2019 Annual Report

Page 1

Investing In

Community

COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND 2019 ANNUAL REPORT

COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND | ANNUAL REPORT 2019 | 1


2019 ANNUAL REPORT

Table Of Contents BERING SEA EARNINGS FUEL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Mission Statement................................................................. 3 Report From The CEO: Investing In Community............... 4 By The Numbers: People, Employment & Fishing............. 5 How Our Fleet Fuels Our Programs..................................... 6

DIRECT EMPLOYMENT

PATHWAYS TO SUCCESS

COMMUNITY ESSENTIALS

Creating Sustainable Jobs

Supporting Youth for Career Success

Providing Essentials

157 STAFF & BOARD in

892 YOUTH TO WORK

2,160 HOUSEHOLDS

20 COMMUNITIES

and INTERNS

received

$5.1 MILLION

$1.0 MILLION

142,986 GALLONS of

in EARNED WAGES

in EARNED WAGES

HEATING OIL

$694,850 in

$93,000 in

2,351 TAX RETURNS

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS

COMPLETED

Stories From Our Communities............................................ 7 Three Knots a Day: Introducing The New Youth-to-Work Maritime Program......................................8 Ciuneq: The Path To The Future.........................................9

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS

118 CIUNEQ PARTICIPANTS

‘The Best Feeling In The World’: Receiving a CVRF Scholarship..............................................10

112 SCHOLARSHIPS

Becoming Leaders: The Internship Program...................11 People Propel®: Helping To Fuel Subsistence Hunting.................................12

$15 MILLION INVESTED IN CVRF COMMUNITIES IN 2019

Like R2-D2: Mechanic/Welders At CVRF Shops..............13 Warmth In The Winter: Pollock Provides Heating Oil Program...............................14 Preserving Our Heritage: Pollock Provides Elder Program...........................................15 Big Things Have Small Beginnings: CVRF’s Tiny House Program.................................................16 Financial Disclosures ............................................................19 Board of Directors.................................................................24 Message from the Chairman.................................................26 2019 Annual Report Scavenger Hunt!.................................27

Pollock Caught

101.94 MILLION POUNDS

COD Caught

17.31 MILLION POUNDS

Crab Sold

2.11 MILLION POUNDS


COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND

Our Mission

STRATEGIC INTENT (VISION)

CORE COMPETENCIES

CORE VALUES

Continuous focus on balancing growth in commercial fishing and sustainable development of Coastal Villages Region Fund communities.

STRATEGIC MISSION Provide the means for development of our communities by creating sensible, tangible and long-term opportunities that generate hope for all people who want to fish and work.

Effective Strategic Leadership

Trust, Integrity and Teamwork

Respect for and Understanding of All People

Active Community Participation

Respect for and Understanding of the Land, Sea and Resources

Growth and Sustainability Through Maximum Return on Capital

Industrious People + Job Opportunities = Self-determination

Balance the needs, wants and expectations of all — now and seven generations from now.

Understand risks/rewards, develop a plan of action, support it and execute on it.

Deliver efficient and equitable economic benefits to our communities.

Develop and deploy successful business models and adapt as needed for future use.

Support bold thinking and continuous innovation.

Deliver disciplined, purposeful and sensible initiatives to sustain and stimulate new economic growth in our region.

Scammon Bay Hooper Bay

Chevak

Newtok

OUR MEMBER COMMUNITIES Tununak Toksook Bay Mekoryuk

Nightmute Chefornak Kipnuk

ALASKA

Napakiak

Oscarville Napaskiak

Tuntutuliak Eek Kongiganak

Kwigillingok Quinhagak

• • • • • • •

Scammon Bay Hooper Bay Chevak Newtok Tununak Mekoryuk Toksook Bay

• • • • • • •

Nightmute Chefornak Kipnuk Kwigillingok Kongiganak Tuntutuliak Napakiak

• • • • • •

Napaskiak Oscarville Eek Quinhagak Goodnews Bay Platinum

Goodnews Bay Platinum

COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND | ANNUAL REPORT 2019 | 3


REPORT FROM THE CEO

Investing In Community To serve CVRF and our communities in any role is an honor. I am deeply humbled and grateful to our Board of Directors for the responsibility of leading this incredible organization. CVRF was founded to address the social and economic challenges in our communities, such as poverty, overcrowding, and high unemployment. From the beginning, our mission has been to generate hope and opportunity for all CVRF residents by contributing to the economic development of our region. My goal is to learn from our setbacks, build on our successes, and fulfill our mission by refocusing on the issues that inspired us at our founding.

Eric Deakin, CEO COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND

Today, CVRF is unique in that we have invested in long-term benefit programs and community services rather than short-term cash subsidies. Through our programs, we work to empower people with skills, experiences and opportunities that allow them to grow as individuals and professionals in their communities. In this year’s report, you will hear from participants who have benefited from CVRF’s programs in many ways, including strengthening their communications skills, continuing their education, and becoming better equipped to support themselves through subsistence. Their success is our ongoing mission. As we start a new decade, CVRF is exploring new business opportunities that will allow us to better serve our communities. By partnering with other CDQ groups, we can focus on our common challenges and goals to improve conditions for all CDQ residents. By partnering with Native corporations, commercial fishing companies, and other business organizations, we can expand our presence in the Bering Sea, improve our financial performance, and help our communities grow in innovative and sustainable ways. In 2019, CVRF expanded the Tiny House Program to Chevak, introduced the new Youth-to-Work Maritime Program, provided $1.8 million in support through the People Propel® Program, and did much more to improve lives and provide equal access to benefits for all of our residents. And, while our region still struggles to solve the complex social and economic challenges we face, CVRF programs continue making a positive, tangible impact on the lives of everyone they have touched. By reinvesting and reinventing our programs and seeking strong new partnerships, we can lift up our communities and create a brighter, more hopeful future. That is our mission, and it is my vision as the new Chief Executive Officer. I hope you will join me in making that vision a reality.

By reinvesting and reinventing our programs and seeking strong new partnerships, we can lift up our communities and create a brighter, more hopeful future. ERIC DEAKIN, CEO COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND

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BY THE NUMBERS

People, Employment & Fishing 2019 POPULATION

2019 JOBS, WAGES + BENEFITS

ADULTS 18+ 10,000

8,927

9,441

9,517

9,312

5,860

8,000

6,000

YTW-AGED YOUTH

4,000

1,032

2,000

HOUSEHOLDS

0 YEAR

2012

2015

2018

2019

2,193

SOURCE: State of Alaska Permanent Fund Division (2019). Revenue Permanent Fund Information System dataset for 2019 Dividend year (PFD).

YOUTH TO WORK (YTW) + INTERN EMPLOYEES

IN-REGION EMPLOYEES + BOARD MEMBERS

TOTAL EARNED WAGES

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS

839

157

$6.1M

$602K

In 2019, CVRF employed 1,049 in-region individuals who earned $6.1 million combined. We continue to invest in our staff and communities by offering training and professional development opportunities.

2018 vs 2019 BERING SEA EARNINGS

2019

CVRF is devoted to serving our communities and meeting their unique needs — today and in the future. 2018

POLLOCK CAUGHT

COD CAUGHT

CRAB SOLD

101.94

17.31

2.11

MILLION POUNDS

MILLION POUNDS

POLLOCK CAUGHT

COD CAUGHT

99.47

15.86

MILLION POUNDS

MILLION POUNDS

CRAB SOLD MILLION POUNDS

1.71

MILLION POUNDS

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OUR FLEET

How Our Fleet Fuels Our Programs In 2010, CVRF redeemed its investment in American Seafoods to acquire a small fleet of fishing vessels. At 341 feet in length, The Northern Hawk, a catcher-processor factory trawler, was the largest vessel acquired in that transaction and was transformative in moving CVRF from a quota-leasing CDQ company to a fully functioning commercial fishing business operating in the Bering Sea. The Northern Hawk, along with our cod boats (Lilli Ann and Flicka) and crab boats (North Sea and Arctic Sea), serves as the lifeblood of our programs funding. Through fishing in the Bering Sea, we are able to produce worldclass fish products for sale and compete on a global market, generating roughly $85 million in revenue. This revenue pays for all our vessel operations, our Seattle and Anchorage Corporate offices, and 100% of our program activities.

None of this would be possible without the hard work of our fleet’s 203 crewmembers, who braved the frigid waters, inclement weather, and long days at sea to bring in a total of 121.36 million pounds of pollock, Pacific cod, and crab in 2019. We want to thank everyone involved in our Bering Sea fishing operations, from the captains to first mates to deckhands and everyone in between who helps catch, process, and sell the fleet’s output. Moving into our second decade of fleet ownership and operation, we look forward to our Bering Sea fleet’s continued growth and success. Our fishing operations fuel everything CVRF does in this region, so more fish means more money available for local jobs and community programs that support our residents as they live, grow, and enjoy our unique culture. It means even more training opportunities for our youth and resources to put toward

programs and benefits that help lift up the entire region. It also means jobs available within our fleet to any in-region resident who is willing to work hard, learn the trade, and make the sacrifices and the commitment needed to earn a living at sea. To prepare youth for this trade, in 2019 we introduced one of our newest programs: Youth-to-Work Maritime. With this exciting new program, we hope to teach our youth the skills necessary for working at sea in our fleet, which will bring economic benefits back to our communities. This program will also teach various safety and survival skills that will improve local conditions on the river and the ocean during critical subsistence fishing activities.

Our fishing operations fuel everything CVRF does in this region, so more fish means more money available for local jobs and community programs that support our residents as they live, grow, and enjoy our unique culture.

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STORIES FROM OUR COMMUNITIES What follows are stories from community members who have participated in and benefited from Youth-to-Work Maritime and many other CVRF programs. We will hear from a bright young man heading to college after graduating as the valedictorian of his high school, from a husband and father of three children living in a house he can call his own for the first time in his life, from elders preserving and documenting our way of life and Alaska Native culture, and from many others whose lives have been improved thanks to CVRF and Bering Sea fish.

HILLARY BEEBE

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COMMUNITY PROGRAMS

Three Knots a Day Introducing The New Youth-to-Work Maritime Program After thirteen successful summers with the Youth-to-Work (YTW) program, CVRF added a new program: YTW Maritime. Designed to help youth prepare for careers in the maritime industry, this innovative summer program combines handson maritime experience with in-depth training that satisfies the requirements of an AVTEC certificate in nautical skills. In 2019, 18 young men and women completed the program. Of those 18, ten went on to attend an advanced 5-day basic training program in Seward, which prepared participants for the different types of emergencies that might arise at sea. This training included applying for a Transportation Workers Identification Credential — a prerequisite for the Merchant Mariner Credential — as well as learning the skills needed for four U.S. Coast Guard Certifications: •

Personal Safety and Social Responsibilities

First Aid and CPR

Basic Firefighting

Personal Survival Techniques

STEPHEN MAXIE III, a graduate of the 5-day training program, said he especially appreciated the personal safety training. Prior to attending YTW Maritime, he almost never wore a life jacket on a boat, and he did not know how to tie any life-saving knots. Now, he says, he always wears his life jacket when on the water, and after learning three knots a day for four weeks he has decided his favorite is the bowline knot. It makes him feel safer.

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Though not yet 100% sure he wants to work in the maritime industry, Stephen enjoys the flexibility of knowing he has the skills needed to work on a boat if he decides to after college. Meanwhile, ROBYN KUGTSUN, another graduate of the 5-day training, says she definitely plans to work on a commercial fishing vessel. “I want to be a ship’s cook,” she says, thereby combining her maritime knowledge with the joy of being in the kitchen. Both Stephen and Robyn are heading to the University of Alaska Fairbanks this fall and are very excited for what the future holds. We wish them luck in their education and careers, and we look forward to expanding the vocational training and job opportunities we provide through programs like YTW Maritime.

ROBYN KUGTSUN


COMMUNITY PROGRAMS

Ciuneq The Path To The Future

Ciuneq was the path to the future. IRIS PAUL, VALEDICTORIAN CHIEF PAUL MEMORIAL SCHOOL

IRIS PAUL

At CVRF, we believe in the saying “children are our future.” One of the many ways we invest in that future is by offering our annual Ciuneq program, which is designed to provide students with educational and career opportunities that help them envision life and work beyond high school. In 2019, 118 students participated in the program. Every year, dozens of hard-working students come together to learn valuable skills, gain hands-on experience and receive valuable guidance on the many career paths available to them. One of those hard-working students was IRIS PAUL, a young man born and raised in the village of Kipnuk, on the

banks of the Kugkaktlik River. A naturally curious person, Iris realized his love of learning at an early age. With the encouragement of a relative who happened to be a teacher at his school, Chief Paul Memorial School, Iris developed a love of math. His math skills and hard-working attitude made him well-suited for the Ciuneq program, which provided him many unique opportunities to learn and grow as he prepared for college. In 11th grade, Iris traveled with the Ciuneq program to Washington, D.C. — his first time visiting the East Coast. After exploring the nation’s capital and visiting its many historic monuments, Iris and the other participants met

with Senators Lisa Murkowski and Dan Sullivan. Both were so impressed with Iris that they encouraged him to enroll at Georgetown University and to pursue a career as a senator. Since that experience, Iris has gone on to graduate as valedictorian of his school and to enroll at the University of Alaska Anchorage as a UA Scholar. His major remains undecided for now, but he has said there’s a good chance it will involve math. Whether that means studying business, training to be a doctor or even becoming a senator, only time will tell. He thanks Ciuneq and CVRF for making so many options available to be him.

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SCHOLARSHIPS

‘The Best Feeling In The World’ Recieving a CVRF Scholarship At CVRF, we understand that investing in the future cannot be a one-time event. It must instead be a sustained, ongoing practice, providing our youth with a multitude of programs, experiences and opportunities. To that end, we not only offer the Ciuneq, YTW and YTW Maritime programs but also maintain the Louis Bunyan Memorial Scholarship Fund. This scholarship allows residents enrolling in higher education or certificate programs to receive funding for tuition, room and board, books, and required fees. The training assistance program provides tuition assistance to residents attending short-term training programs from two days to 12 weeks. For many students, enrolling in higher education would not be possible or affordable without the

scholarship except by taking out costly student loans. For CHARITY MAXIE, a recent recipient, the scholarship was a lifesaver. As a freshman in college, while figuring out how to navigate life away from home, she found herself in the uncomfortable position of being short on funds. Having already completed the YTW program and maintained a high GPA all throughout high school, she hoped she was a strong applicant for the scholarship. When she heard she received the scholarship, she said, it came as a huge relief. “It was the best feeling in the world,” said ELTON CHANAR, another recipient, of receiving the news of the scholarship. As a graduate of the YTW program, he knows how CVRF programs can help create new opportunities and open doors for youth in this region. “For many of us, CVRF is

our first paycheck.” Through this scholarship, CVRF can continue helping bright young Alaskans — even if they have not participated in other CVRF programs. CVRF plans to continue supporting our region’s youth at every stage of their education and career development. In 2019, 112 individuals received scholarship and training awards totaling roughly $433,000. We encourage any and all residents currently enrolled in university, college or vocational school (or those planning to enroll in the near future) to apply for the Louis Bunyan Memorial Scholarship. Note: for students, the minimum GPA requirement is 2.0. The higher the applicant’s GPA, the greater the chance of qualifying for the maximum available funding — $4,000 per semester.

I’m grateful for the CVRF scholarship, which has helped me pursue my dream of studying Tribal Management at the University of Alaska. CHARITY MAXIE SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENT

ELTON CHANAR

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CHARITY MAXIE


INTERNSHIP PROGRAM

Becoming Leaders The Internship Program

THOMASINA TALL

DESIREE CLEVELAND

Today’s children are tomorrow’s leaders, captains, commercial fishermen, mechanics, welders, healthcare practitioners, and more — there is no limit on what they

understanding of our operations in other CVRF villages and Dutch Harbor. Our interns have the opportunity to meet and work with many new people while serving their own

Anchorage office gave her the opportunity to strengthen her interpersonal skills so she could be comfortable not only talking to new people but also leading groups

can do. At CVRF, we help youth in the region reach their full potential by providing them with a variety of opportunities to gain experience with the working world and explore career paths rooted in the community. One way we do this is by maintaining a strong internship program that provides CVRF youth with a way of developing professional skills. In 2019, 16 interns from 12 different communities worked in Anchorage or a CVRF community, all together earning more than $110,000.

communities.

of students. As an intern, she helped guide students in traditional crafts, including beading, quilting, and sewing beaver fur into a pair of mittens or a malagg’aayaq (fur hat with ear flaps).

In addition to gaining hands-on experience in the dayto-day tasks of an office environment, our interns receive focused career coaching designed to help identify their natural abilities, enhance their knowledge and strengthen their weaknesses. This program also provides participants with a chance to travel around Alaska to deepen their

For THOMASINA TALL, the ability to work in her village and help others is what drew her to apply to the internship. During the summer of 2019, Thomasina was able to work from her home village, assisting CVRF staff with the Youthto-Work program during the work week and helping out with subsistence hunting on the weekends. She remembers how, during net mending lessons in the YTW program, her presence as a woman who had participated in YTW herself inspired the girls in the program, making them less shy about learning a skill often seen as “just for boys.” Another young woman, DESIREE CLEVELAND, said CVRF’s internship helped her get over her shyness and become a leader. A naturally quiet person, Desiree’s work in the

This experience leading student groups proved invaluable for both Desiree and Thomasina, who are currently studying at the University of Alaska to be teachers. Thomasina has not decided yet which subject she wants to teach, but Desiree already knows. “I always loved math. Ever since I was a little kid.” Now Desiree wants to inspire that same love of math in future generations. Like Thomasina, she believes that one teacher can make a huge difference in a child’s life. We are excited to see all the good Desiree and Thomasina will do in the world.

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COMMUNITY ESSENTIALS

®

People Propel

Helping To Fuel Subsistence Hunting

People Propel® directly facilitates the independent Alaskan way of life, enabling our community to continue subsistence fishing, hunting and other vital activities such as traveling between villages or keeping equipment safe and protected from extreme weather conditions. EVAN S. EVAN, BOARD MEMBER GOODNEWS BAY CHARLENE & JONATHAN BOSCO

We know how critical good mobility is to people balancing work, life and subsistence hunting, so in 2012 we created the People Propel® program, which has helped CVRF community residents purchase nearly $30 million worth of equipment total. In 2019, CVRF covered 30% of the cost of equipment critical to remote village life, including ATVs, appliances, outboards, snow machines, heating systems, boats, trailers and more. In 2019, we accepted 778 applications and provided approximately $1.9 million in vital support, helping residents purchase more than $6.2 million in equipment and contributing to the region’s economic development. For certified teacher CHARLENE BOSCO, a lifelong resident of Toksook Bay, People Propel® meant more than 30%

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savings on the cost of a new boat. It meant peace of mind. Without the program, she said, she would never have thought to purchase a boat trailer to accompany her boat. Now, she and her husband Jonathan can attach the boat to their Honda using the trailer and bring the boat home with them each night instead of leaving it at the beach, where it would be vulnerable to the elements. With the boat safely stored at home, Charlene and her husband save time and fuel by no longer needing to travel back and forth from the beach to check on the boat. Whenever they are ready to hunt, they can hitch up the trailer and set out, confident in their own skills and resources. As a result, the 2019 catch was one of their best yet. Charlene directly credits the successful catch of a

spotted seal, 16 geese, and many butter clams to the boat she was able to purchase thanks to the People Propel® program. Without the program, Charlene says, she would have had to borrow or barter for many important items, such as blubber, seal meat, salmonberries and even the use of a boat itself. Owning their own boat and trailer allows them to easily travel across Toksook Bay to the village of Nightmute, where they gather berries. Every once in a while, when the weather is good and the freezers are full, Charlene and Jonathan take their boat out not to fish but to enjoy a welldeserved vacation.


COMMUNITY ESSENTIALS

Like R2-D2 Mechanic/Welders At CVRF Shops When asked if she had taken the boat she bought through People Propel® in to a CVRF shop, Charlene Bosco smiled. “Not yet — it’s still so new. But I will when it needs repairs.” When that time comes, CVRF’s talented team of Mechanic/ Welders (M/Ws) will be there to assist her. With 54 M/Ws working across 18 communities, the CVRF shops provide a valuable service to almost every village in the region. In addition to performing routine maintenance on a variety of equipment, including ATVs, snow machines, outboard motors, Toyo stoves, heaters, and other equipment eligible for the People Propel® program, our M/Ws have all the skills and experience to complete custom projects for residents, including work on aluminum boats. “Sometimes, people in the community call M/Ws R2-D2 because of all the

different things we can do,” reports JACOB RIVERS, a M/W working out of his hometown of Scammon Bay. After many years living elsewhere, working in aviation, at a gold mine, and as a cop, Jacob was happy to have an opportunity to move back to Scammon Bay with his wife and settle into a good job at the shop. There, he has been working with his fellow M/Ws on an innovative new piece of equipment: a walkthrough windshield, which can be installed on boats to protect fishermen from bad weather. “That’s the project I’m most proud of,” Jacob says. On the southern banks of the Yukon Delta, in the village of Kipnuk, ERIC DOCK, another M/W, recalls a welding project that he was particularly proud of: building a brand-new hull

from scratch. “It took almost two weeks,” he says, to cut out the bottom of the boat and weld together two enormous, 20-foot sheets of aluminum into the sleek, durable hull the customer needed for his subsistence fishing. Without the shop, Eric says, customers like this would have no other option. They would have to do the work themselves — and risk faulty repairs or even failures that would damage their ability to take kids to school, go to work, put food on the table and transport needed heating oil for their homes. CVRF is proud to provide a service that aids residents in every aspect of life and keeps our communities running smoothly.

CVRF + HONDA WARRANTY REPAIR CENTERS

Since the founding of the People Propel® program, CVRF has continuously searched for ways to leverage vendor and manufacturer relationships for the benefit of our residents. In 2019, after years of intensive collaboration, CVRF signed a partnership agreement with American Honda Motor Company that enables CVRF staff to provide service and warranty work on Honda ATVs and UTVs by providing Honda factory training. We have also made a substantial investment in parts, tires, oil and tools necessary to save our residents the time and money of having to ship equipment out of the region for warranty repairs. If this pilot program proves successful, CVRF hopes to expand the program so that residents of all our communities can save time and money and use it to support their subsistence lifestyle. JIMMY LARSEN, JR.

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COMMUNITY ESSENTIALS

Warmth In The Winter Pollock Provides Heating Oil Program Winters are long in Alaska. From mid-September through May, temperatures in many of CVRF’s communities never break 50⁰ F — and in the deep winter temperatures routinely dip below 0⁰ F. Snow, ice, and wind are common during the long winter, when residents rely on heating oil and wood-burning stoves to keep their homes warm all winter. Couple this high demand with the high price of purchasing and transporting heating oil, and you end up with exorbitant costs for basic necessities.

I would like to thank CVRF for the Heating Oil Program. It has been a very big help. WINNIE BILLY, TUNUNAK

Recognizing the need for warmth and financial relief, CVRF stepped up to provide community members with the resources they need via the Heating Oil Program. This program provides residents with much-needed support during the coldest months of the year. In 2019, CVRF provided more than 2,160 households with $775,000 of heating oil. “It saved me a lot of money,” said ROY ATCHAK, a resident of Chevak and recipient of the program. “When I get heating oil from CVRF, I use the savings to pay for groceries, bills and my phone.” Another resident, WINNIE BILLY, said the savings have been a huge help in recent years, following the death of her husband. An elder resident of Tununak, Winnie lives in a three-bedroom house with her daughter and grandson. The Heating Oil Program has enabled Winnie to keep her whole family warm and to use the time she would have spent worrying about bills to focus on gathering her favorite subsistence foods, including it’garraleks (beach asparagus), quaggciks (sourdocks), ikiituk (wild celery), tangerpak (blackberries) and ayuq (Labrador tea). WINNIE BILLY

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MAX ANGAIAK (Designee for Robert Angaiak)


COMMUNITY ESSENTIALS

Preserving Our Heritage Pollock Provides Elder Program “For thousands of years, the elders have been guiding our community,” said JOHN PINGAYAK, an elder resident of Chevak and retired teacher who, in 2006, received an honorary doctorate from University of Alaska in recognition of his decades of work reviving and incorporating traditional lifeways into Chevak School. For 34 years, John served his community as an educator, teaching the Cup’ik language, as well as Eskimo dancing and drumming. Elders like John not only preserve a community’s historical knowledge but also provide wisdom and guidance to younger generations as they navigate the ever-changing world. “You can look back on life and say money is

everything, but I have learned that elders know everything,” John told us. This includes knowing not only the best food sources but also the best medicines, how to maintain a subsistence lifestyle and even how to survive pandemics, such as smallpox and influenza.

fish, the Elder Program provides much-needed assistance, especially during long, cold winters. For elders who can no longer work or hunt, the program provides a helpful lifeline. Together, CVRF’s programs create a community support system that helps honor and care for our elders.

Without elders, we know, our communities would be lost. This belief provides the core of one of our longest-standing programs: the Pollock Provides Elder Program. Each year, this program provides support to elders and distributes a variety of essential items, such as heating oil or high-quality meat from an Alaska butcher shop. For elders such as John, who remain active and continue to subsistence hunt and

SIMEON SUNNY, an elder and lifelong resident of Nightmute, said, “Without this program, people would suffer and struggle more to get by.” A retired airline agent, Simeon has been benefiting from the Elder Program for the past five years, since turning 65 years old. Thanks to CVRF, he can now enjoy his retirement and spend more time with his wife and local dance group.

The Elder Program really helps in our community. CVRF’s way of helping is beyond measure. JOHN PINGAYAK, ELDER, PH.D, CHEVAK

JOHN PINGAYAK

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COMMUNITY ESSENTIALS

Big Things Have Small Beginnings CVRF’s Tiny House Program In Alaska, there are certain basic necessities everyone needs not only to survive but to thrive in the often-harsh environment: food, heat, transportation, and, perhaps most importantly, shelter. A 2018 CVRF community survey revealed that nearly 30% of those who answered the survey identified housing as their biggest challenge. That same year, CVRF began working on an idea that would allow residents and tribal members to take control of their own housing needs: the Tiny House Program. Inspired by the tiny house movement, the program supports construction of small energy-saving homes designed for the rural Alaska environment with input from tribal members and traditional knowledge from the local community. CVRF took on the role of builder and looked for local labor to help construct the homes. Where possible, we collaborated with other local project resources to ensure key stakeholders and governing bodies can replicate and champion future projects. CVRF staff has worked with partner organizations to build a successful and affordable mortgage model. CVRF aligns home buyers with funding sources, such as BIA’s “Category D” & CVRF’s People Propel® down payment assistance programs, which both provide a 30% subsidy, up to

16 | COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND | ANNUAL REPORT 2019

$75,000 each, to qualified participants. CVRF also guides applicants to the mortgage program best suited to their needs, such as USDA 502 Direct or Alaska Housing Finance Corporation’s Rural Loan Program, which have proven to be the best lending programs available to tribal members on tribal lands. After a successful test project in Eek in 2018, CVRF expanded the Tiny House Program to the Native Village of Chevak. In 2019, CVRF built two affordable, energy-saving homes for residents and their families using polyurethane foam core structural insulated panels (SIP), a material that saves more energy than traditional stick-built construction. To meet the needs of individual applicants and their families, home floorplans can be customized as needed, making the program accessible to families in need of more space. For new homeowner CLIFFORD PANIYAK, this program was literally lifechanging. Before moving into a twobedroom tiny house in Chevak, Clifford, his wife and their three children lived in his father-in-law’s house, sharing a bedroom of approximately 192 square feet. After several years in such cramped quarters, Clifford says, his family is

glad to have room to spread out. “My sons actually have a bedroom now. They can have friends over. Watch TV. Be kids.” It makes a big difference in their quality of life. Even better than all the extra space is the ability to rely on themselves. Clifford and his family no longer have to borrow space in someone else’s home. Instead, they can live in their own home and chop wood for their own stove. This allows them to take control of their own destiny and to dream of what’s next for them while enjoying the comfort of their surroundings. Since moving in just before Thanksgiving 2019, the family has celebrated many firsts in their new home: the first holidays, the first spring, the first outdoor grill. Clifford, who works at the CVRF shop in Chevak and volunteers with local search and rescue, said he can see the Tiny House Program making a real difference in his community. “There’s a huge need for housing in Chevak,” he said. Overcrowding continues to be a problem not just in Chevak but in the entire region.In the future, CVRF hopes to continue expanding this program to all 20 of our communities and empower our residents to not only survive but also to thrive in every part of life.


We were lucky to move in around Thanksgiving and get to celebrate together in our new home. CLIFFORD PANIYAK, TINY HOUSE OWNER CHEVAK

COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND | ANNUAL REPORT 2019 | 17


We will continue to invest in innovative programs and services that provide assistance where traditional government programs cannot reach. RICHARD JUNG, CHAIRMAN COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND

18 | COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND | ANNUAL REPORT 2019


2019 ANNUAL REPORT

Financial Disclosures COMMITTEES & COMMITTEE MEETINGS The CVRF Bylaws create an Executive Committee made up of seven Board members who are elected by the full Board of Directors: the Chairman, Vice Chairman, Secretary, Treasurer and three at-large Executive Committee members. CVRF’s Bylaws authorize the Executive Committee to exercise all authority of the full Board in managing CVRF, except for the election of officers and Executive Committee members. The CVRF Bylaws also authorize the Chairman, with support from the Board of Directors, to appoint other committees with such functions, powers and duties as determined by the Chairman and Board. Using this authority, CVRF has created several committees made up of members of the Board of Directors: •

A Policy/Compensation Committee to make policy recommendations to the Board

A Finance Committee to advise the Board on budgeting and financial matters

A Regulatory and Legislative Committee to provide the Board with information about issues of interest to CVRF

An Election Committee to advise the company on policies and procedures related to community Board member elections

A Disciplinary Committee to make recommendations to the Board on a variety of topics related to Board member actions and interactions.

For CVRF’s six subsidiaries (Coastal Alaska Premier Seafoods [CAPS], Coastal Villages Pollock [CVP], Coastal Villages Crab [CVC], Coastal Villages Longline [CVL], Coastal Villages Enterprises [CVE] and Coastal Villages Seafoods [CVS]), CVRF has established subsidiary Boards. CVRF committees and subsidiary Boards are made up of members of the Board of Directors, and met either in person or via teleconference as needed throughout 2019: •

The full Board met seven times during 2019: January 23, March 12, June 6, August 8 (teleconf), August 14, October 15, and December 10. (Note: the January 23 meeting was the 2018 annual meeting, which was postponed following the November 30, 2018 earthquake.)

The CVRF Executive Committee met seven times: February 13, March 8, May 21, June 24, July 17 (teleconf), September 3 (teleconf), and October 10.

The six subsidiary Boards (CAPS, CVP, CVC, CVL, CVE, and CVS) met in January of 2019 to complete their 2018 annual meetings, which were postponed due to the November 30, 2018, earthquake. The subsidiary boards then met in December of 2019 for the 2019 annual meetings.

The Policy and Compensation Committee met twice: March 7 and in joint session with Executive Committee on March 8.

The Disciplinary Committee met on April 2.

The Finance Committee met on December 9.

The Election Committee met twice: September 17 and October 7.

There were numerous informal meetings and teleconferences with the President/Vice President and the Administration.

AUDITOR & AUDITOR RELATIONSHIP CVRF has not had any disagreements with its auditors (KPMG) in any year, including 2018 and 2019. CVRF received non-audit services from its auditors in 2019, and paid KPMG $213,850 for audit, tax, and other consulting services. COMPENSATION TO KEY CVRF PERSONNEL AND RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS CVRF fully discloses the salaries of its top staff in each annual report to its residents. The federal CDQ statute specifically requires each CDQ group to disclose the “compensation levels of the top 5 highest paid personnel” (16 U.S.C. § 1855(i)(1)(F)(ii)). Until 2012, there was also a CDQ Panel rule requiring the disclosure of the “total amount… received by each such individual.” CVRF believes that its residents have a basic right to more information than what is currently required by the statute and that providing full and fair disclosure is the best way to ensure strong self-governance, the key to the longterm success of any business. The company believes this approach to be in the best interest of its communities, the CDQ program as a whole and the Bering Sea commercial fishery over the long term.

COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND | ANNUAL REPORT 2019 | 19


2019 ANNUAL REPORT

Financial Disclosures (Continued) In the spirit of openness, CVRF has always reported the total amount paid to the company’s top five personnel, whether they are office staff or crew members. Starting with the 2012 annual report, CVRF expanded its report to include the company’s top 10 personnel. The CVRF Board of Directors sets aggressive goals and objectives for the Company and is pleased with the results that the personnel in the company have helped deliver to our communities. CVRF maintains its commitment to hiring and retaining the best personnel available to bring the vision of the Board of Directors to life and create amazing returns for stakeholders and residents of CVRF communities for generations to come. The Board follows IRS Rebuttable Presumption of Reasonableness guidelines in calculating the salaries for its top executives, a process completed by an independent contractor, which includes comparisons with salary levels at other similar companies. In 2019, the top 10 highest paid personnel earned the following wages: Cloyd Crow, Chief Executive Officer (Base Salary: $561,042, Bonus $375,000); Owen Kvinge, Crab Vessel Captain (Base Salary: $406,592); Angela Pinsonneault, Director of Business Development (Base Salary: $228,405, Bonus $175,000); Eric Deakin, Chief Operations Officer (Base Salary: $241,983, Bonus: $98,000); Michelle Drew, Chief Financial Officer (Base Salary: $236,683, Bonus: $95,000); Michael Coleman, Bering Sea Operations General Manager (Base Salary: $281,750, Bonus: $40,000); Harald Longvanes, Northern Hawk Fishmaster (Base Salary: $301,159); Nicholas Souza, Deputy Director (Base Salary: $222,375, Bonus: $68,000); Michael Henken, Northern Hawk Chief Engineer (Base Salary: $282,768); James Egaas, Northern Hawk Captain (Base Salary:

20 | COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND | ANNUAL REPORT 2019

$280,783, Bonus: $1,117). Additionally, in 2019, the Chief Executive Officer received a $10,000 life insurance benefit. BOARD COMPENSATION POLICY AND FEES CVRF Board members receive a daily stipend during meetings and an additional monthly stipend for the CVRF-related work that occurs between CVRF meetings. CVRF’s Board compensation policy was adopted in June 2004 after consultation with independent experts. The policy stipulates that any changes must be approved by an independent body. The policy was updated in January 2011 and approved by the independent authorized body comprised of an independent member of each community. The CVRF Board compensation policy is in full compliance with IRS Rebuttable Presumption of Reasonableness guidelines. During 2019, CVRF paid its Board members $657,148 in salaries, stipends and benefits. RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS CVRF goes above and beyond the required related party disclosures in its reporting of material employment and business relationships. None of CVRF’s employees or Board members have a financial relationship with any partners who lease or harvest CVRF’s quotas. Related party transactions with Board members include: Board Member Clarence Dull/daughter-in-law Caryn Dull, CSR ($55,241); Board Member Larson Hunter/father-in-law George Smith, M/W Manager ($136,682); Board Member John Samuel/ self, Winter Watchman ($12,725); Board Member Nicholai Steven/sister-in-law Marita Steven, CSR ($53,007); Board Member John Matthew/wife Mary Matthew, CSR ($44,368);

Board Member Eric C. Olson, Sr./daughter Cheryl Smart, CSR ($53,705); Board Member John Xavier/daughter, Megan John, Administrative Assistant ($19,910); Board Member Albert R. Williams/daughter Gretchen Williams, Community Benefits Associate, Accounting ($64,167); Board Member Albert R. Williams/daughter Theresa Kiokun, Accounting Specialist ($55,891). LEGAL PROCEEDINGS INVOLVING DIRECTORS CVRF was not engaged in any litigation with any of its directors during 2019. PROFESSIONAL FEES In 2019, CVRF paid the following fees for professional services: (1) $364,873 in legal fees; (2) $672,493 in consulting fees; (3) $213,850 in accounting fees; and (4) $187,479 in lobbying fees.


FINANCIAL DISCLOSURES

Consolidated Statements Of Financial Position (Balance Sheet) DRAFT 10/4/20 9:27 PMDRAFT Audited 10/4/20 Financial9:27 Statement PM Audited Schedule Financial for Annual Statement Report..xlsx Schedule for Annual Report..xlsx

COASTAL VILLAGES REGION COASTAL FUND VILLAGES REGION FUND AND SUBSIDIARIES AND SUBSIDIARIES

POLLOCK DRIVES CVRF FISH SALES 2019 SALES BY SPECIES ($)

Coastal Villages Region Fund &Consolidated Subsidiaries Consolidated Statements of FinancialStatements Position of Financial Position YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

December 31, 2019 andDecember 2018 31, 2019 and 2018

As s e t s Assets

As s e t s

Current assets: Current assets: Cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents $ 54,309,964 Restricted certificates ofRestricted deposit certificates of deposit — Trade accounts receivable, Trade less accounts allowance receivable, for doubtful less accounts allowance for doubtful accounts of $230,678 and2018, $240,146 in 2019 and 2018, respectively 3,481,159 of $230,678 and $240,146 in 2019 and respectively Refundable income taxes Refundable income taxes 92,707 Notes receivable, current Notes portion, receivable, net current portion, net 131,633 Inventories Inventories 5,632,962 Prepaid expenses Prepaid expenses 2,834,620 Other assets Other assets — Total current assets

Total current assets

Other assets Other assets Assets held for sale Assets held for sale Restricted certificates ofRestricted deposit certificates of deposit Refundable income taxes Refundable income taxes Deposits Deposits Notes receivable, excluding Notescurrent receivable, portion excluding current portion Property, plant, vessels,Property, and equipment, plant, vessels, net and equipment, net Investments in fishing rights Investments in fishing rights Equity method investment Equity method investment Total assets

Total assets

2019

2019

202 18 019

$

2018 2018

51,313,031 54,309,964 401,190 —

51,313,031 401,190

6,867,602 3,481,159 93,012 92,707 174,301 131,633 3,832,680 5,632,962 3,302,290 2,834,620 75,000 —

6,867,602 93,012 174,301 3,832,680 3,302,290 75,000

66,483,045

66,059,106 66,483,045

66,059,106

360,326 — 235,000 — 35,336 146,024 80,591,117 121,405,130 10,818,983

360,326 — 325,230 — 235,000 235,000 82,573 — 8,336 35,336 281,127 146,024 85,616,306 80,591,117 121,405,130 121,405,130 5,965,645 10,818,983

— 325,230 235,000 82,573 8,336 281,127 85,616,306 121,405,130 5,965,645

$

280,074,961

$

279,978,453 280,074,961

279,978,453

$

2,797,275 3,245,182 2,824 390,685 13,369

$

2,574,797 2,797,275 2,928,020 3,245,182 2,681 2,824 12,959 390,685 15,478 13,369

2,574,797 2,928,020 2,681 12,959 15,478

5,533,935 6,449,335

5,533,935

POLLOCK

65.56%

COD

18.37%

Li abi l i t i e sand and Net N e t AAssets s s eLtisabi l i t i e s and N e t As s e t s Liabilities

Current liabilities: Current liabilities: Accounts payable and accrued expenses Accounts payable and accrued expenses Accrued payroll liabilities Accrued payroll liabilities Capital lease, current portion Capital lease, current portion Deferred revenue Deferred revenue Security deposits Security deposits Total current liabilities Total current liabilities

6,449,335

Capital lease, net of current Capital portion lease, net of current portion Total liabilities

Total liabilities

Net assets, without donor Netrestrictions assets, without donor restrictions Total liabilities and net assets Total liabilities and net assets

4,758

7,810 4,758

7,810

6,454,093

5,541,745 6,454,093

5,541,745

273,620,868 $

280,074,961

$

274,436,708 273,620,868

274,436,708

279,978,453 280,074,961

279,978,453

CRAB

15.08%

See accompanying notes See to accompanying consolidated financial notes tostatements. consolidated financial statements.

COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND | ANNUAL REPORT 2019 | 21

1

1


FINANCIAL DISCLOSURES

Consolidated Statements Of Financial Position (Balance Sheet) 2019 GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

CUMULATIVE REVENUES JANUARY 1997 - DECEMBER 2019

Advertising

6,172

Bank and finance

9,217 68,108

Computer and software

148,078

Depreciation

64,296

Drug screening & preemployment

1,589

Dues, permits, taxes & licenses

4,070

Employee education assistance

5,536

Freight

23,297

Insurance

358,008

Interest

476

Meals and entertainment

41,203

Other fees and charges

80,388

600

300

1,179,289

Rent

11,318

Repairs and maintenance

1,612

Supplies

89,346

Training

26,508

Transportation and parking

16,415

Travel and lodging

308,901 $ 9,590,358

22 | COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND | ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Since purchasing our own fleet in 2010, CVRF has continuously grown our revenue, programs and impact in our communities.

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2003

2004

2002

21,666

2001

Printing

0

1999

140,359

2000

Per diem

1998

695,348

GRAND TOTAL

Coastal Villages Region Fund has earned $1.46 billion in cumulative revenue over the last 32 years.

900

6,287,719

Payroll taxes and benefits

Professional services

1200

IN THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS

Communications

Payroll

1500

$ 1,440

Bad debt


FINANCIAL DISCLOSURES

Consolidated Statements Of Activities (Income Statement) DRAFT 10/4/20 8:53 PM Audited Financial Statement Schedule for Annual Report..xlsx

COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND AND SUBSIDIARIES Consolidated Statements of Activities

Coastal Villages Region Fund & Subsidiaries

Years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018

2019

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

2 01 9

BERING SEA Be r i ng S e a FISHING fi s hi ng OPERATIONS

ope r at i ons

Revenue and andgains Gains(losses): (losses): Revenue Seafood sales Lease and profit share income Community service centers Residential construction Rent Interest income Gain (loss) on disposal of assets Other

2018

$

PROGRAMS Pr ogr ams & PROJECTS, and pr oj e c t s , GENERAL & ge ne r al and ADMINISTRATIVE

admi ni s t r at i ve

2 01 8

TOTAL

Tot al

BERING SEA Be r i ng S e a FISHING fi s hi ng OPERATIONS

ope r at i ons

PROGRAMS Pr ogr ams & PROJECTS, and pr oj e c t s , GENERAL & ge ne r al and ADMINISTRATIVE

TOTAL

admi ni s t r at i ve

Tot al

76,457,924 402,885 — — — — 2,000 (165,854)

— 2,163,353 748,156 535,000 275,893 31,196 (10,750) 131,113

76,457,924 2,566,238 748,156 535,000 275,893 31,196 (8,750) (34,741)

83,320,882 1,811,786 — — — — 4,000 163,356

— 2,358,057 610,128 — 236,677 36,614 (43,901) 136,133

83,320,882 4,169,843 610,128 — 236,677 36,614 (39,901) 299,489

76,696,955

3,873,961

80,570,916

85,300,024

3,333,708

88,633,732

28,452,680 — 30,561,313 795,417 — — —

— 14,950,698 — 8,794,941 912,563 — (10,439)

28,452,680 14,950,698 30,561,313 9,590,358 912,563 — (10,439)

29,954,618 — 27,859,498 910,348 — 65,000 —

— 14,914,814 55,341 8,262,340 761,344 655,267 3,092

29,954,618 14,914,814 27,914,839 9,172,688 761,344 720,267 3,092

Total Totalexpenses Revenue and andlosses Gains (losses)

59,809,410

24,647,763

84,457,173

58,789,464

24,652,198

83,441,662

Change in net assets before equity in income of equity method investee

16,887,545

(20,773,802)

(3,886,257)

26,510,560

(21,318,490)

5,192,070

3,070,417

3,070,417

3,079,676

3,079,676

19,957,962

(20,773,802)

(815,840)

29,590,236

(21,318,490)

8,271,746

Total (losses) Totalrevenue Revenueand andgains Gains (losses)

Expensesand andlosses: Losses: Expenses Cost of seafood sales Programs and projects Fishing operating expenses General and administrative Property management Loss on asset impairment Income tax expense

Equity in income of equity method investee Change in net assets

$

Net assets at beginning of the year, without donor restrictions

274,436,708

Net assets at end of the year, without donor restrictions

273,620,868

266,164,962 $

274,436,708

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

1

COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND | ANNUAL REPORT 2019 | 23


2019 ANNUAL REPORT

Board Of Directors The Board of Directors plays an important role at CVRF, serving as the governing body that steers the vision, mission, values and policies of the organization. Most importantly, members of the Board provide a critical link between community members and CVRF. THE ROLE AND FUNCTIONS OF THE BOARD CVRF’s Board of Directors is responsible for governing CVRF’s affairs. The Board makes broad policy decisions and sets organizational goals that the staff carry out. The primary functions of the Board are to act in the best interests of the company and the Coastal Villages region. These functions enable the organization to achieve its purpose of providing the means for development by creating sensible, tangible, long-term solutions for the residents of CVRF’s 20 member communities. The Board makes decisions that balance growth in commercial fishing and sustainable development in CVRF communities. The Board accomplishes this oversight by staying up to date about CVRF’s activities and communicating appropriate information to residents. In 2019, the Board of Directors hosted meetings in all 20 CVRF member communities to share the organization’s goals and financial performance with residents.

ARCHITECTS OF THE DREAM

SHAPING THE FUTURE

CVRF would like to remember community leaders who have served on the company’s Board of Directors and are no longer with us. These individuals helped shape CVRF with their leadership, action and wisdom. CVRF is grateful for their many contributions while serving on the Board.

CVRF would also like to acknowledge the contributions that sitting Board members made in 2019. Board members provided valuable guidance and oversight that helped move CVRF closer to achieving some of its long-term goals. CVRF staff thanks the Board for hosting community meetings that took place throughout our region in 2019.

JONATHAN LEWIS CHEFORNAK

HENRY WILLIAMS PLATINUM

STEVEN WHITE EEK

WASSILLIE BAVILLA QUINHAGAK

JOHNNY HAWK EEK

ALOYSIUS AGUCHAK SCAMMON BAY

CHARLEY CHINGLIAK GOODNEWS BAY

SABASTIAN KASAYULI SCAMMON BAY

HULTMAN KIOKUN MEKORYUK

DAVID BILL, SR. TOKSOOK BAY

FRITZ WILLIE NAPAKIAK

PETER JOSEPH, SR. TUNTUTULIAK

CARL MOTGIN NAPAKIAK PETER JOHN NEWTOK JOSEPH POST NIGHTMUTE

ANDY CHARLIE, SR. TUNUNAK DANIEL OLRUN, SR. MEKORYUK FRANK BEREZKIN, SR. OSCARVILLE

COMMUNITY ELECTIONS CVRF’s Board of Directors is made up of democratically elected representatives from each of our 20 member communities. Board members serve six-year terms, and elections take place every two years. All Board members must be permanently domiciled residents of the communities they are representing, meaning that the Board member must have permanent residency and plan to remain a resident. Elections are run under a standardized democratic process designed to give fair voice to all residents of each community. CVRF welcomed eight new Board members in 2019: •

Hooper Bay: Eric Olson Sr.

Kwigillingok: Andrew Kiunya

Napaskiak: Stephen Maxie, Jr.

Newtok: Xavier John

Platinum: John Samuel

Quinhagak: John W. Matthew

Tuntutuliak: Gabriel Olick

Tununak: Alma Kanrilak

No elections are scheduled for 2020. We are excited for the seven elections that will take place in 2021.

24 | COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND | ANNUAL REPORT 2019


2019 ANNUAL REPORT

Board Of Directors RICHARD JUNG

STEPHEN MAXIE, JR.

JOHN SAMUEL

GABRIEL OLICK

CHAIRMAN

VICE CHAIRMAN

SECRETARY

TREASURER

NAPAKIAK

NAPASKIAK

PLATINUM

TUNTUTULIAK

2016 - 2021

2014 - 2019

2014 - 2019

2014 - 2019

CARLIE BEEBE

EVAN S. EVAN

LARSON HUNTER

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

EDWARD KINEGAK CHEFORNAK

EEK

GOODNEWS BAY

SCAMMON BAY

2018 - 2023

2016 - 2021

2016 - 2021

2016 - 2021

ALFRED ULROAN CHEVAK

ERIC OLSON, SR. HOOPER BAY

GEORGE CHUCKWUK KIPNUK

JERRY IVON KONGIGANAK

2018 - 2021

2019 - 2023

2018 - 2023

2018 - 2023

ROLAND LEWIS KWIGILLINGOK

ALBERT WILLIAMS MEKORYUK

JOHN ANDY NEWTOK

CLEMENT P. GEORGE NIGHTMUTE

2014 - 2019

2017 - 2021

2014 - 2019

2018 - 2021

NICHOLAI STEVEN OSCARVILLE

JOHN W. MATTHEW QUINHAGAK

CLARENCE DULL TOKSOOK BAY

PHILLIP KUSAYAK TUNUNAK

2018 - 2023

2020 - 2025

2018 - 2023

2016 - 2019

COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND | ANNUAL REPORT 2019 | 25


BOARD OF DIRECTORS

A Message From The Chairman CVRF has grown from humble beginnings into a multi-million dollar fishing operation, providing lifechanging programs and support to our local residents. Much of our success can be attributed to our recently retired Chief Executive Director, Morgen Crow, who always believed that, as an Alaskan company, CVRF was a natural owner and operator in the Bering Sea fishing industry. Morgen’s efforts have led us to where we are now: the sole owner and operator of a fleet of fishing vessels operating in the Crab, Cod, and Pollock fisheries of the Bering Sea. We control our own destiny in these fisheries, which are the source of all of our program funding.

Richard Jung, CHAIRMAN COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND

Today, we continue to benefit from and build upon our past successes. As I write this, our incredible staff are guiding us through a global pandemic. Their careful planning and management have enabled CVRF’s Bering Sea fleet to safely start the 2020 fishing season and protect our fishing crew from COVID-19. While other fishing companies docked their ships and paused their fishing activities, CVRF has so far been able to safely fish our quotas while following official health guidelines to limit the spread of the virus. This is a testament to the resourcefulness of the staff and the innovative programs they were already running prior to the pandemic. CVRF thanks our congressional delegation for the tremendous federal support flowing into Alaska in response to the COVID crisis. We will be tracking where these funds are used, as well as how the 2020 Census will impact the federal and state budgets. CVRF stands ready to assist our region in leveraging these government funds to help our communities. We will continue to invest in innovative programs and services that provide assistance where traditional government programs cannot reach. In this way, we help address the complex social and economic challenges facing our region, such as poverty and overcrowding. As we refocus on our mission of generating hope and creating economic opportunity within our region, we will continue to look for ways to empower our people through unique Alaska-centered programs, services and partnerships. Our ongoing partnership with another CDQ group in the in-shore pollock fisheries has produced great benefits for both CDQ regions. We are also exploring additional business opportunities that will help us fulfill our mission and grow our footprint within the Alaska fishing industry. In the years to come, we look forward to expanding our existing programs further. For example, by building on the success of the Tiny House Program we can develop even more (and potentially larger) housing options in our communities. We have seen the power of the program to improve the lives of all those who participate in it — from the program managers who scope out projects to the builders who construct houses to the individuals and families who call these houses home. I look forward to working with CVRF staff under new leadership and with my fellow Board members to create even more of these life-changing opportunities in the future.

26 | COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND | ANNUAL REPORT 2019

As we refocus on our mission of generating hope and creating economic opportunity within our region, we will continue to look for ways to empower our people through unique Alaskacentered programs, services and partnerships. RICHARD JUNG, CHAIRMAN COASTAL VILLAGES REGION FUND


Entry # 00000

2019 ANNUAL REPORT

Scavenger Hunt! Now that you’ve read the annual report, we’ve put together a quick quiz for you. The correct answers can all be found in this annual report. Complete and answer all five questions on this card, remove it, and bring it to your local CSR at the CSC—and you’ll be entered to win some terrific prizes in our drawings!*

1 2

How many pounds of cod was caught in 2019? o

TEAR HERE

o

1.5 million

121.36 million

252 feet

o

o

199 feet

341 feet

The People Propel® program has helped community residents purchase important equipment since 2012. How much assistance did the program provide in 2019? o

4

o

CVRF purchased the Northern Hawk in 2010, and it’s the largest vessel in the Bering Sea Fleet. How long is it? o

3

17.31 million

About $900,000

o

About $1.9m

o

About $1.1m

In 2019, CVRF supplied heating oil to how many households in our communities? o

2,160

o

3,023

o

4,330

Your Name

Your Community

Your Contact Information (Phone or Email) Residency? o YES o NO

CVRF Board member or employee? o YES o NO

*RULES: Only one entry per household, and you must be a verified resident. CVRF board members and employees do not qualify to enter, but spouses or other family members can participate. You do not need to be present to win.


ANCHORAGE OFFICE 711 H St, Suite 200 Anchorage, AK 99501 907-278-5151 1-888-795-5151

Residency Verification Hotline: 1-844-357-6565 People PropelÂŽ Hotline: 1-888-983-7155

Facebook:

facebook.com/CoastalVillagesRegionFund/

Twitter:

@coastalvillages

LinkedIn:

linkedin.com/company/coastal-villages-region-fund/