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Fur techniques by Kopenhagen Studio The forest and its abundance of life have always been shrouded in a glow of mystique. The calm and sense of magic that the forest brings to its visitors have been an inspiration for artists and writers over the ages, and its compelling beauty and uncertainty have often been used as the themes in legends and fairy tales. This year the furriers of Kopenhagen Fur have allowed themselves to be allured into the universe of the magical forest. Many forms and interpretations of the forest mystique can thus be found in this year’s techniques from Kopenhagen Studio. Combining mink with leather and coated fabrics the techniques encapsulate the textures of the forest such as the structure of bark and the shimmering colours of moss, together with patterned recreations of the forest’s fruits, seeds and leaves. The range of colours chosen comprises shades of brown and kit. This allows the classic, natural mink types to shine through and blend in with the elements of forest nature.


Fur techniques by Kopenhagen Studio The forest and its abundance of life have always been shrouded in a glow of mystique. The calm and sense of magic that the forest brings to its visitors have been an inspiration for artists and writers over the ages, and its compelling beauty and uncertainty have often been used as the themes in legends and fairy tales. This year the furriers of Kopenhagen Fur have allowed themselves to be allured into the universe of the magical forest. Many forms and interpretations of the forest mystique can thus be found in this year’s techniques from Kopenhagen Studio. Combining mink with leather and coated fabrics the techniques encapsulate the textures of the forest such as the structure of bark and the shimmering colours of moss, together with patterned recreations of the forest’s fruits, seeds and leaves. The range of colours chosen comprises shades of brown and kit. This allows the classic, natural mink types to shine through and blend in with the elements of forest nature.


moss

This technique is inspired by the moss upon the forest bark. Coated fabric mimics the surface of the rough bark and gives the technique a dramatic effect. It is almost as if the hairs penetrate the surface and grow wild. This technique is perfect for fuller styles like capes or jackets.


moss

This technique is inspired by the moss upon the forest bark. Coated fabric mimics the surface of the rough bark and gives the technique a dramatic effect. It is almost as if the hairs penetrate the surface and grow wild. This technique is perfect for fuller styles like capes or jackets.


1. Mark the individual pattern onto the coated fabric

3. Place stripes of skin according to the pattern

2. Cut almost through the surface of the fabric

4. Stitch the strips onto the fabric


1. Mark the individual pattern onto the coated fabric

3. Place stripes of skin according to the pattern

2. Cut almost through the surface of the fabric

4. Stitch the strips onto the fabric


5. Tear the coated fabric apart and make space for the hairs

6. Sew parts of the coated fabric together with visible leather twine


5. Tear the coated fabric apart and make space for the hairs

6. Sew parts of the coated fabric together with visible leather twine


cone

This technique is inspired by the light brown, slender cones of the northern spruce trees. The combination of leather and skin and diamond-shaped pattern gives an almost three-dimensional life to the surface. This technique is very versatile and can be used both on a small and large scale, such as for mink jackets or cushions.


cone

This technique is inspired by the light brown, slender cones of the northern spruce trees. The combination of leather and skin and diamond-shaped pattern gives an almost three-dimensional life to the surface. This technique is very versatile and can be used both on a small and large scale, such as for mink jackets or cushions.


1. Mark out the pattern on the back of the skin

3. Cut out the leather and skin petals

2. Mark the same pattern on the leather

4. Arrange the petals according to the preferred design combination


1. Mark out the pattern on the back of the skin

3. Cut out the leather and skin petals

2. Mark the same pattern on the leather

4. Arrange the petals according to the preferred design combination


5. Use the combination of leather, skin and different colours to create a depth effect

6. Combine the petals by stitching them together

7. The petals will when combined create a layered effect


5. Use the combination of leather, skin and different colours to create a depth effect

6. Combine the petals by stitching them together

7. The petals will when combined create a layered effect


8. Dampen the back side by brushing water onto the skin

9. Nail the skin onto a wooden board while stretching the skin


8. Dampen the back side by brushing water onto the skin

9. Nail the skin onto a wooden board while stretching the skin


Trails

This technique is inspired by the beautiful mapping of the forest floor. Under fallen leaves you find all kinds of different trails which reveal the history of the forest in a remarkable way. The needlework leaves a unique trail in the surface of the skin and is what makes this technique particularly interesting. It is a masculine technique but is somewhat softened by the small lines of the trails. The effect is very heavy and as such this technique should be used only in parts of an entire style.


Trails

This technique is inspired by the beautiful mapping of the forest floor. Under fallen leaves you find all kinds of different trails which reveal the history of the forest in a remarkable way. The needlework leaves a unique trail in the surface of the skin and is what makes this technique particularly interesting. It is a masculine technique but is somewhat softened by the small lines of the trails. The effect is very heavy and as such this technique should be used only in parts of an entire style.


1. Choose the skin types and preferred look

3. Make a hole pattern in thick cardboard

2. Dye the leather side of the skin black

4. Use the cardboard to transfer the pattern of dots to the leather side of the skin


1. Choose the skin types and preferred look

3. Make a hole pattern in thick cardboard

2. Dye the leather side of the skin black

4. Use the cardboard to transfer the pattern of dots to the leather side of the skin


5. Fold the skin and connect the dots by stitching them together

6. This technique creates a smocking effect in the skin


5. Fold the skin and connect the dots by stitching them together

6. This technique creates a smocking effect in the skin


www.kopenhagenfur.com


www.kopenhagenfur.com


Profile for Kopenhagen Fur

Kopenhagen Studio techniques 2012/13  

Kopenhagen Studio techniques 2012/13

Kopenhagen Studio techniques 2012/13  

Kopenhagen Studio techniques 2012/13