2020 Annual Report

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Charting New Waters COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND 2020 ANNUAL REPORT

COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND | ANNUAL REPORT 2020 | 1


2020 ANNUAL REPORT

Table Of Contents BERING SEA EARNINGS FUEL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Mission Statement................................................................. 3 Report From The CEO: A New Era Of Partnership............... 4 By The Numbers: People, Employment & Fishing............. 5 Safely Navigating Troubled Waters..................................... 6 Community Programs & Essentials A Cause For Celebration.......................................................7 Listening, Recalibrating and Adapting: Working Together To Meet The Community Challenges Of The Pandemic....................................................................8 Sharing and Expanding Our Knowledge: In-Region Programming Keeps Youth-To-Work Program Moving Forward......................................................................9

DIRECT EMPLOYMENT

PATHWAYS TO SUCCESS

COMMUNITY ESSENTIALS

Creating Sustainable Jobs

Supporting Youth for Career Success

Providing Essentials

138 STAFF & BOARD in

526 YOUTH TO WORK

2,222 HOUSEHOLDS

20 COMMUNITIES

and INTERNS

received

AND ANCHORAGE

$303,000 in

77,524 GALLONS of

$5.1 MILLION

EARNED WAGES

HEATING OIL

in EARNED WAGES

99 STUDENTS RECIEVED

2,747 PREPARED

$622,000 in

$389,479 in SCHOLARSHIPS

TAX RETURNS

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS

Peace of Mind: Recieving a CVRF Scholarship................10

$14 MILLION INVESTED IN CVRF COMMUNITIES IN 2020

Internship Program: ‘Years Of Experience In One Summer’...............................11 More Than A Mechanic: M/Ws At CVRF Shops.................13 Not So Tiny: CVRF’s Rural Housing Program............................................14 People Propel : Providing Support For Our Communities..........................15 ®

Fuel In Lockdown: Pollock Provides® Heating Oil Program.............................16 A Helping Hand: Pollock Provides® Elder Program..........17 Financial Disclosures ............................................................19 Board of Directors.................................................................24 Message from the Chairman.................................................26 2020 Annual Report Scavenger Hunt!................................27

Pollock Caught

116.90 MILLION POUNDS

COD Caught

13.29 MILLION POUNDS

Crab Caught

2.40 MILLION POUNDS


COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND

Our Mission

STRATEGIC INTENT (VISION)

CORE COMPETENCIES

CORE VALUES

Continuous focus on balancing growth in commercial fishing and sustainable development of Coastal Villages Region Fund communities.

STRATEGIC MISSION Provide the means for development of our communities by creating sensible, tangible and long-term opportunities that generate hope for all people who want to fish and work.

Effective Strategic Leadership

Trust, Integrity and Teamwork

Respect for and Understanding of All People

Active Community Participation

Respect for and Understanding of the Land, Sea and Resources

Growth and Sustainability Through Maximum Return on Capital

Industrious People + Job Opportunities = Self-determination

Balance the needs, wants and expectations of all — now and seven generations from now.

Understand risks/rewards, develop a plan of action, support it and execute on it.

Deliver efficient and equitable economic benefits to our communities.

Develop and deploy successful business models and adapt as needed for future use.

Support bold thinking and continuous innovation.

Deliver disciplined, purposeful and sensible initiatives to sustain and stimulate new economic growth in our region.

Scammon Bay Hooper Bay

Chevak

Newtok

OUR MEMBER COMMUNITIES Tununak Toksook Bay Mekoryuk

Nightmute Chefornak Kipnuk

ALASKA

Napakiak

Oscarville Napaskiak

Tuntutuliak Eek Kongiganak

Kwigillingok Quinhagak

• • • • • • •

Scammon Bay Hooper Bay Chevak Newtok Tununak Mekoryuk Toksook Bay

• • • • • • •

Nightmute Chefornak Kipnuk Kwigillingok Kongiganak Tuntutuliak Napakiak

• • • • • •

Napaskiak Oscarville Eek Quinhagak Goodnews Bay Platinum

Goodnews Bay Platinum

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REPORT FROM THE CEO

A New Era of Partnership Across CVRF’s communities, offices and vessels, 2020 was a year of great effort and adjustment. The COVID-19 pandemic threatened lives and livelihoods around the world, and we survived it at CVRF by working together and looking out for one another.

Eric Deakin, CEO COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND

We can be satisfied with our results, especially on the human level. Fishing vessels are among the closest quarters any workers will ever experience. It is almost impossible not to share a cold or other sickness with your shipmates. Yet, our team was able to prevent any outbreak of COVID on our vessels. We did this through careful preparation and investing resources to ensure our crews were healthy before boarding. Other fishing companies took fewer precautions and suffered major COVID outbreaks on their vessels. Their boats went home with sick crews while we fished, safe and healthy. Our successful Bering Sea operations allowed us to continue delivering important benefits in our region, while adjusting our delivery methods to keep our communities safe. We made early, prominent calls for vaccine prioritization to rural villages, working with regional and state leaders to ensure access for the most vulnerable Alaskans. We scrambled to maintain supply chains to support our rural housing projects, while avoiding regional travel and activity when necessary to prevent transmission. The pandemic is not over, and we know 2021 is bringing more challenges. By working together and looking out for each other, we will again stay safe, healthy, and successful in the future. 2020 marked the start of a new era, as we sought partnerships that positioned CVRF to help our own residents and others. In late 2019, we established Honda Warranty Repair Centers in Scammon Bay, Eek, and Kipnuk. These repair centers were the result of a first-of-its-kind partnership with American Honda Motor Company (detail on page 12). While clearly beneficial to our own residents, these services are being sought by members of other communities as well, providing a much-needed resource throughout Western Alaska. At the end of 2020, we finalized a unique new deal that enabled CVRF and Bristol Bay Economic Development Corporation (BBEDC) — together with member villages from each of our regions — to buy one of the largest crab operations in the Bering Sea, the Mariner Company. For the first time, villages from CVRF and BBEDC were able to directly acquire valuable fishing rights for the long-term benefit of residents. We have since reached agreement to have CVRF operate the crab fleets of both CVRF and BBEDC for improved efficiency for all involved. We’re grateful for BBEDC’s leadership on the Mariner transaction, for its vision for village-owned quota, and for its trust in CVRF’s fleet management team. By working together, we have been able to benefit from the respective strengths of both or our companies. Looking ahead, it will be CVRF’s priority to continue working alongside other CDQ and Alaska organizations to grow Alaskan ownership and operations in the Bering Sea and to expand the reach of our benefits programs. I am grateful for the CVRF Board’s endorsement of this approach and for the results it brought us in 2020.

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Our successful Bering Sea operations allows us to continue delivering important benefits in our region, while adjusting our delivery methods to keep our communities safe. ERIC DEAKIN, CEO COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND


BY THE NUMBERS

People, Employment & Fishing 2020 POPULATION

2020 JOBS, WAGES + BENEFITS

ADULTS 18+ 10,000

8,927

9,441

9,517

9,312

9,328

5,856

8,000

IN-REGION EMPLOYEES + BOARD MEMBERS

TOTAL EARNED WAGES

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS

540

138

$5.4M

$622K

YTW-AGED YOUTH

6,000

1,026

4,000

2,000

HOUSEHOLDS

0 YEAR

YOUTH TO WORK (YTW) + INTERN EMPLOYEES

2012

2015

2018

2019

2020

2,254

SOURCE: State of Alaska Permanent Fund Division (2020). Revenue Permanent Fund Information System dataset for 2020 Dividend year (PFD).

In 2020, CVRF employed 674 in-region residents who earned $5.4 million combined. We continue to invest in our staff and communities by offering training and professional development opportunities.

2019 vs 2020 BERING SEA CATCH RATES

2020

CVRF is devoted to serving our communities and meeting their unique needs — today and in the future. 2019

POLLOCK CAUGHT

COD CAUGHT

116.90

13.29

MILLION POUNDS

CRAB CAUGHT MILLION POUNDS

2.43

MILLION POUNDS

POLLOCK CAUGHT

COD CAUGHT

CRAB CAUGHT

101.94

17.31

2.11

MILLION POUNDS

MILLION POUNDS

MILLION POUNDS

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OUR FLEET

Safely Navigating Troubled Waters On January 1, 2020, the forecast for the year still looked optimistic. A new decade brings with it new ideas and fresh perspectives, as well as an opportunity to build upon the work begun in the previous decade and realize longterm objectives. Following a record year of participation in our programs in 2019, as well as the launch of several new programs and partnerships, CVRF was poised for a year of unprecedented successes. No one could have predicted the world-changing year to come or the dangers it presented. At CVRF, our highest priorities are the health and safety of our communities, residents, staff and resources. As the

operator of the largest CDQ fishery in Alaska, we steward our region’s natural resources with the express purpose of investing the fishing revenue back into our communities. Even as the virus spread across the world, our staff and crew worked together to navigate the troubled waters of a pandemic year and ensure completion of a safe, successful fishing season. In 2020, our crew caught and processed 132.6 million pounds of pollock, cod and crab — up 11.26 million (or 8.5%) from 2019. Under normal circumstances, this would be a tremendous achievement. During COVID, it stands as a testament to the dedication, ingenuity and flexibility of

Thanks to careful planning and quick thinking in a global crisis, our Bering Sea fishing operation ended 2020 without a single case of COVID.

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our staff and crew. Thanks to careful planning and quick thinking in a global crisis, our Bering Sea fishing operation ended 2020 without a single case of COVID, having caught enough fish to produce world-class fish products worth more than $85 million. Even during this pandemic, our fishing operations have fueled everything CVRF does in-region. With the revenue from a safe fishing season, we have been able to offer residents key programs modified to follow public health guidelines and protect our communities. As a result, CVRF was able to continue to support our residents during a challenging year.


MAJOR MILESTONE

A Cause for Celebration 2020 also marked a major milestone for CVRF: ten years of owning and operating The Northern Hawk, our fleet’s flagship vessel. In 2010, the addition of this 341-foot-long catcher-processor factory trawler enabled CVRF to stop leasing its CDQ quota out and establish its own fishing operation in the Bering Sea. Since then, CVRF has invested the revenue from its fishing business back into its communities, using those resources to fund an ever-expanding list of local jobs, regional programs and community benefits.

CVRF worked throughout the year to identify new ways to expand the region’s fishing business and to build partnerships with industry leaders, regional corporations and other CDQ groups. In the spirit of expansion and partnership, CVRF negotiated an agreement that enabled BBEDC and CVRF, together with their member villages, to jointly buy the Mariner Companies fleet, including seven crab vessels and significant crab quota shares. Fishing for the village owned crab began in early 2021.

As a result of this cooperative purchase, 37 communities represented by CVRF and BBEDC in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta and Bristol Bay regions now own 3% of the total opilio and red king crab quota in the Bering Sea. Going forward, CVRF and BBEDC will work together to catch and process the crab quota with crab revenue going directly to the villages that own the quota. The newly formed Community Quota Share (CQS) Program will provide significant opportunities for our residents by fueling continued economic development in Western Alaska.

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COMMUNITY PROGRAMS

Listening, Recalibrating and Adapting Working Together To Meet The Community Challenges Of The Pandemic Every year, our program staff works diligently to understand the unique needs of our community members and deliver programming that benefits all our residents. Historically, this has included programs designed to assist residents at every stage of life, from youth looking for their first jobs, to adults purchasing their first homes or ATVs, to elders who benefit from heating oil and high-quality meat to help them through these long Alaska winters. During the pandemic, our program staff’s ability to understand those community needs and adapt programs to fulfill them became all the more important. In February of 2020, program staff began to suspect that the whispers of the coming virus might disrupt programming if they were not prepared. Given Alaska’s remote location, they anticipated a buffer of a few extra weeks before the virus spread to Anchorage, then the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. This offered staff a window of opportunity to get ahead of the planning cycle and begin to recalibrate programming with public health and safety in mind. As the pandemic grew and public health guidance evolved, our staff stayed abreast of all changes, managing and reimagining our programs in real-time to keep our residents safe. Special thanks are due to BRENDA ERIK, who manages our Youth-to-Work (YTW) programs. She spearheaded efforts to develop a plan that incorporated all applicable public health guidelines — from the federal, state and local levels. This plan included social distancing, mask guidance, handwashing and regular sanitization processes in communal spaces, as well as no-contact deliveries of materials whenever needed. After multiple iterations and adjustments to shifting CDC guidelines, the plan went into effect with the summer YTW cohort. It went on to become the model with which all the other in-person community programs operated. None of this would have been possible without input from our residents and community partners across the region. Our team worked together with local leaders on our plans. We consulted with experts from the Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation on best practices. We enabled our staff to work from home when needed by engaging our network provider, GCI, to bring connections to their homes and rush antennas to our communities despite supply chain shortages. Our other vendors diligently implemented social distancing guidelines and no contact procedures in order to keep their staff and our communities safe. We are grateful for all the hard work our staff and partners did in 2020, and we look forward to many more years of collaboration and dedication.

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JOHN P & PAULINE ANDREW


COMMUNITY PROGRAMS

Sharing and Expanding Our Knowledge In-Region Programming Keeps Youth-To-Work Program Moving Forward

Youth-to-Work was a chance for me to share my culture and expand my traditional knowledge by learning from elders and others in my community. MARILYN FAIRBANKS, YOUTH-TO-WORK PARTICIPANT MARILYN FAIRBANKS

For fourteen years, summers in Alaska have seen the return of our long-running Youth-to-Work (YTW) Program. Designed to provide youth with opportunities to develop professional skills and gain valuable work experience, YTW has become a cornerstone of our programming and a key component of local economies. After a record year in 2019, which saw high participation levels of 80% of total in-region youth, YTW shifted gears to enable a more socially distanced program. In preparation for the summer cohort of 510 YTW participants, BRENDA ERIK and her team built a kit of

resources that would prepare local CSRs to facilitate in-community programs. CSRs were trained on how to manage in-region programming, coordinate with youth and interface between the participants, community leaders and staff in Anchorage. In the winter, we reopened YTW in three communities where we were unable to run summer programs. CSRs in those communities made the program possible by providing guidance to youth and assembling packages with all of the materials youth needed to work from home. No-contact delivery protocols were established to ensure the health and safety of all participants.

We had 523 participants in YTW in 2020, including 26 youth from the winter cohort. Together, they earned a combined $226,042 in wages and bonuses. For our youth, YTW is an opportunity both to grow as a professional and connect with traditional Alaska Native culture and practices. A former participant, MARILYN FAIRBANKS, said she has fond memories of doing traditional crafts, including working with beads and sewing qaspeqs. She hopes to put her traditional knowledge to use soon by becoming a Yup’ik language teacher in her community.

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SCHOLARSHIPS

Peace of Mind Receiving a CVRF Scholarship Amidst the economic downturn of 2020 and increased anxieties about paying for education, the Louis Bunyan Memorial Scholarship Fund maintained by CVRF provided residents with needed economic relief. This scholarship program enabled our qualified youth and residents enrolled in a higher education or certificate program to receive funding for tuition, room and board, books, and other required fees.

all residents currently enrolled in a university, college or vocational program (or those planning to enroll in the near future) to apply for the Louis Bunyan Memorial Scholarship. Note that, for students, the minimum GPA requirement is 2.0. The higher the applicant’s GPA, the greater the chance of qualifying for the maximum available funding — $4,000 per semester. For many recipients, this support came at a time when finances were uncertain.

In total, 99 individuals received either scholarship or training awards, totaling $389,479 in 2020. We encourage

For 2020 recipient LARISSA STRUNK, the scholarship meant much more than money to help pay for school. “It

meant peace,” she said. Peace of mind and knowledge that she would still be able to continue her studies in mathematics despite the pandemic. Larissa is known for her work ethic, determination and passion for learning. These qualities enabled her to apply for and participate in a study abroad program in Germany a few years ago. She was able to finance the trip abroad with wages earned as a CVRF intern the summer before, combined with her other savings. This experience taught her how to manage her finances and plan for the future while still in school.

CVRF has had a huge impact on me — personally, professionally and financially. I’m so grateful for the support. LARISSA STRUNK

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LARISSA STRUNK, SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENT


INTERNSHIP PROGRAM

‘Years of Experience in One Summer’ The Internship Program Every year, CVRF interns gain valuable working experience by supporting the operations of our nonprofit from our Anchorage and village offices. During the pandemic, this support focused on implementing and powering the revised health and safety protocols put in place by staff. During the summer YTW program, for instance, interns reviewed the COVID screening questionnaires YTW filled out daily and flagged any anomalies to CSRs and program staff. This vital step in the screening process ensured that our YTW programs ran smoothly and without incident. In the past, local CSRs would assist with timesheet entry and payroll for our interns and YTW participants. In 2020, when CSRs turned their attention to COVID risk mitigation, interns were tapped to help with time entries. This enabled CSRs to focus their attention on administering programs and ensuring health and safety protocols were followed. It also provided the interns with additional work experience to include on their resumes, which further enhanced the value of the programs for the participants. In total, 17 high school and college students participated in the summer internship and earned a total of $77,568. STEPHEN MAXIE III, one of these interns, said he appreciated CVRF maintaining youth training and employment opportunities in a difficult year. “It made me feel like we weren’t being left behind or forgotten about,” he said. He also said that the training and experience he gained through the internship was invaluable. “It really felt like I was gaining years of experience in one summer. I’m so grateful to CVRF for the opportunity.” After completing the internship, he returned to his studies, intent on his goal of one day getting a job that allows him to be active in and give back to his community.

I’m so grateful to CVRF for the opportunity.

STEPHEN MAXIE III

STEPHEN MAXIE III, INTERN

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COMMUNITY ESSENTIALS

More than a Mechanic M/Ws At CVRF Shops

Residents can now rely on CVRF mechanics to offer the same level of service available at one of Honda’s own shops. GEORGE SMITH, SCAMMON BAY SHOP

GEORGE SMITH

Our unique Mechanic/Welders (M/Ws) aren’t your average mechanics. Every day, they come to work with ready to handle the challenges — no matter what comes in, no matter how hard the job. If a resident needs that machine in order to survive in rural Alaska and maintain a subsistence lifestyle, then our M/Ws will roll up their sleeves and find a solution. They have experience servicing a variety of vehicles and appliances, including ATVs, snowmachines, Toyo heaters, boats, boat trailers, and much more. Their broad skill set enables them to apply their craft in a variety of situations.

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Beyond the work in the shop, M/Ws provide vital services to the community by contributing their skills to projects across the region. Our M/Ws regularly participate in trail marking, construction and repair of boardwalks, building infrastructure, laying foundations for new homes and helping with numerous ad hoc repair jobs, where they use their training to help determine what is wrong with a machine and how to fix it. This requires that M/Ws listen to the needs of our residents and understand how vehicles and appliances can improve their lives in a tangible way. In the future, we hope to take these learnings from the

community and create new mechanical solutions to common problems faced in western Alaska. At CVRF, we see the M/W program as a twofold opportunity to both meet community needs and provide a stable, in-region source of skilled labor and training. We believe that investing our time and resources in educational and vocational programs like this one will create opportunities for residents, generate value for our communities and raise the quality of life in Western Alaska.


A FIRST-OF-ITS-KIND PROGRAM: CVRF AUTHORIZED HONDA SERVICE CENTERS Until recently, residents who owned Honda vehicles had few options if their machines needed a warranty repair. For those with the funds, the vehicle could be shipped all the way to Anchorage for repair in a Honda shop. Even the simplest repairs could cost several thousand dollars, plus the weeks spent shipping the vehicle back and forth and confirming the repairs are completed. To save residents the time and expense, CVRF worked with American Honda Motor Company to develop a first-of-its-kind program: CVRF Authorized Honda Service Centers, which provide in-region Honda warranty repair services for the first time ever in Western Alaska. This partnership with Honda is part of a broader strategy to work with vehicle manufacturers and enhance the service offerings at CVRF shops. Today, our M/Ws are trained Honda technicians, capable of doing work never before possible in our region. This provides enormous benefits to everyone in our region and surrounding communities. We have seen cases of people traveling to our CVRF Honda Certified Warranty Stations from around the region for service and warranty work. We look forward to seeing even more of this in the future as we continue to pursue our partnership strategy.

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COMMUNITY ESSENTIALS

Not So Tiny CVRF’s Rural Housing Program Originally known as the Tiny House Program, CVRF’s Rural Housing Program has expanded to be much more than a construction company for sustainable homes. It provides residents with an opportunity to purchase housing that meets their needs, with flexible floor plan options so that a resident can more comfortably raise a family or care for their elders in a multigenerational family setting. Beyond that, CVRF works with community and organizational partners to finance homes and help prospective homeowners secure home loans. In this capacity, CVRF coordinates with the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Nunakauiak Yup’ik Corporation (NYC), Nunakauyak Traditional Council (NTC) and others. Representatives from these organizations met with CVRF staff and Toksook Bay residents in March 2020 to discuss housing projects in the community. By coordinating with such organizations, CVRF has been able to develop a multi-phase housing process that includes surveying suitable land for new construction, gauging community interest, assisting residents with applying for loans, training in-region construction crews, building homes and connecting them to sewer and water. This process takes time to get right, but it has multiple benefits. With this extra time, CVRF can do more on behalf of applicants, such as assist eligible applicants in securing an additional $75,000 in funding from BIA. We also use the time to train local crews, which provides in-region job opportunities and contributes to the local economy. As a result, an in-region crew trained on previous CVRF housing projects was able to complete the construction of a home in Chevak in 2020, when CVRF staff were unable to travel. Meanwhile, program staff provided subsidies and helped five more applicants secure loans for homes built in summer 2021. Our housing program has already made a significant impact on the lives of our residents. One homeowner, CLIFFORD PANIYAK of Chevak, said that, after his family moved into their new home in 2019, others were inspired to fill out applications for houses. “It’s a good feeling, knowing you’ve helped give people hope.” For Clifford, buying this house was the realization of a long-cherished dream of living under his own roof, giving his kids their own room and being able to just take for granted that, when he turns on the faucet, water will run. At CVRF, we want every resident who dreams of owning a home to have that opportunity. We look forward to helping more residents achieve that dream in the years to come.

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COMMUNITY ESSENTIALS

People Propel® Providing Support For Our Communities Since 2012, People Propel® has subsidized the purchases of a variety of essential equipment, including ATVs, appliances, boats, snowmachines, fishing gear, heating systems and even the occasional renewable energy resource. Last year, we opened two rounds of People Propel®, in which we accepted 867 applications. In total, we provided approximately $2 million in financial support and helped community residents purchase more than $6.7 million in equipment, which further contributes to the region’s economic development.

in the winter to subsistence activities in traditional hunting and fishing sites. In rural Alaska, where distances are vast and the terrain is often rugged, motorized equipment and appliances have become essential to our way of life. Equipment purchased through the People Propel® Program sees regular use and can easily be serviced at CVRF shops if they ever break down or suffer normal wear and tear. In this way, CVRF helps provide for the entire lifecycle of a machine, ensuring that our residents receive the most value possible from this program.

This program is designed to support residents in every aspect of their life, from day-to-day travel to heating homes

Without support from People Propel®, these essential machines and appliances would be much more expensive

for our residents — sometimes prohibitively so. “Thanks to CVRF, everyone in our communities can apply for this 30% subsidy, and I’m so grateful for that,” said PETER J. PAUL, an elder and longtime resident of Kipnuk, who purchased a boat and other appliances alongside his family with People Propel®. What he saves on equipment through People Propel®, he puts toward other necessities: food and fuel in winter, travel to medical specialists when necessary, and repairs on the boat he uses for subsistence fishing. CVRF’s subsidy enables our residents to purchase more goods and participate in the region’s economy, further stimulating economic development opportunities in our region.

SUPPORTING ALASKAN COMMUNITIES

Since 1999, Yukon Delta Fisheries Development Association has operated a skiff-building facility, Yukon Marine Manufacturing, which enables residents build their own motorized boats. In 2020, the People Propel® Program helped subsidize purchase of six of these boats, thus increasing the impact of our programs on Alaskan communities.

Thanks to CVRF, everyone in our communities can apply for this subsidy, and I’m so grateful for that. PETER J. PAUL, KIPNUK

PETER J. PAUL

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COMMUNITY ESSENTIALS

Fuel in Lockdown Pollock Provides Heating Oil Program In 2020, one of the few things you could count on was a cold winter. From the mid-September chill to the May thaw, temperatures in our communities rarely broke 50⁰ F, often dipping below 0⁰ F. To prevent the spread of COVID-19, residents were advised to stay at home as much as possible, which made deliveries of heating oil even more essential than in normal years. Our Pollock Provides® Heating Oil Program delivered much-needed fuel to community members in winter, from late 2020 to early 2021.

Many people in our village were struggling with the winter cold, and CVRF was there to provide us heating oil.

To maintain safe social distances and follow CDC guidelines, CVRF staff quickly pivoted to no-contact delivery protocols wherever possible. This enabled many of our community members to continue receiving muchneeded heating oil without fearing exposure to COVID-19. CVRF spent $389,824 on the program and provided a total of 2,222 households with 35 gallons of heating oil each. “CVRF heating oil deliveries have helped so much in lockdown, because we were unable to work and pay for fuel,” said DEANNA NICHOLAI, a resident of Napaskiak.

DEANNA NICHOLAI, NAPASKIAK

MONICA WESLEY, a resident of Mekoryuk, said the heating oil was a huge help for her as a single mother raising her daughter. “When it is stormy and cold outside, the heating oil CVRF provides keeps us warm. I’m very grateful for this program, because it helps me heat my home and take care of my daughter.” Monica also participated in the People Propel® Program, which enabled her to replace her old stove and install a much-needed exhaust cover. This is just one example of how CVRF programs can be combined to help heat and improve homes in the region. DEANNA NICHOLAI

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NICHOLAS and XENIA EVAN


COMMUNITY ESSENTIALS

A Helping Hand Pollock Provides Elder Program Our elders have always been a source of vital historical knowledge, and perhaps never more so than in 2020, when our communities were threatened by pandemic. During lockdown, our elders shared teachings on traditional medicines and subsistence practices, as well as remembrances of previous pandemics, such as smallpox and influenza. Without our elders, our history and our culture could be lost to time and the ravages of disease. In recognition of the vital role our elders play in our lives, CVRF maintains the Pollock Provides® Elder Program. The program provides much-needed support to elders,

including those no longer able to engage in traditional subsistence activities. High-quality meats from Alaskan butchers were delivered to elders via no-contact protocols, as were barrels of heating oil to fuel their homes. For the elders unable to safely work or hunt during the pandemic, this program provided a valuable lifeline as a resource of essential foods and goods when traditional supply chains were disrupted. In total, CVRF spent over $365,000 dollars serving more than 800 elders in our communities. JONES ANAVER,

an elder from Kwigillingok, noted that the support CVRF provided was tailored to the community and responsive to the needs of the elders participating in the program. “A thank you may seem small,” Jones said, “but it shows how grateful I am that CVRF continues to provide benefits to our communities. Not just to elders but also to youth and to anyone in distress.” Moving forward, CVRF will continue to provide this vital community support system and honor all our elders and residents.

CVRF continues to provide benefits to our communities. Not just to elders, but also to youth and anyone in distress. JONES ANAVER, ELDER, KWIGILLINGOK

JONES ANAVER

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We are excited about the potential these partnerships and programs have to lift up our fellow Alaskans and create new opportunities.

PHOTO: HELENA MILLER, EEK

RICHARD JUNG, CHAIRMAN COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND

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2020 ANNUAL REPORT

Financial Disclosures COMMITTEES AND COMMITTEE MEETINGS The CVRF Bylaws create an Executive Committee made up of seven Board members who are elected by the full Board of Directors: the Chairman, Vice Chairman, Secretary, Treasurer and three at-large Executive Committee members. CVRF’s Bylaws authorize the Executive Committee to exercise all authority of the full Board in managing CVRF, except for the election of officers and Executive Committee members. The CVRF Bylaws also authorize the Chairman, with support from the Board of Directors, to appoint other committees with such functions, powers and duties as determined by the Chairman and Board. Using this authority, CVRF has created several committees made up of members of the Board of Directors:

For CVRF’s six subsidiaries (Coastal Alaska Premier Seafoods [CAPS], Coastal Villages Pollock [CVP], Coastal Villages Crab [CVC], Coastal Villages Longline [CVL], Coastal Villages Enterprises [CVE] and Coastal Villages Seafoods [CVS]), CVRF has established subsidiary Boards. CVRF committees and subsidiary Boards are made up of members of the Board of Directors and met either in person or via electronic conferencing, as appropriate, throughout 2020. Due to COVID-19, most meetings were transitioned to video conference for safety and to respect travel restrictions. We are very much looking forward to resuming normalized operations in 2021 and meeting with our Board members in person. •

The full Board met seven times during 2020: April 6, April 30, May 29, June 12, August 5, October 14 and December 8.

The CVRF Executive Committee met nine times: January 24, February 20, April 16, May 13, July 8, July 22, August 21, November 13 and December 30.

A Policy/Compensation Committee to make policy recommendations to the Board

A Finance Committee to advise the Board on budgeting and financial matters

A Regulatory and Legislative Committee to provide the Board with information about issues of interest to CVRF

An Election Committee to advise the company on policies and procedures related to community Board member elections

The six subsidiary Boards (CAPS, CVP, CVC, CVL, CVE, and CVS) met in December 2020 for their annual meetings.

he Policy and Compensation Committee did not meet during 2020.

The Disciplinary Committee did not meet during 2020.

The Finance Committee met on January 30.

The Election Committee did not meet during 2020.

A Disciplinary Committee to make recommendations to the Board on a variety of topics related to Board member actions and interactions

There were numerous informal meetings and teleconferences with the President/Vice President and the Administration.

AUDITOR AND AUDITOR RELATIONSHIP

CVRF has not had any disagreements with its auditors (KPMG) in any year, including 2020 and 2019. CVRF received non-audit services from its auditors in 2020 and paid KPMG $208,735 for audit, tax and other consulting services. COMPENSATION TO KEY CVRF PERSONNEL AND RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS The federal CDQ statute requires each CDQ group to disclose the “compensation levels of the top 5 highest paid personnel” (16 U.S.C. § 1855(i)(1)(F)(ii)). Until 2012, there was also a CDQ Panel rule requiring the disclosure of the “total amount…received by each such individual.” CVRF has always reported the total amount paid to the company’s top five personnel, whether they are office staff or crew members. Starting with the 2012 annual report, CVRF expanded its report to include the company’s top 10 personnel. The CVRF Board of Directors works closely with Company leadership and is pleased with the results that the personnel in the company have helped deliver to our communities. CVRF maintains its commitment to hiring and retaining the best personnel available to benefit our stakeholders and residents.

COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND | ANNUAL REPORT 2020 | 19


2020 ANNUAL REPORT

Financial Disclosures (Continued) The Board follows IRS Rebuttable Presumption of Reasonableness guidelines in calculating the salaries for its top executives, a process completed by an independent contractor, which includes comparisons with salary levels at other similar companies. For 2020, the top 10 highest paid personnel earned the following: Chief Executive Officer, Retired (Base Salary: $645,399); Crab Vessel Captain (Base Salary: $456,836); Chief Executive Officer, Incoming (Base Salary: $301,140); Northern Hawk Fishmaster (Base Salary: $295,110); Bering Sea Operations General Manager (Base Salary: $294,000, Bonus: $6,500); Chief Financial Officer (Base Salary: $286,200); Northern Hawk Captain (Base Salary: $274,793); Crab Vessel Captain (Base Salary: $264,272); Crab Vessel Crewman (Base Salary: $264,064); Northern Hawk Chief Engineer (Base Salary: $247,673). Additionally, in 2020, the Chief Executive Officer (retired) received a $10,000 life insurance benefit.

BOARD COMPENSATION POLICY AND FEES CVRF Board members receive a daily stipend during meetings and an additional monthly stipend for the CVRF-related work that occurs between CVRF meetings. CVRF’s Board compensation policy was adopted in June 2004 after consultation with independent experts. The policy stipulates that any changes must be approved by an independent body. The policy was updated in January 2011 and approved by the independent authorized body comprised of an independent member of each community. The CVRF Board compensation policy is in full compliance with IRS Rebuttable Presumption of Reasonableness guidelines. During 2020, CVRF paid its Board members $621,815 in salaries, stipends and benefits. RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS None of CVRF’s employees or Board members have a financial relationship with any partners who lease or harvest CVRF’s quotas. Related party transactions with Board

20 | COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND | ANNUAL REPORT 2020

members include: daughter-in-law, CSR ($45,844); fatherin-law, M/W Manager ($116,643); self, Winter Watchman ($12,000); sister-in-law, CSR ($42,316); daughter, CSR ($37,044); daughter, CSR ($50,604); daughter, Accounting Specialist ($34,060); daughter, Community Benefits Associate, Accounting ($62,560); daughter, Accounting Specialist ($36,257). LEGAL PROCEEDINGS INVOLVING DIRECTORS CVRF was not engaged in any litigation with any of its directors during 2020. PROFESSIONAL FEES In 2020, CVRF paid the following fees for professional services: (1) $397,094 in legal fees; (2) $698,421 in consulting fees; (3) $208,735 in accounting fees; and (4) $187,479 in lobbying fees.


FINANCIAL DISCLOSURES

Consolidated Statements Of Financial Position (Balance Sheet) DRAFT DRAFT 10/6/21 10/6/21 5:15 5:15 AM AM Audited Audited FS.xlsx FS.xlsx

POLLOCK DRIVES CVRF FISH SALES 2020 SALES BY SPECIES ($)

C CO OA ASSTTA ALL V VIILLLLA AG GEESS R REEG GIIO ON N FFU UN ND D

Coastal Villages Region Fund & AASubsidiaries N ND D SSU UB BSSIID DIIA AR RIIEESS

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND 2019 Consolidated Consolidated Statements Statements of of Financial Financial Position Position December December 31, 31, 2020 2020 and and 2019 2019

Assets

2020

A Asssseettss

Current Current assets: assets: Cash Cash and and cash cash equivalents equivalents Trade accounts accounts receivable, receivable, less less allowance allowance for for doubtful doubtful accounts accounts Trade of $73,076 $73,076 and and $230,678 $230,678 in in 2020 2020 and and 2019, 2019, respectively respectively of Refundable income income taxes taxes Refundable Notes receivable, receivable, current current portion, portion, net net Notes Inventories Inventories Prepaid expenses expenses Prepaid Notes receivable receivable -- CQS CQS bridge bridge loan loan Notes

220 0220 0

$$

220 01199

47,572,359 47,572,359

54,309,964 54,309,964

6,318,646 6,318,646 — — 62,080 62,080 4,536,155 4,536,155 3,787,801 3,787,801 7,227,500 7,227,500

3,481,159 3,481,159 92,707 92,707 131,633 131,633 5,632,962 5,632,962 2,834,620 2,834,620 — —

69,504,541 69,504,541

66,483,045 66,483,045

486,574 486,574 933,700 933,700 235,000 235,000 22,196 22,196 253,534 253,534 7,227,500 7,227,500 74,319,614 74,319,614 121,405,130 121,405,130 362,838 362,838 13,670,743 13,670,743

360,326 360,326 — — 235,000 235,000 35,336 35,336 146,024 146,024 — — 80,591,117 80,591,117 121,405,130 121,405,130 — — 10,818,983 10,818,983

$$

288,421,370 288,421,370

280,074,961 280,074,961

$$

2,914,510 2,914,510 2,389,529 2,389,529 2,950 2,950 96,956 96,956 10,809 10,809

2,797,275 2,797,275 3,245,182 3,245,182 2,824 2,824 390,685 390,685 13,369 13,369

5,414,754 5,414,754

6,449,335 6,449,335

Total current current assets assets Total Other Other assets assets Assets held held for for sale sale Assets Restricted certificates certificates of of deposit deposit Restricted Deposits Deposits Notes receivable, receivable, excluding excluding current current portion portion Notes Notes receivable receivable -- CQSs CQSs Notes Property, plant, plant, vessels, vessels, and and equipment, equipment, net net Property, Investments in in fishing fishing rights rights Investments Investments in in fishing fishing permits permits Investments Equity method method investment investment Equity Total assets assets Total

2019

POLLOCK

70.50%

COD

14.26%

iiaabbiilliitNet tiieess aaAssets nndd N Neett A Asssseettss LiabilitiesLLand

Current Current liabilities: liabilities: Accounts Accounts payable payable and and accrued accrued expenses expenses Accrued payroll payroll liabilities liabilities Accrued Capital lease lease obligation, obligation, current current portion portion Capital Deferred revenue revenue Deferred Security deposits deposits Security Total current current liabilities liabilities Total Capital Capital lease lease obligation, obligation, net net of of current current portion portion Total liabilities liabilities Total Net Net assets, assets, without without donor donor restrictions restrictions Total liabilities liabilities and and net net assets assets Total

$$

2,047 2,047

4,758 4,758

5,416,801 5,416,801

6,454,093 6,454,093

283,004,569 283,004,569

273,620,868 273,620,868

288,421,370 288,421,370

280,074,961 280,074,961

CRAB

15.23%

See See accompanying accompanying notes notes to to consolidated consolidated financial financial statements. statements.

11

COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND | ANNUAL REPORT 2020 | 21


FINANCIAL DISCLOSURES

Consolidated Statements Of Financial Position (Balance Sheet) 2020 GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

CUMULATIVE REVENUES JANUARY 1997 - DECEMBER 2020

Advertising

$ 115

Bad debt

11,867

Bank and finance

37,537

Communications

75,956

Computer and software

239,601

Depreciation

84,465

Drug screening & preemployment

1,613

Dues, permits, taxes & licenses

4,543

Employee education assistance

8,046

Freight

22,231

Insurance

281

Meals and entertainment

14,256

Other fees and charges

5,744,169

$1,200,000

$1,000,000

Coastal Villages Region Fund has earned $1.55 billion in cumulative revenue over the last 33 years.

$800,000

$600,000

$400,000

$200,000

594,802

Per diem

14,256

Printing

16,629

$0 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

1,258,992

Rent

13,853

Repairs and maintenance

501

Supplies

68,856

Training

27,676

Transportation and parking

3,215

Travel and lodging GRAND TOTAL

$1,400,000

83

Payroll taxes and benefits

Professional services

$1,600,000

395,309

Interest

Payroll

$1,800,000

40,375 $ 8,679,732

22 | COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND | ANNUAL REPORT 2020

Since purchasing our own fleet in 2010, CVRF has continuously grown our revenue, programs and impact in our communities.


FINANCIAL DISCLOSURES

Consolidated Statements Of Activities (Income Statement) DRAFT 10/6/21DRAFT 5:29 AM Audited FS.xlsx DRAFT 10/6/21 10/6/21 5:29 5:29 AM Audited AM Audited FS.xlsx FS.xlsx

COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND COASTAL COASTAL VILLAGES VILLAGES REGION REGION FUND FUND AND SUBSIDIARIES ANDAND SUBSIDIARIES SUBSIDIARIES Consolidated Statements of Statements Activities Consolidated Consolidated Statements of Activities of Activities

2020 31,December 2020 and 2019 Years Years ended ended December 31, 2020 31, 2020 and and 2019 2019 Coastal Villages Region Fund & SubsidiariesYears ended December YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND 2019

PROGRAMS 2020 2020 2020 BERING SEA & PROJECTS, Programs Programs Programs FISHING GENERAL & Bering Sea andSea projects, Bering Bering Sea andand projects, projects, OPERATIONS ADMINISTRATIVE fishing general fishing fishing and general general andand operations administrative Total operations operations administrative administrative

Revenue and Gains (losses):

Revenue and gains (losses): Revenue Revenue andand gains gains (losses): (losses): Seafood sales Seafood Seafood salessales Quota and profit share income Quota and profit share income Quota and profit share income Community service centers Community service centers Community service centers Residential construction Residential construction Residential construction Rent RentRent Interest income Interest income Interest income Gain (loss) on disposal of assets (loss) on disposal of assets GainGain (loss) on disposal of assets Other Other Other

$

Total Revenue Gains (losses) Total revenueand andTotal gains (losses) Total revenue revenue andand gains gains (losses) (losses)

2019 Bering Sea TOTAL fishing operations Total Total

PROGRAMS 2019 2019 2019 BERING SEA & PROJECTS, Programs Programs Programs FISHING GENERAL & andSea projects, Bering Bering Sea andand projects, projects, OPERATIONS ADMINISTRATIVE general fishing fishing and general general andand administrative Total operations operations administrative administrative

TOTAL

Total Total

86,397,170 86,397,170— $ $ 86,397,170 1,021,102 2,428,471 1,021,102 1,021,102 — 683,338 — — — — —— — 204,568 — — — 17,292 — — — —1,500 — 179,077 712,936 179,077 179,077

86,397,170 — — 3,449,573 2,428,471 2,428,471 683,338 683,338 683,338 — —— 204,568 204,568 204,568 17,292 17,292 17,292 1,500 1,500 1,500 892,013 712,936 712,936

76,457,924 86,397,170 86,397,170 402,885 3,449,573 3,449,573 683,338 683,338— — —— 204,568 204,568— 17,292 17,292— 2,000 1,500 1,500 (165,854) 892,013 892,013

76,457,924 76,457,924— 2,163,353 402,885 402,885 748,156 — — 535,000 — — 275,893 — — 31,196 — — (10,750) 2,000 2,000 131,113 (165,854) (165,854)

76,457,924 — — 2,566,238 2,163,353 2,163,353 748,156 748,156 748,156 535,000 535,000 535,000 275,893 275,893 275,893 31,196 31,196 31,196 (8,750) (10,750) (10,750) (34,741) 131,113 131,113

76,457,924 76,457,924 2,566,238 2,566,238 748,156 748,156 535,000 535,000 275,893 275,893 31,196 31,196 (8,750) (8,750) (34,741) (34,741)

87,597,349

4,048,105 87,597,349 87,597,349

91,645,454 4,048,105 4,048,105

76,696,955 91,645,454 91,645,454

3,873,961 76,696,955 76,696,955

80,570,916 3,873,961 3,873,961

80,570,916 80,570,916

31,099,499 — 30,600,478 572,591 — —

31,099,499 31,099,499— 13,799,093 — — 30,600,478 30,600,478— 8,107,141 572,591 572,591 934,711 — — — ——

31,099,499 — — 13,799,093 13,799,093 13,799,093 30,600,478 — — 8,679,732 8,107,141 8,107,141 934,711 934,711 934,711 — ——

28,452,680 31,099,499 31,099,499 13,799,093 13,799,093— 30,561,313 30,600,478 30,600,478 795,417 8,679,732 8,679,732 934,711 934,711— — ——

28,452,680 28,452,680— 14,950,698 — — 30,561,313 30,561,313— 8,794,941 795,417 795,417 912,563 — — (10,439) — —

28,452,680 — — 28,452,680 28,452,680 14,950,698 14,950,698 14,950,698 14,950,698 14,950,698 30,561,313 — — 30,561,313 30,561,313 9,590,358 8,794,941 8,794,941 9,590,358 9,590,358 912,563 912,563 912,563 912,563 912,563 (10,439) (10,439) (10,439) (10,439) (10,439)

62,272,568

22,840,945 62,272,568 62,272,568

85,113,513 22,840,945 22,840,945

59,809,410 85,113,513 85,113,513

24,647,763 59,809,410 59,809,410

84,457,173 24,647,763 24,647,763

(18,792,840) (18,792,840) 6,531,941 25,324,781 25,324,781 (18,792,840)

16,887,545 6,531,941 6,531,941

Expenses andand Losses: Expenses losses: Expenses losses: Expenses andand losses: Cost of seafood sales Cost of seafood Cost of seafood salessales Programs and Programs projects Programs projects andand projects Fishing operating expenses Fishing operating expenses Fishing operating expenses General and administrative General andand administrative General administrative Property management Property management Property management Income tax expense (benefit) Income tax expense (benefit) Income tax expense (benefit) Total and losses Totalexpenses Expenses and Losses Total Total expenses expenses andand losses losses

Change in netChange assets before in income of equity investee 25,324,781 Change in net in equity net assets assets before before equity equity in income in method income of equity of equity method method investee investee Equity in income of equity investee Equity in income of equity method investee Equity in method income of equity method investee Change in netChange assets in net assets Change in net assets

2,851,760 $

2,851,760 2,851,760—

2,851,760 — —

3,070,417 2,851,760 2,851,760

28,176,541 (18,792,840) (18,792,840) 9,383,701 $ $ 28,176,541 28,176,541 (18,792,840)

19,957,962 9,383,701 9,383,701

Net assets at beginning ofatthe without restrictions assets at year, beginning of donor the year, without donor restrictions NetNet assets beginning of the year, without donor restrictions Net assets at end the year, restrictions Netof assets at end of the year, without donor restrictions Net assets atwithout end of donor the year, without donor restrictions

$

(20,773,802) (20,773,802) (3,886,257) 16,887,545 16,887,545 (20,773,802) 3,070,417 3,070,417—

84,457,173 84,457,173 (3,886,257) (3,886,257)

3,070,417 — —

3,070,417 3,070,417

(20,773,802) (20,773,802) (815,840) 19,957,962 19,957,962 (20,773,802)

(815,840) (815,840)

273,620,868 273,620,868 273,620,868

274,436,708 274,436,708 274,436,708

283,004,569 $ $ 283,004,569 283,004,569

273,620,868 273,620,868 273,620,868

See accompanying notes to consolidated statements. SeeSee accompanying accompanying notes notes tofinancial consolidated to consolidated financial financial statements. statements.

1

1

1

COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND | ANNUAL REPORT 2020 | 23


2020 ANNUAL REPORT

Board Of Directors The Board of Directors plays an important role at CVRF, serving as the governing body that steers the vision, mission, values and policies of the organization. Most importantly, members of the Board provide a critical link between community members and CVRF. THE ROLE AND FUNCTIONS OF THE BOARD CVRF’s Board of Directors is responsible for governing CVRF’s affairs. The Board makes broad policy decisions and sets organizational goals that the staff carry out. The primary functions of the Board are to act in the best interests of the company and the Coastal Villages region. These functions enable the organization to achieve its purpose of providing the means for development by creating sensible, tangible, long-term solutions for the residents of CVRF’s 20 member communities. The Board makes decisions that balance growth in commercial fishing and sustainable development in CVRF communities. The Board accomplishes this oversight by staying up to date about CVRF’s activities and communicating appropriate information to residents. In 2020, the Board of Directors did not host any meetings in CVRF member communities due to COVID-19 concerns.

SHAPING THE FUTURE CVRF would also like to acknowledge the contributions that sitting Board members made in 2020. Board members provided valuable guidance and oversight that helped move CVRF closer to achieving some of its long-term goals. CVRF staff thanks the Board for advocating for their communities throughout the region in 2020. COMMUNITY ELECTIONS CVRF’s Board of Directors is made up of democratically elected representatives from each of our 20 member communities. Board members serve six-year terms, and elections take place every two years. All Board members must be permanently domiciled residents of the communities they are representing, meaning that the Board member must have permanent residency and plan to remain a resident. Elections are run under a standardized democratic process designed to give fair voice to all residents of each community. No elections were scheduled for 2020. Seven elections will take place in 2021.

ARCHITECTS OF THE DREAM CVRF would like to thank all community leaders who have served on the company’s Board of Directors past and present. CVRF is grateful for their many contributions while serving on the Board.

24 | COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND | ANNUAL REPORT 2020


2020 ANNUAL REPORT

Board Of Directors RICHARD JUNG

LARSON HUNTER

JOHN SAMUEL

GABRIEL OLICK

CHAIRMAN

VICE CHAIRMAN

SECRETARY

TREASURER

NAPAKIAK

SCAMMON BAY

PLATINUM

TUNTUTULIAK

2016 - 2021

2016 - 2021

2020 - 2025

2020 - 2025

CARLIE BEEBE

EVAN S. EVAN

GEORGE CHUCKWUK

STEPHEN MAXIE, JR.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

EEK

GOODNEWS BAY

KIPNUK

NAPASKIAK

2018 - 2023

2016 - 2021

2018 - 2023

2020 - 2025

EDWARD KINEGAK CHEFORNAK

ALFRED ULROAN CHEVAK

ERIC OLSON, SR. HOOPER BAY

JERRY IVON KONGIGANAK

2016 - 2021

2018 - 2021

2019 - 2023

2018 - 2023

ANDREW KIUNYA KWIGILLINGOK

ALBERT WILLIAMS MEKORYUK

XAVIER JOHN NEWTOK

CLEMENT P. GEORGE NIGHTMUTE

2020 - 2025

2017 - 2021

2020 - 2025

2018 - 2021

NICHOLAI STEVEN OSCARVILLE

JOHN W. MATTHEW QUINHAGAK

CLARENCE DULL TOKSOOK BAY

ALMA KANRILAK TUNUNAK

2018 - 2023

2020 - 2025

2018 - 2023

2020 - 2025

COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND | ANNUAL REPORT 2020 | 25


BOARD OF DIRECTORS

A Message From The Chairman Everything has changed in the past year. Entire nations have shut down, COVID vaccines have been rapidly developed and rolled out, and businesses around the world have had to adjust to lockdown and increasingly virtual environments. During this difficult time, I can think of no better person to guide CVRF than ERIC DEAKIN. In his first year as CEO, he has embodied a new vision for our organization and a new kind of leadership based on engagement, partnership and trust. I am immensely grateful for the work he has done in the last year to lead the organization, protect our staff and serve our communities.

Richard Jung, CHAIRMAN COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND

Our staff should also be commended for all their hard work in 2020. Everyone — from the CSRs in our communities to the staff in the Anchorage office to the crew onboard our Bering Sea fleet — helped make that difficult year a success. I also want to give a special shoutout to our Seattle staff, including MIKE COLEMAN and LORENA ROSENBERGER. They went above and beyond to manage our fleet and ensure safety onboard our vessels. Thanks to their careful planning, our crew was safe and healthy throughout the year. It’s also worth noting that Lorena and Mike celebrated their 10-year work anniversaries in 2020. Congratulations to both! Despite the challenges of the past year, we still have much to celebrate and be grateful for this year and in the years to come. New partnerships, such as those with Honda and the Bristol Bay Economic Development Corporation (BBEDC), will provide additional benefits to the more than 9,300 residents in our region. We are also working on several other partnerships with Alaskan organizations, which we hope to announce soon so that members of our communities can begin to reap the rewards of these efforts. Additionally, Eric is helping to revitalize the Western Alaska Community Development Association (WACDA) so that all CDQs can work together and create benefits for all Alaska communities, not just those in our region. Most of all, we are excited about the potential these partnerships and programs have to help lift up our fellow Alaskans and create new opportunities. Examples of this include good jobs for our youth, additional training and support via scholarships and our Honda program, added housing options through our Tiny House program, and much more. Crab caught and sold as part of the 3% CDQ quota secured in our deal with BBEDC will result in revenue that goes directly to our communities, allowing them to decide where those funds are needed most and what to do with them. This revenue could be a reliable long-term resource for tribal organizations, giving them fuel to stimulate economic development in the region. I look forward to working with Eric and my fellow board members in the years to come to create even more opportunities for CVRF and our communities.

26 | COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND | ANNUAL REPORT 2020

Despite the challenges of 2020, we still have much to celebrate and be grateful for this year and in the years to come. RICHARD JUNG, CHAIRMAN COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND


2020 ANNUAL REPORT

Scavenger Hunt! Answer the questions below for a chance to win some terrific prizes through our drawings!* We would like to thank All Seasons Honda and Alaska Commercial Company for providing some of the prizes for our drawings. All the correct answers can be found in this annual report. To enter, share your answers with your local CSR via your preferred method: in-person, by text, over the phone, or via email. Alternatively, scan the QR code to the right with your cell phone and complete the form that it opens. Good luck!

1

What percentage of the total crab CDQ quota in the Bering Sea will communities in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta and Bristol Bay receive as a result of the deal struck between CVRF and Bristol Bay Economic Development Corporation (BBEDC)? o

2 CHELSEA PLEASANT

3 4

5%

o

2%

o

3%

How many pounds of crab were caught in 2020? o

2.43 million

o

13.29 million

o

116.90 million

How many individuals received scholarships and training awards in 2020? o

131

o

99

o

116

How many gallons of heating oil did each household receive in 2020 thanks to the Pollock Provides® Heating Oil Program? o

23

o

47

o

35

*RULES: Only one entry per household, and you must be a verified resident. CVRF board members and employees do not qualify to enter, but spouses or other family members can participate. You do not need to be present to win.


ANCHORAGE OFFICE 711 H St, Suite 200 Anchorage, AK 99501 907-278-5151 1-888-795-5151

Residency Verification Hotline: 1-844-357-6565 People Propel® Hotline: 1-888-983-7155

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