olympic values have really become part of the culture of the town. All those characteristics that make great athletes also make great communities, and that’s what makes Park City so amazing,” says Kelly. Kelly retired in June, but quickly pivoted to launch his own public relations consulting agency while carving out time for photography, traveling, and skiing. Duh, who’s a fiber artist with experience in fashion, has also adapted to the shift. The two hike, collect Jeeps, and seek out artistic inspiration, often ending up at a barn in the mountains where Kelly takes photos and Duh knits. Barn photography is something Kelly is particularly passionate about, and in 2017, the couple built a barn on their property in Silver Creek. Their structure stands almost as an ode to the McPolin Barn and the movement that made Kelly fall in love with the city almost 30 years ago. “I still feel that the heart and soul of Park City is seen in how this community protected its image and brand. When you come to town you’re greeted by the white barn, and for us as locals, we know the history. It is something special about this community,” says Kelly. n


HIGHSTYLE PROFILE

Finding Flow CREATING A HEALING SPACE TO PLAY

WORDS Natalie Taylor | IMAGE Deborah DeKoff

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ILL JOHNSON LIKES TO PLAY. IN FACT, CREATIVITY AND PLAY ARE INSTRUMENTAL TO HER SUCCESS AS THE CHIEF CREATIVE OFFICER OF THE PAINT MIXER—A WINE AND ART STUDIO. “WE HAVE SURVIVAL INSTINCTS AND PLAY INSTINCTS,” SHE SAYS. “ALL TOO OFTEN, WE GET FURTHER FROM PLAY BY PUTTING PARAMETERS ON HOW THAT LOOKS. THE FOCUS HAS SHIFTED AWAY FROM THE PROCESS OF CREATIVITY AND ONTO THE FINAL PRODUCT.” THAT’S WHY THE PAINT MIXER CAN BE SO HEALING. “PEOPLE CAN TRY, MAKE MISTAKES, BE GENTLE ON THEMSELVES,” SHE SAYS. “EVERYONE HAS A STORY OF WHEN THEY LOST THEIR CREATIVITY—IT’S A TRAUMA AROUND CREATIVITY AND PLAY AND IT HAPPENS WITH TRAUMA ITSELF.” Johnson not only understands trauma, but as an art therapist, she specializes in it. In her private practice, Purity of Play LLC, she works with survivors of sexual assault, the Wounded Warrior Project at the National Ability Center, active military at Hill Air Force Base, and children with epilepsy. She knows the power of using art to heal. “Art disrupts our narratives,” she says. “We all have scripts, especially with trauma, that we repeat. But art gives people their own symbols, their own creative language, and the ability to create a different story.” Johnson’s story began on the slopes. A Park City native, she was a former U.S. Freestyle Ski Team member. Being an athlete shaped her future as a therapist. “As a competitive mogul skier, I was a gracious loser and a terrible winner,” she says. “I would ‘choke’ in the gate.” She saw a sports therapist who taught her the power of visualization and how to be present in the games. “In athletics, they call it the zone, in art, they call it a flow state,” she explains. “When I’m on my skis, it’s effortless, mindless. Creativity is the same: I see parallel alignment between the zone and the flow.” Years later, Johnson revisited therapy to help her process her parents’ divorce. Her mother was a very talented fine arts painter, so she grew up with an artist’s eye. It made sense to go to Chicago and earn an MFA in art therapy from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. When she returned to Utah, she started working with the

“...art gives people their own symbols, their own creative language, and the ability to create a different story.” – Jill Johnson

National Ability Center and Art Access and her therapy and volunteer work evolved from there. Johnson’s constantly investing in her community. “I grew up in Park City and it’s changed so much—but the soul is still here,” she says. “A big reason is that so many people give back. Local outreach keeps it rich.” She supports neighboring businesses by providing local food and drink such as Old Town Cellars wine, Tandem Chocolates, Townshend’s Tea, Vinto pizza, and seasonal specialties from Alpine Distilling at Paint Mixer events in Park City. “Local businesses and local partnerships thrive when we work and play together,” she says. n

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HIGHSTYLE PROFILE

The Dynamic Duo FINDING LOVE AND LUSCIOUS FOODS IN UTAH

WORDS Ted Scheffler | IMAGE Deborah DeKoff

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EORGIA AND NORTH CAROLINA DON’T GET A LOT OF SNOW. AND YET, MATTHEW (MATT) HARRIS AND MAGGIE ALVAREZ, HAILING ORIGINALLY FROM GEORGIA AND NORTH CAROLINA RESPECTIVELY, LOVE WINTER SPORTS. GOOD THING THEY EACH FOUND THEIR WAY TO PARK CITY.

“At Tupelo, we really want to showcase Utah.” – Maggie Alvarez

The married couple are the owners of Tupelo, a restaurant that features globally-inspired cuisine with a Southern slant. Pan-roasted bass comes with corn chowder and smoked andouille sausage, for example, and pork tenderloin sports braised collard greens. It’s cooking that meshes the couple’s love of travel and exploring world cuisines with their fondness of Southern cooking. The two Southerners met right here in Utah. Destiny? Probably. Harris, who worked construction and other jobs during high school, found that he preferred toiling in restaurant kitchens over pounding nails. Harris has come a long way from working in a family-style eatery in Buford, Georgia. He worked in fine dining restaurants in Atlanta, New York City, and San Francisco, before opening J&G Grill at the St. Regis Deer Valley as executive chef for renown chef/restaurateur Jean-Georges Vongerichten. That’s where he met his future wife, Alvarez. The Tupelo website refers to Alvarez as “Partner/Tiger Mom.” Of the two, she’s the more organized. “I’m not really a restaurant person,” she says, having come from a more entrepreneurial and business background. “We’re a

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small business,” she says. “But I like to apply the principles that I learned in big business and corporations such as the St. Regis to our business.” Attention to detail—right down to the Tupelo servers’ nametags—is her specialty. Harris is notably more laid back. “I’m not a planner,” he admits. Harris says that when he relocated to Utah he was very skeptical, thinking he’d have to order a lot of foodstuffs from out of state. But he was pleasantly surprised. “With every challenge that I had when I came here, I was met with an equal blessing. All of the sudden I was finding that the beets here are fantastic. The lamb is out of this world! While you might struggle with caviar or truffles, you’re blessed with an amazing cheese that’s only made here. Or you’re blessed with a type of tomato or honey that’s only found here.” Today, on their small Midway farm, Harris and Alvarez grow some of the produce and herbs that they use at Tupelo. Alvarez says, “At Tupelo we really want to showcase Utah. It’s like, what can you get here in Park City that you can’t get anywhere else?” They both talk enthusiastically about Utah foods that even Jean-Georges Vongerichten doesn’t have access to: Green River melons, Gold Creek Farms’ feta, the tomatoes they’re growing themselves, goat milk and cheese from Drake Family Farms, and on and on it goes. Both inside and outside Tupelo, Harris and Alvarez are a dynamic duo. “We can’t eat all the time,” says Alvarez. So they also love hiking, camping, backpacking, fly-fishing, backcountry skiing, globetrotting, and just about any adventure or challenge that’s put in front of them. This winter they opened the world’s first ski-in, ski-out raw bar, Rime Raw Bar, at Deer Valley Resort. They are an active couple, to say the least—a very dynamic duo, indeed. n


“WE STRIVE TO BE THE VOICE OF THE ATHLETES AND PRIORITIZE FUNDING, WHICH HELPS THEM BECOME THE BEST THEY CAN BE BY OFFSETTING THEIR EXPENSES.” – BILL DEMONG

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THE FUTURE OF NORDIC SUPPORTING THE NEXT GENERATION

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WORDS Evie Carrick | IMAGES Courtesy Romina Eggert and U.S. Ski & Snowboard–Steven Earl

ANY OF US IMAGINE THE PATH OF AN OLYMPIC-LEVEL ATHLETE AS BEING GOLD PLATED, WITH AN ABUNDANCE OF FREE GEAR AND WADS OF MONEY. FOR THE SHAUN WHITE’S OF THE OLYMPIC WORLD, THAT MAY BE TRUE, BUT FOR UNESTABLISHED ATHLETES IN LESSER-KNOWN SPORTS THE ROAD TO THE OLYMPICS IS MORE ROCKY THAN PAVED (AND SURELY NOT GOLD PLATED).

It takes plenty of ambition and talent, but also money, to maintain a competitive Olympic career. Park City local and Alpine skier Megan McJames knows this all too well. When she was cut from the U.S. Ski and Snowboard team in 2012, she made the choice to continue competing independently. She fully funded her own career before announcing her retirement in 2018. Even athletes with a spot on a national team struggle to cover every cost. It’s why organizations like USA Nordic were created. We sit down with USA Nordic Executive Director Bill Demong to get his take on the organization’s role in supporting Nordic combined and ski jumping athletes. Then, we’ll hear from national team athletes Jasper Good and Sarah Hendrickson on what it takes to succeed and where their sights are set moving forward. Tell me about USA Nordic. USA Nordic started because of a need. In 2008, U.S. Ski and Snowboard made a strategic shift in its resource allocation, which resulted in decreased funding for some disciplines, including ski jumping. A group of ski jumping alumni incorporated a nonprofit called USA Ski Jumping (USASJ) and started to fundraise to ensure continuity of the national team program for men (women’s ski jumping had not yet begun on an international level).

In 2014, following the winter games in Sochi, the Nordic combined program also lost much of its funding. In the following months USASJ welcomed Nordic combined and by the spring of 2015 there was a restructuring and a name change to USA Nordic. Today, USA Nordic is the national leadership organization for ski jumping and Nordic combined, staffing and programming national teams for men and women in both disciplines and working with 30 clubs from Alaska to New Hampshire that operate programs. How does USA Nordic support the athletes (both financially and otherwise)? We are an athletes-first driven organization. We strive to be the voice of the athletes and prioritize funding, which helps them become the best they can be by offsetting their expenses. Last year, USA Nordic covered all of the out-of-pocket expenses for our World Cup athletes, regardless of team rank. This means we covered all airfare, lodging, coaching, ground transportation, and reasonable equipment expenses for all of the athletes who represented the U.S. at the World Cup and Olympic level. We also invest in resources like sports psychology, nutrition, physical therapy, and with amazing partners like Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine, we can help athletes make incremental changes to their training to be the best they can be.

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What’s the athlete’s role in garnering their own financial support? What does it take to be successful at this? We have a great group of athletes who believe in “One-Team” and that means fundraising and providing value to sponsors together for the common good. That’s why we prioritize funding the World Cup level fully, so athletes and their parents know that if they commit to the sport, we are commiting to them. Unfortunately, we can’t fund every level of development fully so we prioritize the shared costs of lower tier competitions, like staff, vehicles, and lodging. That means that athletes do have to cover personal travel to competitions like the Continental Cup through personal sponsors and fundraising. We do our best to help them procur those individual needs with partnerships like the National Nordic Foundation (NNF). Tell me about the national team of athletes you work with today. We have an amazing stable of young, talented, and hard-working athletes across disciplines and genders. It is great to observe the culture they are building together, and with a 50 ParkCityStyleMag.com |

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dedicated and energized staff of coaches they are working hard to make the U.S. great across all the disciplines. I am super excited every time I go to the hill to see the progress the young athletes are making! Tell me about your personal history with Nordic. I started competing in cross-country when I was 5 and remember just loving to race! I added jumping when I was 9 and knew right away that Nordic combined was the sport for me. I enjoy the pain of a race as much as the pleasure of soaring through the air, and after five Olympic Games, I can look back and say I honestly accomplished more than I ever dreamed of. Winning America’s first gold medal in Nordic skiing was a team effort and the journey, with teammates like Johnny Spillane and Brett and Eric Camerota, was more powerful than the victory itself. My biggest goal now is to ensure that future generations have the same opportunities I did. How have Nordic combined and ski jumping developed in the U.S. over the years? Ski jumping and Nordic combined have an incredibly rich history in the U.S. as the

original snow-sport disciplines. There used to be hundreds of ski jumping venues from California to Maine, but that number fell off as Alpine became more popular and resorts replaced ski jumps. Today, we have 30 clubs from Alaska to New Hampshire with the highest density being 15 clubs in the Midwest. I’m proud to say that number is growing and we have doubled the number of kids participating since 2012. The sports are much less dangerous and much more focused on cutting edge equipment and technique these days. We want to promote the fact that even kids as young as 14 can learn to soar as far as 130 yards with very few injuries compared to other snow sports. Looking forward, what’s your ultimate goal for the sport? Ultimately, our goal is to make the U.S. one of the best nations in the world in ski jumping and Nordic combined. From podiums at the games to having great programs across the country that help teach our core values of Courage, Confidence, and Character to aspiring youth through flying on skis! n


JULIE NESTER GALLERY

Nicholas Wilton, Eclipse, 36" x 48", mixed media on panel, 2018

NICHOLAS WILTON I Orchestrated Moments I December 21 - January 22 GUY DILL I Selected Works from "Los Angeles" and the "White Series" I February 1 - 26 JENNIFER NEHRBASS I Pioneer Project I March 1-26

1280 Iron Horse Dr, Park City, UT

435.649.7855

ju Iie nesterga I le ry.com


BASECAMP

FLY HIGH, SKI FAST OLYMPIAN RELIES ON ROOTS, SETS SIGHTS HIGH

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WORDS Evie Carrick | IMAGES Gillian Hunter and Sarah Brunson

S A KID GROWING UP IN STEAMBOAT, COLORADO, SKI JUMPING WAS LITERALLY ALWAYS IN JASPER GOOD’S LINE OF SIGHT. WHEN HE WALKED OUT OF HIS CHILDHOOD HOME, TOOK A RIGHT, AND HEADED DOWNTOWN, THERE THEY SAT: THE SKI JUMPS ON HOWELSEN HILL. GOOD REMEMBERS THINKING, “I CAN’T GROW UP IN STEAMBOAT, LOOKING AT THOSE JUMPS EVERY DAY, AND NOT TRY THEM.” AND SO HE DID.

Good says the “hook of flying” and his skill for endurance led him to explore the sport of Nordic combined with the Steamboat Springs Winter Sports Club. The sport has two components: ski jumping and cross-country skiing, a mix that requires athletes to be explosive and strong, as well as swift. Competitors ski jump first, and based on distance and style, their starting position in the cross-country portion is determined. After high school, Good deferred from college and took a gap year to give his ski career a shot. That year resulted in his acceptance on the U.S. Nordic Combined Team, a move to Park City, and a string of career highs, including a spot on the Nordic combined team for the PyeongChang Olympics. Good’s first Olympic results didn’t earn him a podium, but at 22, his career is just unfolding and his sights are set on the 2022 Olympics in Beijing. “The Olympics this past season were in some ways an experience Olympics. Our team will be at the point in four years [four years from the 2018 Olympics] where we’ll be fighting for medals at our event. We have four years to get there and get there in a good mentality,” he explains. When he considers where he is today, Good is highly aware of everyone who continues to make it possible. “In order to pursue this career I had to learn how to become a self fundraiser. I fully fund my career through fundraising,” explains Good, noting that without the support of his community, friends, family, donors, and USA Nordic “this quite simply would not be possible.” As Good continues advancing in the sport, he’s relying on his supporters—both financial and otherwise—to aid him in reaching his full potential. These people and organizations are turning the goals of a young boy inspired by 52 ParkCityStyleMag.com |

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Howelsen Hill into a reality. As for Good? He’s typically on the move. Between trainings in the Czech Republic and competitions in Slovenia,

he’s taking classes with the University of Utah online; constantly working to grow his career and make his supporters proud. n


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“I respect the male jumpers more than anyone and I want to take nothing away from them, but I want the same treatment.” – Sarah Hendrickson

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Women in Flight FIGHTING FOR EQUALITY

WORDS Evie Carrick | IMAGE Deborah DeKoff

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HEN IT COMES TO THE OLYMPIC GAMES, SARAH HENDRICKSON HAS A KNACK FOR TIMING. A PARK CITY LOCAL, SHE STARTED SKI JUMPING AT THE AGE OF 7, RIGHT AROUND THE TIME PARK CITY STARTED PREPARING FOR THE 2002 OLYMPICS. TRAINING FACILITIES AND YOUTH PROGRAMS THAT DIDN’T EXIST A FEW YEARS PRIOR WERE SUDDENLY AVAILABLE AND THERE WAS NO SHORTAGE OF INSPIRATION AS OLYMPIANS FLOODED INTO TOWN. Then, at the 2014 Olympics in Sochi, women were allowed to participate in Olympic ski jumping for the first time and Hendrickson was assigned bib No. 1, making her the first woman to jump at an Olympic event. Female inclusion in the sport was the result of a long battle for equality that Hendrickson and other female skiers fought for. “Honestly, ski jumping is such a technical sport that the women do take on more speed than the men due to our body structure. With more speed, it’s easier to go farther and you don’t need as much power on the takeoff,” says Hendrickson. “I think it was a little threatening for the male side of the sport. I respect the male jumpers more than anyone and I want to take nothing away from them, but I want the same treatment.” Today, Hendrickson has her eye on the next moment in history for female ski jumpers. After only being able to compete on normal hill jumps, the International Ski Federation has added a series of large hill jumps to the women’s ski jumping calendar. For the first time, women will be able to compete on the same jumps men have used for years. The good news for Hendrickson? Large jumps have always been her forte and as an advocate for ski jumping equality, this is right up her alley. The bad news? She’s dealing with a knee injury that’s plagued her since 2013. While the injury has certainly held her back, it’s also provided her with the time to pursue other interests, most notably Fly Girls, a youth development program for talented female ski jumpers. While male athletes now also participate, Hendrickson says “It was started in hopes of expanding women’s involvement in the sport. We wanted to get awareness out and start developing the next generation.” In addition to continuing her work with Fly Girls, Hendrickson is currently taking time off to attend college and let her body heal after finishing 19th in the 2018 Olympics. The healing process has been a frustrating one for Hendrickson. “Once you’ve won, all you want to do is win again because you know that feeling. It’s made my rehabs so much harder because I know I can get there, but my body won’t let me,” she explains. However, if her history is any indication, Hendrickson’s resolve to heal her body may end up being perfectly timed, as the 2022 Olympics in Beijing draw near. n

MARVIN SKIS Guided Ski Trips

Let Marvin Skis shape your local and worldwide adventures From Park City to Jackson Hole, Alaska to France, South American to Japan Sign up with Marvin Skis and be

READY TO GO 307.690.5323 • marvinskis@gmail.com

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Backcountry Ski Beta FINDING THE SILVER LINING ON A CROWDED POWDER DAY WORDS Ashley Brown | IMAGES Courtesy Rebekah Stevens–Park City Powder Cats

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N A POWDER DAY IN PARK CITY, MOST OF US HAVE EXPERIENCED SHOWING UP 45 MINUTES TOO LATE FOR LIFT-ACCESSED POWDER SKIING. FIGHTING THROUGH SWARMS OF HUMANS INFECTED WITH A SEVERE CASE OF POWDER FEVER CAN BE DISHEARTENING. THE NUMBER OF SKIERS AND RIDERS IS ON THE RISE, MAKING LIFT-ACCESSED SKIING FEEL MORE LIKE A THEME PARK THAN A QUIET MOUNTAIN EXPERIENCE. RIDING A CHAIRLIFT AND TAKING LOTS OF TURNS IS A GRATIFYING OCCURRENCE NOT TO BE DISREGARDED, BUT THERE ARE TIMES WHEN SOLITUDE AND UNTRACKED POWDER ARE NECESSARY.

One way to practically guarantee mountain solitude and fresh tracks is to ascend the mountain with skins and ski down. The slow speed of uphill movement is an antidote to our progressively busy lifestyles, and the majesty of the mountains provides an irreplaceable feeling of humility and peace. It’s no wonder backcountry skiing is so magnetizing. The rewards reaped while ski touring come with inherent risk. Backcountry skiing occurs in uncontrolled environments that require avalanche rescue equipment, the knowledge to assess snowpack stability, and an understanding of avalanche terrain. If you’re navigating uncontrolled terrain as a recreational or professional user, the Utah Avalanche Center (UAC) is a trusted resource for up-to-date avalanche conditions, forecasts, and occurrences. There are two avenues for learning how to navigate the backcountry: taking an avalanche course and skiing independently or hiring a professional guide. 56 ParkCityStyleMag.com |

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INDEPENDENT BACKCOUNTRY SKIING A popular backcountry access point is at the top of Ninety-Nine 90 chairlift on the Canyons Village side of Park City Mountain. Guiding services do not have permission to guide out of Park City ski resorts, so utilizing this access point is truly a ski at your own risk experience. Before you exit through the backcountry gate there is a sign reading, “You are leaving the ski resort, YOU CAN DIE, this is your decision.” Pictures of individuals smiling in front of this sign with no avalanche safety gear are abundant and concerning. There is nothing funny about the notice as the backcountry access from Ninety-Nine 90 is historically one of the most dangerous in the Wasatch. Presumably because people make the short hike from the chairlift without education and assume the sign is a joke. For backcountry skiers, avalanche safety requires a serious and informed approach. The only safe way to ski the backcountry is to become educated in avalanche safety. There


are several avalanche safety course providers including American Alpine Institute (AAI), American Institute for Avalanche Research and Education (AIARE), Utah Avalanche Center (UAC), and select local guiding services. Park Citybased White Pine Touring offers AIARE courses with increasing levels of depth, including companion rescue and recreational level 1 and 2 courses. You’ll learn how to assess and navigate avalanche terrain safely and practice using your beacon, shovel, and probe. GUIDED SKIING Getting on the snow with a guide who has made avalanche safety and risk management their professional career allows for a safer backcountry experience. By hiring a professional guide, a skier can gain valuable skills and lessons about navigating avalanche terrain as well as the intricacies of ski touring. For most, skiing with a guide is the best choice even after completing an avalanche education course. Most guiding companies can provide customized programs to achieve the needs and goals of the client. This includes snow science skills, more efficient skinning, informed avalanche terrain travel, and skiing powder. Several professional guiding services offer a multitude of ski touring destinations within a short distance from Park City. Utah’s iconic backcountry ski destination is the Central Wasatch, which includes the mid and upper Big Cottonwood Canyon and Little Cottonwood Canyon. The base of both canyons is a 30-minute drive from Park City and offers an abundance of ski touring occasions. Guided access to the Park City ridgeline is an option with entry from Big Cottonwood Canyon. The Backcountry Pros and Utah Mountain Adventures are trusted guiding companies with permits for the Central Wasatch. The skiing in the western fringe of the vast Uinta Mountains is a 45-minute drive from Park City and will feel like remote wilderness compared to the Central Wasatch. The Uintas are uninhabited and frequented far less. These mountains have completely different weather patterns and are home to a less-stable snowpack than the Central Wasatch. A ski touring trip to the Uinta Mountains is an opportunity for quiet, fresh powder turns, and remote experiences. Inspired Summit Adventures is a reputable guiding company that has a permit for ski touring and snowmobile access ski touring in the Uintas. Park City Powder Cats is a Uinta-based cat skiing operation where clients enjoy untracked powder on 43,000 acres. For almost all recreational skiers, the seldom-utilized terrain of the Uinta Mountains requires the assistance of a guide. Whether you ski independently or with a guide, approach the backcountry with respect and caution so that you and your friends can get out and do it again. n 57 ParkCityStyleMag.com |

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Think Outside the Chairlift 10 UNIQUE PARK CITY EXPERIENCES EXPLORE PARK CITY’S CUISINE AND HISTORY ON A FOOD TOUR Gourmand Food Tours guides participants through the cuisines at three excellent restaurants where the attendees will have the opportunity to try a variety of dishes. For a healthy dose of history, the tour includes a visit to Park City Museum where participants learn about Park City’s mining and early ski days. Gourmand Food Tours is pleased to accommodate any dietary restrictions and has experience working with chefs to make specialty food items. IMMERSE YOURSELF IN A WINE TASTING EXPERIENCE Fox School of Wine delivers a variety of wine-tasting experiences with qualified wine professors. One such experience is Table for 12, an intimate, in-depth study of wine with food pairings led by a certified sommelier and hors d’oeuvre expert. The school’s Weekend Wine Series is an educational happy hour for up to 21 guests that features wines chosen based on a weekly topic. The hour-long session is a delightful pre-game for dinner or a night on the town. WORDS ASHLEY BROWN IMAGES Gillian Hunter, Courtesy Park City Powder Cats and The Mine Bouldering Gym

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E EXPECT MILES OF GROOMED RUNS AND FRESH POWDER TURNS IN PARK CITY, BUT SKIING IS JUST ONE OF THE WAYS TO PLAY AMID THE WASATCH PEAKS. BEYOND THE SLOPES ARE OCCASIONS TO DELIGHT THE PALATE OR BECOME ACQUAINTED WITH PARK CITY’S HISTORY. RECREATIONAL EXPERIENCES OUTSIDE THE RESORTS ARE PLENTIFUL.

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FLOAT THROUGH UTAH POWDER IN THE UINTA WILDERNESS Take a break from the resort crowds and find freedom on your skis at Park City Powder Cats. The Uinta-based cat-skiing operation is a quick 30-minute drive from Park City. Despite the proximity, Park City Powder Cats operates in a true wilderness area with access to 43,000 acres of ski terrain. The vast Uinta Mountains create an opportunity for life-changing powder runs accessed via the leisure of a snowcat. BOOK A GENUINE YURT-GLAMPING EXPERIENCE Inspired Summit Adventures in partnership with White Pine Touring offers an exceptional backcountry experience. Skiers can sleep deep in the Uinta Mountains at the Castle Peak Yurt and enjoy powder runs alongside a qualified guide. It’s a winter “glamping” occasion with skiing out the front door and terrain as varied as low-angle tree skiing and high-alpine descents. Gourmet meals and a woodfire sauna elevate the experience. Book your trip through Inspired Summit Adventures.


CRUISE SNOWY TERRAIN VIA SNOWMOBILE Snowmobiling at Daniels Summit Lodge provides a remote high-elevation experience. Daniels Summit Lodge maintains over 40 miles of groomed runs. Options for snowmobile rentals include guided and self-guided trips that will challenge novice and experienced riders. Make it a weekend getaway and rent a rustic wood cabin for the night.

UTAH’S ULTIMATE SNOWCAT SKIING EXPERIENCE

featuring premier backcountry skiing and riding

TEST YOUR STRENGTH AND BALANCE AT THE MINE BOULDERING GYM When it’s too cold for another ski day, The Mine Bouldering Gym delivers active entertainment for children and adults of all ages. Climbing shoes and chalk are available for rent and the bouldering wall is approachable, with no belay and rope expertise needed. A day pass includes access to one of the gym’s daily yoga classes. SETTLE IN FOR BRUNCH WITH A $4 MIMOSA OR BLOODY MARY On Saturday and Sunday, Squatters nourishes Park City with $4 mimosas and bloody marys from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Order an enjoyable brunch for omnivores and herbivores alike with typical comfort dishes and vegan delights. If there’s a wait for a spot in the dining area, the bar is first come, first served. LET LOOSE AT THE UTAH OLYMPIC PARK (UOP) The UOP is a playground for people of all ages. The Winter Summit Course and the Winter Canyons Course are obstacle courses designed to test your limits and skills. For an extreme adrenaline boost, reserve a Winter Bobsled Experience. Before leaving, be sure to browse the park’s museums to savor highlights from the 2002 Winter Olympic Games and learn about the history of skiing. TEST YOUR BALANCE WITH INDOOR PADDLEBOARD YOGA For a uniquely Utah experience, drive the 30-minutes to Midway to visit the Homestead Crater. Park City Yoga Adventures offers daily paddleboard yoga classes in the crater’s Caribbean-blue, 95-degree mineral water. If nothing else, the geographical structure of the Homestead Crater makes for a picturesque and tranquil experience. For an added adventure, snowshoe through Wasatch Mountain State Park prior to your class. RENT SNOWSHOES OR SLAP ON YOUR YAKTRAX AND TAKE A HIKE Park City is home to miles of trails that are groomed and maintained all winter long. Appreciate the Wasatch Range in a new light with a winter wonderland stroll. Round Valley is an excellent location with groomed trails and little to no chance of avalanche occurrence. Check out White Pine Touring for snowshoe rentals. n

• UNTRACKED POWDER, EVERY RUN! • CUSTOM HEATED SNOWCAT COACHES • NO RESORT BOUNDRIES OR LIFT LINES

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MOUNTAINSTYLE LIVING

HISTORY

HOME HERITAGE SHARING A LOVE FOR THE LAND

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WORDS Darby Doyle | IMAGE Deborah DeKoff

FIFTH-GENERATION UTAHN, PAGE MORRIS JULIANO DESCRIBES HERSELF AS A “UTAH GEMINI,” WITH HALF OF HER TIME SPENT IN BUSTLING SALT LAKE CITY AND THE OTHER HALF SPENT ENJOYING THE OPEN SPACES AROUND PARK CITY. HER GREAT-GRANDFATHER WAS ELECTED MAYOR OF SALT LAKE CITY IN 1904, AND THE FAMILY SPENT SUMMERS AT BRIGHTON. WHEN HER FATHER—THE NOW-LEGENDARY DEER VALLEY DEVELOPER ROB MORRIS—WAS A CHILD, HE AND HIS SIBLINGS WOULD PACK A LUNCH AND RIDE HORSES OVER GUARDSMAN PASS TO PARK CITY TO GET HAIRCUTS ON MAIN STREET, AN ALL-DAY ADVENTURE. JULIANO GREW UP TRAVELING BETWEEN SALT LAKE CITY AND PARK CITY REGULARLY FOR SCHOOL AND ACTIVITIES. “IT’S THE BEST OF BOTH WORLDS,” SHE SAYS OF HER DUAL COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS.

Along with a generations-deep love of the land, Juliano recognizes that her passion for fine arts comes directly from her father and mother. Her mother, Carlyle Morris was equally respected in real estate and Utah arts circles. After Juliano completed her studies at the University of Utah in art history, she worked for many years in the gallery scene. Eventually, she shifted back to the family business of real estate while keeping one foot firmly planted in Utah’s arts community. An avid art collector, her support of the scene has been constant, with Juliano serving on the Park City Kimball Art Center board and the University of Utah’s World Leaders Lecture Forum board. Juliano’s love for art and architecture translates to helping her clients find places that speak to them. Says her assistant Kelley Keator, “Page’s 60 ParkCityStyleMag.com |

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radius is wide, but she gives every client her full attention.” With listings from Bountiful to Park City and Salt Lake City, her clients come from a huge range of backgrounds. “Everyone gets the same quality and exposure. My attention is not exclusive to price point. I really enjoy helping people find homes that they love,” says Juliano. Her role of carrying on her family’s long lineage along with her husband of 32 years and her two “beautiful, strong children” is not something Juliano takes lightly. “The key to success in real estate anywhere, but especially Park City, is connections,” she says of her underlying philosophy of treating everyone with compassion and respect, “getting along with everyone will serve you well in the long run.” Juliano’s especially proud to be part of the Summit Sotheby’s organization and the

“Sotheby’s Cares” donation program where agents voluntarily share a portion of each finalized transaction with a nonprofit of their choice. Her desire to give back also shows in her passion for open land conservation and historic preservation. She most recently championed preservation efforts at Bonanza Flats and the Armstrong Ranch, and serves on the Park City Board of Realtors. “Park City has changed a lot,” says Juliano. “Sometimes I’m driving around, and I get choked up thinking about what’s been lost.” From land preservation to nonprofit support, Juliano’s sharp focus always comes back to her love of helping others find joy and harmony in their home. “I love houses,” she says of the many she’s owned over the years and hundreds she’s helped clients find. “They’re little pieces of art.” n


“I REALLY ENJOY HELPING PEOPLE FIND HOMES THAT THEY LOVE” – PAGE MORRIS JULIANO


MOUNTAINSTYLE LIVING

PARK CITY SHINES ON FINDING YOUR SILVER LINING

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WORDS Ashley Brown | IMAGES Angela Howard, Courtesy Historic Park City Alliance and Deer Valley Resort

OR MOST OF US, CHANGE IS SCARY, AND WITNESSING THE TRANSFORMATION OF PARK CITY FROM A QUIET MOUNTAIN TOWN TO A WORLD-RENOWNED DESTINATION CAN BE DIFFICULT. AT THE HEART OF THRIVING RECREATION, ABUNDANT MUSIC, DIVERSE ARTS, GOURMET CUISINE, AND LUXURY ACCOMMODATIONS IS THE SOUL OF PARK CITY—THE MOUNTAINS.

The sweet warmth of reminiscing is alluring, and it’s easy to talk about the Park City of a quarter century past. Yes, the infrastructure continues to expand with carefully built homes, restaurants, hotels, and shops in Park City proper and the surrounding areas. The growth is unavoidable, but the community remains central in molding how our mountain town matures. Those who make Park City their home find the silver lining in the abundance of public trails

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maintained by organizations like Mountain Trails Foundation and Basin Recreation. Park City’s booming trail system entails over 400 miles of pathways earning them the prestigious title of “Gold Level Ride Center” from the International Mountain Bicycling Association. In addition, Nordic skiers have access to over 30 miles of groomed trails. For a couple years running, Park City has been named home to the largest ski resort in North America. The two ski resorts in town are

making continued improvements to lifts, lodges, and dining opportunities. The overall ski mountain experience is elevated to a level of sophistication that is undeniably luxurious. The Wasatch peaks are Park City’s anchor, and after a day of hiking, skiing, or biking we’re rewarded with live music and a mountain backdrop. Year-round outdoor music is central to Park City. Free shows are abundant, and venues like the Eccles Theater, Egyptian Theatre, and Park City Live welcome renown acts.


AS PARK CITY BLOSSOMS TO MEET INTERNATIONAL ATTENTION, THE MOUNTAINS REMAIN CENTRAL.

Find yourself in

The transformation from sleepy mountain town to thriving art center has brought famous musicians to play on Park City stages. In tandem with increased recreation and tourism, talented artists and artisans are drawn to the Wasatch mountains. The peaks and wildlife that give Park City its personality inspire a multitude of art, jewelry, and crafted goods. Talented individuals recreate the majesty of nature with items to display in our homes or on our bodies. Sundance Film Festival’s annual arrival in January drives profits for businesses and service-industry employees. It draws producers, directors, actors, and entertainment professionals who dine, play, and enjoy the mountain air. After long days and late nights, individuals with tip-based jobs receive monetary motivation. Chefs infuse cuisines with local elements and flavors. The expansion of Park City has come with a wealth of ethnically diverse restaurants. Dining opportunities are as broad as skiing experiences, with tastes to appease sophisticated and traditional palates alike. Chefs utilize items from local farms and regional wild game. Locally-sourced products are the centerpiece of many restaurant menus around town. Each year, more and more people visit Park City or choose to call it home. Visitor lodging, homes, and commercial space continue to develop, but a consideration for wilderness conservation is evident within many organizations. Locals can drive the direction of growth by defining historic preservation and environmental concern as top priorities. A respect of nature is apparent in Park City’s effort to make choices that reduce environmental impact. LEED-certified buildings, electric buses, and the restoration of old mining structures illuminate the community’s values. The miraculous fundraising feat to save Bonanza Flats from development points to what Park City can accomplish as it matures as an eco-focused community. As Park City continues to attract international attention, the mountains remain central. They are the essence of Park City life. Expansive trails, inspired art, and local food are just a few ways in which the Wasatch mountains impact and inspire Park City’s growth. From artistic renderings to recreation opportunities, Park City still shines as a soul-filled mountain town. n

the mountains and escape

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MOUNTAINSTYLE LIVING

Soul HISTORIC PARK CITY

WORDS Evie Carrick | IMAGES Courtesy Historic Patk City Alliance

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F YOU ASK MICHAEL BARILLE, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE HISTORIC PARK CITY ALLIANCE, HE’D TELL YOU THAT THERE’S “NO DOUBT THAT HISTORIC PARK CITY IS THE ‘MAIN ATTRACTION.’”

And he’s right, there is something special about Historic Park City. Maybe it’s the fact that some of the buildings from the mining era still remain. Or the 1,200 miles of mining tunnels that wind through the surrounding mountains. Or maybe it’s the fact that it started as a silver town and almost became a ghost town before reinventing itself as a ski destination. Today, more than 200 businesses line Main Street and if the shops, restaurants, and spas don’t hold your interest, you can pop on your skis or snowboard, hop onto the Town Lift, and get whisked into the snowy hills of Park City Mountain within minutes. “Visitors can shop among over 100 independent specialty shops, dine at 50 one-of-a-kind

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restaurants, relax at a restorative spa, ride the town lift to play in the mountains, stay in style within a short walk of everything, revel in our spirited nightlife, discover something to treasure from our lively art community, connect with someone who can help you start a life in Park City, or meet within the heart of a mountain town,” says Barille. His claim that this historic part of the city is Park City’s main attraction may be debated by some, but there’s no doubt that it houses the soul of Park City. It’s here that people have gathered for generations—whether for a postshift beer between miners or a post-shred coffee and bagel between ski bums. Historic Park City is where the magic of today and generations past meet. n

“Visitors can shop among over 100 independent specialty shops, dine at 50 one-of-a-kind restaurants” – Michael Barille


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MOUNTAINSTYLE LIVING

Glitz DEER VALLEY RESORT

WORDS Evie Carrick | IMAGES Courtesy Deer Valley Resort

D

EER VALLEY RESORT MAY NOT BE THE FIRST U.S. SKI RESORT, BUT ACCORDING TO THE WORLD SKI AWARDS, IT’S EASILY THE BEST. IN 2018, DEER VALLEY WAS VOTED THE BEST U.S. SKI RESORT BY SKI TOURISM PROFESSIONALS AND SKI CONSUMERS FROM AROUND THE WORLD. THE HONOR IS THE SKI INDUSTRY’S MOST PROMINENT ACCOLADE, BUT IS ECLIPSED BY THE FACT THAT THIS IS THE SIXTH CONSECUTIVE YEAR DEER VALLEY HAS RECEIVED THE AWARD. They’re that good. Deer Valley is the standard for first-class service in the ski industry. Their mission appears to be simple, but is extremely difficult to deliver on. They work to provide the level of service one would expect to receive at a five-star hotel, and they take that mission seriously. Deer Valley offers over-thetop dining (both on mountain and off), sells just a limited number of daily lift tickets to ensure the

mountain is never too crowded, and is home to the mid-mountain Goldener Hirsch Inn (which was just rated the best U.S. ski boutique hotel). Details like these guarantee skiers at Deer Valley a ski day like no other. (And yes, the resort is skiing only.) Emily Summers, the senior communications manager for the resort says that in addition to an unparalleled attention to detail,

Deer Valley guests experience unique perks like supreme guest service and everything you’d expect at a “world-wide award-winning vacation destination.” To put it simply, Deer Valley delivers the glitz. As part of Park City as a whole, the acclaimed resort brings a level of class and notoriety the city wouldn’t have otherwise; enticing the world’s elite with a ski experience like no other. n

“...the acclaimed resort brings a level of class and notoriety...”

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MOUNTAINSTYLE LIVING

Ease CANYONS VILLAGE

WORDS Evie Carrick | IMAGES Courtesy Park City Mountain

C

ANYONS VILLAGE MAKES SKIING SIMPLE. JUST 35 MINUTES FROM SALT LAKE CITY AIRPORT AND 15 MINUTES FROM HISTORIC PARK CITY, CANYONS VILLAGE IS THE FIRST SKI BASE YOU’LL COME ACROSS ON YOUR DRIVE INTO TOWN.

The mindfully constructed, family-friendly ski village reduces the inevitable ski vacation stressors; everything in the village is a quick walk or gondola ride away, the ski school is central, and the Orange Bubble Express—the U.S.’s first bubbled and heated chairlift—warms up cold kids (and adults) between runs. Canyons Village sits at the base of Park City Mountain, acting as the counterpart to Park City Mountain Village just north of Historic Park City. “Canyons Village at Park City Mountain is a wonderful place to stay and explore if you are planning a trip to Park City, especially for

families,” says Jessica Miller with the resort’s communications team, noting that the area has several ski-in, ski-out properties that are mere steps from the chairlift. When Canyons Resort merged with Park City Mountain in 2015, the newly formed resort gained notoriety as the largest ski area in the U.S. and underwent a $50 million dollar transformation. With 341 trails and 41 lifts, you can start your day at Canyons and end up in Park City Mountain Village—or even Historic Park City. Canyons Village adds to the Park City experience by providing an added level of ease and

“The area is transforming into one of the most vibrant areas of town” – Jessica Miller

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accessibility. In addition to easy airport and city access, the village is a basecamp for skiers who want an escape from the bustle of the city and are seeking comfort after a day on the mountain. “The area is transforming into one of the most vibrant areas of town with new options for dining, lodging, and entertainment,” says Miller. “This season, Canyons Village will present a series of complimentary live concerts, fireworks displays, and village activities for guests to enjoy after they hit the slopes. It’s the perfect complement to a day spent on the mountain.” n


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BHHSUtah.com | Mobile Search: Text “utah” to 87778 435.649.7171 | 354 Main Street, Park City © 2019 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently owned and operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. Equal Housing Opportunity. Photo courtesy of Hotel Park City.

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MOUNTAINSTYLE LIVING

IS THE SKI BUM DREAM STILL ALIVE? MAKING IT WORK IN PARK CITY

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WORDS Darby Doyle | IMAGE Gillian Hunter

CAME TO THE U.S. WITH A BACKPACK AND A SNOWBOARD,” SAYS HIGH WEST DISTILLERY BEVERAGE MANAGER STEVE WALTON, “AND NOW I’VE GOT A MORTGAGE, A WIFE, AND TWO KIDS.”

A native of Newcastle, U.K. he’s seen huge changes since his first Park City Mountain (PCM) season in 2005. “I was hired as a liftie, making $7 an hour. We lived in a two-bedroom house on Park Avenue. Six people ‘officially’ lived there, and we woke up with someone new on the couch every morning.” Walton eventually became assistant lift operations manager at PCM and bartended evening shifts at the Waldorf Astoria. Now, full time at High West Distillery, he sees the other side of hiring. “It’s hard to staff a ski town, even with High West’s great reputation,” he says, noting that the distillery offers benefits and insurance. Walton notes that today’s young ski bums “have to be very creative” as they juggle limited in-town housing and multiple income streams. He’s still got a soft spot for hiring lifties. “Their work ethic is terrific,” says Walton. “They work hard at two jobs, and they’re my best bartenders.” Of the changes he’s seen in Park City’s ski bum culture, Shabu bartender and Deer Valley Mountain Host Tom Reynolds says everything’s more crowded, even in the backcountry. In 1993, the Connecticut native moved into the legendary Centennial House, living there for two years. Today, with median Park City home prices topping a million dollars “lots of our friends still identify as Park City-ites, but we’ve moved to the ‘burbs,” says Reynolds, referring to Silver Summit, Heber, and Kamas. Reynolds also sees big changes in the recreation lifestyle due to technology. “In the ’90s, we’d all be skiing and would somehow find each other without phones or walkie-talkies. Now I want to tell people: ‘Just put down the phone, look around. You’re missing out!’”

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My then-boyfriend (now husband) and I also had our first Park City season in the early ’90s. We tent camped at a KOA until we found a basement apartment in South Salt Lake, driving up I-80 every day for our jobs in lift ops and ticket sales. Our friends living off Park Avenue crammed into rooms with sleeping bags on the floor and a sheet tacked to the ceiling to divide the space. Another couple rented a “no pets” condo and snuck their dogs in and out through a bathroom window, while another guy rigged up a heater and hot plate and lived illegally out of a storage unit in Snyderville. “You hear crazy stories about where people have scrambled to live,” says PCM Snowboard Instructor Mitch Scheffler. “People live out of their vans, another guy stayed in his Honda Element. And there’s a lot of couch surfing.” Says Scheffler, “It was a big deal when I could afford a place with even one wall.” I also asked 20-something Scheffler if “ski bum” is even a relevant term anymore. “Sure,” he says with a big laugh, “People use it because it’s easy. Ski bum or ‘dirt bag’ are pretty interchangeable.” On the other end of the “winging-it” spectrum, Xania Woodman formulated a two-year strategic plan for her Park City move. She first came to Sundance in 2005 as a Las Vegas nightlife reporter covering the festival and loved the entire experience. She says, “I kept coming back here to ski, and one day I stood at the top of the mountain and said to myself, ‘That’s it. I’m sold. I will find a way to make this lifestyle work.’” Seriously downsizing, Woodman ended her lease, reduced the amount


“YOU HEAR CRAZY STORIES ABOUT WHERE PEOPLE HAVE SCRAMBLED TO LIVE.” – MITCH SCHEFFLER

of “stuff” in her life, and moved to Park City just in time for the 2017 winter season. As a freelance writer and editor and a bartender, Woodman notes her career is well suited to ski town living. The downside? Housing. She lived in a friend’s condo with reduced rent doing housekeeping flips for their Airbnb, and she’s contemplating a winter stay at a boarding house in Heber this season. “We’re clinging to the side of the mountain,” she says. But for Woodman, it’s worth it. “I’m happy being here even if I’m just looking out the window at the mountains.” She knows that anytime she wants to ski, access is right there. “Park City is the total package,” she says. “I’m addicted to it.” Deer Valley Recruiting and Housing Manager Lisa Angotti also sees the changing demographic of the average Park City ski bum. “They’re the older, bolder set, and many of them have downsized or are semi-retired.” Ditching high-stress office jobs elsewhere, at Deer Valley they’re parking cars or making coffee. And, says Angotti, “they’re out skiing every day.” Of the 2,800-3,000 staff needed to run the mountain each winter, she hires about 700-900 new employees every year, including approximately 360 young international staff with J-1 student visas. They compete with other resorts and restaurants on Main Street for housekeepers, hospitality, and mountain operations workers. And for the 360 housing slots, there’s a waiting list every year. Even so, “Deer Valley has one of the highest employee retention rates in the industry,” says Angotti of the 62-68 percent average annual returns and estimated 600 yearround employees. Further diversifying Park City’s year-round local employment base, Bryon Friedman’s company, Soul Poles, hand-builds ski poles using sustainable materials. Friedman grew up in Park City competitive ski racing, becoming an Olympic U.S. Ski Team member for 10 years and competing on the World Cup circuit. Says Friedman, “Park City has been extraordinarily supportive of my business as a locally-owned company.” On living in Park City, he says the perks are hard to beat: “I can ski right to my doorstep on a powder day.” n ParkCityStyleMag.com |

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DINING

BREAKING BREAD WITH BRENT

RED BICYCLE BREADWORKS’ FOUNDER ON BAKING, BIKING, AND MORE

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WORDS Ted Scheffler | IMAGES Angela Howard

T ALL BEGAN WITH SIX LOAVES OF BREAD. THAT WAS THE HUMBLE FOUNDATION UPON WHICH BRENT WHITFORD WOULD BUILD RED BICYCLE BREADWORKS, A POPULAR INDEPENDENT BAKERY LOCATED AT THE REAR OF THE MARKET IN SNOW CREEK PLAZA. TODAY, THERE’S PROBABLY NOT A LOCAL IN TOWN WHO HASN’T ENJOYED HIS STICK BREAD (KNOWN TO MANY PARKITES AS “CRACK BREAD”). THE WICKEDLY ADDICTIVE ITEM IS MADE SOLELY FROM FLOUR, WATER, YEAST, NATURAL REDMOND SALT, AND OLIVE OIL AND LOOKS SORT OF LIKE A SCRAWNY BAGUETTE. BUT DURING BUSY TIMES, HE’LL BAKE 700 OF THOSE SUCKERS A DAY.

In 2003, Whitford, a Connecticut native, was cooking in a fine-dining restaurant when he was offered a seasonal job at the now-closed, but very loved Chez Betty restaurant in Park City. He’d work in their kitchen in the winter and return to his East Coast job in the summer. “I was doing the back-and-forth thing and then one day one of the locals here said to me, ‘Dude, what’re you doing man? Summer is where it’s at!’ So I took his advice and I’ve been here ever since.”

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Whitford speaks fondly of his Chez Betty experience. “I was working the line and then moved up to the grill station,” he remembers. “Then, I was chef de cuisine and creating tasting menus and using local ingredients from producers like Ranui Gardens, Copper Moose Farm, and so on. I worked there for eight years and it was such a great crew.” Then one day, Chez Betty’s owner and chef, Jerry Garcia, decided to stop making bread


in-house. Whitford remembers being concerned that people would notice the loss, especially if the wildly popular cornbread muffins went missing. “So an old high-school friend of mine gave me some bread recipes and I started experimenting in the Chez Betty kitchen during the slow shoulder season,” he says. Before long, Whitford had taken charge of the restaurant’s bread production. The demand for his bread only grew from there. Whitford’s friend (and now business partner) Brad Hart had a stand at the then newly-launched Park Silly Sunday Market where he would gather up produce and artisanal foods from local purveyors and resell them. Whitford doesn’t remember where Hart was getting his bread from, but remembers Hart saying that no one was buying it and he couldn’t give the bread away. “So Jerry [Garcia] let me use his oven and I baked six loaves of bread and took them to Brad at the Silly Market. It went in no time at

all from six loaves of bread to 40, then 100, and just took off from there,” remembers Whitford. The Red Bicycle Breadworks moniker came from the red stumpjumper bike that Whitford modified with saddlebags and a small bread trailer. “I’d hop on the Rail Trail and cruise down to the Park Silly Market with my bread and that’s how the name for our business originated. We decided to get serious and Mike Holmes, the manager of The Market, offered us the use of the full-sized bakery in the back of the store and we’ve been there ever since.” In truth, the soft-spoken Whitford doesn’t much enjoy talking about himself and is quick and eager to shine the light on his “ridiculously talented” staff and partners, which include ex-chefs who’ve worked in world-class restaurants, such as the gifted Paul Serpe, among others. Today, Red Bicycle Breadworks makes around 20 different types of bread, take-and-heat pizzas, and more recently, sandwiches. The next time

you’re in Salt Lake City on a Saturday, be sure to stop by Beltex Meats and pick up their awesome weekend Cuban made with bread from Red Bicycle that has pork lard incorporated into the flour. Whitford and his crew are justifiably proud of their “slowly made” bread, which makes use of natural wild yeasts—with bacteria and probiotics—and simple ingredients: flour from Central Milling, water, and Utah salt. Some of the bread can take three days to make, but don’t get Whitford started on modern, mass-produced bread that is hard to digest and virtually nutrition-free. And, although Stick Bread is by far his biggest seller, Whitford is most proud of his team’s sourdoughs and unique offerings like the naturally leavened Peasant Bread, Sprouted Quinoa Honey Wheat, and slightly sweet Mocha Bread. Whitford might not enjoy talking about himself, but he loves talking about bread and breadmaking. So, for a thorough bread-ucation, stop by Red Bicycle Breadworks and say hello. n

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DINING

Park City Dining 350 MAIN

BONEYARD SALOON

Enjoy contemporary American cuisine and craft cocktails in an upscale, mountain dining locale. 350 Main creates simple, classic, and comfortable cuisine by using traditional preparation techniques.  Using local and sustainable food sourced right here in the Wasatch Mountains, we invite you to join us for a memorable experience with our dynamic staff, great food, and exciting atmosphere. Open daily 3-10 p.m.

Boneyard Saloon features an all-wood-fired grill with traditional American gastronomy and a range of tastes sure to delight all foodies. This industrial finished “gastropub” offers a full bar and Park City’s most expansive craft bottle and beer selection. Housing Park City’s largest collection of jumbo flat screen TVs make it the premier spot for watching all your favorite sporting events. Open for eating and drinking every day for lunch, dinner, and late night. An abundance of free parking. Yep, free parking. Lunch and dinner 11 p.m.-1 a.m., brunch 10 a.m. on Saturday and Sunday.

350 MAIN STREET | 435.649.3140 350Main.com

1251 KEARNS BOULEVARD | 435.649.0911 BoneYardSaloon.com

DEN RESTAURANT

DRAFTS BURGER BAR

Start your day in Park City with a classic American breakfast at DEN, then return in the afternoon for a delectable lunch paired with your favorite cocktail. DEN serves patrons healthy and hearty dishes for breakfast and lunch.

Home to award-winning burgers, 50 beers from around the world, and spectacular slope-side views. Your DBB experience will not be complete until the family dives into one (or three) of our over-the-top milk shakes. Drafts also serves up handcrafted burgers, delicious wings, and delectable sides with spectacular slope-side views. Review the extensive wine list or try a specialty cocktail while enjoying the year-round wraparound deck or a game on one of the 10 flat-screen HDTVs.

1895 SIDEWINDER DRIVE | 435.615.4525 Mariott.com

WESTGATE PARK CITY | 3000 CANYONS RESORT DRIVE | 435.655.2270 WestGateResorts.com

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PARK CITY’S

FINEST FOUR

BUTCHER’S CHOP HOUSE

Home of the world famous buffalo burger 447 Main Street NoNameSaloon.com fantastic nightlife

With great steaks and a comfortably priced menu, Butcher’s Chop House has something for everyone. This family-friendly restaurant features steaks, chops, seafood, pasta, a late-night menu, a kids menu, and more. Try the prime rib, a locals’ favorite. The beautifully finished cherry wood bar boasts one of the finest wine lists and liquor displays in Utah, as well as craft cocktails and a solid beer list. The bar has a 166-inch screen TV for special events. For the ultimate dining experience with spectacular mountain views at the base of the Town Lift, head to Butcher’s. 3 p.m.-midnight daily.

Great steaks, chops, seafood & cocktails 751 Lower Main Street ButchersChopHouse.com family friendly

751 MAIN STREET | 435.647.0040 ButchersChopHouse.com

EDGE

Small plate menu 8 wines on tap 1251 Kearns Blvd WineDivePC.com artisan pizzas

Edge Steakhouse delivers a modern culinary experience specializing in prime, dry aged, domestic Wagyu and Japanese Wagyu beef. Chef Wayne Christian has crafted a unique menu using locally sourced and organically grown produce served alongside an award-winning wine list. Edge Steakhouse offers a full bar with specialty drinks and great selection of domestic, international, and local beers. WESTGATE PARK CITY | 3000 CANYONS RESORT DRIVE | 888.796.0765 WestGateResorts.com

Wood fired grill Great beer selection 1251 Kearns Blvd BoneyardSaloon.com always free parking

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DINING

Park City Dining FRESHIES LOBSTER CO.

MINDFUL CUISINE

Freshies Lobster has been serving fresh Maine lobster to Park City, Utah since 2009. Freshies started out at the Park Silly Market and farmers market and expanded into a food truck that serves Park City, Midway, and Salt Lake City. After seeing the demand for lobster rolls we have opened a cafe to serve the Park City locals and tourists year round. Come join us for our award-winning lobster rolls or order to go. Freshies sources quality ingredients and uses local products whenever possible.

A cooking and dining experience in a beautiful Park City venue. Join Mindful Cuisine for a dinner party style cooking class or let us provide the food and fun for your next family gathering, night out with friends, office party or team building event, or club meeting! Create a custom menu from a wide array of choices. The class options can be either hands-on or a demonstration. Not only will you experience a restaurant-quality meal, but you’ll learn to make it again, at home! We take care of all the details. Enjoy complimentary appetizers prepared by the chef before the cooking begins.

1897 PROSPECTOR AVENUE | 435.631.9861 FreshiesLobsterCo.com

354 ASPEN LANE MindfulCuisine.com

THE SPUR BAR AND GRILL

TIMBERS BAR & PATIO

Offering amazing bar food including our famous wings, classic “Spur Burger,” and our new brick-oven pizza. Enjoy our comfortable atmosphere for a full dinner or appetizers and drinks with great service and live music all night!   Live music every night!” and merge it with the following sentence to read: “With live music every night, The Spur Bar and Grill hosts local, regional, and national music acts with genres ranging from rock, country, Celtic, folk, bluegrass, cover bands, blues, and singer-songwriters.  You can find the music calendar at www.TheSpurBarAndGrill.com. Open 10 a.m. to 1 a.m.

A great new après-ski destination in Park City, offers a casual atmosphere ideal for unwinding after a busy day of meetings or adventures. Indulge in light dining and your favorite picks from our beer, wine, and spirits menu. Enjoy après ski every evening on our outdoor heated patio complete with gourmet hot cocoa and hot cider. Open for dinner.

352 MAIN STREET | 435.615.1618 TheSpurBarAndGrill.com

1895 SIDEWINDER DRIVE | 435-615-4525 Mariott.com

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a DBR Joint

NO NAME SALOON

Old Town family-friendly dining comfortably priced

Great steaks, chops, seafood, pasta & salads

No Name is the home of the world-famous buffalo burger. Locally voted best bar and best burger for six years in a row, it is the pulse of the bar scene in Park City. Centrally located on Historic Main Street, you can enjoy three full bars on two levels, including a yearround heated rooftop patio offering sweeping views of town and nearby mountains. The saloon has 17 HD TVs for all your favorite sports and an industrial vintage décor with a regulation shuffle board table. Before and after your day on the mountain, belly on up for some wings, cold beers, and the best dang buffalo burger around. Lunch, dinner, and a lively late-night scene. Eating and drinking every day from 10-1 a.m. daily.

kid’s menu available

447 MAIN STREET | 435.649.6667 NoNamesaloon.com

WINE DIVE

ate night menu after 10:00 p.m.

This culinary haven is for foodies who love wine and craft cocktails. An off-Main Street locals’ favorite, Wine Dive features a wood-fired oven and an exhibition kitchen where a host of small-plate items and artisan pizzas are prepared. Woodfired pizzas with a crispy cornmeal-dusted crust and an assortment of toppings. With over 100 labels on the wine list, the Wine Dive is also the first spot in Park City with wine on tap. For a vibrant and social scene with a wine-and-dine concept, this is your place. Plenty of free parking for patrons right next door to our sister restaurant, Boneyard Saloon & Kitchen. 4 p.m.–1 a.m. daily. 1251 KEARNS BOULEVARD | 435.649.0911 WineDivePC.com

beers, whiskies & premium spirits

751 Lower Main Street (in the Caledonian Hotel) call for reservations (435) 647-0400 or visit ButchersChopHouse.com 77 ParkCityStyleMag.com |

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NIGHTLIFE

MUSIC FOR THE SOUL

VOCALLY DRIVEN, SOUL-STOMPING PIANO ROCK

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WORDS Ashley Brown | IMAGE Deborah DeKoff

ISA NEEDHAM AND RICH WYMAN HAVE BEEN MAKING MUSIC TOGETHER SINCE THEY FIRST MET AT A PARTY IN NEW YORK CITY. THE TWO BEGAN DATING, AND THE RELATIONSHIP BLOSSOMED INTO A LIFELONG LOVE AND MARRIAGE.

a lot of support from our friends. The duo stumbled upon Park People care about each other and City and decided the mountain the community, and that is part town was the perfect home base of what makes Park City a great and a great place to raise a famplace.” ily. Needham opened a thriving When their youngest son left yoga studio and launched the Park home, the two moved toward City Divas, while Wyman sang and their shared dream of performing played piano around the world together. “It’s awesome being an with Park City as his home base. empty nester. We prepared, and “As Park City grew, we grew. it feels like we’ve started dating My work with Van Halen led to a again. It’s a new chapter, a rebirth record deal over in Europe, and of our marriage and our mindset,” that coincided with the Olympics says Needham. and the explosion of Sundance.” The duo’s new professional Wyman worked with Van Halen – RICH WYMAN name, PARK88, marks a new and other big names in the music musical endeavor. “PARK” is an industry, and both Wyman and ode to Park City and “88” repNeedham opened for Alanis Morissette and the Goo Goo Dolls during the 2002 Winter Olym- resents the number of keys on a piano. For years, the coupics. His keyboard skills and distinctive raspy voice paved the ple has performed as Rich Wyman and Lisa Needham, but way for 10 successful albums, many of which feature Need- PARK88’s album, “The Fearlessness” is the first album they co-wrote entirely. ham’s sultry voice on backup vocals. PARK88 is a living dream for the duo. “It’s all about the The couple did all this while raising two children. “We have always had independent, creative careers and always music. No one sings with me the way Lisa does. Our voices wanted to have a family. I think we moved into that next are very different, mine is raspy and Lisa’s is smooth, it’s the step smoothly,” says Needham. Both attribute the support- fire and ice element, and we complement each other,” says ive Park City community as a vital component in their success Wyman. “People say you’re living the dream, and you’re raising a family. Wyman illuminates, “We always felt we had doing it together, and that’s really inspiring.” n

“PEOPLE SAY YOU’RE LIVING THE DREAM, AND YOU’RE DOING IT TOGETHER, AND THAT’S REALLY INSPIRING.”

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NIGHTLIFE

The Soul of the City CREATING MUSIC-INSPIRED MOMENTS WORDS Evie Carrick | IMAGES Courtesy Mountain Town Music–Digital Edge Marketing

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RIAN RICHARDS HAS BEEN THE COMMUNITY CONDUCTOR OF MUSICAL AFFAIRS FOR MOUNTAIN TOWN MUSIC FOR 10 YEARS, WHICH MEANS HE’S HELPED PROGRAM AROUND 3,500 MUSICAL PERFORMANCES OVER THE COURSE OF HIS CAREER. STILL, THERE ARE CERTAIN MOMENTS THAT STAND OUT.

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“Music is a feeling. It isn’t always about the message; it makes you feel good.” – Brian Richards One such moment was during a Wailers show in 2016. When it comes to the band Richards admits to being a bit jaded, but he ended up witnessing a moment he’ll never forget. “The singer brought a boy who was deaf on the stage and while he couldn’t hear, he was feeling the vibration of the music on the stage and started dancing around. He could see and feel it,” remembers Richards. “Music is a feeling. It isn’t always about the message; it makes you feel good.” That moment epitomizes everything Mountain Town Music works to do. It isn’t about the venue or who’s on stage, it’s about using musical performances to create an energy that brings the community together and establishes a love and appreciation for music. They do this by keeping events free and the musicians primarily local. Through summer camps, school programs, and scholarships, Mountain Town Music mentors and supports young musicians, who then have the opportunity to play on stages graced by the likes of Bob Dylan and Willie Nelson. Mountain Town Music enhances the Park City lifestyle, but the relationship is a reciprocal one. Richards says they have “lots of Vibe Tribe members [a yearly $50+ membership] as opposed to a few large donors, and people who chuck a buck at the various shows they attend” in addition to partners and sponsors. The entire community is vested in keeping Mountain Town Music alive and bringing musical experiences to town. The grassroots support system matches the organization’s family-style operation. Everyone from the sound engineers to the board to Richards’ own family pitches in to keep Mountain Town Music running. “We all work together, sweat together, and then sit down and eat together,” explains Richards. With a mission to “produce, foster, and support,” Mountain Town Music is truly a musical resource for the community. Their programs are far-reaching, but their goal is simple: To create music-inspired connections. When a familiar song entices an entire audience to sing along or a local kid rocks out on stage, you can bet Richards and his crew are sporting giant smiles. These are the moments they live for. n

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Hands-on cooking classes - Private cooking parties Enjoy a meal and a spectacular view Perfect for newcomers, date nights, vacation activities Sign up on our website for a class today!

  

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A Cooking and Dining Experience in Park City

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ALSO OFFERING CATERING, FOOD TRUCK PARTIES & VENUE RENTALS PARK CITY: 1897 PROPECTOR AVE 435.631.9861 • SALT LAKE CITY: 356 E 900 S 801.829.1032 WWW.FRESHIESLOBSTERCO.COM 81 ParkCityStyleMag.com |

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NIGHTLIFE

New Wine in Old Town MAKING WINE ON MAIN STREET WORDS Ted Scheffler | IMAGES Angela Howard

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VEN AFTER ALL THESE YEARS, STEVE MARTIN STILL KILLS ME WHEN, AS NAVIN R. JOHNSON IN “THE JERK” (1979), HE RESPONDS TO A RESTAURANT WAITER’S OFFER OF “ANOTHER BOTTLE OF CHATEAU LATOUR” BY SAYING, “AH … YES, BUT NO MORE 1966. BRING US SOME FRESH WINE! THE FRESHEST YOU’VE GOT—THIS YEAR! NO MORE OF THIS OLD STUFF!”

It’s priceless, not unlike Chateau Latour 1966 itself. And while on the surface, the scene may seem to be about an unsophisticated buffoon, it’s also a backhanded slap at wine snobbery. That’s something—like Latour ‘66—that you won’t find at Park City’s Old Town Cellars (OTC). In fact, you can check your hifalutin wine attitude at the door.

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The OG’s of OTC are Stephen MacKay and Jason Morgan. The two business partners know plenty about wine and winemaking but they consciously strive to promote a friendly and welcoming space for folks to taste and enjoy wine, regardless of their expertise or experience. The wines MacKay and Morgan produce at OTC are provocative enough to delight wine

sophisticates and rookies alike. But, “From Day 1 our goal was to make wine approachable,” says Morgan. “Flip-flops and T-shirts are permitted.” Unlike some Napa or Sonoma wine tasting rooms—which can be intimidating to say the least—OTC is laid-back and comfortable. The space is strewn with sofas and comfy-cushioned seats that invite visitors to kick back and


unwind. It’s a unique combination of wine tasting venue, bar, and lounge all in one. In addition to sipping OTC wines made on the premises, customers can also enjoy Italian Prosecco, natural wines from innovative Utah-winemaker Evan Lewandowski, craft beers, cocktails, and spirits. And if you’re hungry or in need of a palate cleanser, there’s locally-sourced fare from Beltex Meats and Ritual Chocolate to nosh on. “We’re licensed like a bar, so you can enjoy a 2-ounce sample, 5-ounce pour, or purchase wine by the bottle,” says Morgan. Morgan and MacKay are Park City natives who pride themselves on being part of the community. “We’re first in line on a powder day and we love and live the lifestyle here,” says Morgan. When I ask how the fellas decided to open a winery in Park City, MacKay says that the two got together at a Squaw Valley wine bar called Uncorked. “[It happened] over a couple bottles of really good wine, Riesling and Grüner Veltliner. It was snowing heavily outside and we talked about what Park City was lacking; what we could bring to this wonderful community. Knowing that wine bars had come and gone with the seasonality of Park City, we hit on the idea of wine manufacturing. High West Distillery founder David Perkins was a neighbor and we had a lot of good resources and people in the community to talk to. We eventually decided to pull the trigger and we’re really happy with where we are right now.” The winemaking process at OTC is part science and part art. Morgan explains: “After lots of tasting and experimenting with ‘mock’ blends from boutique winemakers at the various out-ofstate wineries, we’ll come up with ideas about a style that we like and then purchase very large amounts of those wines in the ratios that we want from our winemaker friends. We’ll then bring the wines in-house, filter them, blend them, and bottle them.” Various varietals are blended to create unique OTC wines such as their Perpetual Pinot, Mountain Town White, Snowbunny Syrah, Mountain Town Red, Old Town Outlaws (modeled after a Right Bank Bordeaux), Coach’s Choice White, and Townie Rosé. While these aren’t wines that you’ll cellar for a rainy day a couple decades away, they are serious, well-made wines. As one who has written hundreds of wine articles, I was impressed, for example, by the complexity of the Townie Rosé, which has relatively low alcohol and bright acidity, made in the style you’d find in Provence. And here’s a fun fact: OTC’s license permits them to sell bottles of wine for takeout on Sundays. So if you find yourself running out of wine as the weekend wanes, OTC is the place to grab a bottle to go. n

OPEN 10am - 1am DAILY BRUNCH LUNCH DINNER LATE NIGHT LIVE MUSIC 7 NIGHTS A WEEK 352 Main Street I 435-615-1618 thespurbarandgrill.com 83 ParkCityStyleMag.com |

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NIGHTLIFE

6 of the Best After-Hour Hot Spots THE 411 ON THE 435

WORDS Darby Doyle | IMAGES Angela Howard

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T’S NEXT TO IMPOSSIBLE TO CURATE A COMPREHENSIVE LIST OF PARK CITY’S FANTASTIC APRÈS SKI AND EXTENDED LATE-NIGHT SCENE. THE OPTIONS ARE JUST THAT GOOD! BUT HERE’S A SAMPLE OF OUR “BEST OF” PICKS FOR ADULT BEVERAGES AND ENTERTAINMENT.

CLASSY COCKTAILS

Firewood Lounge (downstairs) 306 Main St. | (435) 252-9900 firewoodonmain.com The go-to spot for beautifully-made classic cocktails, best enjoyed in a cozy leather armchair on a blustery night. Try the Woodlands Old Fashioned with cherry wood smoked demerara, share a couple of appetizers, and call it a perfect date night.

OLD TOWN NOSTALGIA

No Name Saloon 447 Main St. | (435) 649-6667 nonamesaloon.com “If we don’t have it, you don’t need it,” has been the decades-long refrain at the No Name Saloon. Park City’s quintessential locals’ bar, the saloon has been a fixture on historic Main Street since the 1980s and is a place everyone should experience at least once. The rooftop patio—heated year-round—has some of the best après ski parties in town.

OFF-MENU BARGAIN BREWS

The Corner Store 1325 Lowell Ave. | (435) 645-8666 cornerstorepc.com Since 1974, the Corner Store’s patio après ski scene has been a Park City Mountain Resort’s “must-do.” And any liftie will tell you that the best bargain in PC isn’t listed on the menu board: $3 PBR tall boys.

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WEDDINGS • PRIVATE SHOWS • SOLO PIANO • DUELING PIANOS

LIL’ SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

Boneyard Saloon & Kitchen Boneyard’s Wine Dive 1251 Kearns Blvd. | (435) 649-0911 boneyardsaloon.com Two concepts. Two menus. Both with reliably delicious food and drinks at a price point that’s hard to beat in PC. At the saloon enjoy wood-fired pizza, burgers, and a huge selection of brews. The Wine Dive has—you guessed it—16 wines on tap, dozens of wines by the bottle, and lighter fare.

A Jazz and Classical based pianist, Mike has played 1000s of shows with hundreds of amazing talents across the country. From weddings and special events to solo artist, “Mr. Rogers” also performs for American Dueling Pianos at the Tavernacle in Salt Lake City, and both The Spur Bar & Grill and The Cabin in Park City.

MIKEROGERSPIANOMAN.COM

GETTING THERE IS HALF THE FUN

The St. Regis at Deer Valley’s Mountain Terrace 2300 Deer Valley Dr. East | (435) 940-5700 marriott.com/hotels/hotel-information/ restaurant/slcxr-the-st-regis-deer-valley/ The wine list is arguably one of the best in Utah, the cocktails are sublime, and the views are reliably spectacular from the St. Regis at Deer Valley’s terrace-adjacent bar. But like any good adventure, getting there is as much fun as the destination itself. Ski in from Deer Hollow Run or ride the funicular up the mountainside after you’ve valeted your car at the base. Don’t miss the après ski Champagne sabering ceremony, held daily on the Mountain Terrace at 5:30 p.m.

LIVE, LOCAL MUSIC

The Spur Bar & Grill 352 Main St. | (435) 615-1618 thespurbarandgrill.com While there are plenty of regional and national music acts on the winter roster at The Spur, one of the highlights of this joint is the opportunity to see so many Utah-based singer-songwriters. Count on live music every night, with several local musicians on rotation weekly covering the gamut of genres: bluegrass, Celtic, folk, and good ole rock ‘n’ roll covers. n

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480.326.3840 • ctdpromotions.com 85 ParkCityStyleMag.com |

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PARK CITY PARK CITY

Catalogue

Specializing in South Sea pearl designs This custom ring features a white South Sea baroque pearl bird with diamond feathers and ruby eyes perched on 18K yellow gold branches.

PARK CITY, UT 513 Main St • 435.649.6944 JACKSON HOLE, WY 90 E Broadway • 307.734.0553


LEAD WITH YOUR SOLE shopzenzee.com A P a r k C i t y b r a n d a v a i l a b l e a t M a r y J a n e s & P a r k C i t y Yo g a S t u d i o


PARK CITYSTYLE CATALOGUE

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Lead With Your Sole INSPIRING AND EMPOWERING WOMEN THROUGH FASHION WORDS Ashley Brown | IMAGES Deborah DeKoff

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HEN SHARON BACKURZ AND HER FAMILY MOVED TO PARK CITY MORE THAN EIGHT YEARS AGO, SHE WAS MOTIVATED TO START HER BRAND, ZENZEE. IN ADDITION TO “ULTRA-LIGHT, MARSHMALLOWSOFT SHOES” BACKURZ MAKES GRAPHIC APPAREL WITH THE INTENTION OF “ENABLING WOMEN TO FEEL COMFORTABLE AND CONFIDENT WHILE MAKING A STATEMENT WITH THEIR FASHION.” PRINTED ON ECOCONSCIOUS FABRICS, ZENZEE APPAREL CERTAINLY MAKE A STATEMENT WITH WORDING LIKE: “INHALE THE FUTURE, EXHALE THE PAST,” “VOTE,” AND “BITCHES GET SHIT DONE.” Backurz explains what inspires her designs: “I am passionate about current events, doing my part to move women’s issues forward, and using my love of design and typography to promote powerful sentiments. This is my way of making a difference.” Backurz carefully considers every step that goes into designing and manufacturing Zenzee products, shaping Zenzee into “a good global citizen.” All shoes and apparel are manufactured in factories certified by Worldwide Responsible Accredited Production, which requires high standards of pay, working conditions, and treatment. In Utah, Zenzee products are distributed by employees with disabilities at Columbus Production Services.

“Women supporting women is at the heart of what’s important to me.” – Sharon Backurz

In addition to using her brand to advocate for women and factory workers, Backurz is enthusiastic about supporting nonprofits. “I love to collaborate and use my talents to do good,” she says. Thirty percent of the proceeds from Zenzee’s “Art Lover Capsule,” a collection that highlights art and artists, goes to support art and culture programming through the Park City Summit County Arts Council of which Backurz is a board member. She has also teamed up with Farasha, a Park Citybased fashion consulting company to create

the “Femme & Fierce Capsule,” a collection of clothing to embolden women. The collection donates 10 percent of proceeds to SUREFIRE, an organization devoted to empowering teenage girls by providing them with the resources to navigate success. The latest Zenzee collaboration is with the Utah chapter of Girls on the Run, a nonprofit that encourages young girls to exercise. For Backurz, “The collaborations are coming naturally.” She works consistently with organizations that are true to her vision. “Women supporting

women is at the heart of what’s important to me,” she says. Zenzee is more than shoes, apparel, and meaningful collaborations. Backurz sees her female-focused business as a way to be a positive role model. “I have a teenage daughter. Being an example for her is essential. Teaching her to stand up for herself and be strong; these are the themes of my life as a mother.” You can purchase Zenzee products locally at Mary Jane’s and Park City Yoga Studio, or shop online at Amazon and ShopZenzee.com. n ParkCityStyleMag.com |

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REBECCA KINKEAD FLIGHT EXHIBITION Reception on Friday, December 28th 6 to 9 PM Above- “Grey Horse with Snow,” 2018, Oil, 95” x 58”

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MONTHLY ARTIST RECEPTIONS CONTACT THE GALLERY TO RECEIVE A FIRST LOOK CATALOG Gallery Artists, clockwise from top left: Jared Davis, Cristall Harper, Rebecca Kinkead, Bridgette Meinhold

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KAY STRATMAN

Canyon Shower ~ Watercolor ~ 14 x 20

Wasatch Twilight Timelapse ~ Watercolor ~ 16 x 24

Enhancing the Traditional • Introducing the Innovative ( 3 0 7 ) 7 3 9 - 1 5 4 0 | H O R I Z O N F I N E A R T G A L L E R Y. C O M | 3 0 K I N G S T | P O B O X 4 9 2 0 | J A C K S O N , W Y 8 3 0 0 1


ERIC STEARNS

Damn Broke ~ Pierced Ceramics ~ 5.5 x 7.25

Eye of the Storm ~ Pierced Ceramics ~ 18 x 9

Before the Storm ~ Pierced Ceramics ~ 18 x 3

Enhancing the Traditional • Introducing the Innovative ( 3 0 7 ) 7 3 9 - 1 5 4 0 | H O R I Z O N F I N E A R T G A L L E R Y. C O M | 3 0 K I N G S T | P O B O X 4 9 2 0 | J A C K S O N , W Y 8 3 0 0 1


MILES GLYNN WALLFLOWER SERIES

Bison #1 ~ Photography on Belgian Linen ~ 26 x 39

Moose #2 ~ Photography on Belgian Linen ~ 26 x 39

Enhancing the Traditional • Introducing the Innovative ( 3 0 7 ) 7 3 9 - 1 5 4 0 | H O R I Z O N F I N E A R T G A L L E R Y. C O M | 3 0 K I N G S T | P O B O X 4 9 2 0 | J A C K S O N , W Y 8 3 0 0 1


TRACIE SPENCE

GRACE UNDER PRESSURE THE SPANISH WILD MUSTANG COLLECTION

Free Will ~ Photography ~ Inquire for available sizes

One More Time ~ Photography ~ Inquire for available sizes

Enhancing the Traditional • Introducing the Innovative ( 3 0 7 ) 7 3 9 - 1 5 4 0 | H O R I Z O N F I N E A R T G A L L E R Y. C O M | 3 0 K I N G S T | P O B O X 4 9 2 0 | J A C K S O N , W Y 8 3 0 0 1


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