Page 1

portfolio kirsten wong


CONTENTS

4

la luna

10

duality

16

a place to dream

22

viggsรถ cabin

26

coolbox


L A LUNA University of Washington, Winter 2019 A studio for a photographer located on Ballard Ave that includes both a space for the photographer to create his photos as well as spaces for him to display his works. In designing this studio, I was greatly inspired by photographer Hiroshi Sugimoto’s Theatres series and how it reminded me of Moonlight, the design was centred around creating a space that represented the forces of Moonlight. Its softness, subtlety, and strength. The translucent skin that wraps around most of the features in this design is highly integral in creating an experience of soft light in the building as well as in showing the direction of the pull of light. It was also utilised with the intention of having it be a physical representation of light itself.

4


trouts initial study models exploring forces in the space 1/16”=1’-0” scale materials: c-flute cardboard, trace paper, binding wire 1/16”=1’-0” site model materials: c-flute cardboard models: 100% hand-crafted

1/16”=1’-0” site model

5


gesture model initial study models exploring forces in the space 1/16”=1’-0” scale materials: c-flute cardboard, trace paper, binding wire 1/16”=1’-0” site model materials: c-flute cardboard models: 100% hand-crafted

6


final model 1/8”=1’-0” scale model materials: c-flute cardboard, e-flute cardboard, basswood, trace paper, binding wire 1/8”=1’-0” site model materials: c-flute cardboard models: 100% hand-crafted

6

3

1

5 4

2


1

2

3

4

5

6

8


DUALITY University of Washington, Fall 2018 This is an intervention located on a meadow in Discovery Park, Seattle. It emphasises the sense of duality present within the site created by the difference in spatial experience when standing on top of the hill vs. standing below the hill. The intervention serves as a place of refuge for visitors to the park, allowing them to camp overnight at the site. It begins with an open and elevated gathering space framed by wooden beams, reflecting that sense of exposure one would feel when standing at the top of the hill. The design then gradually transitions to a slightly more enlosed space that sits on the ground. This space is intended for people to work and prepare food. Eventually, users would travel even deeper into the intervention, where individual spaces of rest exist semi-underground.

10


process

d i a g r a m m at ic s ect ion

p a r ti d i a g rams

se c ti o n b b

initial circulation + for m stud y

section cc

section d d


floo r plan

s ect io n aa

0

4'

8' 12' 16'

32'


final model 1/8”=1’-0” scale model of intervention materials: c-flute cardboard, 3-dot chipboard, basswood 1/16”=1’-0” parti model of intervention materials: 1-dot chipboard, 3-dot chipboard, basswood models: 100% hand-crafted entourage: laser cut


1/8” =1’ 0 ” m o d e l

1 / 1 6 ”= 1 ’0 ” parti m o del

14


A PL ACE TO DRE AM University of Washington, Winter 2018 Dreams provide a disconnection from reality. In order to achieve this disconnection, the design provides a distorting spatial experience for individuals as they navigate through the space. The amount of distortion experienced gradually increases as one moves further up the space, relating back to how we gradually transition deeper into our sleep, allowing us to dream. This gradual increase and decrease in distortion also helps individuals to better cope transitioning away from or back into the outside world. The use of mirrors in the space further help to distort visual senses by providing individuals with unexpected views. The confusion experienced relates back to how dreams tend to confuse us. Furthermore, the centrepoint of this design is a physical representation of the distorting experience dreams provide. The structure also sits disconnected from the rest of the site on its own little hill which separates it from the rest of the grander landscape by a ravine, reinforcing this idea of detachment. This design is thus the embodiment of the experience of dreaming itself.

16


process

parti of main space

parti of path

form study sketch

pathway experience study sketches

initial study models


dream collages ESCAPE

--:--

photo collage on what dream means to me it means endless possibilities, an escape from reality and an expression of self. programme(s) used: adobe photoshop cs6

SLP

0:00:00

3d collage on dreams surrealism. memory of dreams are mostly fuzzy and they hold so much endless possibilities. each dream is open to interpretation on what it could signify. materials used: trace paper, coloured paper, hot press white cardboard, mirror

18


final design

perspective sequence of pathways


floor plan N

reflection from mirror brings exterior in, but shows back view rather than front view


VIGGSÖ CABIN University of Washington, Fall 2018 Precedent study carried out on Arrhov-Frick’s Viggsö Cabin. Their design of this Swedish summer cabin is centred around a strong focus on its transition from an outdoor to an indoor space. This is done by having each third of the house gradually increase in opacity as the house recedes back into the forested area. The use of light materials such as white corrugated metal for the roof and wood for the structure serve to amplify this expression. In opening up the last third of the house, its spatial boundaries have really been extended to the surrounding landscape, creating an open concept that utilises the landscape as a view and slowly integrating that to the interior space. This gradual transition also serves to bring the building and the landscape together as a whole. Keeping in mind these details about Viggsö Cabin, my groupmates and I then recreated it as a 1/2”=1’-0” scale model as well as a 1/16”=1’-0” scale parti model. Groupmates: Alondra Pulido, Dylan Miller, Justin Luu, Kirsten Wong 22


final model 1/2”=1’-0” scale model materials: c-flute cardboard, basswood, grafting paper group members: alondra pulido, dylan miller, justin luu, kirsten wong 1/16”=1’-0” scale parti model materials: c-flute cardboard, basswood, grafting paper, card stock paper group members: justin luu, kirsten wong models: 100% hand-crafted


1/2” =1’ 0 ” m o d e l

1 / 1 6 ”= 1 ’0 ” parti m o del

24


COOLBOX University of Washington, Winter 2019 A “cool” box that is able to open fast and in a cool way. It is able to contain a model of a slide, 3 11”x17” PDFs folded up, as well as a USB. The design of this coolbox is very closely tied to home – Singapore. It was inspired by food carts that were commonly used in Singapore in the 1960s. Back then, selling food on the streets was illegal and thus food vendors needed carts that were able to close quickly, allowing them to make a quick escape when the police showed up. The design of the slide is also reminiscent of Singapore in that it is modelled after the iconic Dragon Playground. Many iconic playgrounds in Singapore have been torn down due to the lack of use, sparking nostalgic sentiments within the hearts of many Singaporeans, spurring the need to preserve this playground (and our culture). Thus, this Dragon Playground was registered as a national heritage icon.

26


final model materials: e-flute cardboard process: modelled using rhinoceros 6, 100% laser cut, glued by hand

27


instructions 1. Lift lid 2. Flip base over 3. PDFs stored under the base 4. Park Vignette is revealed 5. USB pocket at the back


THANK YOU kirsten wong +65 9027 9972 +1 (626) 679-0568 kirstenwongkaiqin@gmail.com

Profile for Kirsten Wong

Architecture Portfolio | April 2019  

Architecture Portfolio | April 2019  

Advertisement