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summary Profiled rolex yachting events

Rolex Ilhabela Sailing Week Ilhabela, São Paulo, Brazil July 5 – 11, 2009 Rolex Fastnet Race Cowes – Plymouth, United Kingdom August 9 – 14, 2009 Maxi Yacht Rolex Cup Porto Cervo, Sardinia, Italy September 6 – 12, 2009 Rolex Big Boat Series San Francisco, CA, United States September 10 -13, 2009 Circuito Atlántico Sur Rolex Cup Buenos Aires, Argentina – Punta del Este, Uruguay January 17 – 25, 2009 International Rolex Regatta St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands | March 27 – 29, 2009 Portofino Rolex Cup Portofino, Italy | May 8 – 10, 2009 Rolex Capri Sailing Week Capri, Italy | May 19 – 23, 2009 Giraglia Rolex Cup Saint-Tropez, France – Genoa, Italy | June 13 – 20, 2009 Rolex Farr 40 World Championship Porto Cervo, Sardinia, Italy | June 24 – 27, 2009

Rolex Veteran Boat Rally Porto Cervo, Sardinia, Italy September 15 - 19, 2009 Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez Saint-Tropez, France September 26 – October 4, 2009 Rolex Middle Sea Race Valletta, Malta | October 17 – 24, 2009 ISAF Rolex World Sailor of the Year Awards Busan, Korea | November 2009 Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race Sydney – Hobart, Australia December 26, 2009 – January 1, 2010


summary Profiled rolex yachting events

Rolex Ilhabela Sailing Week Ilhabela, São Paulo, Brazil July 5 – 11, 2009 Rolex Fastnet Race Cowes – Plymouth, United Kingdom August 9 – 14, 2009 Maxi Yacht Rolex Cup Porto Cervo, Sardinia, Italy September 6 – 12, 2009 Rolex Big Boat Series San Francisco, CA, United States September 10 -13, 2009 Circuito Atlántico Sur Rolex Cup Buenos Aires, Argentina – Punta del Este, Uruguay January 17 – 25, 2009 International Rolex Regatta St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands | March 27 – 29, 2009 Portofino Rolex Cup Portofino, Italy | May 8 – 10, 2009 Rolex Capri Sailing Week Capri, Italy | May 19 – 23, 2009 Giraglia Rolex Cup Saint-Tropez, France – Genoa, Italy | June 13 – 20, 2009 Rolex Farr 40 World Championship Porto Cervo, Sardinia, Italy | June 24 – 27, 2009

Rolex Veteran Boat Rally Porto Cervo, Sardinia, Italy September 15 - 19, 2009 Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez Saint-Tropez, France September 26 – October 4, 2009 Rolex Middle Sea Race Valletta, Malta | October 17 – 24, 2009 ISAF Rolex World Sailor of the Year Awards Busan, Korea | November 2009 Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race Sydney – Hobart, Australia December 26, 2009 – January 1, 2010


MEDIA INFORMATION 2009

INTERNATIONAL ROLEX YACHTING PORTFOLIO www.regattanews.com

“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.” Mark Twain 


introduction New Perspectives Sailing offers a multitude of perspectives on life, nature, technology, sport and business. It is more than just a past time and its spirit transcends the simple activity of taking to the water in a boat. Yacht racing attracts people from all walks of life for all sorts for reasons. Competition, camaraderie, adventure, proximity to the natural world and lifestyle are a few of the driving forces. This Media Information Portfolio sets out to inspire and encourage a view beyond simply the yachts and people that sail them. The photography chosen endeavours to paint many different versions of the overall picture that awaits the spectator at the venues covered. Quite simply, Rolex Yachting lives up well to the words of Mark Twain. The following pages will enable you to explore the variety of locations, sailing craft and personalities that make the events in this portfolio so special. We hope this small sample will awaken new editorial inspirations and we will do our best to help you discover more about the related possibilities and opportunities. www.regattanews.com


MEDIA INFORMATION 2009

INTERNATIONAL ROLEX YACHTING PORTFOLIO www.regattanews.com

“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.” Mark Twain 


introduction New Perspectives Sailing offers a multitude of perspectives on life, nature, technology, sport and business. It is more than just a past time and its spirit transcends the simple activity of taking to the water in a boat. Yacht racing attracts people from all walks of life for all sorts for reasons. Competition, camaraderie, adventure, proximity to the natural world and lifestyle are a few of the driving forces. This Media Information Portfolio sets out to inspire and encourage a view beyond simply the yachts and people that sail them. The photography chosen endeavours to paint many different versions of the overall picture that awaits the spectator at the venues covered. Quite simply, Rolex Yachting lives up well to the words of Mark Twain. The following pages will enable you to explore the variety of locations, sailing craft and personalities that make the events in this portfolio so special. We hope this small sample will awaken new editorial inspirations and we will do our best to help you discover more about the related possibilities and opportunities. www.regattanews.com


INTERNATIONAL ROLEX YACHTING PORTFOLIO www.regattanews.com

MEDIA INFORMATION 2009

the events Profiled rolex yachting events

Rolex Capri Sailing Week


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MEDIA INFORMATION 2009

the events Profiled rolex yachting events

Rolex Capri Sailing Week


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La Dolce Vita E m pe r o r s , po li t i c i a n s , t h e s pi a n s , gl itterati…

di ffe r e n t pe o ple wi t h o n e s h a red l o v e: Ca pri

Capri first appears in the history books in Roman times. Octavian - the future Emperor Augustus - was so enchanted with this small isle in the Gulf of Naples that he traded the nearby, larger island of Ischia for it, making Capri the private preserve of the imperial family. In 26 AD Emperor Tiberius moved to Capri in self-imposed exile and ruled from here until his death. The rediscovery and restoration of Roman ruins on the island in the early 19th century, greatly enhanced Capri’s attraction and lead to its adoption by various artists and intellects such as Felix Anton Dohrn, Axel Munthe, John Singer Sargent, Frank Hyde and eventually, Pablo Neruda and Graham Greene at the start of the 20th century. The 1950s catapulted Capri into the spotlight when the jet setters brought their luxury lifestyle to the island. Sofia Loren, Audrey Hepburn, Jackie Kennedy, Aristotle Onassis, Gianni Versace, the Spanish royal family, Liz Taylor, Emilio Pucci, Gracie Fields, Clara Agnelli, Elsa Martinelli and Lucia Bosé are just some of the names that have helped gild the image. Today Capri remains a favourite destination for the international movers and shakers. Famous visitors and residents may have widened the island’s international renown, but Capri boasts a fine reputation established and nurtured by the local population. Committed to the pleasures of conventional Italian hospitality, the Caprese have long been recognised as purveyors of superb dining. They are also fiercely protective of the island’s natural surroundings, which have added to its magnetic charm.

The only way to approach the island is by water and the best time is, preferably, during a regatta when the surrounding gulf is filled with sails. Leonardo Ferragamo, chairman of Nautor’s Swan and son of fashion icon Salvatore Ferragamo, visits his family home in Capri often and is a regular competitor at the Rolex Capri Sailing Week in May. In an interview with the Financial Times newspaper he encapsulated the island’s magic, “I defy anyone not to be seduced by its true dolce vita, the southern Italian lifestyle. Nowadays, this suggests 1950s and 1960s glamour, yet throughout history everyone from the Greeks, Romans, Napoleon and the British has loved or fought over Capri and, if you spend some time here, you can see why.”


MEDIA INFORMATION 2009

INTERNATIONAL ROLEX YACHTING PORTFOLIO www.regattanews.com

La Dolce Vita E m pe r o r s , po li t i c i a n s , t h e s pi a n s , gl itterati…

di ffe r e n t pe o ple wi t h o n e s h a red l o v e: Ca pri

Capri first appears in the history books in Roman times. Octavian - the future Emperor Augustus - was so enchanted with this small isle in the Gulf of Naples that he traded the nearby, larger island of Ischia for it, making Capri the private preserve of the imperial family. In 26 AD Emperor Tiberius moved to Capri in self-imposed exile and ruled from here until his death. The rediscovery and restoration of Roman ruins on the island in the early 19th century, greatly enhanced Capri’s attraction and lead to its adoption by various artists and intellects such as Felix Anton Dohrn, Axel Munthe, John Singer Sargent, Frank Hyde and eventually, Pablo Neruda and Graham Greene at the start of the 20th century. The 1950s catapulted Capri into the spotlight when the jet setters brought their luxury lifestyle to the island. Sofia Loren, Audrey Hepburn, Jackie Kennedy, Aristotle Onassis, Gianni Versace, the Spanish royal family, Liz Taylor, Emilio Pucci, Gracie Fields, Clara Agnelli, Elsa Martinelli and Lucia Bosé are just some of the names that have helped gild the image. Today Capri remains a favourite destination for the international movers and shakers. Famous visitors and residents may have widened the island’s international renown, but Capri boasts a fine reputation established and nurtured by the local population. Committed to the pleasures of conventional Italian hospitality, the Caprese have long been recognised as purveyors of superb dining. They are also fiercely protective of the island’s natural surroundings, which have added to its magnetic charm.

The only way to approach the island is by water and the best time is, preferably, during a regatta when the surrounding gulf is filled with sails. Leonardo Ferragamo, chairman of Nautor’s Swan and son of fashion icon Salvatore Ferragamo, visits his family home in Capri often and is a regular competitor at the Rolex Capri Sailing Week in May. In an interview with the Financial Times newspaper he encapsulated the island’s magic, “I defy anyone not to be seduced by its true dolce vita, the southern Italian lifestyle. Nowadays, this suggests 1950s and 1960s glamour, yet throughout history everyone from the Greeks, Romans, Napoleon and the British has loved or fought over Capri and, if you spend some time here, you can see why.”


INTERNATIONAL ROLEX YACHTING PORTFOLIO www.regattanews.com

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Giraglia Rolex Cup Saint-Tropez


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Giraglia Rolex Cup Saint-Tropez


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Ville de luxe of the French Riviera

L i n k i n g A r t a n d t h e Sea t h r o u g h o u t h is to ry Saint-Tropez is often cast as a place of chic extravagance, but behind this image rests a deeper character, a strong and historical connection to the sea perpetuated by artists and yachtsmen. The connection may be traced back to the town’s earliest roots as a fishing village. Even its name stems from the sea. In 68 A.D. a Roman centurion, Torpes, converted to Christianity and was beheaded by Emperor Nero. His remains were thrown into a small boat with a rooster and a dog and they were carried 200-miles westward by the Ligurian current. The body was discovered miraculously untouched by the animals; Torpes was beatified and is today the patron saint of Pisan and Genoese sailors. Perhaps, more significantly, Saint-Tropez was born. In 1880, the novelist Guy de Maupassant sailed into the port, the first of many painters and writers to be seduced the village. By the time of World War I, Saint-Tropez had

become an artist’s colony welcoming Paul Signac, Henri-Edmond Cross, Albert Marquet, Camille Pissarro and Henri Matisse, among many others. Their influence is felt today with the profusion of painters found around the port and in the many local galleries. This incursion gave rise to a reputation, which spread slowly until the 1950s when the town was put on the map by the Bridget Bardot movie “And God Created Woman”, which portrayed “Saint-Trop” as the beachfront destination for the international jet set. Today, the Vieux Port remains the beating heart of the town, bustling with activity. During early summer, the Giraglia Rolex Cup fills the harbour with racing yachts about to tackle a race against the Ligurian current towards Genoa. Then, in late autumn the harbour is taken back in time by Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez, which attracts a large classic fleet of varnished wood, polished brass and

canvas, along with some stunning high-tech maxi boats. Perhaps it is no surprise that, given the nautical bond, the one true Tropézienne experience is sitting at a portside café watching the world go by.


MEDIA INFORMATION 2009

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Ville de luxe of the French Riviera

L i n k i n g A r t a n d t h e Sea t h r o u g h o u t h is to ry Saint-Tropez is often cast as a place of chic extravagance, but behind this image rests a deeper character, a strong and historical connection to the sea perpetuated by artists and yachtsmen. The connection may be traced back to the town’s earliest roots as a fishing village. Even its name stems from the sea. In 68 A.D. a Roman centurion, Torpes, converted to Christianity and was beheaded by Emperor Nero. His remains were thrown into a small boat with a rooster and a dog and they were carried 200-miles westward by the Ligurian current. The body was discovered miraculously untouched by the animals; Torpes was beatified and is today the patron saint of Pisan and Genoese sailors. Perhaps, more significantly, Saint-Tropez was born. In 1880, the novelist Guy de Maupassant sailed into the port, the first of many painters and writers to be seduced the village. By the time of World War I, Saint-Tropez had

become an artist’s colony welcoming Paul Signac, Henri-Edmond Cross, Albert Marquet, Camille Pissarro and Henri Matisse, among many others. Their influence is felt today with the profusion of painters found around the port and in the many local galleries. This incursion gave rise to a reputation, which spread slowly until the 1950s when the town was put on the map by the Bridget Bardot movie “And God Created Woman”, which portrayed “Saint-Trop” as the beachfront destination for the international jet set. Today, the Vieux Port remains the beating heart of the town, bustling with activity. During early summer, the Giraglia Rolex Cup fills the harbour with racing yachts about to tackle a race against the Ligurian current towards Genoa. Then, in late autumn the harbour is taken back in time by Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez, which attracts a large classic fleet of varnished wood, polished brass and

canvas, along with some stunning high-tech maxi boats. Perhaps it is no surprise that, given the nautical bond, the one true Tropézienne experience is sitting at a portside café watching the world go by.


INTERNATIONAL ROLEX YACHTING PORTFOLIO www.regattanews.com

MEDIA INFORMATION 2009

Maxi Yacht Rolex Cup Sardinia


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Maxi Yacht Rolex Cup Sardinia


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Porto Cervo I t a ly’ s E m e r a ld C o a s t The Costa Smeralda is one of the places in the world to visit. Its appeal is diverse, but perhaps most significant is the effortless and harmonious blending of chic, glamorous villages and ports with the raw Sardinian landscape of windblown granite, a clear turquoise sea and secluded beaches. Famous for attracting the rich and celebrated, Porto Cervo has become the focal point of this mix of opulence and natural beauty, particularly since its development started by the Aga Khan in the 1960s. As a stepping stone to the region’s attractions ashore and afloat, Porto Cervo is second to none. The showpiece Yacht Club Costa Smeralda, simply one of the most striking yacht clubs anywhere in the world, stands proudly overlooking the harbour, a command centre for the waterborne activities that have added to the fame of the area since the late 1970s. Whilst the five-star hotels and beach resorts stylishly created to ensure the comfort of the well-heeled vacationer exert a magnetic draw, it is the sea and the Maddalena archipelago that spread northwards from Porto Cervo that are the true celebrities. The surrounding waters are peppered with rocky outcrops, islets and islands;

amongst the yachting fraternity these waters are considered some of the most entertaining and challenging racecourses in the world. And the yachts that traverse these waters form a true link between the natural treasures offshore with the man-made ones onshore.

The Maxi Yacht Rolex Cup, held every September, is one sailing event capable of enhancing the majestic view from Sardinia across the chain of offshore islands to Corsica. Maxi yachts are large enough to fill the gaps between the rocks with their length, mast height and speed, all seemingly working to compress the twenty nautical mile water-wonderland into a short stroll through this designated National Park. It is easy to cover a location in superlatives to cover its flaws, but this is one that rarely resorts to self-flattery and rarely disappoints.


MEDIA INFORMATION 2009

INTERNATIONAL ROLEX YACHTING PORTFOLIO www.regattanews.com

Porto Cervo I t a ly’ s E m e r a ld C o a s t The Costa Smeralda is one of the places in the world to visit. Its appeal is diverse, but perhaps most significant is the effortless and harmonious blending of chic, glamorous villages and ports with the raw Sardinian landscape of windblown granite, a clear turquoise sea and secluded beaches. Famous for attracting the rich and celebrated, Porto Cervo has become the focal point of this mix of opulence and natural beauty, particularly since its development started by the Aga Khan in the 1960s. As a stepping stone to the region’s attractions ashore and afloat, Porto Cervo is second to none. The showpiece Yacht Club Costa Smeralda, simply one of the most striking yacht clubs anywhere in the world, stands proudly overlooking the harbour, a command centre for the waterborne activities that have added to the fame of the area since the late 1970s. Whilst the five-star hotels and beach resorts stylishly created to ensure the comfort of the well-heeled vacationer exert a magnetic draw, it is the sea and the Maddalena archipelago that spread northwards from Porto Cervo that are the true celebrities. The surrounding waters are peppered with rocky outcrops, islets and islands;

amongst the yachting fraternity these waters are considered some of the most entertaining and challenging racecourses in the world. And the yachts that traverse these waters form a true link between the natural treasures offshore with the man-made ones onshore.

The Maxi Yacht Rolex Cup, held every September, is one sailing event capable of enhancing the majestic view from Sardinia across the chain of offshore islands to Corsica. Maxi yachts are large enough to fill the gaps between the rocks with their length, mast height and speed, all seemingly working to compress the twenty nautical mile water-wonderland into a short stroll through this designated National Park. It is easy to cover a location in superlatives to cover its flaws, but this is one that rarely resorts to self-flattery and rarely disappoints.


INTERNATIONAL ROLEX YACHTING PORTFOLIO www.regattanews.com

MEDIA INFORMATION 2009

Rolex Sydney-Hobart


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Rolex Sydney-Hobart


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INTERNATIONAL ROLEX YACHTING PORTFOLIO www.regattanews.com

Going South

A B o x i n g D a y T r a di t i o n More than 60 years of tradition, nine degrees of latitude, an estimated 44,600 participants and hundreds of thousands of spectators, the Rolex Sydney Hobart is a veritable feast of figures. From the length of the racecourse to the number of television viewers, this is an event immersed in impressive statistics.

Since it was first held in 1945, when nine yachts took part and the 35-foot Rani took six and a half days to complete the course, this race has advanced considerably in both notoriety and popularity. One element has remained stable throughout its life: the length of the track is 628 nautical miles from Port Jackson in Sydney Harbour, south through the Tasman Sea to the Bass Strait and the 180 nautical mile open ocean passage to the northern tip of Tasmania, and then south to the Organ Pipes at Tasman Island and into the Derwent River for the finish. No short journey for the faint of heart, in 2005 the 98-foot Wild Oats XI clocked a time of 1 day 18 hours 40 minutes 10 seconds and who is to say that will not be beaten. The enduring popularity of the race amongst competitors is more than matched by the Sydneysiders who turn out in droves to witness the fleet set sail, covering the shore line and spilling onto the thousands of boats that form the spectator fleet. Starting each year on the 26th of December, the event has become a sporting icon throughout Australia with the lunchtime start and live television broadcast biting chunks from the viewing figures of the traditional Boxing Day cricket test held in Melbourne. This iconic status stretches beyond national borders to the four corners of the earth, with almost every country in the

world carrying news of the start and, if conditions are tough, the finish. No other sailing event achieves the same. “Physically and culturally, the harbor is the center of Sydney, never more so than the day after Christmas, when the start of the 630-mile race from Sydney to Hobart… causes it to become an enormous natural amphitheatre. Virtually everyone in Sydney watches the start, either in person or on television.” G. Bruce Knecht, The Proving Ground.


MEDIA INFORMATION 2009

INTERNATIONAL ROLEX YACHTING PORTFOLIO www.regattanews.com

Going South

A B o x i n g D a y T r a di t i o n More than 60 years of tradition, nine degrees of latitude, an estimated 44,600 participants and hundreds of thousands of spectators, the Rolex Sydney Hobart is a veritable feast of figures. From the length of the racecourse to the number of television viewers, this is an event immersed in impressive statistics.

Since it was first held in 1945, when nine yachts took part and the 35-foot Rani took six and a half days to complete the course, this race has advanced considerably in both notoriety and popularity. One element has remained stable throughout its life: the length of the track is 628 nautical miles from Port Jackson in Sydney Harbour, south through the Tasman Sea to the Bass Strait and the 180 nautical mile open ocean passage to the northern tip of Tasmania, and then south to the Organ Pipes at Tasman Island and into the Derwent River for the finish. No short journey for the faint of heart, in 2005 the 98-foot Wild Oats XI clocked a time of 1 day 18 hours 40 minutes 10 seconds and who is to say that will not be beaten. The enduring popularity of the race amongst competitors is more than matched by the Sydneysiders who turn out in droves to witness the fleet set sail, covering the shore line and spilling onto the thousands of boats that form the spectator fleet. Starting each year on the 26th of December, the event has become a sporting icon throughout Australia with the lunchtime start and live television broadcast biting chunks from the viewing figures of the traditional Boxing Day cricket test held in Melbourne. This iconic status stretches beyond national borders to the four corners of the earth, with almost every country in the

world carrying news of the start and, if conditions are tough, the finish. No other sailing event achieves the same. “Physically and culturally, the harbor is the center of Sydney, never more so than the day after Christmas, when the start of the 630-mile race from Sydney to Hobart… causes it to become an enormous natural amphitheatre. Virtually everyone in Sydney watches the start, either in person or on television.” G. Bruce Knecht, The Proving Ground.


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MEDIA INFORMATION 2009

Rolex Big Boat Series

San Francisco


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MEDIA INFORMATION 2009

Rolex Big Boat Series

San Francisco


MEDIA INFORMATION 2009

The City by the Bay

A F a b u lo u s wi n do w o n li fe

San Francisco is known by the sobriquet, “the City by the Bay” and has long received well-deserved accolades as a discerning traveller’s destination, brimming with culture, scenic beauty, award-winning cuisine and spectacular wines. Yet it is San Francisco Bay that forms the centrepiece attraction. With the city surrounding the bay like a natural amphitheatre, draped over some 45 square-miles and some 40 hills, it presents plenty of opportunities to catch a glimpse of the water and a view of the myriad of sailing events held on the bay, including the pre-eminent Rolex Big Boat Series in September. The best viewpoint though is, arguably, the St. Francis Yacht Club. Perched on the waterfront next to the Presidio, an historic, former military post, the Spanish-style yacht club affords an unparalleled panorama out to the iconic orange-hued span of the

Golden Gate Bridge, the 700-acre Angel Island, and the infamous former prison on Alcatraz Island. If that is not enough, imagine sipping a cocktail on the Yacht Club’s race deck with that backdrop as the day’s racing finishes within finger-touching distance. With a Mediterranean climate and an ethnically diverse population, San Francisco offers serious competition to Capri in the culinary stakes. No other city in the USA brings to mind food and wine so readily. For the past 30 years, restaurants such as Berkeley’s Chez Panisse have been preparing cuisine from organically grown local produce, a trend now popularized as the “locavore” movement. San Francisco is another one of those places that effortlessly plays on the senses, drawing one into its captivating charms, so that one cannot help but return, time and time again, to the city by the bay, the city that stole even Frank Sinatra’s heart.


MEDIA INFORMATION 2009

The City by the Bay

A F a b u lo u s wi n do w o n li fe

San Francisco is known by the sobriquet, “the City by the Bay” and has long received well-deserved accolades as a discerning traveller’s destination, brimming with culture, scenic beauty, award-winning cuisine and spectacular wines. Yet it is San Francisco Bay that forms the centrepiece attraction. With the city surrounding the bay like a natural amphitheatre, draped over some 45 square-miles and some 40 hills, it presents plenty of opportunities to catch a glimpse of the water and a view of the myriad of sailing events held on the bay, including the pre-eminent Rolex Big Boat Series in September. The best viewpoint though is, arguably, the St. Francis Yacht Club. Perched on the waterfront next to the Presidio, an historic, former military post, the Spanish-style yacht club affords an unparalleled panorama out to the iconic orange-hued span of the

Golden Gate Bridge, the 700-acre Angel Island, and the infamous former prison on Alcatraz Island. If that is not enough, imagine sipping a cocktail on the Yacht Club’s race deck with that backdrop as the day’s racing finishes within finger-touching distance. With a Mediterranean climate and an ethnically diverse population, San Francisco offers serious competition to Capri in the culinary stakes. No other city in the USA brings to mind food and wine so readily. For the past 30 years, restaurants such as Berkeley’s Chez Panisse have been preparing cuisine from organically grown local produce, a trend now popularized as the “locavore” movement. San Francisco is another one of those places that effortlessly plays on the senses, drawing one into its captivating charms, so that one cannot help but return, time and time again, to the city by the bay, the city that stole even Frank Sinatra’s heart.


INTERNATIONAL ROLEX YACHTING PORTFOLIO www.regattanews.com

Port o Cervo, S a r d i ni a , i ta l y

Rolex Farr 40 World Championship Risk Manage me n t, Quick D ecisions

What do you get when a group of highly competitive amateurs and professionals come together to race identical yachts over fast-paced, technically demanding, short courses? The Rolex Farr 40 World Championship, where the worlds of business and sailing collide. The event attracts the keenest commercial minds and the most accomplished yachtsmen to stand behind the wheel of a 40-foot racing yacht. In a role reversal that has the makings of a reality television programme, it is the amateur owner of the boat who is obliged to hold the wheel and steer. And, for once, these corporate titans have to bend their ear to the more-experienced, professional tactician whose job it is to advise, encourage and cajole. Just like the stock market, racecourse losses and gains are visible and immediate. Success and failure are easily measured by whether one returns home clutching the silverware or empty-handed. And it’s much more exciting than your average boardroom meeting.

MEDIA INFORMATION 2009

Ilhabela, São Paulo, Brazil

Rolex Ilhabela Sailing Week Endless Summer

Brazil has long drawn international tourists to its rainforests, beaches and famous cities, but just off the Northern coast of São Paulo state lies a locally kept secret, a stunning island territory named Ilhabela. Ilhabela is an offshore cluster of Brazilian paradise that has attracted locals for decades, especially during the time of the Rolex Ilhabela Sailing Week in July when the boats parade through the channel, captivating the entire region. Ninety-five percent of Ilhabela’s territory is a protected National Park and the ideal wind along with warm water temperatures on the island have made it famous as a year-round water sports capital for sailors, divers, swimmers, in short anyone who loves the ocean. Ilhabela’s charm and authenticity are enchanting and the island’s villas are nothing short of gorgeous - even the Queen of Portugal once had a palace here. Ilhabela, “Beautiful Island”, is the locals’ choice for good reason, and here one cannot help but be taken by the island rhythm of almost 346 square kilometres of unspoilt, Brazilian beauty.


INTERNATIONAL ROLEX YACHTING PORTFOLIO www.regattanews.com

Port o Cervo, S a r d i ni a , i ta l y

Rolex Farr 40 World Championship Risk Manage me n t, Quick D ecisions

What do you get when a group of highly competitive amateurs and professionals come together to race identical yachts over fast-paced, technically demanding, short courses? The Rolex Farr 40 World Championship, where the worlds of business and sailing collide. The event attracts the keenest commercial minds and the most accomplished yachtsmen to stand behind the wheel of a 40-foot racing yacht. In a role reversal that has the makings of a reality television programme, it is the amateur owner of the boat who is obliged to hold the wheel and steer. And, for once, these corporate titans have to bend their ear to the more-experienced, professional tactician whose job it is to advise, encourage and cajole. Just like the stock market, racecourse losses and gains are visible and immediate. Success and failure are easily measured by whether one returns home clutching the silverware or empty-handed. And it’s much more exciting than your average boardroom meeting.

MEDIA INFORMATION 2009

Ilhabela, São Paulo, Brazil

Rolex Ilhabela Sailing Week Endless Summer

Brazil has long drawn international tourists to its rainforests, beaches and famous cities, but just off the Northern coast of São Paulo state lies a locally kept secret, a stunning island territory named Ilhabela. Ilhabela is an offshore cluster of Brazilian paradise that has attracted locals for decades, especially during the time of the Rolex Ilhabela Sailing Week in July when the boats parade through the channel, captivating the entire region. Ninety-five percent of Ilhabela’s territory is a protected National Park and the ideal wind along with warm water temperatures on the island have made it famous as a year-round water sports capital for sailors, divers, swimmers, in short anyone who loves the ocean. Ilhabela’s charm and authenticity are enchanting and the island’s villas are nothing short of gorgeous - even the Queen of Portugal once had a palace here. Ilhabela, “Beautiful Island”, is the locals’ choice for good reason, and here one cannot help but be taken by the island rhythm of almost 346 square kilometres of unspoilt, Brazilian beauty.


MEDIA INFORMATION 2009

www.regattanews.com

Cowes–Plymouth, United kingdom

Rolex Fastnet Race A Legendary Exp e ri e nce It is the ambition of every offshore racing yachtsman or woman to have a Rolex Fastnet Race on their sailing CV. Why a 608 nautical mile race, often held in atrocious weather conditions, with a course open to the worst sea state the Atlantic Ocean can lay on, has achieved such legendary status is sometimes difficult to understand. Eighty years of history tells its own story. If one delves into the record books and looks beyond the impressive veneer of the famous yachts and owners that have taken part, one finds scores of ordinary sailors that have achieved the extraordinary in completing this most challenging of races. The Fastnet Rock itself, Carraig Aonair (Lonely Rock) in Gaelic, has iconic status too and rounding this isolated imposing rock,

which lies just off the Irish coast, is one of those moments in life, whether the granite lighthouse is silhouetted against the moon or sun, glimpsed shrouded in fog or in the depth of night, that is often described as a mystical experience.

Valletta, Malta

Rolex Middle Sea Race A c o mmo n b o nd If ever there was a racecourse that linked the past with the present, myth with historical fact, natural beauty with man-made wonders, it is the Rolex Middle Sea Race. Starting beneath the 16th Century bastions of Valletta,

built by the Knights of St John, the course takes yachts on a partial circumnavigation of Sicily, within touching distance of active volcanoes, through the narrow Strait of Messina that saw monsters challenge Ulysses, past the scenes of great sea battles, through waters used by every great trading empire the world has seen, around islands touched by the smell of Africa and back to an archipelago with archaeological remains dating back 7,000 years. Add to this mix an incomparable warmth of welcome, an extraordinary fusion of cultures and a weather pattern capable of confusing the most experienced, and one begins to wonder if the island where this race starts and finishes really occupies less than 100 square miles (245km2).


MEDIA INFORMATION 2009

www.regattanews.com

Cowes–Plymouth, United kingdom

Rolex Fastnet Race A Legendary Exp e ri e nce It is the ambition of every offshore racing yachtsman or woman to have a Rolex Fastnet Race on their sailing CV. Why a 608 nautical mile race, often held in atrocious weather conditions, with a course open to the worst sea state the Atlantic Ocean can lay on, has achieved such legendary status is sometimes difficult to understand. Eighty years of history tells its own story. If one delves into the record books and looks beyond the impressive veneer of the famous yachts and owners that have taken part, one finds scores of ordinary sailors that have achieved the extraordinary in completing this most challenging of races. The Fastnet Rock itself, Carraig Aonair (Lonely Rock) in Gaelic, has iconic status too and rounding this isolated imposing rock,

which lies just off the Irish coast, is one of those moments in life, whether the granite lighthouse is silhouetted against the moon or sun, glimpsed shrouded in fog or in the depth of night, that is often described as a mystical experience.

Valletta, Malta

Rolex Middle Sea Race A c o mmo n b o nd If ever there was a racecourse that linked the past with the present, myth with historical fact, natural beauty with man-made wonders, it is the Rolex Middle Sea Race. Starting beneath the 16th Century bastions of Valletta,

built by the Knights of St John, the course takes yachts on a partial circumnavigation of Sicily, within touching distance of active volcanoes, through the narrow Strait of Messina that saw monsters challenge Ulysses, past the scenes of great sea battles, through waters used by every great trading empire the world has seen, around islands touched by the smell of Africa and back to an archipelago with archaeological remains dating back 7,000 years. Add to this mix an incomparable warmth of welcome, an extraordinary fusion of cultures and a weather pattern capable of confusing the most experienced, and one begins to wonder if the island where this race starts and finishes really occupies less than 100 square miles (245km2).


MEDIA INFORMATION 2009

INTERNATIONAL ROLEX YACHTING PORTFOLIO www.regattanews.com

USM is the official furniture supplier of the media centres at Rolex sponsored international yachting events International contact:

Media services

Pro vid e d o n - si t e and year- ro und

USM U. Schärer Söhne AG 3110 Münsingen | Switzerland Tel: +41 31 720 72 72 | www.usm.com

www.regattanews.com – the virtual media centre and comprehensive source for up to date and archived text, images and video material for all major Rolex yachting events

assistance with sailing opportunities, media boats and interviews

multi-lingual assistance

video news material

professionally staffed and fully-equipped media centres

post-event follow-up

photography by world’s top yachting photographers


MEDIA INFORMATION 2009

INTERNATIONAL ROLEX YACHTING PORTFOLIO www.regattanews.com

USM is the official furniture supplier of the media centres at Rolex sponsored international yachting events International contact:

Media services

Pro vid e d o n - si t e and year- ro und

USM U. Schärer Söhne AG 3110 Münsingen | Switzerland Tel: +41 31 720 72 72 | www.usm.com

www.regattanews.com – the virtual media centre and comprehensive source for up to date and archived text, images and video material for all major Rolex yachting events

assistance with sailing opportunities, media boats and interviews

multi-lingual assistance

video news material

professionally staffed and fully-equipped media centres

post-event follow-up

photography by world’s top yachting photographers


MEDIA INFORMATION 2009

INTERNATIONAL ROLEX YACHTING PORTFOLIO www.regattanews.com

International Media Information Key Partners (KPMS) 20, Av. Edouard Dubois CH - 2000 Neuchâtel Switzerland Tel:

+41 32 724 28 29

Fax:

+41 32 724 28 33

Mobile: +41 79 359 15 47 Email: info@regattanews.com www.regattanews.com

UK & Ireland Giles Pearman Key Partners (KPMS) 20, Av. Edouard Dubois CH - 2000 Neuchâtel | Switzerland Mobile: +41 79 348 00 23 Fax: +41 32 724 28 33 Email: giles@regattanews.com Spain Javier Sobrino Key Partners (KPMS) C / Ma Auxiliadora, 4 | 36202 Vigo Tel: +34 986441001 Fax: +34 986225981 Mobile: +34 629893637 Email: javier@regattanews.com Italy Ufficio Stampa Rolex Italia Foro Buonaparte, 54 | 20121 Milano Tel: +39 02 72001513 Fax: +39 02 72020171 Email: alberto.franchella@seci1981.it antonella asnaghi & associati Via Giacomo Leopardi 14 | 20123 Milano Tel: +39 02 48008294 Fax: +39 02 43916618 Email: sinergie@asnaghiassociati.it

Germany Andreas Kling | Föhrdener Strasse 6 | 25563 Wrist Tel: +49 4822 360 900 Fax: +49 4822 360 901 Mobile: +49 172 257 8817 Email: andreas@regattanews.com France Thomas Campion & Delphine de Nervaux Event International | 70, rue de la Tour | 75116 Paris Tel: +33 1 45 03 21 26 Fax: +33 1 45 03 40 04 Email: tcampion@eventinternational.com ddenervaux@eventinternational.com Portugal Diogo Muller e Sousa EgoCorp Comunicação e Imagem Rua Braancamp, 88 - 5° Esq. | 1250-052 Lisboa Tel: +351 21 383 86 00 Fax: +351 21 383 86 10 Mobile: +351 91 727 25 27 Email: dsousa@egocorp.pt

Media Contacts

Rolex yachting Public relations

USA Susan Maffei Plowden Key Partners (KPMS) 45 Calvert Place | Jamestown | RI 02835 Mobile: +1 401 855 0234 Email: suma@regattanews.com Barby MacGowan (US Events) Media Pro International 41 Memorial Blvd. | Newport | RI 02840 Tel: +1 401 849 0220 Fax: +1 401 847 4535 Mobile: +1 401 225 0249 Email: barby.macgowan@mediapronewport.com Australia Lisa Ratcliff OCC – On Course Communications PO Box 1513 Mona Vale NSW 1660 Tel: + 61 418 428 511 Fax: + 61 280 881 260 Email: lisa@occ.net.au


MEDIA INFORMATION 2009

INTERNATIONAL ROLEX YACHTING PORTFOLIO www.regattanews.com

International Media Information Key Partners (KPMS) 20, Av. Edouard Dubois CH - 2000 Neuchâtel Switzerland Tel:

+41 32 724 28 29

Fax:

+41 32 724 28 33

Mobile: +41 79 359 15 47 Email: info@regattanews.com www.regattanews.com

UK & Ireland Giles Pearman Key Partners (KPMS) 20, Av. Edouard Dubois CH - 2000 Neuchâtel | Switzerland Mobile: +41 79 348 00 23 Fax: +41 32 724 28 33 Email: giles@regattanews.com Spain Javier Sobrino Key Partners (KPMS) C / Ma Auxiliadora, 4 | 36202 Vigo Tel: +34 986441001 Fax: +34 986225981 Mobile: +34 629893637 Email: javier@regattanews.com Italy Ufficio Stampa Rolex Italia Foro Buonaparte, 54 | 20121 Milano Tel: +39 02 72001513 Fax: +39 02 72020171 Email: alberto.franchella@seci1981.it antonella asnaghi & associati Via Giacomo Leopardi 14 | 20123 Milano Tel: +39 02 48008294 Fax: +39 02 43916618 Email: sinergie@asnaghiassociati.it

Germany Andreas Kling | Föhrdener Strasse 6 | 25563 Wrist Tel: +49 4822 360 900 Fax: +49 4822 360 901 Mobile: +49 172 257 8817 Email: andreas@regattanews.com France Thomas Campion & Delphine de Nervaux Event International | 70, rue de la Tour | 75116 Paris Tel: +33 1 45 03 21 26 Fax: +33 1 45 03 40 04 Email: tcampion@eventinternational.com ddenervaux@eventinternational.com Portugal Diogo Muller e Sousa EgoCorp Comunicação e Imagem Rua Braancamp, 88 - 5° Esq. | 1250-052 Lisboa Tel: +351 21 383 86 00 Fax: +351 21 383 86 10 Mobile: +351 91 727 25 27 Email: dsousa@egocorp.pt

Media Contacts

Rolex yachting Public relations

USA Susan Maffei Plowden Key Partners (KPMS) 45 Calvert Place | Jamestown | RI 02835 Mobile: +1 401 855 0234 Email: suma@regattanews.com Barby MacGowan (US Events) Media Pro International 41 Memorial Blvd. | Newport | RI 02840 Tel: +1 401 849 0220 Fax: +1 401 847 4535 Mobile: +1 401 225 0249 Email: barby.macgowan@mediapronewport.com Australia Lisa Ratcliff OCC – On Course Communications PO Box 1513 Mona Vale NSW 1660 Tel: + 61 418 428 511 Fax: + 61 280 881 260 Email: lisa@occ.net.au


INTERNATIONAL ROLEX YACHTING PORTFOLIO www.regattanews.com

Notes

MEDIA INFORMATION 2009


INTERNATIONAL ROLEX YACHTING PORTFOLIO www.regattanews.com

Notes

MEDIA INFORMATION 2009


The other side of Sailing  

Beautiful sport, beautiful place

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