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2017

ANNUAL REPORT

KEEPING THE DREAM ALIVE


TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

Table of Contents Table of Contents

2

Mission Statement

3

Chief Executive Director’s Message of a Dream4 The Bering Sea6 Community Assets 7

Education & Training Programs

8

Employment12 Essentials

14

16

Community Service Centers 

Advocacy

18

20

Community Engagement

Disclosures

2

Committee Meetings 

23

Financial Disclosures

23

Balance Sheet

25

Income Statement

26

Looking to the Future: A Message from the Chairman

28

Board of Directors

29

C O A S TA L V I L L A G E S RE G I O N F U N D


M I S S I O N S TAT E M E N T

Strategic Intent (Vision) Continuous focus on balancing growth in commercial fishing and sustainable development of Coastal Villages Region Fund communities.

Scammon Bay Hooper Bay

Chevak

Newtok

Strategic Mission Provide the means for development of our communities by creating sensible, tangible and long-term opportunities that generate hope for all people who want to fish and work.

Mekoryuk

Tununak Toksook Bay Nightmute Chefornak Kipnuk

Oscarville Napaskiak

Tuntutuliak Eek Kongiganak

Kwigillingok

Core Values • • • • • • •

Napakiak

Quinhagak

Effective Strategic Leadership Trust, Integrity and Teamwork Respect for and Understanding of all People Active Community Participation Respect for and Understanding of the Land, Sea and Resources Growth and Sustainability through Maximum Return on Capital Industrious People + Job Opportunities = Self Determination

Goodnews Bay Platinum

Core Competencies • Balance the needs, wants and expectations of all-now and seven generations from now • Understand risks/rewards, develop a plan of action, support it and execute on it • Deliver efficient and equitable economic benefits to our communities • Develop and deploy successful business models and adapt as needed for future use • Support bold thinking and continuous innovation • Deliver disciplined, purposeful and sensible initiatives to sustain and stimulate new economic growth in our region

Member Communities Scammon Bay

Hooper Bay

Chevak

Newtok

Tununak

Mekoryuk

Toksook Bay

Nightmute

Chefornak

Kipnuk

Kwigillingok

Kongiganak

Tuntutuliak

Napakiak

Napaskiak

Oscarville

Eek

Quinhagak

Goodnews Bay

Platinum

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CHIEF E XECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S MESSAGE

Chief Executive Director’s message of a dream Reflecting on 2017, I am once again proud of Coastal Villages Region Fund’s (CVRF’s) accomplishments in the Bering Sea and within our region. We have meaningful ownership of vessels and quota and a steady income stream. Of equal importance are the profits that we have harnessed from the Bering Sea and driven back into our communities. In doing so, we have increased the number of job opportunities available and the number of residents prepared to take on those opportunities across the 20 communities in our region.

MORGEN CROW CHIEF EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

I DREAM OF EQUALITY OF ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY, WHICH CAN ONLY BE FULLY ACHIEVED WHEN THERE IS FAIRNESS IN THE CDQ ALLOCATIONS AND AN EFFECTIVE AND HONEST CDQ PROGRAM”. MORGEN CROW CHIEF EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

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We are very pleased with our positioning in the industry. Our owners are much different than the industry’s traditional owners; we have a much longer-term focus. Despite this key difference, we are all facing the same challenges with decaying boats, changing markets and regulatory hurdles, such as the chinook three-river index. We have evolved past the stage of negotiating (and expecting) higher and higher royalty rates. This evolution has brought us closer to the core of the industry and has given us a better chance of surviving the challenges that the industry faces. By taking a logical, sustainable and long-term approach to the Bering Sea commercial fisheries, CVRF has realized a fundamental dream of the CDQ program. Through my friendship with two of the longstanding visionaries of the program, Wassilie Bavilla and Steven White, I am confident that their dreams for CVRF are being fulfilled. These two long-serving executive board members and pillars of CVRF dedicated their lives to serving their communities and creating a better future for the region. Early on, Steven understood that industrial fishing – for pollock, cod and crab – would be the most profitable and effective way to grow the company sustainably. Meanwhile, Wassilie dreamed of a program that spread the benefits evenly across communities, not one that only allocated them to a special subset of people living in certain communities. He talked about adopting this idea in the “spirit of patience, kindness and understanding.” They both took ownership of decisions made about our assets, our executive team, our faults and our improvements. They understood clearly their moral duty to advocate for the best interests of our region and to stand up for the actions of the company. The CDQ program has evolved – from one whose benefits accrue primarily to local fishermen and their families – to one that reaches a greater number of people through a wide variety of programs and assistance. Our work at CVRF is dedicated to carrying out the dreams of the CDQ program’s visionaries – harnessing the wealth of the Bering Sea to help the more than 9,300 residents of our region build and sustain their financial security. CVRF has designed programs to help residents prepare to work and earn the money they need to live independently. Our education and training programs, like Youth to Work, internships and scholarships, are creating a pathway to elevate people’s professional success in whatever career they choose: working for CVRF at-sea, locally in their home community, and even globally. CVRF is proud to provide a wide variety of sustainable jobs in-region, with nearly 150 individuals working hard and earning wages from CVRF. In addition to jobs, we have heard from residents that housing and public safety are issues in their communities. We hope to tackle those topics in future years, but changes in the CDQ program must take place before we can commit to any significant expenditures for new programs.


CHIEF E XECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S MESSAGE

The CDQ allocations were born during a time of politics and corruption. A report in the Alaska Legislative Digest from November 2017 pointed out that the rationale for the apportionment of fish during the formation of the CDQ program has never been clear. What is clear to me, however, is that the original quota is a result of the politics of the 1990s. At that time, the northern CDQ groups didn’t have the same political clout as those in the south; as newcomers to the state’s fisheries politics, the northern groups lost out on the CDQ allocations. Much has changed since that time, but the allocations remain locked in place. CVRF, on behalf of our residents, continues to fight for an effective, honest and unbiased CDQ program. That type of program can only be achieved by starting with a fair and equitable allocation based on a common-sense formula, like ones used by other federal programs. I have dreamt about the day that we see movement toward increasing economic opportunities for all the people of all our regions. In order to achieve that dream, allocative fairness is necessary in the CDQ program. We stated our case at the roundtable discussion with the Alaska delegation and other CDQ groups in April. Members of our board and staff have worked tirelessly for 25 years to make the dream a reality. Our residents are growing increasingly more insistent about their right to be treated fairly, through letters to the Alaska delegation and through the power of the vote. And, I am exhilarated by the progress that I see. But there is a long way to go, and we will not stop advocating to the congressional delegation or sharing information with our residents and the public about the imbalanced allocations. Until the allocations change to become more fair and equitable, it is impossible to completely fulfill the dream of the CDQ program. And not fulfilling that dream is not an option. Our mission is to provide the means for development of our communities by creating sensible, tangible and long-term opportunities. I dream of equality of economic opportunity, which can only be fully achieved when there is fairness in the CDQ allocations and an effective and honest CDQ program. We will continue to fulfill our organization’s mission and the dreams of the CDQ program’s early visionaries. We will not let the dream of fair and equitable CDQ allocations die, and we know that you will join us in keeping it alive.

Michelle Tuluk, of Chevak, completed her head dress as part of the Youth to Work Program. Youth to Work is one of Coastal Village Regions Fund’s programs that is designed to elevate people’s professional success in whatever careeer they choose.

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THE BERING SE A

Setting a foundation for the dream BERING SEA EARNINGS FUEL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Pollock

98.15 million lbs caught

Cod

20.01 million lbs caught

Crab

2.23 million lbs sold

$14.6 MILLION INVESTED IN CVRF COMMUNITIES IN 2017 Direct Employment

Pathways to Success

Community Essentials

Creating Sustainable Jobs

Supporting Youth for Career Success

Providing Essentials

146 staff & board in 20 communities $4.4 Million earned wages $213,000 in employee benefits

804 Youth to Workers and Interns 80 Ciuneq participants 124 scholarship recipients

2,200 households and 678 elders received 93,000 gallons of heating oil $1.6 Million 2,000Designated tax returnsFunds completed

CVRF’s Bering Sea operations yield profits for investing in CVRF communities Industrial commercial fishing activities and the resulting sales of seafood products allow CVRF to earn profits and provide our residents and communities with programs like Youth to Work, People Propel®, Pollock Provides® Heating Oil and many others. CVRF does not rely on grants or donations; instead, we earn money for our communities through the hard work of fishing fleet employees and crew who work on our vessels in the Bering Sea. When CVRF started in the 1990s, the company leased its CDQ quota to other fishing companies. By 2010, we had acquired our own crab, pollock and cod boats, and additional quota. These additional quotas are above and beyond what the CDQ program allocates to CVRF and contribute to the earnings that we use to help fund projects and programs in the region. CVRF has successfully operated our fishing fleet for nearly ten years and we continue to invest in it to generate income for our 20 member communities. In 2017, we worked on converting our new fishing vessel, F/V Flicka, into a cod longliner that will replace F/V Deep Pacific in 2018. Coastal Alaska Premier Seafoods (CAPS) is the platform for CVRF’s industrial Bering Sea fishing operations. Without profitable fishing in the Bering Sea and the hard work of the people that work for CAPS and its subsidiaries, CVRF would not be able to provide programs for our residents. Thank you, staff and crew! 6

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COMMUNITY ASSETS

Investing in the dream of sustainable jobs, hope and fairness Every day, CVRF staff members in our communities, corporate offices and the Bering Sea work hard to fulfill the dream of the early visionaries of the CDQ program. Our goal is to create opportunities for individuals to reach and maintain financial security. We work toward this goal by directly investing in the most important asset of our region: our people. Our staff and board work to fulfill this mission and the dream of the CDQ program in a variety of ways, some of which are focused on workforce development. CVRF provides job opportunities with real expectations that promote real achievements. We facilitate development of people’s workforce skills by providing educational and training opportunities. Community service representatives help residents access CVRF’s many programs and apply for jobs and other career development opportunities. Mechanic/welders provide discounted shop services. Our presence in every community means jobs and direct employment in addition to helping people access our

programs. We are proud that we have been able to create sustainable and meaningful local jobs for our residents. CVRF is dedicated to supporting youth on the pathway from their first job in high school to identifying their desired career or vocation, reaching their career goals, and accessing the funding they need to complete education or training. These programs can provide critical support for an individual working toward financial security. CVRF also understands that living in rural Alaska is expensive and we know that residents appreciate having support for the essentials like heating oil, transportation, home appliances and tax preparation. All 9,341 permanent residents of CVRF’s 20 villages are eligible for CVRF programs. However, to participate in most programs, residents need to verify their permanent residency. For more information talk to your community service representative or visit: WORKFISHHOPE.COASTALVILLAGES.ORG

Salmon drying in a CVRF Community.

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E D U C AT I O N & T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M S

Quinhagak Youth to Work with three nets they mended.

Creating a pathway to the future Youth to Work: Gaining a positive first work experience The Youth to Work (YTW) program provides a positive first work experience for young adults, ages 14-19, in the Coastal Villages region. Applicants go through the full job cycle: applying online, meeting expectations for coming to work on time every day, performing their job duties and earning a paycheck. YTW enables participants to gain job experience at local stores, governing bodies and Community Service Centers (CSCs). This experience empowers youth and expands their choices for jobs after high school. Youth can also cultivate their leadership skills in the Team Lead position. In 2017, 785 youth participants earned roughly $591,000 in wages.

74%

$750

$975

Percentage of youth population that completed YTW

Average earnings for YTW team member

Average earnings for YTW Team Lead

I THINK IT IS VERY IMPORTANT TO PARTICIPATE IN ANY EMPLOYMENT AT A YOUNG AGE BECAUSE A FIRST JOB IS MORE THAN A PAYCHECK. IT’S A PRIVILEGE TO BOOST ONE’S CONFIDENCE, A WAY TO APPRECIATE THE VALUE OF EDUCATION AND AN EXPERIENCE THAT CAN HELP YOU ENVISION A CAREER PATH.” TIFFANY DANIEL COMMUNITY SERVICE REPRESENTIVE KWIGILLINGOK 8

C O A S TA L V I L L A G E S RE G I O N F U N D


E D U C AT I O N & T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M S

Ciuneq - Looking Forward: Exposure to education and career options The Ciuneq program builds on a youth’s summer work experience by increasing their understanding of different career pathways available to them in Alaska, Washington and the Bering Sea. In collaboration with the Take Wing program at the Alaska Humanities Forum, CVRF exposes youth to a variety of educational and career development opportunities that are available to high performing, motivated high school students.

10th Grade Experience:

9th Grade Experience: •

Where: Anchorage & Seward - AVTEC, Alaska Pacific University, University of Alaska, Anchorage

What: 40 tenth graders from 16 CVRF communities - Learned about career and educational opportunities in the maritime industry - Developed strategies for preparing for entrance into college and trade school - Gained hands on experience - Practiced taking the ACT college entrance test - 6-day program

What: 40 ninth graders from 16 CVRF communities - Met faculty and staff - Learned what it takes to reach the careers they want - Planned high school course work and gained understanding of grades required for acceptance into college and trade school - 4-day program Who – Minimum Program Requirements Recognizing Hard Work: 2.5 GPA during 8th grade, on track to pass Algebra 2

Where: Anchorage & Seattle - Seattle Maritime Academy, University of Washington, Coastal Alaska Premier Seafoods

Who – Minimum Program Requirements Recognizing Hard Work: 2.5 during 9th grade, on track to pass Algebra 2, compelling statement of interest

3.67

3.48

Average GPA of 9th grade participants

Average GPA of 10th grade participants

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E D U C AT I O N & T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M S

Katie Kashatok was so successful in her summer internship at CVRF that she was offered a full-time job as a Cash Specialist in the Accounting department last August. She’s been with the company full-time for nearly a year and during that short time, she was promoted from Cash Specialist to Accounting Specialist with CAPS.

APPLYING FOR THE CVRF INTERNSHIP IS A VERY GOOD EXPERIENCE. YOU GET TO HAVE SOMETHING ON YOUR RESUME, HAVE SPENDING MONEY FOR COLLEGE, LEARN HOW TO BE INDEPENDENT, AND IF YOU APPLY FOR THE INTERNSHIP IN ANCHORAGE/SEATTLE, YOU WILL GET THE FEEL OF LIVING OUTSIDE THE VILLAGE. YOU WILL LEARN MORE THINGS ABOUT CVRF AND WHAT IT DOES.”

KATIE KASHATOK ACCOUNTING SPECIALIST 2017 ACCOUNTING INTERN

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E D U C AT I O N & T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M S

Post-High School Programs: Developing skills and gaining experience Internships with CVRF provide an important platform for developing professional skills and acquiring knowledge, thereby preparing students to thrive in any work environment. In addition to their work tasks, interns receive focused career coaching, and the chance to travel to other CVRF villages, Seattle and Dutch Harbor to increase their understanding of CVRF operations. In 2017, 19 interns from 14 different CVRF communities worked in Anchorage, Seattle or a CVRF community, and earned $113,000. Interns working within their home communities gain valuable work experience while having the chance to live at home between the spring and fall semesters of college. To qualify for the internship program, a resident must be currently enrolled in or entering college or vocational school.

Scholarships: Key financial support for higher education and vocational training CVRF supports region residents in pursuit of their career path. After high school, those residents who want to expand the number and types

of job opportunities available to them can pursue vocational school, college or university. The Louis Bunyan Memorial Scholarship Fund enables residents pursuing higher education or certificate programs to receive money for tuition, room and board, books and required fees. The training assistance program provides tuition assistance to residents attending short-term training programs from 2 days – 12 weeks. 2017 scholarship recipients attended the University of Alaska, Anchorage, Fairbanks and Kuskokwim campuses, AVTEC and other institutions. Training award recipients attended Northern Industrial Training and other training programs. CVRF is committed to hiring from our communities for jobs located in our communities, the corporate office, and in our Bering Sea fleet. Higher education and training can be great preparation for those jobs. 128 individuals received scholarships and training awards totaling nearly $485,000 in 2017. Residents currently enrolled in college or vocational school or those who plan to attend should apply for a scholarship. The minimum GPA requirement to qualify is 2.0. The higher the applicant’s GPA, the greater chance they have of qualifying for the maximum funding available–$4,000 per semester.

In the Fall of 2017, Peter Romer began classes at AVTEC in construction and plumbing, with support from CVRF’s Louis Bunyan Memorial Scholarship Fund. After finishing the program at AVTEC, Peter plans to open his own construction and plumbing business by applying the skills he learned during the program. Before starting the program at AVTEC, Romer spent his summers interning with CVRF.

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EMPLOYMENT

Earning income and moving toward the core of the dream CVRF provides paid work opportunities to motivated, hard-working individuals living in our region. Job opportunities exist at all 20 CVRF offices, as well as on our crab boats, longline vessels and catcher/ processor vessel. We take pride in hiring the best and the brightest from our communities for these true Alaskan jobs. In 2017, CVRF employed 950 individuals across the region, in full and part-time positions, as well as in summer employment for career development. These individuals collectively earned more than $5 million.

Resident Employees & Board Paid Positions Full and Part-Time Positions

Positions

Gross Wages

Bering Sea Fishing

6

$181,985

Board of Directors

31

$666,287

Community Service Centers

53

$1,702,856

Mechanic/Welder Services

54

$1,790,310

Security Services

2

$24,000

146

$4,365,438

Summer Employment for Career Development

Number of Paid Positions

Gross Wages

Youth to Work

785

$591,554

Interns

19

$112,985

804

$704,539

950

$5,069,977

Total Paid Positions & Wages In-Region

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Number of Paid

C O A S TA L V I L L A G E S RE G I O N F U N D

CVRF staff members use community leave benefit to volunteer with local search and rescue CVRF offers a variety of benefits to its employees. One of those benefits, community service leave, allows regular full-time employees up to 40 hours of paid leave per year to perform community service, subject to supervisor approval. Community service means volunteering with a nonprofit organization or a local school. In Scammon Bay, George Smith and Jacob Rivers used their leave to volunteer with search and rescue: an important service to the community, especially in the winter when storms and whiteout conditions can last for days. Last winter, Smith, a Mechanic/Welder Regional Manager, and Rivers, a Mechanic/Welder, used their community service leave to install new trail markers between Scammon Bay and Chevak and to fill some gaps between Scammon Bay and Hooper Bay. Those two paths are important ones – residents use them to travel between communities to participate in basketball tournaments, visit family, attend social gatherings and go shopping. Trail markers are essential for guiding the way for these families, and the new ones that George and Jacob installed are bright orange and easy to see. Trail markers save lives. A Chevak resident who had been lost out in the snow expressed his gratitude to Smith for the trail markers between Scammon Bay and Chevak. He told Smith that he had been lost until he stumbled upon the bright orange trail markers, and that he followed the markers until the weather got so bad he could no longer see them. He waited out the storm until he was located by search and rescue and noted that the best reassurance he had were the orange trail markers. Smith, Rivers and the Scammon Bay search and rescue team plan to install another set of markers between Scammon Bay and the Kusilvak Mountains, as well as to the Black River. These are important routes for subsistence activities. They hope to use their community service leave benefit to install these markers during the freeze up in fall 2018.


EMPLOYMENT

George Smith and Jacob Rivers with the orange trail markers. George Smith has worked at CVRF as a Mechanic/Welder Regional Manager for four years and has been involved with the company for more than 20 years. He has volunteered with the local search and rescue for more than 40 years. Rivers has worked at CVRF as a Mechanic/Welder for 15 years and volunteered with the local search and rescue for 15 years.

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ESSENTIALS

Providing goods and services necessary for daily life in the villages Living in rural Alaska is expensive. CVRF supports residents in purchasing equipment necessary for living in rural Alaska, and by facilitating tax preparation services and making funds available to other local organizations. With these goods and services, CVRF is also helping residents save money, which can support them in the future.

People Propel® The People Propel® Program was created in 2012 and has grown to be one of CVRF’s most popular and well-known programs. In 2017, CVRF paid 30% of the price of equipment, helping residents purchase boats, outboards, ATVs, snow machines, appliances, heating systems and more. This program helps lower the cost of equipment critical to village life, and supports people in amassing assets, a component of economic development.

$1,600 Average tax refund received by CVRF residents who participated in Tax Assistance Program

In 2017, CVRF accepted 543 applications and provided roughly $1.18 million in support, which helped residents purchase over $3.95 million in equipment. Since the program’s inception, People Propel® has assisted residents with purchasing nearly $18 million worth of equipment.

Free tax assistance to region residents CVRF partnered with the Alaska Business Development Center (ABDC) volunteer tax and loan program to provide free tax return assistance to residents of the Coastal Villages region. CVRF provides funding for volunteer tax preparers to travel to CVRF communities and help people prepare and file their tax returns. CVRF’s local staff help to coordinate the volunteers’ stay in the communities. For the 2016 tax year, the program resulted in nearly $3.3 million in refunds and more than 2,000 completed returns. Since the program’s inception in 2006, residents have received more than $30 million in tax refunds.

THIS PROGRAM MAKES IT EASIER FOR RESIDENTS TO RECEIVE TAX SERVICES LOCALLY AND AT NO COST - A

Pollock Provides® Heating Oil Program

PROGRAM DESIGNED

The Heating Oil Program provides residents an important break from the hefty costs of heating oil for the winter. In 2017, CVRF expended more than $385,000 on the program and provided roughly 2,160 households with 26 gallons of heating oil and a 30-gallon drum each.

TO MEET REAL

Pollock Provides Elder Program Each winter, CVRF distributes much-needed heating oil to elders living in the region as part of its longstanding Elder Program. CVRF distributed 55 gallons of heating oil, and 60 pounds of highquality meat from an Alaskan butcher shop to 680 elders in the communities. The total value of these items per person is roughly $590, and CVRF spent more than $400,000 on the elder program in 2017.

Designated Fund & Youth Leadership Funds In 2017, CVRF awarded approximately $380,000 in funding to local organizations for community and economic development projects that largely contributed to community safety efforts. Youth Leadership funds from CVRF provided local organizations more than $80,000 in support for developing social, learning and leadership skills among youth. Projects included supplies for Head Start programming, travel to sports tournaments and community clean up events.

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COMMUNITY NEEDS.” DELORAS LOZANO COMMUNITY SERVICE MANAGER - KONGIGANAK

$128 Average savings on heating oil per household, thanks to Pollock Provides® Heating Oil Program


ESSENTIALS

Mekoryuk community member David David receiving a 60 pound meat package from Pollock ProvidesÂŽ Elder Program.

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COMMUNITY SERVICE CENTERS

Creating community, providing services and making space CSC services and staff

Scammon Bay Expansion

CVRF has Community Service Centers (CSCs) and staff in 20 communities, where 53 dedicated staff members serve CVRF residents and listen to their needs. The CSCs are open to the public, and offer a variety of services including meeting room rental, shop space rental, mechanic/welding services, internet access and information about CVRF programs. Staff are available to assist with residency verification applications, job searches and applications for CVRF programs.

In 2017, CVRF expanded the Scammon Bay CSC. This much-needed expansion will allow for more meeting room and YTW space, as well as improved community services and shop services. Six local hires worked on the expansion project.

CVRF Shop Services CVRF has a talented team of 54 Mechanic/Welders across 18 communities who provide shop services to all CVRF residents. These highly skilled Mechanic/Welders are able to perform routine maintenance on ATVs, snow machines, outboard motors and Toyo stoves and heaters. They can also repair and customize aluminum boats and work on other custom projects for residents.

CVRF capitalized on existing skills already in the community: two of the local hires had recently earned their diplomas in Residential Construction from the Amundsen Educational Center in Soldotna. Hubba-Jay Charlie and Chance Hunter, both recipients of CVRF scholarships in 2017, applied the skills that they learned during their training to the Scammon Bay expansion project, and earned wages for their work. This presented a win-win situation for everyone: two new construction workers gained valuable experience; CVRF built on the investments it has made in the community; and Scammon Bay has a larger CSC for use by its community members.

CSC Building Operating Hours: Monday - Friday - 8am to 5pm Chefornak CSC: (907) 867-8303

Kwigillingok CSC: (907) 588-8250

Oscarville CSC: (907) 737-7358

Chevak Joe Paniyak CSC: (907) 858-7566

Mekoryuk CSC: (907) 827-8138

Quinhagak Wassilie Bavilla CSC: (907) 556-8301

Eek Steven ‘Angivran’ White CSC: (907) 536-5301

Napakiak Fritz Willie CSC: (907) 589-2300

Goodnews Bay CSC: (907) 967-8338

Napaskiak Helen Sarah Kaganak CSC: (907) 737-7016

Scammon Bay Maryann Sundown CSC: (907) 558-5300

Hooper Bay CSC: (907) 758-4330 Kipnuk Tim Samson CSC: (907) 896-5080 Kongiganak CSC: (907) 557-5300

Toksook Bay CSC: (907) 427-7300

Newtok CSC: (907) 237-2310

Tuntutuliak CSC: (907) 256-2200

Nightmute Paul Tulik CSC: (907) 647-6252

Tununak CSC: (907) 652-6250 Platinum CSC: Open 10am–2pm.

CVRF is hiring - Learn more: http://www.coastalvillages.org/careers/job-listings 16

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COMMUNITY SERVICE CENTERS

Residents save money on costly repairs with CVRF Mechanic/Welder services For the first time ever, residents of CVRF’s 20 communities can obtain routine snow machine maintenance in their local communities. In 2017, 20 mechanics from 16 CVRF communities attended a month of training at All Seasons Honda in Homer, Alaska. The training focused on hardware, software, welding, repair and diagnostic equipment for Ski-Doo snow machines and Honda 4-wheelers, two very popular products in the Coastal Villages region. The new skills that CVRF Mechanic/Welders gained from this training will allow residents to have their equipment repaired in the region. And, it means that CVRF residents will be spared from having to ship out their machines for special repairs, which can cost well over $1,000 for shipping alone. CVRF is working to respond to the needs of its residents. By training our mechanics to provide a greater variety of services, we are helping residents to keep more money in their pockets and reducing the high cost of living in Western Alaska. CVRF hopes to send mechanics to more dealerships for additional certification, building on their knowledge and helping CVRF residents save money and time.

Victoria purchased a new Ski-Doo Grant Touring 600 E-TEC through the People Propel® Program. After 1,700 miles, it stopped running properly and needed some repairs. Under normal circumstances, Victoria would have had to spend more than $1,000 to ship it back to Bethel or Anchorage for repairs. Because CVRF’s local Mechanic/Welders had completed a Ski-Doo training, they were able to diagnose and repair the problem in the next village over, saving Victoria thousands of dollars.

Local hires from Scammon Bay hard at work on the CSC expansion in their community.

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ADVOCACY

Keeping the dream alive Over the past 25 years, earnings through the Western Alaska CDQ program have enabled the six CDQ groups to spend more than a billion dollars on economic development programs and projects in 65 Bering Sea coastal communities. Without the CDQ program, it is unlikely that these communities would reap the same level of economic benefits from the federal fisheries. As the CDQ program has matured, the unfair distribution of benefits within the program has become more apparent, and we can see that residents of a few small villages have the ability to receive significantly more just by virtue of where they live. All 26,000 residents who live in the 65 CDQ communities deserve to be treated equally. However, as it currently stands, more than 9,300 residents of the CVRF region are not able to access the same level of benefits as residents from other CDQ groups. Unfair resource allocations established in the early days of the program remain locked in place, while the population in the larger and less advantaged groups continue to grow. For the continued success of the program, Congress should restore fairness and remove perceptions of political influence by instituting a formula-based system for allocating quota.

Engaging with other groups to strengthen our voice CVRF is communicating with other groups from the Yukon Kuskokwim (YK) Delta region about advocacy strategies for improving the lives of residents in the region. In February 2017, CVRF joined a group of YK Delta organizations to meet with legislators in Juneau to share issues of concern. CVRF has also participated in economic development conversations such as the Y-K Economic Summit in Bethel in early 2018. Additionally, CVRF engaged with leaders from other CDQ groups about equitable allocations issues. In August, Senator Sullivan brought together key stakeholders for a field hearing in Soldotna on the Reauthorization of the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA). Ragnar Alstrom, the Executive Director of Yukon Delta Fisheries Development Association, spoke on behalf of the CDQ groups. During his testimony, he shared that the groups would like to see stability in the program and continued “There are some CDQ groups that would like to revisit allocations. Some of them would like to revisit allocations based on population, or another group might want to revisit allocations based on proximity to the resource…Yukon Delta…we’d like to revisit allocations based on poverty.” Drawing on conversations with CVRF, Mr. Alstrom included a critical perspective on necessary improvements to the method for allocating CDQ quotas. CVRF appreciates the camaraderie and relationship that we share with YDFDA.

THE QUOTA ISSUE IS A JUGGERNAUT THAT DIVIDES THE CDQS. HOWEVER, THE CURRENT SYSTEM [THAT] IS IN PLACE, [PROVIDES] AN ADVANTAGE FOR THOSE WISHING TO KEEP IT THE WAY IT IS. THE PROCESS OF CHANGE IS DIFFICULT, HIGHLY POLITICAL AND MAYBE EVEN RISKY IF IT INVOLVES THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT OR THE CONGRESS.” [BRADNERS’ ALASKA LEGISLATIVE DIGEST NO 54/17, 11/7/17]

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ADVOCACY

Let’s fix the allocation situation! To learn more visit: www.beringseabalance.com Standing up for equitable allocations At a roundtable discussion of the CDQ program in April 2017, CVRF made sure that the Alaska congressional delegation and the other attendees understood our proposal for a population-based formula for the CDQ allocations. Senator Lisa Murkowski organized the roundtable to create a forum for the six CDQ groups to share their ideas for improving the CDQ program. Representatives from each group talked about their strategies for addressing the economic and social needs in their communities. The groups also discussed several legislative proposals, including improving the method by which CDQ quotas are allocated. Another group expressed frustration with the current allocation scheme. CVRF hopes that they will join us in advocating for a fair and equitable distribution of CDQ resources and benefits.

CANGALLRUVKENAKI: [CHA-NGAL-RUF-KENAKI] NO DIFFERENT FROM ANYONE ELSE (FAIR) Communicating on behalf of residents CVRF’s advocacy team has worked persistently to make sure that CVRF residents, the Alaska congressional delegation, and the broader public are aware of the inequitable allocations. The CVRF Board of Directors

On the day of the roundtable, Chairman of the CVRF Board of Directors Richard Jung had an article published in the Juneau Empire. He noted that it is high time for the CDQ program to help all residents in all of the CDQ communities in a fair and balanced, real and sustainable way. Chairman Jung pledged that CVRF’s region will remain united and strong in the quest for fair and equitable CDQ benefits. In October, CVRF board members and executives went to Washington DC to advocate for equitable CDQ allocations. They met with the offices of Senator Sullivan, Senator Murkowski and Congressman Young and shared the message that CVRF will continue to advocate for fair and equitable allocations for all CDQ residents. All federal programs supporting rural Alaska use a population-based formula, and the CDQ program should, too.

PITALGUTKENGNAQLUKI: [BE-DULL-GU-TE-KENG-NAKLOO-KI] TRYING TO MAKE EQUAL

works with the advocacy team to determine the issues and concerns that CVRF brings to policymakers and the press.

Contact your representative to support fair and equitable CDQ allocations! SENATOR LISA MURKOWSKI Washington, DC Office 522 Hart Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510 Phone: (202) 224-6665 Fax: (202) 224-5301

SENATOR DAN SULLIVAN Washington, DC Office 702 Hart Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510 Phone: (202) 224-3004 Fax: (202) 224-6501

REPRESENTATIVE DON YOUNG Washington, DC Office 2314 Rayburn House Office Building Washington, DC 20515 Phone: (202) 225-5765 Fax: (202) 225-0425

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

Connecting with the dreams of CVRF residents Community Meetings

Understanding the economic realities of the region

Members of the CVRF board visited seven communities in the summer of 2017. We are grateful for the hospitality that the 700 attendees extended to the Board members who visited their communities. At each stop, residents shared their thoughts, and Board members provided updates on CVRF’s activities, including their vision for the future of the company and CVRF’s efforts to ensure fair and equitable treatment for all CDQ communities. The discussions at these meetings made clear that we all need to keep the future of our communities and the CDQ program in mind when it is time to vote.

CVRF commissioned a study in order to better understand economic need in the CDQ program region. Community Attributes, Inc., an independent firm that specializes in economic analysis, released the findings in early 2018. The study finds that the communities of CVRF, Norton Sound Economic Development Corporation (NSEDC) and Yukon Delta Fisheries Development Association (YDFDA) experience higher levels of poverty than the other CDQ groups. Read the full study at: https://tinyurl.com/cvrf2018

The executive board looks forward to continuing these discussions in more CVRF communities during the summer of 2018.

What does the study mean for CVRF residents?

The CDQ program was created to help reduce poverty and support economic development in communities along the Bering Sea coast. CDQ groups that serve the residents with the most need receive the lowest benefit per person from the CDQ program. The residents of the northern CDQ groups are not getting their fair share of the CDQ program benefits

Jaden Joe and Paul Lake distribute the CVRF newsletter, Niitarkat, to elder Maria Green in Hooper Bay.

THAT’S WHERE OUR POWER IS...OUR POWER IS IN THE VOTE...I WAS TALKING [TO] A GUY FROM EEK THE OTHER DAY...WHO SAID ‘AW WE CAN’T DO NOTHING ABOUT IT.’ WE CAN DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT... WE HAVE TO SHOW UP AT EVERY ELECTION, TO SHOW THEM WE HAVE THE VOTES HERE.” RICHARD JUNG

CVRF BOARD CHAIRMAN NAPAKIAK

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

CVRF serves residents with the most need, but receives the lowest benefit per person from the CDQ program Share of total CDQ Population Living in Distressed Communities

Current Pollock Allocation

CVRF has the highest portion of individuals living in communities identified as distressed by the Denali Commission, but CVRF’s pollock allocation is only 24%. This compares to APICDA, which has only 0.3% of the CDQ population living in distressed communities and receives 14% of the pollock quota. Source: Community Attributes, Inc., “Western Alaska Community Development Quota Program Economic Needs Assessment.” 2018.

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

Community survey CVRF is always looking for ways to better serve our communities. To that end, we commissioned a survey so that we could collect feedback from the region’s residents. We wanted to better understand big issues facing people in CVRF communities, learn how familiar residents are with CVRF programs, hear what they think of those programs, and better understand attitudes toward CVRF. The response was overwhelming. Nearly 2,000 people–roughly 35% of the adult population in CVRF’s communities-

participated in the survey. The survey response rate was so high that Alaska’s federal delegation asked CVRF to collaborate with the local task force of the U.S. Census Bureau to share best practices for gathering comprehensive data in western Alaska. The information we learned from the survey will help us direct resources to better meet the needs of CVRF communities. Thank you to everyone who participated! Your voice is important.

1,990 34% of respondents think that making money is the biggest challenge facing their community

Number of adults in CVRF communities who completed the survey

35% Percentage of adults in CVRF communities who completed the survey

28% of respondents think housing is the biggest challenge in their communities

ONE RESULT [OF] THE CDQ QUOTAS [ALLOCATIONS]- THAT DO NOT REFLECT THE POPULATION [SIZE] - IS THAT BENEFITS PER CAPITA [FOR GROUPS WITH LARGER POPULATIONS, LIKE CVRF AND NSEDC] WILL ALWAYS BE LESS BECAUSE THE LARGER POPULATION CDQS HAVE TO SPREAD BENEFITS AMONG MORE PEOPLE. THE NORTHERN CDQS GENERALLY HAVE INCOMES HALF THAT OF THOSE IN THE SOUTH.” [BRADNERS’ ALASKA LEGISLATIVE DIGEST

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FINANCIAL DISCLOSURES

Commitees & committee meetings The CVRF Bylaws create a CVRF Executive Committee consisting of seven members: the CVRF President, Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer, and three at-large CVRF Board members. The CVRF Executive Committee is authorized by the Bylaws to exercise all authority of the full CVRF Board in managing CVRF, except for the election of CVRF officers and Executive Committee members. The CVRF Bylaws also authorize the President, with affirmation from a majority of the CVRF Board, to appoint other CVRF committees with such functions, powers, and duties as determined by the President and CVRF Board. Using this authority, CVRF has established several committees comprised of members of the Board of Directors: A Policy/Compensation Committee to make recommendations to the Board on CVRF policies, a Finance Committee to advise the Board on budgeting and financial matters, a Regulatory and Legislative Committee to provide the Board with information about issues of interest to CVRF, and a Disciplinary Committee to make recommendations to the Board on a myriad of topics related to Board member dynamics. For CVRF’s subsidiaries CAPS, CVP, CVC, CVL, CVE and CVS, CVRF has established subsidiary boards. CVRF committees and subsidiary Boards are comprised of members of the Board of Directors, and met either in person or via teleconference as appropriate throughout 2017: o The CVRF Executive Committee met seven times: January 11, March 29, April 11, September 8, October 18, October 19 and November 15 o The six subsidiary Boards (CAPS, CVP, CVC, CVL, CVE and CVS) each met in early December for their annual meetings. Additionally, the CVS Board met on January 11 o The Disciplinary Committee met three times: February 8, October 18 and October 19 o The Finance Committee met on January 20 o The Policy & Compensation Committee met twice, on January 19 and March 1 o An ad hoc committee on the People Propel® Program met twice, on May 23 and November 9 o The Regulatory and Legislative Committee represented CVRF in Juneau February 13-14, at the CDQ roundtable April 20 and in Washington DC October 2-5

Financial disclosures Auditor & Auditor Relationship KPMG, LLP, performed the audit and prepared the audit report on the financial statements, upon which the financial information presented in this annual report is based. CVRF has not had any disagreements with our auditors (KPMG) in any year, including 2016 and 2017. CVRF received nonaudit services from our auditor (KPMG) in 2017; we paid KPMG $82,410 for tax services.

Compensation to Key CVRF Personnel and Related Party Transactions In past annual reports, when discussing financial matters involving individuals such as compensation paid to key personnel and related party transactions, CVRF identified the individuals by name and title or relationship. Unfortunately, criminals used CVRF’s transparency in such matters to launch several sophisticated cyberattacks in 2017. To make such attacks more difficult, going forward CVRF will avoid disclosing the names of individuals in such financial contexts and will instead refer to them by title or relationship only. CVRF fully discloses the compensation of its top personnel in each annual report to its residents. The federal CDQ statute specifically requires each CDQ group to disclose the “compensation levels of the top 5 highest paid personnel” (16 U.S.C. § 1855(i)(1)(F)(ii)). Until 2012, there was also a CDQ rule requiring the disclosure of the “total amount…received by each such individual.” CVRF believes that its residents have a fundamental right to more information than what is currently required by the statute and that providing full and fair disclosure is the best way to ensure strong self-governance, the key to the long-term success of any enterprise. We believe that this approach is in the best interest of our communities, the CDQ program as a whole, and the industry over the long term. In the spirit of full disclosure, CVRF has always disclosed the total amount paid to our top five personnel, whether they are office staff or crew members. Starting with the 2012 annual report, we expanded our disclosure to include our top 10 personnel and payments made to staff and to Board members.

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FINANCIAL DISCLOSURES The CVRF Board of Directors sets aggressive goals and objectives for the Company and is pleased with the results that the top personnel in our company have helped deliver to our communities. CVRF will maintain its commitment to hiring and retaining the best personnel available to bring the vision of our Board members to life and create exceptional returns for our stakeholders and the residents of the CVRF communities for generations to come. The Board follows IRS Rebuttable Presumption of Reasonableness guidelines in determining the compensation for its Executive Director and top executives, a process conducted by an independent contractor which includes comparisons with compensation levels at other similar companies. The Executive Director receives an annual $10,000 life insurance benefit, in addition to cash compensation. In 2017, the top 10 highest paid personnel earned the following wages: Compensation of Key CVRF Personnel Title Chief Executive Director

Base Salary

Bonus

$500,000

$395,000

Arctic Sea Skipper

$401,944

-

Director of Business Development

$302,000

$80,000

Bering Sea Operations General Manager

$294,000

$48,400

Deputy Director

$221,000

$58,400

Northern Hawk Fish Master

$251,255

-

IT Manager

$190,000

$50,900

Northern Hawk Skipper

$232,352

-

Lilli Ann Skipper

$231,375

-

Finance Manager

$190,000

$30,400

Board Compensation Policy and Fees CVRF Board members receive a daily stipend during meetings and an additional monthly stipend for the CVRF-related work that occurs between CVRF meetings. The CVRF board compensation policy was adopted in June 2004 after consultation with independent experts. The policy stipulates that any changes must be approved by an independent body. The policy was updated in January 2011 and approved by the independent authorized body comprised of an independent member of each community. The CVRF board compensation policy is in full compliance with IRS Rebuttable Presumption of Reasonableness guidelines. During 2017, CVRF paid its board members $673,978 in salaries, stipends and benefits.

Related Party Transactions CVRF goes above and beyond the required related party disclosures, by reporting employees and Board members who have sold fish to the company, if any: there were none during 2017. We also report material employment and business relationships, as shown below. None of our employees or Board members have a financial relationship with any partners who lease or harvest our quotas.

RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS Related Party Job Title

Related Party Relationship

M/W Manager

Father-in-law of Board Member

$124,209

CSR

Brother of Board Member

$58,856

CSR

Daughter of Board Member

$51,046

A/P Specialist

Daughter of Board Member

$49,764

Acctg Community Benefits Specialist

Daughter of Board Member

$47,343

On-Call M/W

Self (Board Member)

$12,617

Plant Watchman

Self (Board Member)

$12,000

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Amount


FINANCIAL DISCLOSURES

Legal proceedings involving directors CVRF was not engaged in any litigation with any of its directors during 2017.

Professional fees In 2017, CVRF paid the following fees for professional services: (1) $210,284 in legal fees, (2) $748,388 in consulting fees, (3) $236,710 in accounting fees and (4) $189,215 in lobbying fees.

Consolidated statements of financial position (balance sheet)

Distribution of Assets

Owned Fishing Quotas (Excludes CDQ Quotas)

CVRF leveraged our CDQ to purchase additional fishing quotas in the pollock, crab and cod fisheries

28%

CVRF has acquired a diverse array of assets that are used to generate income

These quotas generate money used for projects and programs

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FINANCIAL DISCLOSURES

Consolidated statements of activities (income statement)

Cumulative Community Benefits January 1997 through December 2017

CVRF has invested an average of $25 million into its communities each year since 2006!

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Cumulative Revenues

January 1997 through December 2017

CVRF has earned over $1.2 billion in our 20 years of operation. Our average annual revenue jumped considerably when we became an operator instead of leasing our quotas.


FINANCIAL DISCLOSURES

GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES DECEMBER 31, 2017

2017 Advertising

2,850

Bad Debt Expense

86,834

Bank & Finance Charges

93,508

Contract Labor

59,466

Computer & Software Expense

73,294

Depreciation Expense Donations & Contributions Drug Screening & Preemployment Expense Dues, Permits, Taxes & Licenses Employee Benefits Employee Education Assistance Freight Fuel Insurance Interest Expense Internet Fees

138,843 340 (2,814) 395,446 15,964 8,394 1,665 580,338 111,679

Meals & Food Expenses

52,976

Miscellaneous Expenses

3,843

Payroll

6,634,729

Penalties

168

Per Diem

129,733

Printing & Production Costs Professional Fees & Services Promotions Rental Expenses

21,017 977,429 637 9,759

Repairs & Maintenance

21,703

Supplies

98,038

Training

27,200

Transportation & Parking

22,369

Travel Expenses Utilities Total G&A Expenses

444,067 $10,009,475

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MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIRMAN

Looking to the Future: A message from the Chairman

RICHARD JUNG CVRF BOARD CHAIRMAN NAPAKIAK

I WISH I COULD LIVE TO BE 150 YEARS OLD, SO I COULD SEE THE DREAM FULFILLED: CVRF GROWING LARGER, DOING BETTER AND EMPLOYING MORE OF OUR RICHARD JUNG RESIDENTS” CVRF BOARD CHAIRMAN NAPAKIAK

Serving on the board of CVRF for the last ten years, I have had the chance to watch this company grow and to learn so much during my tenure here. When I started, I only understood fishing from my experience living in Napakiak – go out and put your net in the water, get your fish, sell it, take your money and go do what you want. The Bering Sea industrial fishery is so much more competitive, complicated and political than I could have imagined – I had to shift my thinking from the simplicities of catching fish to the politics of quotas and allocations. CVRF gained independence in the Bering Sea back in 2010, when we took an enormous risk and cashed out our ownership in American Seafoods in exchange for a fleet. With this step into the unknown, we had the opportunity to gain control of decision-making and corporate spending, and to drive more money into our villages. We did it. We now own a fleet of six beautiful ships. They are ours and we were the first CDQ group to do it. We should be proud that we have achieved the dream of economic independence. But, there is so much more to do. Our dream has always been to grow. We gained independence with our ships, and now we need to gain additional quota and earn more money to acquire more ships. This will bring more jobs and workforce development opportunities to our communities. As we grow bigger, things will get better for the residents in our villages, as long as we are thoughtful and wise in how we grow. Growing bigger as a company means creating more jobs. Those jobs exist in our member communities, in our corporate offices, and at sea. Seeing more of our residents succeeding in jobs on our vessels is a part of the dream that motivates me. But, members of our communities must want the jobs and be ready to take them. These at-sea jobs involve being away from home for extended periods, hard work, long days and discipline. Our programs, like Ciuneq and Youth to Work, are preparing young people with the skills and understanding they need to take these atsea jobs and other types of employment, now and in the future. So, it is imperative for CVRF to get larger and do better. In order to grow, CVRF must gain access to more fish. The clear route to more fish is equitable CDQ allocations. Only when our communities are treated fairly and equitably will CVRF be able to do even more for its residents. You can help by demanding fair treatment from the Alaska congressional delegation. Most importantly, you can help by going out and voting your conscience. As long as I serve as the Board Chairman, I intend to fight for fair treatment of the people of the Coastal Villages region. CVRF will not stop advocating for fair and equitable CDQ allocations and we will not stop sharing information about the imbalanced allocations with our residents and the public. I know that these shifts toward enhanced corporate growth and increased financial security for residents of our region will take time – maybe 20 or 30 years, maybe more. But we must all keep our eye on the horizon and push forward to achieve our dreams and help our friends, family and neighbors achieve theirs. CVRF can support you in reaching your dreams with our programs and opportunities, but we can only help those who are willing to work hard to achieve their goals. We strive to expose our youth to opportunities for career development, to do our part in developing the workforce, to support basic needs, and tirelessly inform our residents and the Alaska delegation about the real inequities in the CDQ program. With these persistent efforts, we will continue to improve our fleets, gain access to fish, and grow as a company. I wish I could live to be 150 years old, so I could see the dream fulfilled: CVRF growing larger, doing better and employing more of you - our residents.

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BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Community Elections Coastal Villages Region Fund’s Board of Directors is comprised of democratically elected representatives from each of our 20 member communities. Every two years, one-third of the Board members are up for elections in their respective communities. CVRF congratulates George Chuckwuk on his re-election, and is excited to welcome Carlie Beebe, Clarence Dull, Clement George, Jerry Ivon, Nicholai Steven, Sandra Tall-Lake and Albert Williams to the Board.

Board of Directors RICHARD JUNG

STEPHEN MAXIE, JR.

JOHN SAMUEL

GABRIEL OLICK

CHAIRMAN NAPAKIAK

VICE CHAIRMAN NAPASKIAK

SECRETARY PLATINUM

TREASURER TUNTUTULIAK

2016-2021

2014-2019

2014-2019

2014-2019

EVAN S. EVAN

DARREN CLEVELAND

LARSON HUNTER

EDWARD KINEGAK

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE GOODNEWS BAY

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE QUINHAGAK

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE SCAMMON BAY

CHEFORNAK

2016-2021

2014-2019

2016-2021

2016-2021

VACANT CHEVAK

CARLIE BEEBE

SANDRA TALL-LAKE

GEORGE CHUCKWUK

EEK

HOOPER BAY

KIPNUK

2016-2021

2018-2023

2018-2023

2018-2023

JERRY IVON

ROLAND LEWIS

ALBERT WILLIAMS

JOHN ANDY

KONGIGANAK

KWIGILLINGOK

MEKORYUK

NEWTOK

2018-2023

2014-2019

2017-2021

2014-2019

CLEMENT P. GEORGE

NICHOLAI STEVEN

CLARENCE DULL

PHILLIP KUSAYAK

NIGHTMUTE

OSCARVILLE

TOKSOOK BAY

TUNUNAK

2018-2021

2018-2023

2018-2023

2016-2019

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CVRF CAN SUPPORT OUR RESIDENTS IN REACHING THEIR DREAMS WITH OUR PROGRAMS AND OPPORTUNITIES, BUT WE CAN ONLY HELP THOSE WHO ARE WILLING TO WORK HARD TO ACHIEVE THEIR GOALS. WE STRIVE TO EXPOSE OUR YOUTH TO OPPORTUNITIES FOR CAREER DEVELOPMENT, TO DO OUR PART IN DEVELOPING THE WORKFORCE, TO SUPPORT BASIC NEEDS AND TIRELESSLY INFORM OUR RESIDENTS AND THE ALASKA DELEGATION ABOUT THE REAL INEQUITIES IN THE CDQ PROGRAM.” RICHARD JUNG CVRF BOARD CHAIRMAN NAPAKIAK

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Anchorage Interns in Seattle, after a tour of the Northern Hawk: Isaiah Charles, Kayla Kugtsun, Katie Kashatok and Peter Romer.

Follow us on our Facebook account to see highlights from around our region and our company. Every week you can expect to see highlights which may include community-based or Anchorage employees, scholarship recipients, interns and Youth to Work participants, photos from other programs, and news from our region. Our YouTube account highlights videos about our company and our programs. www.facebook.com/CoastalVillagesRegionFund/ youtube.com/user/coastalvillages1

711 H St. #200 Anchorage, AK 99501

Profile for Coastal Villages Region Fund

2017 Annual Report  

2017 Annual Report  

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