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Support Israel Shirts My heart is with Israel

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Table of Contents FEATURED 2. Jewish Orange County 4. One People with One Heart

LOCAL 6. Start the Year with CSP 7. Mixing It Up 8. Standing Together 24/7 with Ari Fuld 10. Fun Day, Great Cause

ETC 11. Talking Turkey 14. Hanukkah in America 16. Friends Don’t Let Friends Shop Retail

Thank you to our sponsors Ponseggi Photography Rapidos Caesar’s Cleaning Saddleback Dental Associates Schneider the Writer SeforimCenter.com Steven’s Pharmacy Tarbut V’Torah

How to Reach Us

AlefDesigns.com Atarem Website Solutions Beth Jacob Congregation Chabad at UC Irvine Chabad of Irvine Community Scholar Program (CSP) Orange County Endodontics

Kosher OC Magazine PO Box 7054 Newport Beach, CA 92658 Email: info@kosheroc.com Web: www.kosheroc.com Shop: shop.kosheroc.com Facebook.com/kosheroc Twitter: @kosheroc YouTube.com/kosheroc


Welcome to

Jewish Orange County Kosher OC Magazine is here to give the Orange County Jewish community news when it happens, here and around the world. We combine the best of modern media and dedicated journalism to give you timely and interesting stories about the movers and shakers of the community and the great events they hold. We also talk about Jewish trends and trendmakers in Israel and throughout the globe with interesting ideas about celebrating holidays and celebrating each other. Join us for a window into the world of Judaism, and let us have your insight and input. It is our pleasure to serve this wonderful community. ZACH MILLER

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16TH ANNUAL ONE MONTH SCHOLAR PROGRAM Dedicated to the memory of Bobbi Cherry Celebrating our 16th year, the mission of the Orange County Jewish Community Scholar Program is to share the joy of Judaism, build community, and celebrate our Jewish heritage with a rich adult education program and unique family experiences.

Visit www.occsp.org or call (949) 682-4040

KOSHER OC MAGAZINE // NOVEMBER 2016

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One People with One Heart I L ENE S C H N E I D E R / C O N T R I B U T O R

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t was breathtaking. A huge room, filled with purple, teal and black balloons, coupled with multicolored lights, served as the backdrop. Women of all ages, sometimes multiple generations together, united for one purpose – to perform a basic mitzvah. There were 1,400 of them, making it the biggest women’s event in Orange County. The 2016 OC Mega Challah Bake On Thursday, November 10 was all that and more. It brought together women from every city in Orange County and some beyond the county borders. It connected women of every persuasion – Modern Orthodox, Chabad, Conservative, Reform, Reconstructionist and none of the above – in a hands-on, time-honored tradition. Some were making challah for the first time while others were seasoned bakers. The enthusiasm was palpable. People were chattering with people they never met before or barely knew, getting into the kneading, the rolling and the braiding. They sang, they laughed and they bonded. The committee, like the event itself, was an eclectic mix of women from Orange County

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with one goal in mind – to make the OC Mega Challah Bake the best evening ever, according to the chairperson, Shana Segall

OC Mega Challah Bake attracts 1,400 women. of Irvine. It was a grassroots effort with a highly professional outcome, from the decorations to the video to the specially prepared sets of ingredients. This was the third mega challah bake in Orange County. Improved lighting, acoustics and instructions played well with the crowd, as did the ability to purchase kosher food and beverages before the event. The mega challah bake is part of a worldwide effort, the Shabbos Project, that started in South Africa to bring Jews together in observance of Shabbat. It begins with women

baking challah, goes through Shabbat and culminates in a celebratory Havdallah. More than 300 communities throughout the world participated this year. 


KOSHER OC MAGAZINE // NOVEMBER 2016

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Start the Year with CSP I L ENE S C H N E I D E R / C O N T R I B U T O R

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ew years are always full of promise and potential. One of the best bets for kicking off the year is to attend the Community Scholar Program (CSP) One Month Scholar program. This year’s program is dedicated in Memory of Bobbi Cherry, z”l.

Historian is One Month Community Scholar. Prof. David Ruderman, Joseph Meyerhoff Professor of Modern Jewish History and formally Ella Darivoff Director of the Herbert D. Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies at the University of Pennsylvania, is the 16th Annual CSP One Month Scholar. He will present a series of talks on the topic, “Jewish History, Jewish Thought: A Journey through Space and Time” at various Orange County and Long Beach locations from January 3 to January 26, 2017. According to Prof. Ruderman, “My lectures in Orange County all emerge from my own personal discovery of the Jewish past based on over forty years of research and teaching the subject. 6

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The cluster of subjects before you reflect some of my deepest concerns upon which I have written: The involvement of Jews with science, medicine, and the world of nature; the long and complex history of Jewish-Christian relations and how the latter have shaped the way we Jews see ourselves; the interaction of Jews and the urban experience; and both the glories and tragedies of the messianic impulse in Jewish history. My interest in the history of modern Jewish thought, in particular, is shaped by my own search for understanding contemporary Jewish faith.” Prof. Ruderman said that one of his professional and personal heroes is European historian Natalie Zemon Davis. “When asked about what we can learn from history, she answered that teaching history is about telling human stories and especially about bringing forgotten or unknown people to life as a mother gives birth to a child,” he explained.

View and download the schedule by visiting the following online: http://go.kosheroc.com/csp17 The Orange County Jewish Community Scholar Program is celebrating its 16th year. It mission is to share the joy of Judaism, build community and celebrate our Jewish heritage with a rich adult education program and unique family experiences, according to Founder and Director Arie Katz.  For more info about CSP, call (949) 682-4040 or online www.occsp.org.


Mixing It Up KO S H ER O C S TA F F / C O N T R I B U T O R

TVT Alumni Reunite

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two-part alumni event brought many graduates back to TVT the day before Thanksgiving. TVT’s Annual Alumni Day was filled with exciting energy as more than 50 alumni returned to campus for the traditional Alumni vs. Varsity Basketball Game on Wednesday, November 23. TVT Founder Irving “Papa” Gelman was a familiar face among fellow alumni, faculty, staff and parents who reunites with TVT graduates. More than 100 alumni from TVT classes of 2001 to 2016 came to TVT’s first evening Alumni Reunion on Newport Bay. Some alumni flew from other states to be a part of this special night. The evening was filled with laughter, reminiscing, speeches, catching up with old friends and meeting new friends. 

KOSHER OC MAGAZINE // NOVEMBER 2016

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Standing Together 24/7 with Ari Fuld RO BI N S I LV E R - Z W I R E N / C O N T R I B U T O R

Organization helps those who protect Israel.

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ri Fuld of Standing Together is someone who is there for those in the IDF who protect Israel 24/7. Ari’s dedication and energy seem to come from the Hungarian-born, Holocaustsurviving grandmother of whom he speaks so highly — the powerful little woman who told him that America was great for accepting her and so many others. However, America is just a stepping stone, and the final quest is Israel, according to Fuld’s grandmother. In fact, when she was 88 she made the move that her beloved grandson was proud to call his own long before. Ari Fuld, like so many Yeshiva High School students, continued his journey to Israel in 1991. He decided to make Aliyah and serve in the IDF. In 1993 his dear friend, bunkmate and 2nd gunner, Jason Yehoshua Friedberg, was kidnapped. Friedberg’s tefillin and wallet were found on the side of the road. Days later, his body was found as well. As Ari Fuld told that story to those of us gathered at Ory and Linda Schwartz’s home recently, I cried. Jason Friedberg was born in Montreal, so his story is etched in my mind. I can picture his family rabbi having to break the news to a devastated community. I know how his teachers and classmates reacted, because I have relatives who walked those mournful hallways. Ari Fuld joined others in the search to

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find Jason and broke down when they did. That heartache never ends, especially when years later you hear news that Friedberg’s murderers were released in order for Israel to get Gilad Shalit freed. As Ari says, in Israel “cease fire” means we “cease” and they “fire.” Ari Fuld seems even more determined to fight for Israel and, although now older than many reservists, still dedicated to do his part. He served in Lebanon in 2006. His unit was the second group in, and they were put in charge of 35 terrorists while Hezbollah was firing from every direction. IDF soldiers were falling everywhere. Once able, the group walked back to Israel through mountains without water, food or sleep. It took eighteen hours, but such is the life of those sent to protect our nation from the Arab militants surrounding Israel on all sides — the nations who strive to destroy us. “Reality is reality and you know you may not come back from war. You may be giving your children their last bracha.” After returning from Lebanon, the troops were met by David Landau, who founded Standing Together 24/7. Landau, who happens to be Rabbi Joel’s brother, had a vehicle filled with supplies — everything from water to food to clean socks and underwear. Landau handed out letters to the weary soldiers from strangers telling them thanks for their service. If ever they doubted

their worth, this boost was so appreciated. Meanwhile, Fuld returned from his latest term, filled with anxiety and confusion. He did not want the medals awarded him but something that could help make sense of what had happened. Between losing Yehoshua Friedberg and his more recent ordeal in Lebanon, even the love of his family was not enough. One door closed and another opened when Landau called and offered Fuld a job with Standing Together 24/7. Fuld says it is not his job but his mission to help make Standing Together successful and by making soldiers’ lives a bit easier. In fact, besides helping those in the field, Standing Together also aids those who have become injured. Standing Together 24/7 purchases microwave ovens that IDF soldier-patients have by their hospital beds to greatly aid their loved ones who visit as well. Standing Together 24/7 is a nonprofit organization “dedicated to making a difference to those who make a difference in Israel.” Every IDF soldier faces emotional and physical pressures that are often shared with family members. We need to show our appreciation by giving our support and admiration: This can mean getting school age children to write letters to those stationed on army bases throughout Israel. This is a great way to boost the moral especially of Lone Soldiers who are so far away from their family and friends.

Schools and youth groups can hold drives to purchase warm gloves and socks. Organizations can sponsor a Coffee and Cake Project, Mishloach Manot, Ice Cream, Pizza or Chanukah Donut Party — $5 per soldier, $500 for 100 soldiers… A Water Pack Campaign is an essential need for those soldiers who must keep hydrated. Each water pack costs $35. Warm Winter Gear includes a waterproof jacket, wind-block face mask, thermal hats and apparel for $100 per soldier. A new Standing Together IDF Truck can serve 1,000 soldiers per day supplying refreshments and operational gear. The truck will have a high-powered generator, built-in grill, freezer, coffee machine, slushy machine and phone chargers. It will be able to transport volunteers and sponsors to meet soldiers in the field. The original 15-yearold vehicle has served tens of thousands, and a new truck is desperately needed. Having a second truck also means being able to service soldiers in the north and south of Israel at all times. The estimated cost is $180,000. It would be an amazing community-wide project.  For tax-deductible donations, make check out to Central Fund of Israel and mail to: Friends of Standing Together 17 E. Stemmer Ln. Suffern, NY 10901-4304 More online: www.stogether.org


Fun Day, Great Cause KO S H ER O C S TA F F / C O N T R I B U T O R

TVT Turkey Trot raises $13,000 to feed hungry.

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ho wants to get out of bed early on a holiday to get the juices flowing for a good reason? Apparently, a lot of supporters of TVT did.

On a crisp but clear Thanksgiving morning, people of all ages brought their friends and even their dogs to participate in the 2nd annual TVT Turkey Trot. There were 387 registrations, and the event raised more than $13,000 TVT Cares, which will use the proceeds to package 75,000 meals for families in Haiti and elsewhere on Super Bowl Sunday, February 5, 2017. 

MALE 1 Justin Soliman — 15 — 16:26 — Irvine, CA 2 Brian Jenkins — 35 — 16:29 — Irvine, CA 3 Raymond Parejo — 18 — 17:57 — Seal Beach, CA FEMALE 1 Linda Siegel — 53 — 22:22 — Newport Beach, CA 2 Nicole Wurscher — 40 — 23:03 — Irvine, CA 3 Sarah Berman — 14 — 24:44 — San Francisco, CA The 3rd annual TVT Turkey Trot is slated for November 23, 2017.

Everybody was a winner, but the fastest finishers in the 2nd Annual TVT Turkey Trot were:

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Talking Turkey I L ENE S C H N E I D E R / C O N T R I B U T O R

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he election day results Perhaps the greatest lesson of the shocked some people and 2016 election is that we all have mortified others. I learned to start listening to one another. what was happening while going Our country is a spectrum, not from election site to election a monolith. That goes for the site as a roving Jewish people troubleshooter. I as well. There Let’s give heard a lot more is anger, there ourselves a gift. while glued to the is suffering, computer and the there is poverty, television when I got home. whether we choose to see it or not. Empathy – the ability to feel A month later, I keep hearing someone else’s pain – is hard. from both disgruntled and Nonetheless, indifference creates pleased (gruntled) people chasms between people. everywhere I go. Thankfully, most of them would rather celebrate We are all guilty. Most of us are happy occasions than argue. Like just too busy to interact with it or not, the election is over with people outside of our comfort the recount probably going the zone. Even if we write checks or way of the pregnant chads. Sadly, do some volunteering, we often the bitterness continues. fail to understand the plight of the people we are helping. We Should well-educated, wellrarely get the chance – or make sheltered exurbanites be the effort – to talk to people in surprised that people in the different socioeconomic circles rust belt, in rural America and or parts of the country. We are in other not-so-well-sheltered remiss in talking to our fellow places have different opinions Jews about the need to be vigilant than they do? Was it clear that about both Israel and domestic people wanted drastic change issues. We may be mainstream, when we first saw Bernie Sanders and we may be well off, but we and Donald Trump get “yuge” still have to be careful. numbers in the primaries? Were pundits upset about the results As we celebrate Chanukah, the or just the fact that they got it great victory of a small group wrong? fighting for its principles, we should remember what they

were fighting for and why they succeeded. We should also give everyone the gift of replacing anger with empathy.  Chag sameach from Kosher OC!

KOSHER OC MAGAZINE // NOVEMBER 2016

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Hanukkah in America NOA M Z I O N / C O N T R I B U T O R

How American Jews made Hanukkah the holiday of religious freedom.

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n the 21st century, Hanukkah is celebrated by more Jews than any holiday other than Passover. Both are performed at least one night a year by almost 90 percent of American Jews, more than the number who observed Hanukkah in the 1930s. The sociological reason is surely related the competition with a commercialized, publicly observed Christmas and holiday season. Yet Jews could have also adopted a secularized Christmas, as many German Jews did in the 19th century and early 20th century. If social pressure and a desire to be like everyone else and make sure children are not left out were the only reasons, then one need not enhance a separate Jewish holiday that highlights the very difference that makes many American Jews uncomfortable. There was also counterpressure to assert one’s ethnic and religious identity against the majority. Thus, whatever the social reasons for Hanukkah, Jewish educators developed an ideological rationale that became very popular. Reform and Conservative Jews led the way in this Americanization of Hanukkah, not only by inventing the custom of giving eight gifts, one per night, and using colored candles, unknown beyond its shores, but also by reshaping the message of the menorah’s light to fit the American Jewish predicament. The Reform reinvention was striking, because there are elements in Hanukkah that could

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be difficult for classical Reform Jews to adopt. For the Maccabees, Hanukkah is celebrated as the rededication of the altar desecrated by the Greek Syrians who sacrificed pigs on that altar to Zeus, but Reform Jews do not pray to return to sacrifices and to rebuild the Temple in Jerusalem. The Maccabees fought to achieve political independence for a separate Jewish nation in the Jewish homeland by trying to expel Western culture (Hellenism) by acts of military heroism. But classical Reform Judaism was non-nationalist, anti-Zionist, pacifist in orientation, and committed to integration within Western civilization in their own lands. Mattathias killed a Jew who publicly worshipped Zeus when Antiochus’s men came to enlist supporters, and Judah the Maccabee forcibly circumcised Jewish babies when their parents wanted to be more Hellenized or were simply afraid of reprisals by the Greek Syrians. In contrast, freedom of conscience, faith in God, loyalty to the state, and an ethics of peace and reason have been central Reform values. Thus, it should not be surprising that Isaac M. Wise, who introduced Reform Judaism in the United States, suggested in 1865 the elimination of the Hanukkah lights. But six years later, the Augsburg Synod, with delegates mostly from German Reform congregations, introduced a resolution urging the appropriate commemoration of Hanukkah, which had been neglected in many Reform Jewish congregations and

schools. The rationale for this resolution was to counteract the celebration of Christmas by many Jewish families “in direct opposition to Jewish consciousness.” One hundred and fifty years later, American Jews continue to give great significance to Hanukkah as a counterweight to Christmas. But they have also made Hanukkah a major symbol of America Jewish values. A 1971 Reform curriculum for children written by Harry Gersh said Hanukkah was “the first for the right of a people within a country to believe as they wish—so long as they followed the king’s law in worldly matters. For thousands of years, Jews have lived under kings, princes, dukes, caliphs, governors, presidents. And they have always been loyal to these rulers—so long as they were permitted to practice their own religion. This idea of religious freedom is followed in all free nations today. It was first given to the world by the Jews.” The battle of the Maccabees against the religious and political coercion of Antiochus was a battle for collective religious, hence national political freedom, but not for individual freedom of conscience as such. Yet the Reform interpretation is certainly as valid as any rabbinic reading of the past, and it makes Hanukkah central to the American Jewish concern for maintaining its difference within a democratic land. Reform Jews have become, at least since the Holocaust, strong supporters of Zionism. And so nowadays, Hanukkah can also represent for them, as it does for Israelis, a war of


independence and a model for the virtue of military courage in a just war. Still, some liberal Reform Jews, especially during the protests against the War in Vietnam, have felt ambivalent about militant nationalism. But I think it is still true to say that liberal American Jews hold that Hanukkah candles represent a value that they are proud to propagate in the public sphere: the banner of religious freedom for every individual. This is the central value for American liberal Jews and for liberal Americans, and that bridges the tension between Jewish and American identity, so the Jews need not feel so uncomfortable with being different. This rationale is as important as the eight presents. ď ?

Stand up for Israel.

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Friends Don’t Let Friends Shop Retail TA NYA C L A I R E / C O N T R I B U T O R

Navigating sales. Tips and tricks of when to buy what you want!

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any of us enjoy going to the mall, walking around, looking at all the new things to buy; where as many people just want to get in and out as fast as possible because the idea of being in the mall is overwhelming and unpleasant. Especialy around this time of year, when everyone is holiday shopping. Well thankfully there are many sales happening and retailers are trying to move winter items out to make room for the new spring merchandise. I’m going to give you some tips on how to easily maneuver around these stores so shopping can become a little easier all while saving you some money! Tip 1: Just because it is on sale doesn’t mean you should buy it! When shopping, ask yourself if the item is something you must have, will work with your current wardrobe, fits you well, is in a color that works with your skin tone, and is in a style that will last a few season. What material is the garment made out of? Try taking the price of the item and divided by the amount of times you think you will wear it. This will give you the price per wear – helping you decide if the price point of that item is worth the amount of times you will wear it. Tip 2: Think before you buy… Be patient with yourself!

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Clients of mine always say thank you so much for being patient and helping me think through the items. Normally clients would just buy the clothes, take them home and never wear them. They impulse shop, or just buy out of necessity but the item itself doesn’t really work. Rather take a minute and ask yourself, is this something I really need to own, does it look fabulous on me and will I be happy to wear it over and over again. Tip 3: A brand-name does not mean good quality or a good price! Many people get stuck on purchasing specific brands believing that the quality of the item is worth the price. Also, some people believe certain stores only carry cheap quality items where as these assumptions are not always correct. Stores like Marshals, TJ Maxx, Forever 21, and Macys are all stores where you can find both high-end and low-end items that will carry quality merchandise. It does depend on the items that you are choosing, however, when I take my clients shopping many of them are surprised at the items that I find and at the quality and good price point of the merchandise that I fine. Sometimes it takes a little patience to look for the gems. Tip 4: Ask about discounts! Stores like Macy’s, many times have sales, or send their customers coupons. I always ask at the register if there’s any extra coupons that can be used and many times depending on the brand or the current sale I am able to

get an extra discount. Many retailers are now sending coupons to people via email as well as online bloggers with affiliate codes help you save some extra money. Tip 5: Know when each item is on sale!! Retailers mark down specific items during specific months! Here is a list to help you be a savvier shopper: January – Best time to buy Suits Many retailers markdown suits during this time of year often because businesses are looking to hire new employees. February – Buy Jewelry Valentine’s Day is around the corner, and even if you don’t have that special someone, jewelry stores are marking down some amazing pieces. So whether it’s for that special someone in your life or just yourself this is a great time to purchase a pretty piece of jewelry. March – Luggage and travel items As spring break, for many, starts in March, this is the time when we see people going on vacation, taking trips, and retailers know that we need new luggage for our adventures. Take advantage! April – Raincoats April showers bring may flowers as many people say. Depending on where you live or raincoat would be a great item for your wardrobe and this is definitely the time to


purchase one! April/May – Thrift & Consignment stores As people are a spring cleaning, many go through their wardrobes, clearing out items, making it a primetime to shop at thrift and consignment stores. Especially if you enjoy searching for interesting and cool pieces to add to your wardrobe. May – Athletic apparel As May starts to heat up, people get into the mood to exercise outside and want to look their best while doing it! Take advantage of them are down and get some nice pieces to wear which will motivate you more to work out and look and feel your best! July/Aug – Summer apparel Summer clothes are my favorite to purchase. In July and August sales are in full swing. This is the best time to purchase items like dresses, sandals, shorts and other summer apparel. Tip: sale stock will be more plentiful in July but come August the discounts will be steeper! August – Swimsuits Stores want to clear out their summer leftovers to make room for the new fall items. Retailers have also started to bring in swimsuits during December due to people vacationing in warmer places; so sometimes January is also a good time to purchase swimsuits on sale. September – Sunglasses

Go get that pair of sunglasses you wanted now that it’s on sale! With daylight savings around the corner retailer start to markdown their higher priced styles before winter sets in. October – Denim Everyone likes to wear denim… especially when it’s on sale! After the back-to-school rush has died down, retailers cut prices to move merchandise and this is a great time to grab that designer pair jeans you want! November – Luxury items Back Friday and Cyber Monday promotions begin and this is an ideal time to treat yourself to luxury pieces such as cashmere sweaters, leather goods, and other high-end items. Many of these items only go on sale during this time of year where as they normally would be full price.

With winter season under way, retailers want to help you look your best in a new winter coat! After the holidays, retailers need to clear the inventory to accommodate the new spring collection that will hit stores shortly after the holidays. If you have any questions or need further assistance on how to purchase items for the best price, especially during a sale, I would love to hear from you!  Email: style.tanyaclaire@gmail.com Instagram: @tanyaclaire Website: http://tanyaclaire.com

November – Luxury loungewear and pajamas Temperatures drop and many people tend to spend more time inside their home lounging around. This is a great time to purchase luxury loungewear to wear during these colder months. While still being comfortable and looking stylish! November – Sneakers With snow and rain in many places, retailers need to make room for the shipments of boots and a winter shoes. So grab that pair of sneakers you want to wear on warmer days while they’re on sale! December – Outerwear KOSHER OC MAGAZINE // NOVEMBER 2016

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