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2020

VO L U M E 3 4


For generations

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I s it possible to feel nostalgic the first time you visit a place? K I A W A H

G E T S

Y O U

A Curated Collection of Homes and Homesites with Club Memberships Available.

kiawahisland.com/legends | 866.554.2924


I T’S A L L I N T H E D E TA I L S

Coordinating Design and Construction of some of the nicest homes on Kiawah for 20+ years.

SC American Institute of Architecture – Award Winner

8 Rhett’s Bluff - Robert Mills Residential Design Award / Merit Architecture by: Anderson Studio of Architecture and Design

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26 CLU B M EM BER PROFI L E S T H A D D E U S & T I F FA N I J O N E S S T E P H A N & C H A R LOT T E Z AC H A R K I W

30 CR EEK FISHING A meander through the marshland around Ocean Park in search of South Carolina’s favorite fish

40 SONGS A BOU T T H E SOU T H L A N D

94

More than any other genre, Southern rock inspires a deep nostalgia and sense of place.

40

58 SU MMER AT THE BE ACH CLU B Sandy feet, icy cocktails, and sunsets that last forever: The rituals that define summer

66 ISL A N D I NSPI R AT ION A visit to Club Member Carey Benham’s art studio in Ocean Park sparks an appreciation for Kiawah’s pristine natural environment.

74 A PL AY ER’S GU I DE TO T H E OCE A N COU R SE Hole-by-hole notes and tips on Pete Dye’s seminal course, site of the 2012 and upcoming 2021 PGA Championships

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C H A R L E S TO N C H A R LO T T E World Class Living

The Mark of Distinction in World Class Home Building™ Charleston (843) 801.1600 Charlotte (704) 889.1600 www.kingswoodhomes.com


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94 DA NC E R S I N T H E DE E P A keystone species in the Lowcountry, the Kiawah dolphin pod captures our hearts and imaginations.

102 F ROM T H E B AT E AU T O THE BA RGE A fascinating history of Lowcountry transportation before the bridges and causeways connected the Sea Islands

112 L OWC OU N T RY DI V E S Offbeat, gritty, and oh-so-cheap: A guide to the Lowcountry’s seven best dive bars

140 K I AWA H T H R O U G H THE LENS Kiawah Island Club Members capture the secret magic of the Lowcountry. Congratulations to our 2019 contest winners!

58 G O OD WOR K S : F R I E N D S OF THE MUNI | 120 INSI DER’S COR N ER : BOB RU M M E L & C Y N T H I A NOBL E | 126 O N & A B O U T K I AWA H | 1 4 4 EN D NOTE | 154

ON THE COVER: Club Member Chris Black f ly fishes near Penny Creek.

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Born In London Enjoyed Around The World Est. 1992

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E X E C U T I V E E D I TO R & D E S I G N

C O N T R I B U TO R S

Hailey Wist

Christine Mitchell Adams Seth Amos Christina Rae Butler Joel Caldwell Stephanie Hunt Bryan Hunter Olivia Rae James Johnathan McGinty Lauren Rust Blake Shorter Lindsey Shorter Charlotte Zacharkiw

C O P Y E D I TO R

Sunny Gray P H OTO E D I TO R

Nathan Durfee

SPECIAL THANKS

Amy Anderson Bert Atkinson Carey Benham Chris Black Jack Case Taylor Clarkson Will Culp Lucinda Detrich Adam Donevant

Janet Edbrooke Peter Frank Edwards Karen Emmons Elliot Hillock Thaddeus Jones Tiffani Jones Kimball Kraus Kevin LaFountain Leonard Long

Celeste Marceca Jennifer McCormick Patrick Melton Brittany Nelson Josh Nissenboim Cynthia Noble Patrick O’Brien Amy Pastre

Mark Permar Jordan Phillips Chris Randolph Helen Rice Dylan Rose Courtney Rowson Darius Rucker Bob Rummel Chuck Schaffer

Chris Shope Kim Souza Blake Suarez Jerrod Wilkins Stephen Youngner Charlotte Zacharkiw Stephan Zacharkiw Aaron Zych

Kiawah Island Legends is a publication of Kiawah Island Publishing, Inc., an affiliate of Kiawah Island Real Estate. Copyright 2020. All rights reserved in all countries. Contents may not be reproduced in any manner without the written permission of Kiawah Island Publishing, Inc. Kiawah Island Publishing, Inc. does not necessarily agree with the viewpoints expressed by authors of articles or advertising copy.

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Contributors

Visiting some of Charleston’s legendary dive bars felt like reuniting for a weekend trip with old friends from college. BL A K E SHORT E R |

WRITER

Blake Shorter is a writer, musician, and aspiring intermediate-level tennis player with a deeply stubborn curiosity and a knack for getting lost in used-book shops. As part of the collaborative project Extra Hands, his writing has been featured by UK travel magazine Lodestars Anthology and the analog photography journal Teeth Magazine.

OLI V I A R A E JA MES |

P H OTO G R A P H E R

Olivia Rae James is a lifestyle and wedding photographer. Born and raised in Nashville, she has called Charleston home for more than a decade. She has been recognized by Harper’s Bazaar and Condé Nast BRIDES as one of the top wedding photographers in the world. She is known for her warm and timeless photos. Carey’s studio overlooking the marsh is a little slice of heaven, and you can clearly see what inspires the magic of her paintings!

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ST E PH A N I E H U N T |

WRITER

Writer Stephanie Hunt, a North Carolina native, has called Charleston home for the last twenty-five years. She’s a regular contributor to Veranda, Coastal Living, and Charleston Magazine. She’s an avid cyclist and board member for Charleston Moves, board president of the IBU Foundation, and she hosts a radio show on WOHM 96.3, Charleston’s nonprofit commercial station. I’m fortunate to paddleboard alongside dolphins quite regularly. But I never fail to be awestruck by their gentle-yet-powerful grace.

L I N D SE Y SHORT E R |

PH OTOG R APH ER

Lindsey Harris Shorter is a travel and lifestyle photographer from Charleston, SC, with work featured in national and international publications like Domino, Garden & Gun, and Lodestars Anthology. Recent photography projects have included road trips through France and Switzerland and a seven-week journey along the American West Coast. The Beach Club in the middle of July is like some kind of childhood dream. I found a shady spot in the corner to take it all in, and I could’ve lounged there all day.


Contributors

SETH A MOS |

CHRISTINA R A E BUTLER |

WRITER

Born and raised in the Lowcountry, Seth Amos now lives and writes in Brooklyn. He is cofounder of Rivet: The Journal of Writing That Risks and served as its poetry editor. His work has appeared in Tin House, Talisman, and others. His one-act play “The Hunt” debuted in July 2018 at HB Studio in New York City. I have always admired the music of the South, not for its virtuosos and technical precision but for the consistent reflection of the grit and fortitude of the individual in a specific time and place.

Christina R. Butler is a professor at the American College of the Building Arts and an adjunct professor at the College of Charleston and owns Butler Preservation L.C., which specializes in historic property research. She is the author of Ansonborough: From Birth to Rebirth and Lowcountry at High Tide: A History of Flooding, Drainage, and Land Reclamation in Charleston. I so enjoyed writing about the rhythms of transportation in the Lowcountry. One can almost feel the tides as a ferry floats along toward Charleston across the Cooper River.

It was a pleasure being out in the marsh with Chris and Elliot, two fishermen who understand and value the salt marsh ecosystem. When done well, fly fishing is beautiful to behold, the perfect marriage of physical finesse and applied knowledge. JOE L C A L DW E L L |

W R I T E R & P H OTO G R A P H E R

Joel Caldwell is an expedition photographer and writer living in New York City. He tells localized conservation and environmental justice stories from around the world. He has been published in Modern Huntsman, National Geographic Voices, Patagonia’s The Cleanest Line, Far Ride Magazine, and many others.

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WRITER

LAUREN RUST |

P H OTO G R A P H E R

Lauren Rust is a marine biologist and executive director of the Lowcountry Marine Mammal Network. After eighteen years of working with marine mammals across the globe, she’s brought her love and expertise of dolphins back to the Lowcountry. I’m fortunate to have spent a lot of time photographing dolphins. The photographs not only allow us to identify individual animals but also to use them as a great educational resource for protecting these amazing creatures.


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EDITOR’S LETTER

As we enter a new decade, we continue to refine our vision for the future of Kiawah Island. In particular, we are thrilled to announce new neighborhoods in Ocean Park as the community gears up for the 2021 PGA Championship at The Ocean Course. Thank you for your readership and we look forward to seeing you on the Island soon! PATRICK, WILL, JORDA N, A ND CHRIS | SOUTH STREET PARTNERS

FRIENDSHIP IS PRECIOUS, NOT ONLY IN THE SHADE, BUT IN THE SUNSHINE OF LIFE. — THOMAS JEFFERSON

Club Members often tell me they chose Kiawah because nowhere else compares. It is a magic mix, they say, of quiet but not too quiet, luxury without pretension, and unrivaled natural beauty. They praise the legendary golf courses, the award-winning chefs, the robust conservation efforts. But most of all, they speak of community— their neighbors and golf buddies, the fellow enthusiasts in their book club, birding group, or art class.

In the making of this issue, I had countless conversations about this very topic. Kiawah seems to give people the freedom to explore a quieter and more truthful part of themselves, and the friendships forged here have a particular honesty and ease. Sifting through photos for Summer at the Beach Club, I was struck by the simple fact that year after year families are growing up together, intertwined by lifelong friendships and important memories.

I am so grateful to tell these stories. Here’s to friendship and community—and to another decade on this sweet Sea Island!

HAILEY WIST

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Club Members

TIFFANI & THADDEUS JONES

From

CHARLOTTE, NC

Q

Where are you from?

Q

Tell me about buying your home.

A

Thaddeus: We live in Charlotte, NC. I’m originally from Mississippi and Tiffani is from Michigan.

A

Q

What do you do?

A

Thaddeus: I work for a tech company in Seattle, which requires a lot of travel. Tiffani: I am an OB/GYN.

Thaddeus: We actually purchased our home from a neighbor two streets over from us in Charlotte. Small world! Our [Kiawah] neighborhood was built to fit within the landscape, so it feels undisturbed. I actually joined our neighborhood board association. All our neighbors are extremely friendly.

Q

What do summers look like for you guys?

A

Tiffani: We come a lot in the summer, and the kids just want to be at the Beach Club. They run into friends from school or familiar faces from Charlotte. We have also met several new families who we enjoy connecting with when we are on the Island together. Thaddeus: For me, Kiawah becomes home base with direct flights to Seattle for my work. I enjoy getting out to play golf. We ride bikes with the kids. Recently, Greyson and I took a canoe from Cassique down the river, watched dolphins, and then collected seashells on the beach. That was a really great time, just the two of us.

Q

Talk to me about the future.

A

Tiffani: We just want to be here more often, to see our kids grow up here through the years. Thaddeus: We want Kiawah to be a place our kids return to. We want them to feel comfortable coming back here with their own kids, to pass down their memories. And at some point, we’d like to be here more permanently. We’ve got a little bit to go on that, (laughs) but we see it on the horizon.

Q

What kind of people do you think Kiawah attracts?

A

Tiffani: Who doesn’t it attract? Kiawah has something for everybody. There are so many different kinds of people here with a common goal to relax and enjoy nature. Thaddeus: We’ve brought several friends to the Island, and two of our close friends are in the process of purchasing a home. It’s just going to continue to improve the inclusiveness of the Island.

Q

It’s all about the quality of the community.

A

Thaddeus: Yes, the Island strikes the right balance between luxury and relaxation. And the people we know are looking for the same when they come here.

Q

What drew you to Kiawah?

A

Tiffani: We felt like things were moving too fast, and the kids were getting bigger each day. We wanted to capture memories and slow down. Several friends and colleagues talked about Kiawah. We came down for the first time about six or seven years ago. We were shocked by the beauty.

Q

What made it different?

A

Tiffani: The mossy oak tree-lined drive onto the island never gets old. The beaches, golfing, bike rides, and tennis—it is amazing. Each year we would take a trip to the Caribbean and Aruba, but the kids would rather come to Kiawah! I was like, Okay, let’s pay attention to this. Thaddeus: Personally, I’m still shocked that Barbara and Lorraine [at the B-Liner] know everyone’s name. It’s mind-blowing that they can remember. That’s the extra component. Every time we bring friends down and go out to dinner, they walk away saying, Wow, I’ve never had a dining experience like that.

Q

But your first impression was the natural beauty?

A

Thaddeus: Absolutely. I mean that’s what draws you to Kiawah, right? As soon as you come through the gates you feel like you’re in another world. You almost feel the stress start to leave when you drive in. I can completely unplug from my day-to-day when I’m here.

Q

What do you think your kids love about the Island?

A

Thaddeus: I was always outdoors as a kid—riding bikes, going fishing. Kiawah has that atmosphere—with the addition of other things our kids like to do, like playing golf and tennis. We notice they seem to bond more when we are on Kiawah, and that’s priceless. Tiffani: The kids unplug from their devices when we’re here. They love the camps and the GoKiawah program. There’s so much for them to do. Pictured here with Gavyn and Greyson

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Club Members

CHARLOTTE & STEPHAN ZACHARKIW

Q

How did you two meet?

A

Stephan: I’m originally from Wilmington, Delaware. Charlotte: And I’m from Baltimore, Maryland. We were both just out of college and in our first jobs. We met and the rest is history.

From

CHARLESTON , S C

airy. And we feel really lucky because we’re on a tidal creek. There is this tree overhanging the creek that the

Q

How did you make your way south?

A

Stephan: Eighty-five inches of snow in 2009. It was crazy. Charlotte came home one day and said, What are we doing here?

Q

kids can walk on and use as a makeshift dock. They can fish from it, and we drop our canoe from there. Steph takes the kids out at high tide to drop crab traps and explore. It is a magical way for the kids to grow up.

Q

What is your daily routine?

A

Charlotte: It’s totally magical. We kayak, we ride bikes. We live on a quiet cul-de-sac, so the kids are always on bikes. We are very close to Night Heron Park, which is so special.

And you had spent time on Kiawah previously?

We can just zip over there and go to the Nature Center. We

A

go to the Friday night concert at Freshfields, the hermit

Stephan: We both vacationed here with our respective families as kids. My uncle has lived on the Island since the early ’90s. I would come down for spring breaks to visit. I had just gotten into golf. I remember losing a lot of golf balls at Oak Point. I played a lot of golf! Charlotte: I came as a child too. We would drive from Maryland, and I distinctly remember the excitement of the last stretch down Bohicket Road, blaring Paul Simon and singing along with my parents. I still do that to this day, so maybe my kids will have a similar memory!

Q

Tell me about your social life here.

Q

What brought you back as adults?

A

Stephan: We’ve met great friends from all over the country.

A

Stephan: Charlotte’s brother went to the College of Charleston, so we visited a lot when he was in school. The week of his graduation we went to visit my company’s Charleston office. Charlotte: The manager told Steph there was an open office. I remember walking outside, looking at the harbor, and saying, Yeah, let’s do it. We’ve never looked back.

crab races at Bohicket—we do it all! Stephan: Every morning, Graham and I get up early and go on a nature adventure. We go get breakfast and then look for as many animals as we can find. We keep a count of the alligators, dolphins, and birds we see. It’s our daily routine, just the two of us.

Everyone has the same frame of mind while they’re here. Charlotte: We’ve made a lot of friends through the kids. There’s a good crew of people who move to Kiawah for the whole summer, so we are always here with those same people. And we’re always at the Beach Club.

Q

What an incredible childhood!

A

Charlotte: There really is a sense of freedom here. The

Q

Have you always had your sights set on Kiawah?

A

Stephan: We started with a villa at Turtle Cove in 2011. Then we had a baby and a dog and just needed a bit more space. We started looking for a home in 2012. Charlotte: We really fell in love with Kiawah while we were living in the villa. But we committed when we bought the house and joined the Club.

kids can bike and play on their own. And the connection

Tell me about your house.

he said he could do it on his own. So he kayaked from

Q

to nature is very special for us. We’re always talking about the animals and their habitats. It does feel like it’s a world away, so peaceful and quiet. Stephan: This morning Graham kayaked in his own kayak for the first time. We went out looking for stingrays, and the dock to the ocean all by himself. We use the Cassique

A

Charlotte: We completely renovated it, made it bright and

boathouse all summer. We love it.

Pictured here with Henry, Graham, and Lucie

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29


CREEK FISHING STORY and PHOTOGRAPHY by JOEL CALDWELL


I

M E ET

CHRIS

BLACK

AND

K I AWA H

I S L A N D C L U B C A P TA I N E L L I O T H I L L O C K AT

THE

OCEAN

PA R K

DOCK

AROUND

TWO IN THE AFTERNOON . When I arrive, Chris is sitting comfortably on the poling

Egrets and herons stare impassively from private docks as

platform of his Hewes 18’ flats boat, feet dangling, country

we motor out Bass Creek towards the Stono River. Black

music drifting out across the water. Hailing from Houston,

and Hillock fall into talking fish, clearly a shared favorite

Black has been coming to the Lowcountry since he was a

subject. The afternoon fall light has the marsh grass ablaze,

teenager. In the late 2000s, he bought property on Kiawah’s

and I’m just warm enough to still be comfortable as Hillock

River Course and became a Club Member. It wasn’t until 2015

accelerates the boat, flattening out at speed. A wide diversity

that Black and his wife began building a home in Ocean Park,

of Lowcountry birds are on display. Scanning the deep blue

just a few houses down from the dock.

sky, Captain Hillock points out two roseate spoonbills, pink

Now in his fifties, Black has the energy of someone much

and white, long-necked, winging their way south.

younger. He greets me with a wide smile as I make my way

We’ve set out in search of redfish, “low tide creek fishing”

along the dock. A few minutes later, Captain Hillock’s truck

as Captain Hillock calls it, working the oyster bars up around

swings into view. Parking, he grabs his boots from the back

the mouth of Penny Creek. Reds chase crab and shrimp into

and walks towards us quickly. I’ve had the pleasure of going

the oyster beds at low tide and we, in turn, chase them.

out on the water with Hillock before, and we briefly catch up

However, we soon realize we aren’t the only species higher

while Black unties ropes and we push away from the dock.

up the food chain chasing fish at low tide. Coming around a

Within moments we’re underway.

bend, I’m confronted by a sight I’m unlikely to soon forget,

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THE

PENDULAR

SWISH

OF

LINE

AND THE ZUZZ AND CLICKS OF THE WHIRLING

REEL.

L ETT I N G

LINE

O U T, B L A C K E X P E R T LY F L I C K S T H E F LY M E R E I N C H E S F R O M S H O R E .

one that Kiawah Island has become famous for. A tangle of

better position against the current. All is quiet but for Black’s

dolphins heave and roll along the sandy shore, appearing

line and reel and the faint sound of water lapping the boat.

from a distance like drunken sunbathers, feeding on mullet

“When they get in really skinny like that, slurping shrimp

they’ve skillfully managed to herd out of the water and onto

and hiding from the dolphins, we call it belly crawling,”

the beach. Moments before, they had launched their bodies—

Hillock whispers down from his perch on the platform.

some weighing as much as five hundred pounds—out of the

Movement catches my eye near the shore’s edge, amongst the

water and onto the shore in a feeding frenzy. It’s over in a

oyster beds. Was that a fin? Black has selected a light, shrimp-

flash.

patterned fly. Its lightness makes it harder to control in the

Hillock kills the engine and we drift towards the mouth

wind, but in the shallow water a heavy fly can make too big

of Penny Creek. Sandy Point, the easterly tip of Kiawah

of a splash, spooking the fish. (“I know that from personal

Island, is in the near distance. “You see that tailfin, Chris?”

history,” Black says with a laugh.)

Hillock hisses to his partner. In response, Black grabs his

And that’s the real art form of fly fishing—having both the

rod and climbs up onto the casting platform. Soon, the air

knowledge of the fish species to understand their changing

above comes alive with the familiar sounds of fly fishing:

diet and the skill to mimic what’s going on in the environment

the pendular swish of line and the zuzz and clicks of the

around them. The goal is to sneak the bait in. But there’s more

whirling reel. Letting line out, Black expertly flicks the fly

to it than just picking the right fly. “It’s about the strip,” Black

mere inches from shore. Behind me, Hillock climbs onto

tells me. The way the fisherman manipulates the fly through

the poling platform and expertly maneuvers the boat into a

the water matters. “Every crustacean does something a little

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35


M AT U R E R E D F I S H , K N O W N A S “ B U L L R E D S ,”

CAN

GR OW

TO

MASSIVE

PR OP ORTIONS, THE L AR GEST EVER CAU G H T T O P P I N G N I N ET Y P O U N D S.

different. If you don’t get the perfect drift on that thing,

moment of spasmodic action and Black sets the hook—the

they’ll pass on it because there’s so much food around them

fight is on. I hear the whining protest of the reel as line is

to choose from.”

played out, followed by the more methodical, slower reeling

Redfish have many names. Officially the red drum, its

in. Black skillfully plays the fish for a few minutes from his

aliases include puppy drum, spottail bass, channel bass, or

elevated position in the bow of the boat, rod craning like

simply, red. And designations vary by region. Renowned for

the necks of so many marsh birds we’ve seen this afternoon.

their fight—“diesel-powered stripers, lots of low-end torque,”

Patiently, Black works the red to the edge of the boat. Hillock

as one afficionado puts it—redfish are found in the Atlantic

is there to help haul the iridescent, reddish-silver, white-

from Massachusetts to Florida, as well as in the Gulf of

bellied fish up out of the water. The two men admire the

Mexico from Florida to northern Mexico. These prized game

catch, pose for a photograph. At twenty-six inches it’s too big

fish have a certain mystique, inspiring poetic descriptors and

to keep, and Black expertly removes the hook, releasing the

fanciful legend. One of my favorite redfish fishing accounts

beauty back into the brackish water.

included the line, “The red ate the fly like an alligator eating

Though most commonly a reddish-bronze, redfish range from a deep blackish-coppery color to nearly all silver. Their

a blackbird.” A flurry of action at the mouth of the creek quiets all

most distinguishing mark is a large black spot on the upper

conversation. “Get it, Chris,” Hillock murmurs as Black makes

tail known as the “false eye.” Each fish can have dozens of

another precision cast, fly gently landing amidst the recently

these spots. Scientists believe that the false eye may help trick

disturbed water. “Eat it,” Hillock urges under his breath. A

predators into attacking the red drum’s tail instead of

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its head. Additionally, immature redfish can have a blue tail,

away from everything,” he says. “There are very few spots

indicating they are feeding. Capable of living sixty years,

on the island where you can get this,” he says, gesturing to

redfish spawn during late summer and into fall along barrier

the pristine marsh floating by to each side. “We looked for

island beaches and inlets. Males produce a “drumming”

five years. I had to have a dock and wanted the home to

sound by vibrating the swim bladder to attract females.

have expansive views.” He goes on to detail a combination of

Immature reds grow up near marsh areas and estuaries,

access to the water and wide open spaces where the family

before schooling up and becoming migratory around the age

plays touch football each Thanksgiving. When I ask Black

of fifteen. Mature redfish, known as “bull reds,” can grow to

what makes fishing here so special, he shakes his head as if

massive proportions, the largest ever caught topping ninety

he can’t believe his luck. “Kiawah is just so undisturbed, no

pounds.

pressure in the estuary. Makes it really fun to fish,” he tells

“Having Chris up there throwing is a guide’s dream,” Captain Hillock confides in me as we get back underway. It’s

me, before adding with a rueful smile, “but that’s our secret, so don’t tell anybody.”

slack tide now and we’ll hit one more spot before heading in.

With that, Black grabs his rod and climbs back up into

The marsh flashes by and I close my eyes, enjoying the wind

the bow of the boat. He balances agilely on the platform,

on my face as we wind up the river. “We’re about to get super

silhouetted by the sun, surrounded by marsh. Captain Hillock

skinny,” Hillock warns, ducking the boat into a tiny creek and

continues to push up the tiny feeder creek, no wider than a

killing the motor.

two-lane road. I close my eyes again. I hear the slap of the

As Hillock returns to the platform, poling us around

water on the side of the boat, the click of the reel, and the call

sandbars up the increasingly shallow creek, I talk to Black

of distant birds. A fisherman’s paradise, an outdoorsman’s

about living in Ocean Park. “It’s just wilder out here, a little

dream. — J.C.

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© Neal Preston | Heart of Gold Gallery


SONGS SOUTHL AND AB OUT THE

WORDS by SETH AMOS


Smokestack, fatback, many miles of railroad track All night radio keep on runnin’ through your rock ‘n’ roll soul All-night diners keep you awake on a black coffee and a hard roll -JAMES BROWN

Music is as important to the Southern soul as hot biscuits. And more so than any other region of the United States, the music of the South inspires a sense of place—it’s as much about rhythm and lyrics as it is about attitude and locale. Whether it’s B.B. King, Johnny Cash, or The Allman Brothers Band, the essence of this music lies in where it comes from. With its blistering-yet-catchy guitar licks and soulful, albeit lawless, lyrics, it’s no surprise that Southern rock has received such long-standing acclaim. “Sweet Home Alabama” most wholly achieves a clear-cut message of, well, home. It has become more than a song. It is essentially a heavy hymn. It conjures both a wildness and a reverence in its listeners. By the time those famous first four notes are picked, people are whooping and hollering and raising their glasses. It’s almost Pentecostal. (I could easily devolve here into a debate about whether Lynyrd Skynyrd or The Allman Brothers Band is the quintessential Southern rock band, but I won’t.)

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© David Corio @david.corio | Heart of Gold Gallery

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© David Corio @david.corio | Heart of Gold Gallery

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I said, oh / Lord, what can a poor boy do? Yes, it’s bad when you can’t make no money/ And your woman turns her back on you -B.B. KING

The archetypes and stories speak to us more than any one band or artist. The roots of Southern music are anchored in despair, struggle, love, devotion, rebellion, and salvation. And these motifs speak to our collective human suffering. Southern musicians have a deep well of soul (and souls) to inspire them. They frequently pull from gospel, blues, folk, country, jazz, rhythm and blues, soul, hymns, and spirituals, and can endlessly craft music that evokes Sunday service as much as cheating women and back-door men. Music evolves over time. Instruments and recording equipment improve. Social and political climates change. The energy changes. But the melody and message stay the same, bringing us closer to making sense of it all, and, if not, helping us to dance or cry in the meantime.

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Well I’m Southbound, baby / Lord, I’m comin’ home to you / I got that old lonesome feelin’ that’s sometimes called the blues -THE ALLMAN BROTHERS

B.B. King’s “Chains and Things” gets at the heart of the tradition of Southern music, the heart of the blues. It reminds us that life is struggle, and that it is the grit of the human spirit that creates art. In short, he makes the grit beautiful. Southern rock feels like you’re on the way to somewhere. Point of departure and destination unknown. Wandering can itself be a place. It’s about the urge to move, to inhabit the space between destinations. Not only are we on the run with The Allman Brothers Band when we listen to “Midnight Rider,” but we are also on dark country roads where the Spanish moss hangs like ghosts and headlights hint at strangers. These artists embody a deep and rich and honest tradition. The late Harlan Howard said country music was “three chords and the truth.” I don’t think it wrong to apply this sentiment to all Southern roots music. Its honesty carries us along.

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© Amalie R. Rothschild | Heart of Gold Gallery

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© Joel Bernstein | Heart of Gold Gallery

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I rolled on as the sky grew dark / I put the pedal down to make some time / There’s something good waitin’ down this road. -TOM PETTY

The music of the South is the music of the ramblin’ man. It is the music of the individual stuck in a place and time, lamenting the present and hopeful of the future. It is the music of the grit and resilience of the human spirit. It is the music of the runaway, the renegade, the prodigal. It celebrates our rebellious nature when presented with seemingly insurmountable obstacles. And we love it. Nestled within the Old Village of Mt. Pleasant, SC, Heart of Gold Gallery is an independent fine art gallery that curates and showcases lifestyle and portrait photography captured from the 1950s through present day. The gallery works directly with legendary photographers to deliver photographs derived from original negatives. From the iconic to the intimate, each image in the collection speaks to the soul.

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K iawah Is Isla lannd

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Kiawah Island – Freshfields Village

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S U M M E R AT T H E BEACH CLUB PHOTOGRAPHY by LINDSEY SHORTER and CHARLOTTE ZACHARKIW


F OR OV E R T W E N T Y Y E A R S , T H E BE AC H C LU B H A S HO S T E D A 4T H OF J U LY PA R T Y. Throughout the years, the daytime party has become rooted in a set of reliable traditions. Kids dive for nearly $800 in coins at the bottom of the pool in the frenzied coin toss. Adults do the same for canned beer and mini bottles in the beverage toss. Someone from the staff sings The Star Spangled Banner as F-16s fly over. At the end of the day, everyone gathers, sunburned and sandy, for a watermelon eating contest. It’s the stuff of family tradition, the rituals of summer, the sharp, pure memories of childhood.

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MOM E N T S OF S UC H S W E E T S IGN I F IC A NC E H AV E H A PPE N E D H E R E —T H E F I R S T BLUS H OF S U M M E R ROM A NC E , T H E E XC I T E M E N T OF N E RVOUS PR OP O S A L S , T H E JOY OF R AUC OUS W E DDI NG PA R T I E S . And that is to say nothing of the smaller, daily moments of significance. Countless children have learned to swim at the Beach Club pool, or learned how to surf, or discovered the great mystery of the tidal pools. Summer at the Beach Club captures the imagination, the essential tenor of summer.

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T H E BE AC H C LU B J US T F E E L S L I K E FA M I LY. It’s the kind of place where three generations can set up a home base from a pair of lounge chairs for the day and get lost in the slow and happy rhythm of summer. It’s comfortable, it’s flexible, and there’s something for everybody. And summer after summer, families reunite and build steadily on lifelong friendships. It is in this way that a community grows up together, creates a collective memory.

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ISLAND I N S P I R AT I O N A L O O K I N S I D E C L U B M E M B E R C A R E Y B E N H A M ’ S D R E A M Y O C E A N PA R K A R T S T U D I O

STO RY BY H AILE Y W I ST PH O TO G RAPH Y BY OL I V I A R A E JA ME S


T H E L AT E O C T O B E R M A R S H R E V E A L S I T S E L F S L O W LY. AT F I R S T G L A N C E , I T I S C O N T R A S T I N G S T R I AT I O N S O F G O L D A G A I N S T G R E E N , T H E PA L E B L U E O F T H E A U T U M N S K Y. But to the patient observer it comes alive—subtle hues of flax

still life is going to be like a Matisse. I’m just going to be playful

and mustard, splendid glints of ochre and peachy streaks of

with it,” she says, laughing. “I’m just not strict with myself

ecru. Stare longer still and, miraculously, the light refracting

anymore.”

off the grass and water flashes teal and purple. And this is

Benham and her husband, Doug, first visited Kiawah in

only in fall. Winter offers a subtle wash of vermilion and rust;

the mid-nineties, but it wasn’t until 2012 that the Lowcountry

summer glimmers a bright combustion of electric greens. And

really clicked. “I was sitting there one day, looking out and

that is to say nothing of the vast and ever-changing sky, the

thinking, Oh my gosh, this marsh is so beautiful. I could have

shifting green shade of the maritime forest.

a house on the marsh!” The Benhams purchased a double lot

Standing at her easel, Carey Benham makes quick,

in Ocean Park. Their property is on the leeward side of the

confident strokes, the stiff brush scratching the canvas in

island, an elevated rectangle of land that looks out over the

brilliant streaks of sky blue. For Benham art has always been

marsh, Bass Creek, and beyond to the Stono River and James

about color. Originally trained in pastels, she only shifted to

Island.

oils a few years ago. Her work is rich and layered, moody yet

They commissioned Keith Summerour out of Atlanta to

vibrant, studied but free. The few paintings I see are quite

build their home. They wanted something modern, boxy,

incredible, but Benham is modest and unpretentious about

and multileveled with big windows. But most of all, they

her work, lacking the ego and stringency of some long-

wanted the house to belong within the environment, to all

time artists. And perhaps that’s her secret. “In this one I’m

but disappear in the tans and greens of the marshside setting.

outlining—and you don’t usually outline! I thought, Okay this

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T H I S S T U D I O, T H E C A N O P Y O F L I V E O A K S , T H E L I G H T O N T H E S AW PA L M S A R E A L L A D E E P A N D F U N D A M E N TA L PA R T O F H E R P R O C E S S .

“We value these trees immensely. We wanted the house to

teacher really hit the mark. “She was a genius with pastels.

be part of the forest.” Sure enough, the wide entrance to the

She taught me to layer until it starts to vibrate with color.

house curves around a massive live oak, its branches winding

That’s what made me stick with it.” Indeed, some of Benham’s

over the roofline in a magnificent canopy.

early pastels have the depth of oil paintings, rich with color.

But set apart from the house and nestled deep into the saw

As she and Doug spend more and more time on the Island,

palms and wax myrtles sits Benham’s studio. It is an artist’s

she can no longer commit to consistent classes. But it seems to

dream: a bank of floor-to-ceiling windows looks out over the

work for her. “Just getting out here and doing it all the time—

marsh, a polished concrete floor gleams, and high ceilings set

that’s the learning curve,” she says. Watching her paint, it

off bright splashes of color. The space is immaculate. Benham

seems to me that Benham works on instinct, feeling around

likely tidied up for our visit, but I also get the sense she’s the

for paintings, colors, and scenes that excite her and simply

kind of artist who works methodically, everything in its right

giving it a try. And this beautifully uncomplicated process is

place.

what makes her work so damn good.

As she paints, I peruse the books on her shelves—names

The light has shifted in the studio, and Benham calls

like John Singer Sargent, Georges Braque, and Pierre Bonnard

it quits for the day. We stand gazing at the immense view.

jump out—and it’s clear Benham knows her stuff. “I majored

“You’ve got this beautiful green in the summer, and then it

in art history, and we’ve collected art for years. So I feel like

goes to a gorgeous gold in the fall,” she says, squinting out at

I know good art!” But she really draws personal inspiration

the marsh. “Do you see those hints of green going through it?

from Fauvism, the colorful work of German expressionism,

And earlier you saw a little bit more red! You can’t help but

a sweet spot somewhere between the bright hues of Ivon

look out and think, I’ve got to get this on a canvas. Every single

Hitchens and the moody depth of Louise Balaam. “I look at

color is out there.”

other artists online, and I know what I’m aiming for,” she says. “Sometimes I can’t achieve it! But I know what I like.” Benham started taking lessons in Atlanta, and one

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Benham isn’t working from a heady conception of what her paintings should look like—instead, she is deeply grounded in her natural settings, playing on the daily inspirations of


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this place. The half-finished painting on her easel now depicts the rangy dune grass behind the Ocean Course, where she runs her dogs in the evenings. Listening to her talk about the colors in the marsh, it’s clear this studio, the canopy of live oaks, and the light on the saw palms are all a deep and fundamental part of her process. Our

conversation

then

turns

to

conservation—

something Benham and her husband care deeply about. Since building their house, she has joined the board of the Kiawah Conservancy and plans to spend much of her time on the Island learning and growing in her role. “It’s a knowledgeable, dynamic group of people,” she says. “They make me want to do my part.” From our vantage point, we can see the Stono River disappearing into the vast horizon, pristine and unobstructed. A flock of ibis flies past, wings low across the marsh, heading east towards Folly Island. “Looking out at this view you realize the marsh needs to be protected, wildlife needs to be protected,” says Benham thoughtfully. “This Island is a gift, and we have to take care of it to the best of our ability.” — H.W.

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|

A PLAYER'S GUIDE TO THE OCEAN COURSE CO U RSE N OTES B Y STEPHEN YO UN GNER


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HOLE #1 Contradictory to his 'Dye-abolical' reputation, Pete Dye's courses often start with an easy hole to let players get off to a decent start. This hole features a wide fairway with a large, flat green. Water to the right of the green and sand at the front poses a bit of trouble, but if you can hit a decent drive and avoid the large sand area guarding the right side of the fairway, you are left with a shortiron approach. Don't be afraid to be aggressive! *Many players in the 2012 PGA Championship challenged the right side off the tee, shaving off even more yardage and leaving a very short approach to the green. This hole played as the easiest par four with a scoring average of 3.99.

hole #2 This par five requires both a strategic approach and careful execution. It may be tempting to take an aggressive line by cutting off the dogleg left and challenging the left side to allow for a shorter second. But the safer play is to stay right and leave yourself a slightly longer layup shot. And this layup shot also offers options due to a strategically placed cross hazard at 120 yards from the green. Some players lay up short of the hazard, leaving themselves a longer third, but some risk it and lay up over the hazard, leaving a much shorter third shot. Beware laying up too close, as the green slopes away and requires a well-struck third with spin to avoid running off the back. *With a few exceptions, players in the 2012 PGA Championship layed up off the tee with a 3-wood and tried to stay at the center left of the fairway, avoiding a downslope and trees on the right that block the second shot. This hole was also one of the easiest during the Championship with a scoring average of 4.8.

HOLE #3 Don't be fooled by this huge fairway. Keep your tee shot left. A distinct ridge bisects this fairway and balls left allow for a full view, making it much easier to hold the green from this angle. This is the most severe and smallest green on the course. A natural, flat sand dune was somewhat leveled to create the putting surface, and balls that end up in the surrounding collection areas pose a very difficult up and down. If the severity of the green complex isn't tricky enough, there is also a tree guarding the front of the green. The 'Rory' tree is so named because Rory McIlroy's tee shot in 2012 landed and stuck in one of the branches during the second round.This hole averaged just under par at a 3.99 score for the field.

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HoLe #4 This is definitely one of the most difficult holes on the course. It's quite long but a cross hazard proves to be a great equalizer.Most tee shots end up at somewhere between 160 and 200 yards from the green for all players (regardless of length off the tee or the tee played). The key is to avoid the marsh on both sides of the fairway and the sand to the right. Drive the ball as close to the cross hazard as possible to shorten the second shot. The green is protected on the right side by two deep sand areas and a massive hazard at the back. The front left of the green is fairly open, so the smart play is to land your second just short and allow it to run into the front left portion of the putting surface. *This hole played over par for the Championship at an average of 4.16 for the field. Many of the professionals used a 3-wood off the tee to ensure they hit the fairway.

HOLE #5 The first par three on the course! We also turn back to the west here after four eastward holes. This hole features a massive green-50 yards deep from front to back. The difference in pin location can change club selection by two, three, and sometimes even four clubs. If the hole is back left, aim for the middle front and a large ridge will feed the ball towards the hole. The front right location is much easier, and a straightforward shot should produce good results. Missing right should be a fairly easy up and down, but a short shot in the sand will be very difficult. This tee boasts one of the most beautiful vistas on the Island with breathtaking 270-degree views of ocean and marsh.

the third easiest par three *Despite playing into the wind, the fifth was average of 3.16. For the for the 2012 PGA at 188 yards and a scoringed to increase to 207. 2021 PGA Championship, the yardage is expect

HOle #6 A challenging and long par four awaits you at the sixth hole. You may be tempted to brave the sand guarding the left side, but there is no advantage in cutting this corner. The smart play is a tee shot aimed center right, leaving a mid-iron approach to a large green. Distance control is critical on your second shot. The green narrows in the middle and flattens towards the rear. The front portion of the green slopes towards the fairway. Due to the slope, your ball will not release if landing on the front. This makes it tough to get the ball all the way back to the hole.

in the 2012 Championship with *This was the seventh hardest holChae mpionship tee was extended a scoring average of 4.29. The for the 2021 PGA. another 10 yards in preparation

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hOle #7 The easiest par five on the course. Your tee shot line is critical here. Longer hitters can challenge a large sand area on the right side, either aiming just left of it or trying to carry it outright. If successful, the aggressive play leaves a reasonable chance to reach the green in two to make eagle or birdie. There is ample room left, however, and a draw still leaves the player an opportunity to get the ball close to the green for the third. The green is guarded by a deep collection area on the front right and sand to the left and rear. Misplay your third and you'll likely see your ball bounding over the green. It is paramount to spin the approach to keep the ball on the putting surface.

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HOLe #8

A fairly straightforward par three, this hole features a moderately small green that slopes away and to the right. When standing on the tee, the back right pin appears incredibly tight and narrow-but don't be fooled! The slope of the green will feed the ball back right. No need to challenge the hole, just play to the middle back and allow the slope to take the ball towards the hole. The front pin location appears tamer but is actually much more difficult. The steep slope guarding the front of the green prevents players from bouncing the ball onto the putting surface, so stopping the ball at the front of the green can be difficult, especially downwind. ree during *The eighth was the easiest par th a scoring the 2012 PGA, playing at 198 yards and average of 3.12. 80

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HOLE #9

HoLe #11

A long and difficult par four completes the front nine. The best line of play is right to left with a center-right placement. A good aiming point is an unreachable sandy area in the middle of the fairway. Position yourself for a mid- to long-iron approach into a fairly large but well-protected green. Pin location makes a big difference in the difficulty of the approach. A right hole location is guarded by a very deep collection area, along with a deep sandy hazard back right, so an up and down from the right of the green is very difficult. A back left pin brings the left sand areas into play, and it is not uncommon for approach shots to bound off the back left of this green. Once again, the smart play is to aim for the middle of the green. Don't challenge holes cut near the edges.

This hole is a dramatic, challenging par five, even for the best players in the world! A huge sand area to the right must be avoided at all costs. Again, Dye allows room off the tee if you keep the ball center left. Since the hole turns a bit right, you may be tempted to drive down the right side, but a miss to the right would be very penal.

*This hole played at a hearty 494 yards and into the wind during most of the 2012 PGA Championship. The hole has been lengthened for the 2021 PGA by 20 yards and is expected to play as long as 514 yards.

hole #10 The tenth borders Willett Pond on the right, and, depending on the tee, features a somewhat blind tee shot. The most prominent feature off the tee is a massive, deep sand area guarding the right side with a vertical grass and sand wall, daring players to clear it. However, the smart play is to keep the tee shot left center, leaving a slightly longer second but not risking the treacherous right side off the tee. The green sits lower than the fairway approach, so club selection is critical. The smallish green flows from back left to front right. A back left pin location is the toughest and front right is the easiest. A fairly straightforward second shot should deliver a good result, but distance control is critical on this somewhat diagonally shaped green.

This green is not usually reachable in two except for the longest hitters in downwind conditions. Thus, an accurate layup is critical. Within 100 yards of the green, the fairway gets very tight. Avoid the sand on the left side and the hazard to the right. A flat, elevated green is guarded on all sides by steep runoffs. In particular, avoid the left side or your ball could roll 20 to 30 yards into a deep, tight collection area. The right side is an easier up and down, but natural areas are pretty close and can result in some tricky lies. All in all, a fair test of golf here!

*The eleventh played to 593 yards during the 2012 Championship and was the hardest par five on the course at a scoring average of 5.06. This yardage may tempt longer hitters to try for the green in two, which will likely result in a lot of drama in 2021!

*The tenth played at 447 yards during the 2012 Championship. It was the third hardest hole with an average score of 4.35.

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HOLE #12 This is one of the widest fairways on the course. Sand areas left and right won't likely come into play but provide good depth perception. The correct play is center right off the tee with a downhill approach to the green. Some players use a 3-wood off the tee to avoid a downhill lie. Plus the fairway narrows quite a bit as you get closer to the green.This green is tucked into a canal on the right side. Play left or center-no need to challenge the hazard to the right. *In 2012, due to the location of the Championship tee, the hole payed forward at 412 yards. Two new tees were built in 2019 in preparation for the 2021 PGA Championship.

HOLE #13 A classic Pete Dye design and one of the toughest holes on the course! Dye tempts you to take the aggressive line down the right side-it is protected by a canal that looks even more menacing due to the very stark edge between fairway and hazard. Players need to decide how much of the hazard they want to carry. A more aggressive line leaves a much shorter approach. A conservative line will leave a long second to a well-guarded green. This may be one of the few situations where you should take a more aggressive line off the tee and avoid the long approach. Whichever line you choose, the green is very long and narrow. It spans 42 yards from front to back and is protected by sand at the front left and Ibis Pond to the right. The best miss is middle left. Play middle yardage even with a back pin location. Hitting this green in two shots is tough, and there is not a good miss, left or right. *The thirteenth was the most difficult hole of the 2012 PGA Championship. It played into the wind with a scoring average of 4.38. Despite his 8-shot winning margin, Rory McIlroy bogeyed the thirteenth twice and parred it twice. It played at a meaty 497 yards and is expected to play a similar yardage in 2021.

hOle #14 Perhaps the most beautiful hole on the course! This stunning par three begins a five-hole stretch that plays directly along the beach. The green is severe and exposed with massive collection areas to the right and behind. A miss right will roll 30 feet below the putting surface and prove to be a very difficult up and down. Sand and a very steep slope protect the left side. The green is quite large but due to the front rear slope, only the front portion is visible. A back left pin looks very intimidating but may actually be the easiest! Play to the center of the green here and hope for the best. *The fourteenth played at an astounding 238 yards in 2012. It was the fourth hardest hole overall and the most difficult par three.

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hoLe #15

A fairly straightforward par four, this hole borders the Atlantic Ocean on the right and features a wide fairway with natural dunes right and left. A good drive should leave a short-iron approach to a mid-size green. Avoid the sand left and you should have a good chance for birdie or par here. holes for the *The fifteenth was one of the easierscoring average Championship in 2012 and played to a from 444 to of 4.0. It was lengthened 22 yards should prove 466 yards for the 2021 Championship and to be a good test.

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HOLE #16

hOLe #18

The last par five on the course, the sixteenth begins a common Pete Dye pattern: a fairly easy par five, then a tough par three, followed by a very demanding par-four finishing hole. This hole has a huge fairway with little trouble, provided you avoid the dunes and the Atlantic to the right. Your layup must avoid a long sand area on the right and another, much deeper, sand area left and short of the green. Downwind this hole should provide a good chance for birdie.

With the Atlantic on your right and the Clubhouse in the distance, this is one of the most beautiful finishing holes in golf. This slight dogleg right is guarded by deep sand areas at the turn, so the ideal tee shot is center right. Longer players may carry the crest of the hill and reach the lower level with an aggressive line off the tee. Most players will face a long second from the top of the hill to a green protected by small, deep sand areas to the left. Missing right should allow a decent chance for an up and down. A miss left is much more penal.

*This hole played downwind for the PGA Championship in 2012 and had a scoring average of 4.78. It was the easiest hole on the course and provided a lot of drama with eagles, birdies, and players reaching the green in two shots. It is a great hole for players to make up a little ground with an aggressive, well-executed play.

hole #17

Although this final hole played downwind, it was still the second most difficult hole in the 2012 PGA Championship. Rory took advantage of the conditions during the final round and drove the ball to the bottom of the hill and hit a 9-iron into the 505-yard par four, making a 20-foot putt for birdie and securing the 8-shot victory with a final round of 66.

The most famous hole on the course and one of the most iconic par threes in the game. The green is technically 44-yards deep, but due to the angle of play from the tee and the overall shape of the green, you really only have about 12-18 yards to land the ball. If it's downwind, play to front or middle yardage and hope it stays on the green. Aim slightly right, as that allows for a bit more runoff. If into the wind, play to back yardage and aim towards the left portion of the green, reducing the carry distance from the tee. Either way, this is a tough shot, requiring not just skill but also mental strength to ignore the trouble and make a good swing under difficult conditions.

Good Luck!

" The tee shot is all carry over water, a very demanding par three and my favorite here. There are sea oaks and big dunes behind the green, which is almost a double green with a front and back landing area. There's a small bailout area to the left of the green with water right up to the front. The green will call for a variety of shots, depending upon the pin positions and wind." - Pete Dye 3 yards during the 22 o t ed ay pl le ho s hi T * and had a scoring ip sh on pi am Ch A PG 12 20 average of 3.31. L EG EN D S MAG AZIN E 20 20

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1988 Site Visit | Image Courtesy of Mark Permar

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R EM EM BER ING PETE DY E

E A R L I E R T H I S Y E A R , K I AWA H I S L A N D L O ST ON E

Dye faced. During the build, Hurricane Hugo crashed over

OF T H E A R C H I T E C T S OF I T S ST ORY.

the Lowcountry, punishing the site with destructive winds, torrential rainfall, and relentless surges from the sea.

Pete Dye, perhaps golf’s most revered course designer, passed

Dye wasn’t deterred. In the wake of the storm, he

away peacefully in January after a long battle with Alzheimer’s

bypassed closed roads by taking a boat to oversee work.

disease. Often working side by side with his beloved wife,

“When I first walked the land, I fell in love with the site,” he

Alice, another master of design, he fashioned some of the most

once said (dyedesigns.com). “This narrow, two-and-a-half-

beautiful courses around the world and played a vital role in

mile beachfront had beautiful ocean views on one side and

shaping the path of this place, crafting a seaside jewel beloved

vast saltwater marshes on the other. I would have bent down

by countless fans of the game.

on my knees and begged for the opportunity to build there.”

To understand the artistry behind Dye’s transformation of

The Ocean Course not only opened on time but also

rolling hills and open fields into grand cathedrals of golf, think

played host to three of the most thrilling days of golf in the

of William Faulkner exploring Southern Gothic storytelling or

storied game’s history. “The War On The Shore” captivated the

Bob Dylan using folk music to weave tales of justice and hope.

world, going down to the final putt as the U.S. team brought

He was a maestro, his mind and hands tasked with gently

home the Ryder Cup for the first time in six years.

molding the earth into some of the most renowned courses in the world. Crooked Stick in Indiana. The Stadium Course in Florida. Austin Country Club in Texas.

Crafting that rugged oceanfront landscape into The Ocean Course is a testament to Dye’s vision. Today, the course welcomes everyday golfers who seek to walk in the footsteps of the game’s legends. “In his genius, Pete Dye had the foresight

And, yes, The Ocean Course at Kiawah Island.

to build enough tees where the course could accommodate

It was perhaps this narrow stretch of sand and marsh that

the length we need for major championships without having

presented him with his greatest challenge. Not only did Dye

to make major changes at all,” said Stephen Youngner, head

have a mere fifty-five acres to work with, in 1989 he also was

professional at The Ocean Course.

tasked with creating a venue fit for the game’s most prestigious international showcase—the Ryder Cup.

Kiawah Island’s destiny is forever intertwined with Dye’s legacy. The Ocean Course stands as a living monument to his

He only had two years to do so, a timeline almost

brilliance, testing and rewarding all drawn to its grandeur.

unheard of in the industry. But that wasn’t the only obstacle

| Words by Johnathan McGinty

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C O U N T D O W N TO THE 2021 PGA CHAMPIONSHIP The 2012 PGA Championship represented the first time one

the 1991 Ryder Cup, which was held in late September.

of golf’s four major championships had been played in the

“In the practice rounds for the Ryder Cup, the wind was

state of South Carolina. And while The Ocean Course has

blowing out of the southwest, and we had players at No. 17

welcomed The Ryder Cup and other championship-level

hitting seven-irons and eight-irons into the par three,” he

events to its sun-soaked fairways and greens, playing host to

says. “On the first day of competitive play, however, the wind

one of the most renowned golf tournaments has initiated a

completely changed to a northeast wind, and those players

new chapter of excellence for one of the world’s great courses.

were having to hit three-woods on the same hole.”

As Kiawah Island eagerly awaits the return of the PGA

Weather aside, The Ocean Course presents enough of a

Championship in 2021, it’s worth noting the sequel will have

test that it can host a professional golf tournament with few,

a distinctly different feel. As part of an overhaul of the FedEx

if any, tweaks to the course setup. In fact, most of the planned

Cup Playoff schedule, the PGA TOUR shuffled its broader

changes to tee locations for next year have more to do with

tournament slate. That meant moving the PGA Championship,

facilitating a smooth flow for the galleries than adding

which traditionally had been played in August, to May. The

difficulty. As is, the course remains a formidable challenge

thunderstorms common in the Lowcountry summer won’t be

for the game’s best players.

as much of a factor, but that does mean players will have to

Those players will have to embrace a layout that has the

contend with a level of unpredictability they didn’t face in

feel of a traditional links course one might more regularly see

2012.

in Northern Europe. Indeed, a quick glance at the leaderboard

As spring transitions to summer, a series of fronts tend

from 2012 suggests who could benefit the most, with six

to sweep across the region, bringing with them fluctuations

players hailing from England, Ireland, Northern Ireland, or

in temperature and wind gusts coming from a variety of

Wales finishing in the Top 12.

directions. Stephen Youngner, head professional at The Ocean Course, says players should expect weather similar to

Words by Johnathan McGinty | Photo by Patrick O’Brien


Hale Irwin Hall of Fame Golfer 1991 Ryder Cup Champion The Ocean Course at Kiawah Island

Sally Irwin

FineMark is an integral part of our team. “Sally and I have had the good fortune to associate ourselves with a great team of trusted advisors over the years. FineMark is an integral part of that team. We are not just clients, we are also shareholders and feel very much part of the FineMark family.” Michael Drohan, President, Charleston Daniel Vroon, Market Executive Brantley Moody •

843-998-6400


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3000 Souther n Pi nes L ane, Kiawah Island , SC TimbersKiawah.com/L egends | 843. 371. 5177 This advertisement does not constitute an offer to sell nor the solicitation of an offer to purchase made in any jurisdiction nor made to residents of any jurisdiction, including New York, where registration is required and applicable registration requirements are not fully satisfied. Timbers Kiawah Acquisition Partner, LLC uses the Timbers Resort,® Timbers Collection® and certain other Timbers brand names under a limited non-transferable license in connection with the sales and marketing of the Timbers Kiawah Ocean Club & Residences (the “Project”). If this license is terminated or expires without renewal, the Project will no longer be identified with nor have any right to use the Timbers® marks and names. All renderings depicted in this advertisement are illustrative only and may be changed at any time. All rights reserved.

TIMBERS COLLECTION l Aspen l Bachelor Gulch l Cabo San Lucas l Jupiter l Kaua‘i l Kiawah Island l Maui l Napa l Scottsdale l Snowmass l Sonoma l Southern California l Steamboat l Tuscany l U.S. Virgin Islands l Vail


dancers in the deep S T ORY b y S T E PH A N I E H U N T PHO T O GR A PH Y b y L AU R E N RUS T


K I AWA H ’ S

W I N DI NG

WAT E RWAYS

ENTHR A LL

of meaning conveyed in a language that defied translation,”

I N T H E I R OW N R IGH T, S H I M M E R I NG R I BB ON S

writes Susan Casey in her book Voices of the Ocean. And

OF R I V E R S A N D T I DA L C R E E K S T H AT W E AV E

according to marine biologists, dolphins have plenty to tell us.

T H R OUGH T H E M A R S H , T H E S U N GL I N T I NG OF F

As apex predators, Atlantic bottlenose dolphins—the species

GE N T L E R I PPL E S .

native to Kiawah’s waters and our region’s most common marine mammal—are a sentinel species, which means they

Our eye is drawn here, to these alluring vistas where water

serve as a barometer and bellwether of the marine ecosystem

meets reed and opens to the sky. And then the surface breaks.

health. If toxins are present in the food chain, they show

A pearly gray being, slick and sleek, curls up from below,

up in dolphins, which is why national and local scientists

arching over and back down. A waterborne ballet. There’s the

and representatives of the South Carolina Department of

beast’s quick breath, then another deep dive. And our quick

Natural Resources (SCDNR) and the National Oceanic and

breath, too—a gasp of wonder. Even if we’ve seen dolphins a

Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) monitor and study the

million times, their surfacing elicits a shudder of awe.

local dolphin population.

Across cultures and across the centuries, dolphins have

In other words, we are connected with these creatures.

been revered as mysterious marvels. They are borderless,

Beyond the way their cuteness tugs at our heartstrings, their

aquatic ambassadors breaking through from the unseen

health is an indicator of our own. “As a sentinel species,

underwater world into ours. Swimmers of power and grace,

dolphins help gauge the overall health of our oceans. If wild

they command the depths as they command the air, arcing

dolphins aren’t doing well, it could also indicate future impacts

up with effortless finesse. Native Americans viewed them as

to ocean health and even our own health,” says Dr. Gregory

messengers of the Great Spirit, and the ancient Greeks revered

Bossart, Chief Veterinary Officer at Georgia Aquarium and part

them as an incarnation of Poseidon, god of the sea. Mythic

of a team that has done longitudinal studies of our Charleston-

and majestic, dolphins hold sway in our psyche as shamanic

area dolphins, every few years going out to tag and measure

guides, and they hold a seat in the heavens too, emblazoned

them and take blood samples. The scientists are looking for

across the night sky as the constellation Delphinus.

changes in their immune and endocrine systems, among other

It’s no surprise that humans feel such an affinity with these mammals. From Flipper’s rise to television fame in

things, and comparing data to that of captive dolphins, to see how changes in the environment impact dolphin health.

the 1960s, to today’s bucket-list tourists paying top dollar to

Indeed, we have our own resident dolphins, Charleston’s

“swim with the dolphins,” we crave connection with these

“estuarine stock,” as the NOAA Fisheries’ identifies them. The

remarkable creatures. With their perpetual smile, so coy and

Tursiops truncatus you see in the Kiawah River or surfing at

cute, and their penetrating eyes, dolphins seem to be on our

the beach are not just migratory dolphins “from off” popping

wavelength. We perceive them as friendly and knowing, as if

in to say hello. They are part of our local population of three

they have something to tell us us, some secret of the deep to

hundred or so that live year-round in Lowcountry waters,

share.

where five rivers and a large harbor all lead to the Atlantic,

“Their whistles and clicks and squeals seemed to me like a liquid symphony, a communiqué from another realm, a galaxy

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and our marshes, inlets, and waterways make for optimal feeding and breeding grounds.


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M Y T H IC A N D M A J E S T IC , D OL PH I N S HOL D S WAY I N OU R P S YC H E A S SH A M A N IC GU I DE S , A N D T H E Y HOL D A S E AT I N T H E H E AV E N S T O O, E M BL A Z ON E D AC R O S S T H E N IGH T S K Y A S T H E C ON S T E L L AT ION DE L PH I N US .

And they are a special lot. Some of the dolphins off Kiawah

People who approach the dolphins on the shore or in a

display a rare and dramatic trick called strand feeding.

boat, hoping to get a close-up photo, can disturb and stress the

“Kiawah is one of the few places in the world where dolphins

animals. “Strand-feeding dolphins might leave instead of feed,

are known to strand feed, which is a unique learned behavior,

which then impacts their daily energy budget—the amount of

taught by mothers to their offspring,” says Lauren Rust,

energy they allocate for feeding, traveling, and resting,” Rust

executive director of the Lowcountry Marine Mammal

explains. And if eager onlookers interrupt their feeding, the

Network (LMMN), a nonprofit that protects marine mammals

dolphins might break the generational transmission of this

through science, education, and outreach. When dolphins

clever learned behavior.

strand feed, they work together to herd mullet or other small

Rust’s work to study and protect the strand feeding

fish, and then, in a meticulously choreographed split second,

dolphins is supported by a grant from the Town of Kiawah

they create a wave with a flip of their powerful tails to wash

Island and carried out with the assistance of trained

the fish on shore. Sometimes these dolphins will even tail slap

volunteers who patrol the waterway between Kiawah and

to stun the fish first. Then they hoist their 400-pound bodies

Seabrook, making sure people understand the law and respect

on to the riverbank to eat their catch.

the animals. “We’re a bridge between the hard-core scientists

It’s a stunning show, to be sure, but this unique feeding

and the community, trying to create awareness about issues

strategy is actually quite risky. “Dolphins expend a great

facing marine mammals,” says Rust. In addition to taking

deal of energy to secure this food source, and they make

notes and photo-identifying resident dolphins, Rust and her

themselves vulnerable,” Rust explains. Which is why one of

team approach beachgoers to create awareness and reduce

LMMN’s chief initiatives is educating the public about keeping

incidents of human interaction.

their distance, which is not just polite respect of wildlife, but

To ensure Kiawah will always have a resident population

federal law. The Marine Mammal Protection Act (passed in

of such mesmerizing, captivating creatures we must care for

1972 to protect dolphins, manatees, polar bears, seals, sea

the ones we have—to give them room, to keep their waters

lions, sea otters, walruses, and whales) requires that people

clean and healthy, and to listen for that wondrous damp

and boaters stay at least fifty yards away from wild dolphins

exhale rising from below, and bask in their glory. — S.H.

in the water and keep at least ten yards distance from shore.

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FROM THE

BATE AU BA RGE TO THE

A H ISTORY OF LOWCOU N TRY TR A NSPORTATION STORY by CH R ISTINA R A E BUTLER


B E FO R E

CA R S

AND

MODERN

H I G H WAYS,

L OWCOU N T RY

RESIDENTS TRAVELED BY CARRIAGE DOWN THE FEW HIGHA N D - D RY PAT H S T H R OUG H T H E I S L A N D M A R S H E S. B U T M O R E C O M M O NLY, THEY R ELI ED ON PR I VATE B OATS A N D FERRIES. BEE’S, PARKER’S, CLEMENT’S, AND GIVHANS FERRIES RECALL E A R LY F E R RY O P E R AT O R S W H O H E L P E D C O N N E CT T H E I S L A N D S TO CHARLESTON AND TO THE GREATER LOWCOUNTRY.

Native American tribes created the earliest roads in South

notoriously treacherous and marred by deep ruts and

Carolina, likely animal trails or river banks that transitioned

shabby bridges that made carriage travel unpleasant at best

into more traveled trade paths. In the colonial days, there

and nearly impossible in a deluge. The highway connected

were few roads to link the Sea Islands and inland plantations

Charleston with Savannah to the south and Wilmington

to Charleston and the coast, and those thoroughfares that

to the north and was later expanded to connect all of the

did exist were rough and subject to flooding. In 1698

eastern seaboard colonies after 1750. Historian William

the colonial government passed “an act for making and

Brockington notes that it began as a series of disjointed

mending the highways and paths, and for cutting of creek

Native American trails that were widened and regularized

and water courses,” which established a Commission of

by English colonists. Much of King Street passed through

High Roads for each parish, with commissioners to create

long stretches of wilderness, and the trek by horse, foot,

and maintain roads and keep river channels clear. They

carriage, or stagecoach would have been a desolate one. As

tasked local property owners (whose enslaved people did

the road neared Charleston, it became better maintained

most of the work) to create bridges and plantation roads. In

and more densely traveled. King Street entered Charleston

1714 the legislature passed another act for building roads

on a high ridge of land (by Lowcountry standards) and was

and bridges because residents complained, “for want of

the main high path into town. Shops, hotels, and taverns

convenient bridges, they are greatly interrupted in their

lined King Street from the earliest days of the city, and it

communication with adjacent parts, and are kept from the

remains the shopping hub of the city today.

worship of God and attendance of musters and alarms.”

Stagecoaches were a popular way to travel by land,

Most roads remained unpaved and poorly maintained,

and support towns or crossroads cropped up along the

however, and traveling by carriage or dray (a horse-drawn

King’s Highway and other main thoroughfares to supply

cart for transporting goods) from Mount Pleasant, Johns

fresh horses, overnight accommodations, food, and drink.

Island, or colonial Dorchester town (near present-day

“Mile house” taverns were positioned every two miles or

Summerville) might have taken a day or more.

so on the Charleston Neck (today’s North Charleston) for

King Street, or the King’s High Road, was the principal path into Charleston, although some sections were

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travelers to rest their horses and enjoy refreshments.


P R E V IOU S S P R E A D : A V I E W OF C H A R L E S T OW N T H E C A PI TA L OF S OU T H C A R OL I N A , N E W YOR K P U B L IC L I B R A R Y | T H E C OL ON I A L C I T Y I S B U S T L I N G W I T H A C T I V I T Y. S E V E R A L C H U R C H E S , T H E F OR T I F I E D S E AWA L L , A N D T H E E A R L I E R E XC H A N G E B U I L DI N G A R E V I S I B L E ON T H E HOR I Z ON . A B OV E : T H E C O T T ON WAG ON B Y W I L L I A M A I K E N WA L K E R | A L A T E N I N E T E E N T H - C E N T U RY DE PIC T ION OF A WAG ON ON I T S WA Y F R OM A C H A R L E S T ON PL A N TAT ION T O M A R K E T

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105


PA S S E N GE R S ON S T R AW B E R RY F E R RY | B E R K E L E Y C OU N T Y PHO T O G R A PH C OL L E C T ION , S OU T H C A R OL I N I A N A L I B R A R Y, U N I V E R S I T Y OF S OU T H C A R OL I N A

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A “ WA T E R T A X I ” C I R C A 1 9 0 0 . T WO M E N R OW A N D O N E M A N S T H E T I L L E R T O S T E E R T H E B OA T T H R OU G H T H E S H A L L OW T I DA L C R E E K S | I M AG E C OU R T E S Y OF T H E C H A R L E S T ON M U S E U M , C H A R L E S T ON , S OU T H C A R OL I N A

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S T E A M E R L A N DI N G , M AG N O L I A - ON -T H E - A S H L E Y, C I R C A 1 9 0 0 -1 910 | T H E S E C OM F OR TA B L E A N D MODE R N S T E A M B OA T S C OU L D RU N AT W I L L A N D W E R E L E S S R E L I A N T ON T H E T I DE S F OR P OW E R T H A N E A R L I E R R OW B OA T S .

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In a community surrounded by water, traveling by

goods, animals, and even carriages down the rivers and

creek and river was often the most popular option from

between towns. Passengers would gather at the landings

the colonial era into the twentieth century. Maritime

to leave either on demand (when the tide allowed) or at

transportation, however, left residents at the mercy of the

set intervals. Operators used the toll fees to maintain the

tides, which determined not only the rate of travel but

ferry fleet and turn a profit. Small shops, taverns, and inns

when it was possible to travel downstream or upstream.

cropped up near the landings, and some became small

Even nineteenth-century steam-powered ferries had to

communities in their own right. Mile houses were often

wait until the tide filled the Lowcountry creeks so their

affiliated with a ferry landing, where passengers could

hulls would not ground in the thick pluff mud that lined

float in and then take a stagecoach or carriage the rest of

the coastal waterways.

the way into town.

Travelers by boat had to weave through an intricate

Ferries connected Charleston to James and Johns

maze of winding tidal creeks and coastal rivers on an

Islands, East Cooper (Mount Pleasant and Awendaw),

“inner passage” from plantation to town. Planters tasked

Wadmalaw Island, Point of Pines Plantation on Edisto

their enslaved laborers to dig “cuts” through the marshes

Island, West Ashley, Dorchester town, and various

to connect waterways that were naturally separated from

communities in Colleton and Georgetown. William Watson

each other. New Cut linked Wadmalaw River with the

operated the first ferry to link the Cooper and Wando

Stono; Watts Cut connected South Edisto to the Dawhoo

Rivers to Charleston in 1733. By the American Revolution,

River; and Wappoo Cut linked the Stono and Ashley Rivers

Andrew Hibben’s ferry service operated from near Shem

via Wappoo Creek.

Initiated in the colonial era, these

Creek and the Old Village to bring travelers to town. By

man-made cuts made the journey from country to town

1787 the City of Charleston constructed a proper ferry

much shorter, and they provided a safer trek than sailing

landing near the foot of today’s Market Streets.

the coast.

Historian Nic Butler explains that passenger ferries might have been simple canoes or long rowboats, while “horse boats” with flat bottoms, a wider deck, and larger

Privately owned ferries operating with public franchise licenses became one of the most common means of transportation from the 1730s until the rise of the auto in the early twentieth century. Ferries carried people,

oars were used to ferry horses, carriages, cattle, sheep, and hogs. Andrew Hibben had enslaved men to operate and row his ferries for him, which was probably common practice throughout the slave-majority Lowcountry. Butler

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notes that by the 1820s, “The newest propulsion technology

to town. Strong tides and formidable sandbars at the mouth

on the Cooper River was a recent invention called the

of the harbor made this a difficult feat prior to modern

‘team boat.’ By using a pair of horses walking on a circular

dredging, and mariners would have had to be intimately

treadmill, a team boat converted literal horse power into

familiar with the tides to navigate the harbor successfully.

mechanical energy that propelled a pair of side-mounted paddle wheels. Even after James Hibben’s ferry and others moved into the steam age, both Milton Ferry and Clement’s Ferry continued to use team boats well into the 1830s.” In the antebellum era and into the later nineteenth century, steam ferries operated in the midst of towline ferries and more primitive horse-powered boats.

The slow demise of the ferry system began with the advent of rail travel, but most residents still relied on water transportation until the modern highway system and the rise of the automobile. People saw the appeal of driving at will (any time of the day and with no concern for the tide) in a private car, and in 1917 the new state highway department began to pave and improve earlier dirt roads

A quick look at architect Robert Mills’s Atlas of the State of

and to construct modern bridges for car travel. Elizabeth

South Carolina (Charleston District) from the 1820s shows

Stringfellow notes that “in 1918 the main road on Edisto

that Kiawah was an isolated Sea Island with no direct road

was straightened, with new bridges, and the island was

access to speak of, in part because the island at that time

connected with the mainland for the first time . . . . by the

was comprised of just a few plantations and no towns.

end of the 1920s, the ferries were gone. The traffic of ferries

If the Vanderhorsts (who owned half of Kiawah) wished

and steamboats diminished and primary transportation

to travel to Charleston by land, they would have had to

moved on wheeled vehicles over land and bridges.”

travel west to Seabrook Island, where there was a road

A water taxi still operates several times a day between

near William Seabrook’s plantation that meandered inland

Mount Pleasant and three stops on the Cooper River side

across Wadmalaw and Johns Islands. They likely would

of Charleston, and it offers a beautiful and relaxing way

have traveled by water instead, boarding a plantation boat

to get to the city. Convenience of cars aside, traffic in the

in the Stono River and heading northward, then cutting

Lowcountry is increasing as new residents flock to the

east toward Charleston via Wappoo Creek, in today’s West

region for its weather and beauty. Perhaps the time has

Ashley area. The last option, which was faster but more

come to renew our ferry lines and reconnect with the

treacherous, was to take a boat along the coast from

historic rhythms of the tides! — C.B.

Kiawah, past Folly Beach, and into the Charleston Harbor

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F E R RY T E R M I NA L B E H I N D T H E C U S T O M HOU S E | F R A N C I S R OB B PHO T O G R A PH A L BU M , H I S T OR IC C H A R L E S T ON F OU N DA T ION A R C H I V E S

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LOWCOUNTRY DIVES PH O T O GRA PH Y by LIND S EY S H O RT E R W RIT T EN by BL A K E S H O RT E R


BOW E NS ISL A N D OPEN: 5 PM | CLOSED SUNDAY & MONDAY

Half a mile down a sandy dead-end road, there’s a halfcentury-old oyster shack that seafood aficionados and thirsty pilgrims journey to every evening at five o’clock. The byword at this legendary hangout, coined by the family matriarch May Bowen, is that “people either like it, or they don’t.” Tuesday through Saturday, a line of eager visitors with sunburnt shoulders and leathery-skinned locals snake up the ramp to the entrance, where a big chalkboard displays the daily menu. Head inside for a rotating selection of seasonal beers from Charleston-area breweries, like the Westbrook Lemon Cucumber Gose, before claiming a place at the end of the queue. With a bucket of steamed oysters on the wraparound deck overlooking the passing sailboats and surfacing dolphins, you might prove Grandma May wrong: Bowens Island is impossible not to like.

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T H E ROYA L A M ER ICA N OPEN: 11 AM | OPEN EVERY DAY

At the bottleneck of the peninsula, nestled up to the railroad tracks, this rusty dive has its own gravitational pull. Once a building that housed an iron forge, now a second home to everyone from bankers to bikers, music scene die-hards to creative freelancers, the wrought-iron railings and tin roof of the open-air patio offer an all-weather haven where the post-work crowd mingles and the cheap beer flows. Owner/manager John Kenney keeps the tiny bar-adjacent stage packed with a well-curated schedule of traveling and local bands, and it’s not uncommon to stumble into a soldout show on a Tuesday night. Order the Chicken Cutlet sandwich, sneakily one of the best around in a city known for fried chicken, and wash it down with a Signature Rum Punch served in a stadium-sized souvenir cup.

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SA LT Y M I K E ’S OPEN: 3 PM | 11 AM ON SUNDAYS

With its weather-beaten facade and concrete floors worn smooth by the soles of thousands of flip-flops, this watering hole is the superlative of a coastal dive. Big garage-style doors stay open, and the hush of the marsh and low hum of boat engines on the Ashley River accompany the rhythm and blues on the radio, the crack of the billiards table, and the clinking of glass bottles on the wooden bar top. The City Marina is next door, which makes the laid-back atmosphere of Salty Mike’s a fitting end to a long day on the water. Sit on the patio that overlooks spartina grass and palmetto trees and order the lemony, rich housemade crab dip with Captain’s Wafers and an easy-drinking lager. Or cozy up to the bar for a gin & tonic and listen to the oldtimers swap stories about the one that got away.

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T H E GR I F FON OPEN: 11 AM | OPEN EVERY DAY

The Griffon is the sort of place where you lose track of time. Just far enough off of the bustling corridor of East Bay Street and just around the corner from the iconic Pineapple Fountain—a symbol of hospitality and welcome—this cozy pub beckons to passersby. Inside, dollar bills autographed with the names of patrons canvas every square inch of available real estate, rustling in the breeze whenever the heavy wood doors swing open. The selection of beers on tap covers all the bases, from refreshingly tart ciders to fullbodied stouts, and features a who’s who of favorites from some of the city’s celebrated local breweries, like COAST’s bitter-green HopArt pale ale and a floral wheat ale from Edmund’s Oast. Paired with the hearty, well-executed pub fare, it’s no wonder this dive is an old-town legend.

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PA L ACE HOT E L OPEN: 11 AM | 4 PM ON SUNDAYS

This eclectic hangout on Charleston’s Eastside is selfadmittedly “neither a palace, nor a hotel.” From the street, the unassuming entrance of the apartment-style building belies the enchantment of its festive, neon-tinged interior, with nautical-striped walls and campy decor. There are arcade games to discover in a half-hidden back room, and metallic pink flamingo yard art embellishes the covered back patio. The lengthy cocktail list is playful and inventive, and the food menu is full of swanky takes on classic bar favorites, like an Angus beef hot dog with an herbaceous cilantro and mint relish. Stop in for the Monday night brunch, live bluegrass music, and a spicy Bloody Mary. The thought of a luxury dive bar may seem like a paradox, but it makes perfect sense at the Palace Hotel.

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T H E W R ECK OF T H E R ICH A R D & CH A R L EN E OPEN: 5 PM | CLOSED ON SUNDAYS

The combination of screened-in maritime kitsch, paper plates loaded with some of the freshest seafood in town, and the smell of saltwater and pluff mud floating in from Shem Creek make “the Wreck” a Lowcountry institution. The nondescript building, tucked in between two creekside seafood purveyors, is easy to miss, which is part of its rugged charm. There’s a four-generations-old secret recipe for deviled crab, safeguarded by the Shaffer family who still prepare the dish for the restaurant. And the combination of just-fried shrimp and hominy cakes, accompanied by a Salted Lime Lager from local Palmetto Brewing Co., is too simple and too effective to change. Come early for dinner and take a drink out to the sun-faded dock to see the returning shrimp boats and the fleet of hungry pelicans trailing in their wakes.

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Photography by Lindsey Shorter | Story by Johnathan McGinty

GOOD WORKS

FRIENDS OF THE MUNI


GOOD WORKS

Kiawah Island Club Members make up the majority of the golfers playing in today’s Texas scramble.

It’s a chilly fall day in the Lowcountry and just about perfect

Members make up the majority of the golfers playing in

conditions on the Cassique Golf Course. The mood feels

today’s Texas scramble—although Darius Rucker and Bill

festive and relaxed as foursomes gather in the midmorning

Murray have also joined the mix. So it’s an easy-going

sun for the Friends of the Muni charity golf tournament.

atmosphere with the sole goal of having fun for a cause. “The

Bert Atkinson moves from group to group, shaking hands

Kiawah community is very generous,” says Atkinson. “They

and chatting. As the chairman of Friends of the Muni,

see their contribution as building on the future of golf, and

Atkinson is helping to marshal support for the restoration of

they recognize how important the Muni is.”

a Lowcountry jewel, the Charleston Municipal Golf Course,

The legacy of the Muni is as timeless as the Stono River

affectionately known as the Muni to locals. And today’s

snaking along its boundaries. The classic-style golf course

inaugural tournament marks another important step toward

is accessible to all who wish to play it. Golf was growing in

the realization of a dream.

popularity across the region in the late 1920s, though, at the

Atkinson, a former assistant professional at Kiawah Island, is more than familiar with the beloved golf course.

time, it was a sport that could only be enjoyed by wealthier members of private clubs along the coast.

A member of the South Carolina Golf Hall of Fame, he’s

Recognizing the need for a public golf course, the

captured seven Charleston City Amateur crowns as well as

Charleston City Council partnered with philanthropic

four Senior City titles, and many of those victories have come

members of these private clubs in a campaign to open the

at the Muni. Yet his love for the course goes far beyond the

game up to more people. The Muni was built on James Island

success he’s experienced there.

on 120 acres donated to the City by C. Bissell Jenkins, who

“The Muni is truly a melting pot of golf in Charleston,

had specified the property only be used as a municipal course.

and you can meet people from A to Z over there. I just learned

Since 1929 the Muni has weathered a changing

to love it over the years and want to give something back to

Charleston, from launching a series of youth programs after

golf and to the golf course,” he says.

World War II focused on growing the game to navigating

After a few short announcements from Atkinson, the

desegregation in the early 1960s after a group of brave

groups tee off around eleven o’clock. Kiawah Island Club

African-American men successfully petitioned the Charleston

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The Winning Foursome | Brook Confort, Gina Zangrillo, Katy Goodrich, and Anne Long

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GOOD WORKS

That same philanthropic spirit that led to the founding of the Muni many years ago now drives its makeover.

City Council to establish it as the only desegregated public or

expand the ponds that buffer the course from the river, using

private golf course in the state.

the excavated material to raise the fairways three to four feet

Throughout its ninety-year history, the Muni has

in some spots.

experienced its share of wear and tear. While the average

Additionally, they will restore the greens to their original

golf course hosts twenty to thirty thousand rounds a year, the

size and reconfigure the tee boxes to accommodate the high

Muni endures more than fifty-five thousand rounds. From the

volume of play. They will rebuild and relocate the bunkers

constant foot traffic to the impact of countless golf swings,

across the course to reflect the evolution of the game,

this overplaying has taken its toll.

equipping the Muni as a challenging test for golfers of various

And the Lowcountry’s day-to-day shifting landscape

skill.

adds to the impact. With each passing tide, the Stono River

“It’s what we in the golf business would call pure golf

swells and spills into surrounding marshlands, creeping ever

because there’s no other real estate around it,” says Leonard

so closer to a steadily sinking course. The deluges common

Long, one of the original developers of Kiawah Island and a

in the warm, damp spring and summer months inundate the

member of the Friends of the Muni. “It’s always nice to find a

course with even more water.

jewel like the Muni that can be brought back to life—where we

“The Muni is closed a lot because it’s so darn wet,”

can bring back an atmosphere that is free of distractions.”

says Atkinson. “Some of those holes along the river are just

That same philanthropic spirit that led to the founding

unplayable for weeks on end. We want to fix the drainage

of the Muni many years ago now drives its makeover. As the

problems the course is dealing with.”

tournament wraps up, the winning foursome high-fives on

That job falls to Troy Miller, head of Miller Golf Design.

the back lawn at the Clubhouse and everyone enjoys cocktails

Miller, a Charleston native, began his career working at

in the fading late afternoon light. Last night’s auction and

Kiawah Island’s Ocean Course. Early on, he advocated for the

today’s tournament raised more than $190,000, pushing the

renovation of the Muni, and it’s his job to restore the course

organization closer to its $1.5 million goal and the ultimate

to its prime playing condition. To do so, his team aims to

mission of restoring the Muni to its former glory.

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Insider’s Corner When Bob Rummel moved to Kiawah in the late seventies, he felt like he had landed in paradise. After over forty years as a sales executive for Kiawah Island Real Estate, work still feels like play and Rummel can’t wait to see what the future holds. Street Partners are doing an amazing job, maintaining the quality of this place, keeping the beauty of it intact.

KL

Where are you from?

BR

I was born and raised in a little town in Southwestern Wisconsin—a cheesehead!

KL

Tell me about selling real estate in the early days.

KL

How did you find your way south?

BR

BR

A friend of mine told me about Kiawah when the Kuwaitis first bought it. He saw an article in The Wall Street Journal. I was in Wisconsin selling real estate. The day I came down for my interview it was fifteen below in Wisconsin and seventy degrees on Kiawah. I guess they felt sorry for me because I had icicles on my ears. The rest is history.

Back then everything was done by a draw. We would have fifty buyers for twenty lots, and we would literally draw names out of a hat. It’s certainly not that way now! (laughs) That’s how big the demand was. We only released a small number of lots. And we’ve continued to do that. The owners wanted to develop the Island slowly. It has always been about the long-term vision.

KL

What kind of people do you think Kiawah attracts?

BR

It’s certainly a group that appreciates the natural beauty of the Island. I talk to people from all around the world, and they’ve never, ever seen anything like this before. And look around! It’s hard to describe this beauty. Everywhere you look is pristine.

KL

You must love your job.

BR

I don’t know how many people you’ve found at the same job for forty-two years, if that’s any indication. Living and breathing this every day is amazing. And I meet wonderful clientele from around the world.

KL

What have been some highlights?

BR

It has been incredible to see the golf events over the years. I don’t know of another place that can say they’ve hosted the World Cup, the PGA Championship, and the Ryder Cup matches. And now the PGA comes back again. And who knows what the future holds!

.

KL

I bet you wanted that job!

BR

(laughs) Yeah! It was one of those lucky opportunities. It has always felt like a privilege to be here.

KL

How long ago was this?

BR

Forty-two years. I started working here in February of 1978.

KL

What were your first impressions?

BR

At that time, the only paved road was the one from Bohicket to the Inn. When I got here, I walked up to the Sundancer, a little gazebo bar at the Kiawah Island Inn, and I looked at this stretch of beach and thought, Wow.

KL

You’ve really seen the development of the Island.

BR

Yes. With the early Kuwaiti money, Charles Fraser [Sea Pines Company] had a blank check to do what he wanted on Kiawah. He created a masterpiece, and the owners since have only enhanced it. Now the South

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Insider’s Corner To sales executive Cynthia Noble, living and working on Kiawah has been a dream come true. In her thirty-five years on the Island, she met her husband, raised a young son, and created a gathering place for extended family.

KL

How did you make your way to Kiawah?

CN

I grew up in Illinois and came to Kiawah on vacation for a week. I loved Kiawah so much I never actually made it into Charleston. I went back to Illinois and put everything up for sale and moved here a year later.

KL

What made you fall in love with the Island?

CN

For me, it was all about nature. No neon lights, no traffic, no fast food restaurants, no high-rises. Just the beauty and the quiet. And the complete lack of commercialism. My son was seven at that time, and this was where I wanted to raise him.

KL

What was it like raising a child here?

CN

What a fabulous experience. I let him get on his bicycle and go anywhere. He was safe! He had his safari hat, his secret buried treasure map, and his compass. He was an island explorer. He loved his boyhood here. When he was a bit older and started playing golf, he kept his clubs at my office, and he would pick them up after school and walk over to Cougar Point. He’d join a group and play nine holes while I finished up at work.

KL

What a great childhood.

CN

After I moved, my mother and three sisters also moved here. So it was perfect. Then my husband and I met in 1999 on the Island. He owned a second home that he had just moved into full time when he retired. We’ve been married for twenty years!

KL

How did you find yourself selling real estate?

CN

I knew that I wanted to live on Kiawah and realized selling real estate here could make that possible. All these years later, I have never “sold” anything in my entire life! All I do is matchmake. I help my clients find what they want. By helping enough other people get what they want, I was able to live and raise my son here.

KL

Sounds like a win-win.

CN

Kiawah has been such a blessing in my life and in the lives of so many others. I am very grateful to the developers for having created such a wonderful place.

KL

How has the Island changed since you first visited?

CN

Amazingly, the Island was very much then like it is today—only enhanced with amenities now. I’ve worked with the developers since 1990. They underpromised and overdelivered. The density is less than originally planned, and the Club facilities and Freshfields Village far exceeded expectations. But the feel of the Island? It’s just the same.

KL

What do you think is so special about the community?

CN

One of the things I find so amazing is that when you visit with owners here, they don’t talk about what they accomplished in their careers that made it possible for them to have a home on Kiawah. They talk about the deer they just saw frolicking at the beach, the simultaneous sunset and moonrise they just witnessed, or their golf game the day before. Kiawah allows them to just be who they truly are. What a blessing!

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Where an evening filled with fine wine and delicious food is complimented by an inviting setting and fabulous conversation.

A Life Plan Community in Charleston, SC | 800.373.2384 | bishopgadsden.org p adsden.o pg org


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IN CONVERSATION WITH

DARIUS RUCKER Q

What do you think is so special about the Lowcountry?

A

Charleston is the best city in the world! The entire region has a laid-back energy that I love, and the people here are all so great. The food is amazing, plus the golf courses and beaches are some of my favorites I’ve ever been lucky enough to visit.

area and the game of golf. I feel lucky to be a part of it.

Q

You play Rock the River at the Club every Thanksgiving!

A

This show is always so much fun. Everyone’s in a great mood with the holiday season getting started, and we all get to come together for a fun night of music in a beautiful setting. I love it!

Q A

What are your favorite pastimes when you’re home in Charleston? Golf! There are so many great courses to play, and I get to take my son out with me, which has been really fun as he’s gotten older. There’s also a great restaurant scene here—FIG, The Obstinate Daughter, TBonz, just to name a few. I also love just getting out and enjoying the area… walking the bridge, watching the sunrise over Sullivan’s Island from Mount Pleasant. There’s so much to love about Charleston.

Q

Tell me about your relationship to Kiawah Island.

A

I love Kiawah. The golf here is some of the best, and the courses are always a good challenge—Ocean, Cassique, River…you can’t go wrong. I’ve also had the chance to play a show here over Thanksgiving for the past few years, which is always a blast.

Q

Congratulations on Imperfect Circle! What are you most excited about in 2020?

A

Thank you! It was so much fun to be back on the road with the guys [Hootie & The Blowfish] last year and to get in the studio together again. It also gave me a renewed sense of energy to keep creating great music as I get back into the process of making my next solo country album. 2020 is going to be awesome!

Q

Cracked Rear View will always remind me of my childhood. To me, your music captured the essence of the South. Where do you see yourself in the canon of Southern Rock?

A

It was always just about making music we love, so it’s hard to think of ourselves in a larger context like that. I think that’s something the fans get to decide. At the end of the

Q A

How would you describe the Kiawah Island Club community?

day, we’re college friends who got lucky enough to turn

It’s such a special place. Everyone shares a passion for the

career.

something we have a blast doing into a thirty-plus-year

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kiawah through the lens K I AWA H I S L A N D C LU B M E M B E R S S E N T I N S O M E O F T H E I R C H E R I S H E D P I C T U R E-WO R T H Y M O M E N T S . S E L EC T I N G T H E 2 0 1 9 W I N N E R S WA S N O E A S Y F E AT. H E R E A R E A F E W O F O U R FAVO R I T E S .


B LO O D M O O N R I S I N G | K I M B A L L K R AU S K r a u s f i r s t v i s i t e d K i a w a h I s l a n d i n 19 9 6 , a n d h e r l o v e o f c a p t u r i n g moments and land scapes f rom behind the lens ha s deepened since r e t i r i n g a n d m o v i n g t o t h e I s l a n d i n 2 015 . H e r p h o t o s f r e q u e n t l y s h o w c a s e t h e I s l a n d ’s e v e r - c h a n g i n g s k i e s , i n c l u d i n g t h e g l o r i o u s f u l l moon s. In addit ion to bein g a board member of the Kiawah Island Photog raphy Club, Krau s i s an av id golfer and love s spendin g t ime with h e r g r o w i n g f a m i l y.


G R A M PA G ATO R | DY L A N R O S E R o s e h a s b e e n c o m i n g t o K i a w a h f o r o v e r t w e n t y ye a r s . H e d e v e l o p e d a l o v e f o r p h o t o g r a p h y a t t h e U n i v e r s i t y o f C o l o r a d o , wh e r e h e s t u d i e d e c o l o g y, e v o l u t i o n a r y b i o l o g y, a n d g e o l o g y. H e u s e s p h o t o g r a p h y t o n o t o n l y b r i d g e the divide bet ween the scient if ic communit y and the rest of the world but a l s o t o d r a w p e o p l e i n t o t h e e n v i r o n m e n t i n wh i c h t h e y l i v e .

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HONORABLE MENTIONS C A S S I Q U E S U N R I S E BY D I C K C L A P P G R E AT W H I T E E G R E T AT LU N C H BY F R E D D I W E I N E R B LU E C R A B BY K A R E N L E E S A I LO R ’ S D E L I G H T B Y JA M E S PAY N E

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T U R K E Y T ROT

M E M B E R- G U E S T B E AC H BA S H

M E M B E R- G U E S T G O L F TO U R N A M E N T

RO C K T H E R I V E R

M E M B E R- G U E S T B E AC H BA S H

N E W Y E A R ’ S E V E BA S H


RO C K T H E R I V E R

M E M B E R- G U E S T B E AC H BA S H

M E M B E R- G U E S T G O L F TO U R N A M E N T

ON AND ABOUT

KIAWAH Throughout the year, The Kiawah Island Club hosts dozens of soirees, outings, and activities. It was a fantastic fall! PHO TOG R APHY by CHAR LO TTE ZACHAR KIW

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Coming soon: senior living Kiawah style. Overlooking the lake next to Freshfields Village, this resort-style senior living community is designed to fit perfectly with the lifestyle you know and love. So whether you’re a longtime resident of Kiawah or long to be here, senior living on the island will soon be a reality.

Call 1.843.558.8387 or visit TheKiawahLife.com to learn more.


8 43 .9 3 7 .6 0 0 1 | www.T HEAN DERSONST UDIO .co m LOWCOUNTRY WHARF HOUSE

2019 ROBERT MILLS MERIT AWARD FOR RESIDENTIAL DESIGN, AIA SOUTH CAROLINA 2019 DESIGN + SERVICE AWARDS JURY CITATION FOR RESIDENTIAL NEW CONSTRUCTION, AIA CHARLESTON


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Club services and amenities available to Members of The Kiawah Island Club. If you are interested in membership, please contact Jacki Allston, Membership Director, at 843.768.5717 to learn more about real estate on Kiawah Island and qualifying properties. C R E E K F I S H I N G | PAG E 3 0

To book your fishing trip with Kiawah Island Club Captain Elliot Hillock call 843.814.5653 DA N C E R S O F T H E D E E P | PAG E 9 4

To book a kayak, paddleboard, or BOTE board, call The Sports Pavilion at 843.768.5330 S U M M E R AT T H E B E AC H C L U B | PAG E 5 8

To book lunch or dinner at the B-Liner call 843.768.6120 or visit the Club website or app to book a reservation online. Lounge chairs and cabanas are first come, first served! LOWC O U N T R Y D I V E S | PAG E 1 1 2

Book the Kiawah Island Club shuttle for a night out on the town! Call 843.768.6120 for more information. *For all other amenities call Member Services at 843.768.6120 SONGS ABOUT THE SOUTHLAND

| PAG E 4 0 To learn more about the featured photographs, visit Heart of Gold Gallery in Mount Pleasant or call 843.606.2562 P L AY E R ’ S G U I D E TO T H E O C E A N C O U R S E

| PAG E 74 To book a tee time at The Ocean Course, call the Kiawah Island Golf Resort at 843-266-4670

A DV E R T I S E R I N D E X

152

Allison Elebash Interior Design...................54

Freshfields Village......................................137

NetJets.........................................................BC

Anderson Studio.........................................151

GDC Home....................................................13

Roper St. Francis..........................................52

Anglin Smith Fine Art..................................57

Henselstone Windows...................................17

R.M. Buck Builders.......................................23

Aqua Blue Pools.............................................6

Kenneth Wiland Architect..........................153

RTW..............................................................56

Big Rock Partners.......................................149

Kiawah Island Club & Real Estate..........2, 3,

Scout Boats.................................................133

Bishop Gadsden..........................................130

91, 156, BIC

Seamar Construction...................................21

Buffington Homes, L.P. .........................FIC, 1

Kiawah Island Golf Resort.................131, 135

Shope Reno Wharton.....................................5

Buist, Byars, & Taylor..................................51

Kingswood Custom Homes.............................9

Spivey Architects..........................................53

Croghan’s Jewel Box...................................150

K&L Gates....................................................54

Steven Shell Living........................................11

Dolphin Architects and Builders..................19

Knight Residential Group..........................134

The Cigar Factory.......................................136

D. Stanley Dixon Architects..........................15

Kristin Peake Interiors.................................20

The Steadman Agency....................................7

Epic Development...........................................4

Mangan Custom Homes...............................50

Thomas & Hutton........................................24

Ferguson.......................................................22

Margaret Donaldson Interiors.....................25

Three Oaks Contractors.............................132

FineMark National Bank & Trust................90

McDonald Architects..................................155

Timbers Kiawah.....................................92, 93

Four Corners Building Supply....................130

MUSC Health................................................51

Watts Builders..............................................55

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KENNETH WILAND A R C H I T E C T

www.kennethwiland.com


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Photo by Peter Frank Edward s

Charleston Celebrates

350 YEARS In 1670, British colonists founded Charles Town on the western bank of the Ashley River. Just ten years later, a more defensible site for the settlement was established at Oyster Point, the present-day site of the Charleston Battery. The burgeoning port town, named for King Charles II, played a crucial role in the colonization of the Americas and by 1690 was one of the largest cities on the continent. 2020 marks the semiseptcentennial anniversary of the Holy City, and the celebrations will last throughout the year. City organizers hope to capture the cultural heart and history of Charleston, exploring the full breadth of the city’s history and heritage with parties, lectures, festivals, and conferences.

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For more than four decades, Kiawah Island Real Estate has been the trusted resource for those who seek the Kiawah lifestyle. With a dedicated team of 50+ executives, three on-island sales offices, and exclusive access to the Kiawah Island Club, we are the only real estate firm focusing solely on Kiawah. We get it, because we live it. We look forward to helping you find your forever home on Kiawah. A C U R AT E D C O L L E C T I O N O F H O M E S A N D H O M E S I T E S W I T H C L U B M E M B E R S H I P S A V A I L A B L E .

kiawahisland.com/legends | 866.554.2924 Obtain the Property Report required by Federal Law and read it before signing anything. No Federal or State agency has endorsed or judged the merits of value, if any, of this property. This is not intended to be an offer to sell nor a solicitation of offer to buy real estate in any jurisdiction where prohibited by law. This offer is made pursuant to the New York State Department of Law’s Simplifi ed Procedure for Homeown-


W hen you’re not here you’ll w ish you were. C O M E

H O M E

T O

K I A W A H

KIAWAH’S MAIN GATE

SANCTUARY HOTEL

FRESHFIELDS VILLAGE

1 Kiawah Island Parkway

near Jasmine Porch

390 Freshfi elds Drive

ers Associations with a De Minimis Cooperative Interest (CPS-7). The CPS-7 application (File No. HO16-0007) and related documents may be obtained from the sponsor. This project is registered with the State of New Jersey Department of Banking and Insurance Real Estate Commission. Obtain and read the NJ Public Offering Statement before signing anything (NJ Reg#16-15-0011 and 0012). An affi liate of Kiawah Partners.


O W N S A N D O P E R AT E S T H E L A R G E S T, M O S T D I V E R S E P R I VAT E F L E E T

GLOBAL REACH: 5,000+ AIRPORTS IN 200+ COUNTRIES AND TERRITORIES

GUARANTEED ACCESS TO YOUR AIRCRAFT OR BETTER

WHAT MAT TERS TO YOU IS ALL THAT MAT TERS Our Owners can rely on access to the largest private fleet in the world, as well as exclusive invitations to extraordinary opportunities, on the ground and in the sky. Every day, we make the impossible possible. That’s why at NetJets, with minimal notice, you can be on your way, wherever you’re needed most. NetJets is the exclusive private aviation partner of Kiawah Island Club & Real Estate. Call 1-877-JET-5633 or visit netjets.com.

NetJets is a Berkshire Hathaway company. Aircraft are managed and operated by NetJets Aviation, Inc. NetJets is a registered service mark. ©2020 NetJets IP, LLC. All rights reserved.

Profile for Kiawah Island

Legends Spring 2020 Issue  

Legends Spring 2020 Issue  

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