2022 Legends Magazine Vol 36

Page 1

2022

VO L U M E 3 6


PRESENTING

Pe a c e o f M i n d

K i a wa h G e t s You

Kiawah Island Club & Real Estate is a trade name and not a legal entity. Kiawah Island Club, Inc. and Kiawah Island Real Estate, LLC are entirely separate entities involved in different businesses on and around Kiawah Island. .LDZDK ,VODQG &OXE ,QF RSHUDWHV D SULYDWH PHPEHUVKLS FOXE ZLWK GLQLQJ JROI DQG RWKHU UHFUHDWLRQDO DPHQLWLHV .LDZDK ,VODQG 5HDO (VWDWH //& LV D UHDO HVWDWH EURNHUDJH ¿ UP IHDWXULQJ SURSHUWLHV RQ .LDZDK ,VODQG DQG ZLWKLQ the neighboring Cassique community. Obtain the Property Report required by Federal Law and read it before signing anything. No Federal or State agency has endorsed or judged the merits of value, if any, of this property.


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This is not intended to be an offer to sell nor a solicitation of offer to buy real estate in any jurisdiction where prohibited by law. This offer is made pursuant to the New York State Department of Law’s Simplified Procedure for Homeowners Associations with a De Minimis Cooperative Interest (CPS-7). The CPS-7 application (File No. HO16-0007) and related documents may be obtained from the sponsor. This project is registered with the State of New Jersey Department of Banking and Insurance Real Estate Commission. Obtain and read the NJ Public Offering Statement before signing anything (NJ Reg#16-15-0011 and 0012). An affiliate of Kiawah Partners.


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We Build It As If It Were Our Own.


We build legacies. A FU L L- S E R V I C E C O N S T R U C T I O N M ANAG E M E N T F I R M D ED I C AT ED T O E XCE E D ING EX P E C TAT I O N S .

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DESIGN | BUILD | POOLS | SPAS | WATER FEATURES

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PHOTO BY HOLGER OBENAUS

Years serving the Lowcountry


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CL A PPED IN THE BR IL L I A NCE OF A CL OU D ’S A PPL AUSE Photographer Patrick O’Brien captures the vivid splendor of a summer storm on Kiawah.

40 T H E M A R K OF A GR E AT PL AY ER

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To PGA Professional Harold Varner III, golf is the ultimate opportunity to learn life’s greatest lessons.

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50 L O O K I N G S K Y WA R D The Island’s best and brightest birders take a walk through the forest with wildlife photographer Cacky Rivers.

70 DAY T R I P History buffs, birdwatchers, and beach enthusiasts alike can all find something to love in this lineup of Lowcountry escapes.

84 L E F T Y W I NS BIG Relive the long and short of Phil Mickelson’s epic win at The Ocean Course last May.

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C H A R L E S TO N C H A R LOT T E World Class Living


124

92

T H E TA ST E OF SU M M ER Enjoy these four summer recipes from Kiawah Island Club’s brilliant chefs.

108 F I N DI NG HOM E Follow one couple’s journey to build their Cassique dream home.

116

JOU R N E Y TO FR EEDOM The courageous story of Robert Smalls, an enslaved man who risked everything for freedom.

124 K IDS AT PL AY A scavenger hunt in Ocean Park captures the magic of summer on Kiawah Island.

142 I M AGI N I NG SE A F I E L DS A conversation with Big Rock CEO Richard Ackerman about the new senior living facility on Kiawah Island.

116 G O OD WOR K S : M US C H E A LT H SEA ISL A NDS | 138 TOM ’S K I TCH EN | 13 4 U N PA R A L L E L E D G O L F G E T AWA Y | 1 5 0 O N & A B O U T K I AWA H | 1 5 4 E N D NOT E | 16 6

ON THE COVER: Seabird Society | Photo by Charlotte Zacharkiw

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It’s Your Home.

Owner, Dolphin Architects & Builders

To design, build, or renovate a home, the team you surround yourself with is just as important as the materials. Actually, it means everything. Dolphin Architects & Builders starts the process the right way — with listening and conversation. You’ll get to know us, and most importantly, we’ll get to know you. For over 30 years, we’ve created Kiawah homes with only our clients and the highest standards in mind. Because in the end, it’s your home. DolphinDesignBuild.com

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E X E C U T I V E E D I TO R & D E S I G N

C O N T R I B U TO R S

Hailey Wist

Christina Rae Butler Joel Caldwell Tom Cunneff Peter Frank Edwards Bryan Hunter Patrick O’Brien Susan Pittard Cacky Rivers Merritt Watts Gately Williams Charlotte Zacharkiw

C O P Y E D I TO R

Sunny Gray P H OTO E D I TO R

Nathan Durfee

SPECIAL THANKS

Richard Ackerman Amy Anderson Sarah Bacik Angie Baldwin Becca Barnet Doug Blair Joanne Bluford John Bluford Gayle Brooker

Patrick Cawley Taylor Cochrane Pamela Cohen Allison Crouch Will Culp Geoffroy Deconinck Joe Deluca Lucinda Detrich Marc Fetten

Kelly Franz Pete Gallagher Bob Hill Kasey Hobbie Norm Hobbie Thaddeus Jones Tiffani Jones Ethan Linen Preston Lyon

Celeste Marceca Patrick Melton Amanda Mole Sean Nealon Dixie Norris Mike O’Shaughnessy Amy Pastre Jordan Phillips Jessica Puder

Chris Randolph Helen Rice Cacky Rivers Courtney Rowson Joan Schochor Jonathan Schochor Chris Shope Harold Varner III Heather Woolwine

Kiawah Island Legends is a publication of Kiawah Island Publishing, Inc., an affiliate of Kiawah Island Real Estate. Copyright 2022. All rights reserved in all countries. Contents may not be reproduced in any manner without the written permission of Kiawah Island Publishing, Inc. Kiawah Island Publishing, Inc. does not necessarily agree with the viewpoints expressed by authors of articles or advertising copy. Kiawah Island Club & Real Estate is a trade name and not a legal entity. Kiawah Island Club, Inc. and Kiawah Island Real Estate, LLC are entirely separate entities involved in different businesses on and around Kiawah Island. Kiawah Island Club, Inc. operates a private membership club with dining, golf, and other recreational amenities. Kiawah Island Real Estate, LLC is a real estate brokerage firm featuring properties on Kiawah Island and within the neighboring Cassique community. Obtain the Property Report required by Federal Law and read it before signing anything.

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Contributors I was delighted to run alongside these enthusiastic kids for their scavenger hunt in Ocean Park. As I documented their wonder and amazement at each discovery, I was reminded that of all of the amenities on Kiawah, for children, nature’s playground is the greatest one of all! CH A R L OT T E Z ACH A R K I W |

P H OTO G R A P H E R

Charlotte Zacharkiw is a photographer and selfproclaimed Adventure Mom based out of Charleston. Her latest project, WEREAWAY, is a website about traveling the world with young children. When she is not working for clients, she is out capturing precious moments with her own family.

CHRISTINA R A E BUTLER |

PAT R ICK O ’BR I E N |

WRITER

PH OTOG R APH ER

Christina R. Butler is a professor at the American College of the Building Arts and an adjunct professor at the College of Charleston and owns Butler Preservation L.C., which specializes in historic property research. She is the author of Ansonborough: From Birth to Rebirth and Dry At High Water: Flooding, Drainage, and Land Reclamation in Charleston and, recently, Italians in the Lowcountry.

For twenty-five years Patrick O’Brien has created memorable photography for clients across the globe. He learned early in his career that passion, preparation, and discipline are the fundamental traits for sustained creative success. He has been honored to collaborate with art directors, designers, and clients who share his passion for creating images that inspire and surprise.

Robert Smalls’s life before, during, and after the Civil War was fascinating to write about. His bravery and perseverance remain an inspiration for us today.

The energy on the last few holes of the PGA Tournament was unlike anything I’ve experienced. It was raw, emotional, and at times unpredictable. An unforgettable week.

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S US A N PI T TA R D |

PH OTOG R APH ER

Susan Pittard is a portrait, lifestyle, and food photographer. Susan seeks out genuine connections with her subjects. She began her photography career in the fashion industry in New York City but has returned to sunny Charleston with her family. Her work has been published in Esquire, Details, Self, HGTV Magazine, and Real Simple, among others. It was a treat to get a close-up look as each of these chefs effortlessly finessed their dish on set. I love how they all intentionally use the freshest ingredients from land and sea.


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LOWCOUNTRY RIVER HOUSE

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404 574 1430

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W W W. D S D I X O N A R C H I T E C T. C O M


Contributors

TOM CUNNEFF |

MER R ITT WATTS |

WRITER

Tom Cunneff has been writing about golf for more than twenty-five years, with his work appearing in Golf, Golf Digest, Sports Illustrated, LINKS, and The Golfer’s Journal magazines. The editor of the College of Charleston Magazine, he is as passionate about playing the game as he is about covering it. Witnessing Phil Mickelson’s historic win on The Ocean Course has really stayed with me, so getting to write about it was a dream assignment.

Merritt Watts is a food and travel writer who has written for The Wall Street Journal, Condé Nast Traveler, Vogue.com, and New York magazine. She recently moved to Charleston with her husband and two daughters. Without intentional conservation efforts, some of these day-trip destinations wouldn’t exist at all. South Carolina used to have more than one million acres of old-growth swampland; now it has thirteen thousand acres.

Kiawah Island is a birder’s paradise! The number of species one can encounter on a morning ramble is truly remarkable. PET E R F R A N K E DWA R D S |

P H OTO G R A P H E R

Photographer and Charleston native Peter Frank Edwards contributes to some of the world’s leading magazines, including Travel + Leisure, Condé Nast Traveler, Virtuoso Life, and is a contributing photographer to Garden & Gun and Charleston magazine. His photographic style relies heavily upon natural light and an easy-going rapport with his subjects. When not on assignment, he enjoys cooking, cycling, and tinkering with vintage audio.

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WRITER

JOEL CALDWELL |

WRITER

Joel Caldwell is an expedition photographer and writer. For the past ten years he has focused on telling conservation and environmental justice stories from around the world. In recent years, his focus has shifted to uplifting stories of ecosystem restoration and humanity’s connection and place within nature. Admiring magnificent birds on Kiawah Island is a lovely way to spend a fall morning. It’s fun to write about something that I enjoy so completely.



EDITOR’S LETTER

After a record-breaking 2021, 2022 promises significant enhancements on Kiawah Island. After our property donation to MUSC Health last summer, we hope the MUSC Health Sea Islands Pavilion will break ground this fall. We also look forward to continued progress on Kiawah’s new senior living facility, Seafields. These two projects will enrich Island life and enhance the long-term integrity of our community. We appreciate your readership and hope to see you soon! PATRICK, WILL, JORDA N, A ND CHRIS

WHEN FROM OUR BETTER SELVES WE HAVE TOO

SOUTH STREET PARTNERS

LONG BEEN PARTED BY THE HURRYING WORLD. — WILLIAM WORDSWORTH

Kiawah has a strange magic. Crossing over the Kiawah River and onto the Island is like entering another world. You can feel it. I can’t begin to count how many times visitors and homeowners alike have recounted this phenomenon—their shoulders soften, their breathing slows, the rest of the world falls away. It is the smell of the maritime forest heavy on the breeze. It is the promise of beach walks and bike rides, of morning swims and shady afternoons.

This issue of Legends is a celebration of this extraordinary Sea Island and all its promises. It is an homage to the breathtakingly simple pleasures that make life here so glorious—the intensity and majesty of a summer storm (pg. 32), giggling children as they stalk through the forest on a scavenger hunt (pg. 124), the cacophony of bird song as sunlight first touches the tops of the trees at dawn (pg. 50), and the sweetness of a summer tomato grown just down the road (pg. 92). Life is short. Let’s spend as much of it as we can on the things that make us feel the most alive.

2022 promises to be another fantastic year on Kiawah Island. Thank you for your readership. Enjoy!

HAILEY WIST

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w w w . m a n g a n i n c c u s t o m h o m e s . c o m 8 4 3 . 7 6 8 . 1 4 1 6

Years



Club Member

NORM HOBBIE

Q

What a big, beautiful family!

A

Norm: Seven kids. Eight of us all together. Kasey: Dad raised us as a single parent. He’s a saint.

Q A

Q

From

us into the vacation mentality. Norm: We have so many memories here. From the age of eight, my son RJ was frequently selected to play in the high school and college pickup basketball games at Night Heron Park. The kids spent countless hours shooting three-pointers on the double-rimmed basketball hoops. Kasey went on to Presbyterian College on a basketball scholarship, and JR set the career three-point record at Brown University.

Are you close? Kasey: Very close. We’re all basically a year apart. There are a lot of big personalities! Norm: It’s really fun, like a built-in social group. We’re a team—our family mantra is “Time to Win!” How did you find Kiawah?

SEA GIRT, NEW JERSEY

Q

Amazing. Where is everyone now?

A

Norm: RJ, Kasey, and CJ are all lawyers in New Jersey. JR is a lawyer at a large New York firm. Jack is in his last year at Georgetown Law and will be joining a New York firm this fall. Tyler is in his last year of college at University of Virginia and will be attending law school in the fall. Savannah is in her last year of college at Furman University and will be attending law school in the fall.

A

Norm: I came for the first time in 1996. I was looking for a place I could bring all of my children. A friend of mine recommended Kiawah. So I played at the River Course as a guest of Ron Motley. There wasn’t even a clubhouse, just a portable trailer. The course was great. I bought a lot the next weekend.

Q

Wow, you move fast!

Q

I hear there is a wedding coming up!

A

Norm: We bought on Sand Fiddler Court, and it was great. But by the time we built the house, we’d had a couple of more children so we bought another lot on Cormorant Island Lane. It was about an acre lot, bigger house. And then, one thing led to another, and I sold that house and bought another lot on Flyway Drive. We built that house and then sold it for an oceanfront house down the street. I knocked down the old house and built a new one. We sold that in 2021, and I just bought a lot on Ocean Course Drive. We’re about to build our fifth house on the Island.

A

Kasey: My fiancé and I are getting married at the River Course in October. I wanted our new chapter to start at Kiawah. My fiancé fell in love with Kiawah the first time he visited. We couldn’t imagine getting married anywhere else. This is the perfect place.

Q

Why do you think Kiawah is so special?

A

Kasey: We’ve always had the best time here. When we were at home in New Jersey, we all had sports and our own activities. But when we came down here, it really brought us together. We could escape the hustle and bustle and just be together. Everyone is in a good mood and living in the moment when we’re here. Norm: Kiawah is our second home. It’s a place my kids will always go back to. They are extremely connected to it.

Q

You must really love it here.

A

Norm: It’s a special place. When the kids were little, I used to bring a nanny and invite my brother and sister and their families down. We biked, swam, hiked, and played a lot of basketball. We’d look for alligators and name them based on their size. We chartered boats for fishing, and we swam and socialized at the Beach Club. We had countless dinners at the River Course and Cassique. I really love the sense of community and closeness to nature here. Kiawah is not commercialized like some of the other resorts. Kasey: It’s the only place we ever came growing up because there were so many of us and no place quite like it. We’d rally all the troops and drive down in two cars. When we got to the Island, my dad would start playing “Regroovable” by Chris Botti. It’s the soundtrack that gets

Q A

What an incredible family legacy. Kasey: My dad is a successful man, as a parent, a role model, and a successful trial lawyer. He worked so hard to give us opportunities, and he leads by example. Now all seven kids are attorneys or in law school. We went through a lot over the years, and he made it possible for us to experience a place like this. I speak on behalf of all my siblings and I say, there’s no place like Kiawah!

Norm with Tyler, JR, Kasey, Savannah, Jack and CJ (RJ not pictured)

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Club Members

Q A

Q A

Q A

JOHN & JOANNE BLUFORD

From

aspects of healthcare, mental health, public health IT, public policy, etc. Then the following summer we place them in internships around the country.

Tell me how you found Kiawah. John: I actually grew up in Columbia, South Carolina, in the fifties and sixties. My grandfather and I used to crab around Johns Island and the Beaufort area as well as Jekyll and St. Simons Islands off the coast of Georgia.

Q

What made you buy a home here?

A

Joanne: Family vacations and, then later, recurring visits to the Lowcountry Jazz Festival. John’s former childhood neighbor, Dr. Thaddeus Bell, is the producer of the festival, which supports the battle against healthcare disparities among vulnerable patient populations. John: Joanne and I are jazz fanatics. We’ve traveled all around the world and the country attending world-class jazz festivals. It’s a hobby of ours. Our favorite stop is Montreux, Switzerland, at the Montreux Jazz Festival. Jazz is a universal language. It brings people together. We started coming here about ten years ago with friends. We stayed in the cottages at Cassique and rented houses from time to time. Eight years ago, one friend suggested we buy a lot and we did! We moved into our home in 2016.

Q

Aside from jazz, what do you think drew you to Kiawah?

A

Joanne: I love the peaceful relaxation the Island offers. Now that we are spending more time here, I plan to get involved with some nonprofit organizations that can use my thirty years of experience in human resources. John: Kiawah is removed from the routine hustle and bustle. Life is peaceful here, a lot slower paced. When we’re in Missouri, there is always some work to be done or a problem to be solved—stress kills! Here, there is much less pressure, more relaxation and life enjoyment.

Q

What are your favorite things to do here?

A

Joanne: The beach, workout facility, aerobics classes, and various activities around the island. We entertain a lot, so there is no shortage of friends and family who want to visit and enjoy everything Kiawah has to offer. John: I enjoy playing tennis and using the bicycle trails. I spend a considerable amount of time upstairs in our music listening room. Many of our friends and guests are also music lovers, so it can be a popular place. Our neighborhood is great, really tight knit. And I really like the tennis community. The beauty of the island is second to none. We love that it is not commercial, and if we want some urban life, Charleston is only thirty minutes away.

How did you two meet? John: We first met in undergraduate school. It was love at first sight. Joanne: But we went our separate ways—John to Chicago and I to Dayton, Ohio. We reunited twenty years later. John: Joanne is leaving out an awful lot of detail! We met while I was attending Fisk University and she was at Tennessee State University in Nashville. The two campuses were separated by a one- or two-mile walk. She was a majorette for the famed Tennessee State marching band, and I saw her performing during a halftime show at one of the football games. Later I was conveniently introduced to her at a fraternity social event. We dated for a while, then went our separate ways. Joanne: About twenty years later, I recognized his name and picture in Parade magazine—nationally distributed in many Sunday morning newspapers. He was profiled along with others who had different careers from banking, transportation, education, health, etc. I saw his picture and called him. The rest is history! I was in Dayton at the time, and he was in Minneapolis. We got married in Minneapolis and soon moved to Kansas City for new job opportunities. What a story! Do you have kids? Joanne: We are a blended family with three adult children. Our children live in Atlanta and Chicago. Our nine-year-old grandson loves to visit Kiawah and go to the beach and play tennis.

Q

Is Kiawah your primary residence?

A

John: Yes, but we still frequent Kansas City. I’m retired from day-to-day management of an academic medical center there, but I founded a 501(c)(3) nonprofit called the Bluford Healthcare Leadership Institute. We work with undergraduate scholars from HBCUs who are interested in healthcare careers. We host a didactic and experiential program during the summer that orients students to all

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C L AP P ED IN T H E B R ILLIANCE O F A C LOUD’S AP P L AUSE PHOTOGRAPHS by PATRI C K O ’ BRI E N




THUN D ER BL OSSOM S GORGEOUSLY A BOV E OUR HEA D S, GREAT, HOL L OW, BEL L - L IK E FL OW ER S, RUMB L ING IN THE W IN D , STRETCHING CL A P P ER S TO STR IK E OUR EA R S. . . F ULL - L IP P ED FL OW ER S BITTEN BY THE SUN BLEEDING R A IN DRIPP ING R A IN L IK E GOL D EN HON EY — AND T HE SW EET EA RTH FLY ING FROM THE THUN D ER .

J E A N T OOME R | “ STO RM EN D ING ”


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A L L NIGH T O UR RO O M W A S O UTE R - WA L L E D WI T H R A I N . DRO PS FE L L A ND FL A T T E NE D O N T HE T I N R OOF , A ND RA NG L IK E L IT T L E DIS K S O F M E T A L . PING! — PING! — A ND T H E RE W A S N OT A P I N - P OI N T OF S IL E NC E BE T W E E N THEM. T H E RA IN RA T T L E D A ND C L A S H E D , A ND T H E S L A T S O F T H E S H UT T E R S D A N C E D A N D GL IT T E RE D. BUT T O M E T H E DA RK NE S S W A S R E D - G OL D A N D C RO C US -C O L O RE D W IT H Y O UR BRIGH T NE S S , A ND T H E W O RDS Y O U W H IS PE RE D T O M E S PRA NG UP A ND FL A M E D— O RA N G E T OR C HE S A G A I N S T T H E RA IN. T O RC H E S A GA INS T T H E W A L L OF C OOL , S I L VE R R A I N !

AMY L OW E L L | “ S U M M ER R A IN ”

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY GATELY WILLIAMS

HV3 BRINGS HIS A GAME A CONVERSATION WITH PGA PRO AND KIAWAH ISLAND CLUB AMBASSADOR HAROLD VARNER III IN HIS HOMETOWN, GASTONIA.


KL

I hear you have a new baby!

KL

HV

Yeah, it’s pretty nuts. It’s fun. It’s been a very crazy year.

HV

KL

When was your son born?

HV KL

October 10, 2021. It’s pretty awesome.

KL HV

KL HV

42

My dad sold cars at the local Cadillac dealership. And my mom has been a day-of surgery nurse for almost thirty years. I have a younger sister, and she lives in Greensboro [NC]. She’s awesome, way more mature than me. I wish she lived closer. I have some really good people around me.

It completely changes the dynamic of your home life!

KL HV

Tell me about your family

Yeah. My wife is pretty amazing. When I’d hear that people had kids, I didn’t really think about it. But now that I’ve had a kid, I’m amazed. The whole thing is amazing. All people tell you is how good it is. All the great stuff, the most magical thing you’ve ever done. And I’m like, man, someone should have said that it’s the toughest thing. But he is great. He has so much hair! I want his hair.

HV

How did you meet your wife? We went to East Carolina University together. My second class we did a group project together. We hung out and became friends. Then after college she moved to New York and I moved to Florida. We saw each other occasionally. And then we both moved back to Charlotte at the same time. We hung out and that was it! So I met her when I was seventeen, and we started dating when I was twenty-five. We got married a year and a half ago.

KL HV

Where did you grow up? I was actually born in Akron, Ohio, but we moved to Gastonia, North Carolina, when I was six. It’s right outside of Charlotte.

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KL

How did you start playing golf? My dad got me started. I had a great golf course to play. It used to be called Gastonia Municipal, and now it’s called Catawba Creek. But they had a junior program where you can basically play unlimited golf from June 1st to September 1st for a hundred bucks. It was incredible! So I played a lot of golf as a kid. When I turned eleven, I started playing tournaments. That’s when it got fun. Once I started competing, I thought, Man, this is what I want to do! I just got addicted to it. I knew that golf was the ticket for me to go to school. What was your childhood like? We were middle class, maybe a little less than middle class. We were on welfare a couple of times, but it helped our family a lot. It’s nothing that people should be ashamed of. We’d just come down on hard times. But there were good times, too, when we were doing just fine. Growing up the way I did has always made me appreciate the little things. My parents wanted to give me better than what they had. I really understand that now as a parent. Was your dad a big golfer?


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I PLAYED A LOT OF GOLF AS A KID. WHEN I TURNED ELEVEN, I STARTED PLAYING TOURNAMENTS. THAT’S WHEN IT GOT FUN.

HV

Yeah, he loves to golf. He really got me started because he wanted someone to play with. When he moved from Akron to Gastonia, he didn’t have anyone to play with. My dad is still playing. We bought sixteen acres in Gastonia. My parents moved out there, and we built a driving range. He’s always out there hitting golf balls.

KL

When did you get serious about golf?

HV

I had never taken lessons. I didn’t know I was good. When I was a kid, I was just playing golf because I loved to play golf. At sixteen, I started working at Gaston Country Club and met this guy Bruce Sudderth. I told him that I wanted to play golf in college. I’ll never forget, he looked at me and said, Okay, see you tomorrow at ten. I was nervous! He really taught me the fundamentals of golf; he really prepared me to be a professional. To this day I still get lunch with him. He’s eighty-one now.

KL

How incredible to have a mentor like that.

HV

I’ve been super fortunate to be able to pick up the phone and talk to these mentors, people who aren’t my parents. These older men have really taken care of me throughout the years and taught me how to treat people. It’s just weird that, you know, I’m the next one up. So I think about that when younger golfers ask me questions. I don’t want to speak in clichés. I have to tell them what I really believe. At the end of the day, the golf stuff doesn’t matter.

KL

Tell me about college.

HV

KL HV

KL HV

I got a golf scholarship to East Carolina, and I went because my mom met Press McPhaul, who was the head coach there at the time. He changed my life. He just gave me a chance. I told him, I want to play on the PGA Tour, and I want to graduate from college. Those are the only things that matter. And he just kept me on that track. He didn’t waver. He helped me be a professional at a young age. He and Bruce prepared me for the PGA Tour when I had no clue I would actually play on the PGA Tour. When did you realize you had a chance at being a professional golfer? I think I realized I had a chance when I was in my junior year of college. I was ranked twenty-eighth individually in the Golfweek’s Final Men’s Collegiate. The first time that I won, I won by nine shots. I won our State Amateur Championship and then the North Carolina Amateur Match Play Championship. I knew I was going to play after school. What was your mindset at the time? At school we always set goals for the upcoming year. Senior year my goal was to learn how to respond to bad golf. I was watching all these professionals play really well all the time; they were so consistent. I wanted to figure out how to handle myself, how to grind it out if I played badly. Not just on the golf course but also how I treat people. That was the best goal I ever made for myself. You don’t get your confidence back by hitting a few good shots; you have to start with confidence and then hit the shot. It’s a mental thing.

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KL

Talk to me about the HV3 Foundation.

HV

I wanted kids to have the same opportunity I had at Gastonia Municipal. It’s all about access to the sport. We started with two events in 2018, and we made some money but not at the scale we wanted. But then I met this guy named Ben Sutton who restructured how we raised money so that we didn’t have to chase it like we had been doing. Then we were able to really ask ourselves what we wanted to achieve with the Foundation. Youth on Course has a program where kids pay five dollars a round, and there are sixty-eight participating courses in North and South Carolina. So we partnered with them and sponsored that program. Last year [kids played] 49,000 rounds of golf, and we covered 35 percent for every kid involved.

KL

You’re a companion organization to Youth on Course?

HV

I personally am an ambassador of Youth on Course. I really believe in it. I think it’s the greatest way to get a kid into golf. Kids need to play and they need to learn how to talk to adults. Those things go so far in life. I learned so much as a kid. That’s what I wanted my Foundation to be about—giving kids the kinds of opportunities that made a big difference to me.

KL HV

46

What does the HV3 Foundation calendar look like? We do an HV3 Invitational with local high school kids in the Charlotte and Gastonia areas, and then [we cohost] the HV3 All-Star Invitational with the American Junior Golf Association. After that [we have] the ECU Pirate Cup, which will raise money for ECU golf and the Foundation. Next we’ll host Drivers Fore! Change, a celebrity Pro-Am with Bubba Wallace in Charlotte. And in December, we host the HV3 Foundation Gala.

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I DON’T WANT TO SPEAK IN CLICHÉS. I HAVE TO TELL THEM WHAT I REALLY BELIEVE. AT THE END OF THE DAY, THE GOLF STUFF DOESN’T MATTER.

KL

Why do you think golf is such a good outlet for kids?

HV

Because you can play by yourself, practice by yourself. But then you obviously meet people. When I was twelve years old, I was playing with people in their sixties. My first golf bag came from these old men at Gastonia Municipal. And on the golf course you really find out who someone is. I feel like it’s all about effort—showing up on time, doing the little things. I think golf teaches you that. I am often asked what the most influential thing that has ever happened in my life is. And I say that I had people in my life who cared about me who were not my parents. So we’re actually starting a mentorship through the First Tee [organization]. They are really great at finding kids who need an opportunity. Right now we have thirty mentors and thirty mentees.

KL

Talk to me about playing on the PGA Tour.

HV

It is the greatest thing I’ve ever done—before getting married and having a kid. I’m in my seventh year on the Tour and tenth year playing professional golf. I love traveling. I love planes. I love the hustle. I just love playing golf. I’m still addicted to it. You meet some cool people. There’s a couple of other players I really like. Bill Haas is one of my favorite people in the world. He gives really sound advice. And Bud Cauley, he’s my age and we are at the same stage in life, just got married. But I can talk to anyone. I’ve gotten to meet some unbelievable people.

KL

Do you have a favorite tournament?

HV

Course-wise, definitely [the Genesis Open at] Riviera

[Country Club in Pacific Palisades]. I’m not a California guy, but that course really is the best. Hospitality-wise, I would say the Wells Fargo [Championship at Quail Hollow Club] in Charlotte. I enjoy any chance I can play in front of the people who have helped me.

KL HV

KL HV

KL HV

Tell me about the ambassadorship with Kiawah. I played golf with Chris Randolph [South Street Partners] and we really hit it off. We decided to partner. They really want to help the Foundation. They’ve donated great auction items to our events that have helped raise money, and we’re currently in talks for planning an event on the Island in 2022. When was the last time you were on the Island? I took a boys trip down there last December, and it was insane. I brought a foursome and we had the time of our lives. One day we played with two of the head pros. One of the guys, Beau Cutts, I actually played junior golf with. Everyone talked smack and had a great time. It was awesome. We played Cassique and the River Course. We still talk about that trip. Which course was the favorite? Everyone else loved Cassique. But I like the River Course. It is so hard; it’s such a grind. I like that. When I was a kid, I actually won a tournament at The Ocean Course. And then I played the PGA Championship there. It’s pretty cool for me. I used to think, Oh, man, I’d love to go to that course. And now I’m actually an ambassador. I can go!

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LOOKING SKYWARD

STORY by JOEL CALDWELL STY LI N G by W H I T L EY FLOY D PHOTOGRAPHY by CACKY RIVERS an d P E TE R FRANK EDWARDS


WOOD STORK The only native stork in North America, the wood stork is huge (can be almost 4’ tall!). Recognizable by their long legs, mostly white body, and very heavy bill, the wood stork soars high on sunny days and wades in the shallows of southern swamps. They are revered in Greek, Chinese, and European mythologies as good luck and harbingers of spring and birth.

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AS

AU T U M N

CO M E S

TO

THE

NORTHERN

HEMISPHERE,

I M M E N S E F LO C K S O F B I R D S TA K E F L I G H T A N D B E G I N T H E I R LO N G J O U R N E Y S O U T H I N N U M B E R S S O VA S T T H AT T H E I R M OV E M E N T C A N B E T R AC K E D BY R A DA R . A S T H E M A R S H G R A S S E S T U R N G O L D E N , S H O R T E R A N D CO L D E R DAYS S I G N A L T H E A R R I VA L O F WAV E U P O N WAV E O F M AG N I F I C E N T B I R D S TO T H E S E A I S L A N D S .

South Carolina’s barrier islands are an essential stopover

Key Sanctuary, a thirty-five-acre sandy preserve designated a

for these winged travelers as they journey, sometimes many

sanctuary in 2006. This small island—along with Deveaux Bank

thousands of miles, to far-flung overwintering sites in the

off Edisto Island and Crab Bank in the Charleston Harbor—is

Caribbean, South America, and beyond. In the spring, this

an undisturbed breeding ground for brown pelicans, laughing

dramatic migration happens in reverse, the salt marsh again

gulls, royal terns, and snowy egrets, to name a few species.

becoming inundated with shorebirds of all shapes and sizes—

Setting aside these three spits of land ensured an enormous

from piping plovers to American oystercatchers—eager to

number of birds would have a place to rest and feed that was

arrive at their breeding grounds to rear their young. Known

free of predators and undisturbed by human traffic.

as the Atlantic Flyway, this migratory route starts as far north

Renowned for its natural beauty and abundant wildlife,

as Greenland and follows the Atlantic coastline southward,

places like Kiawah Island are increasingly rare along the

encompassing some of the hemisphere’s most productive

Atlantic Coast. Kiawah is fortunate to have the Kiawah

ecosystems and providing food, water, and shelter for these

Conservancy, a nonprofit started by residents in 1997

weary travelers.

with the express mission of preserving the Island’s natural

Kiawah Island and the surrounding barrier islands play

environment as well as the restoration of habitat required to

a crucial role in ensuring this avian migration continues

maintain a healthy and balanced population of native plants

successfully into the future. Surrounded by ocean and vast

and animals.

salt marshes, Kiawah’s brackish ponds, lush maritime forest, and picturesque dunes provide much-needed nesting sites

Early one morning in October, a group of bird enthusiasts

and habitat for a wide range of birdlife. Additionally, at the

gather at the Cinder Creek Pavilion. I arrive early and stroll

convergence of the Folly, Stono, and Kiawah Rivers lies Bird

out on the dock to the covered area, admiring the way the

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RED-TAILED HAWK The red-tailed hawk is the most widespread and familiar large hawk in North America. Their plumage can be quite variable but adults usually can be recognized by the trademark reddishbrown tail. The “TV Call” of the bald eagle is actually the cry of a red-tailed hawk because its call is much mightier than its larger cousin.

rising sun colors distant thunderheads a soft pink. A pair of kingfishers play chase along the glassy surface of the creek, pausing to unleash their wild rattling call as they hover midair. Majestic great egrets flap lazily along the treeline, effortlessly kept aloft by their enormous wingspan. It’s one of those perfect Kiawah mornings, impossibly beautiful and full of life. It’s an eclectic group that assembles. Ages span four decades, backgrounds ranging from retired bankers to professional wildlife photographers, all drawn together by a shared fascination with birds. Bob Hill, avid cyclist and the most senior of our group, has been photographing birds on Kiawah for decades and has a running catalog of over 120 species. Pamela Cohen, professional photographer and trained field biologist, brings an impressive wealth of knowledge to the group, explaining peculiar bird behavior in various situations. Marc Fetten is a self-proclaimed raptor guy, recounting stories of photographing birds of prey mid-dive. Crossing the road, we begin making our way toward Blue Heron Pond. Almost immediately we stop in our tracks. Arms

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WHITE IBIS These large wading birds are highly sociable, foraging in large groups. feeding on insects and crustaceans in freshwater marshes, coastal estuaries, mangroves, and swamps. The ibis can fly up to thirty miles an hour! In folklore, the ibis is the last to seek shelter before a storm and the first to emerge afterwards, thus a dual symbol of danger and optimism.


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ROSEATE SPOONBILL The roseate spoonbill, or Platalea ajaja, is recognized by a big spatulate bill and bright pink plumage! Spoonbills feed in shallow waters, walking forward slowly sifting muck with their wide flat bills. They feed on crustaceans that contain carotenoid pigments that turn their feathers pink.

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T H E LOW-A N G L E M O R N I N G S U N C U T S T H R O U G H T H E TO P S O F T H E P I N E T R E E S O N T H E S O U T H S I D E , L E AV I N G H A L F T H E P O N D I N M I R R O R E D S H A D OW, T H E OT H E R H A L F B AT H E D I N G LO R I O U S G O L D.

raise and we squint through binoculars and cameras at a

beautiful morning. Dressed in dark green and khaki and

stand of loblolly pine literally crawling with birds. Shutters

toting an enormous camera and lens, Rivers leads us down

softly click as a group of giant wood storks settle in the bare

a soft dirt path lined by oaks and palmettos. Growing up in

branches of a tall snag to soak up the morning sun, white wings

Charleston, Rivers’s father, Dr. Thomas Rivers, was a well-

folded and bald heads downcast as if in quiet meditation. A

respected family physician and accomplished outdoorsman.

small flock of eastern bluebirds blow through, landing briefly

Rivers credits her father as having had a huge impact on her

in the trees before continuing on their warbling way, calls

love affair with wildlife, nature, and especially birds. When

fading with them. Two red-bellied woodpeckers tap out a

Rivers graduated from college she received a Peterson Field

staccato on a single pine, amidst the chattering of Carolina

Guide to Birds book and a pair of binoculars from her father.

chickadees. We whirl, our attention captured by the loud

The rest is history.

cuk-cuk-cuk-cuk! call of North America’s largest woodpecker.

Emerging from the forest, we climb the spiral staircase of

Nearly a foot-and-a-half tall, of Woody the Woodpecker fame,

Blue Heron Pond observation tower. The low-angle morning

the pileated woodpecker sports an amazing red crest with

sun cuts through the tops of the pine trees on the south side,

dramatic black-and-white markings on its face.

leaving half the pond in mirrored shadow, the other half

Today’s gathering was orchestrated by Charleston native

bathed in glorious gold. Tricolored herons stalk the quiet,

and wildlife photographer Cacky Rivers. A tall and magnetic

shallow waters on the edge of the pond. Strikingly slender

person, her dark halo of curly hair shines copper in the

with a long bill, they wade belly deep in search of fish. We

sun, and a gleam in her eye betrays her excitement for this

laugh from our elevated vantage, watching a juvenile

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A N A R R OW B OA R DWA L K S PA N S T H E P O N D, A N D W E M A K E O U R WAY TO I T S C E N T E R A S A N O S P R E Y W H E E L S OV E R H E A D A N D L A N D S I N A N E A R BY P I N E .

moving much more quickly and less effectively than its older

son. Dropping from its perch, the eagle flies directly above us,

counterparts. It seems patience comes with age for birds too.

Marc at the ready takes photos rapid-fire.

As we walk, the talk turns to habitat and migrant birds.

The group splinters into pairs and threes and begins

Much is made of the recent appearance of roseate spoonbills

drifting back toward Cinder Creek, lost in conversation.

on the Island. With bright pink plumage, greenish heads, and

Crossing over a narrow ribbon of marsh, it’s quite the surprise

long bills that widen roundly at the end—giving them their

to see a young buck making its way toward us along the

name, “spoonbill”—, these birds are sure to garner attention.

boardwalk. Lowering his head coyly, he occasionally slows

“Gorgeous at a distance and bizarre up close” reads one

but doesn’t stop until he’s within five feet of Rivers. Typical

description of the peculiar wading birds. Similar in color to

traffic along the Killdeer Trail?

flamingos but for some reason far more obscure, I’m struck

We finish with breakfast under the Cinder Creek Pavilion,

by how amazing it is that they too make their way to Kiawah,

celebrating a good morning spent doing what we all love with

a particularly unusual character amidst the cacophony of

pastries, fruit, and refreshing mimosas. The view down creek

exotic birdlife on this beautiful island.

is nothing but marsh and a few long docks, a Lowcountry

A sandy path through the maritime forest brings us to

scene no less beautiful for its familiarity. We swap stories

Killdeer Pond. The day is beginning to warm and dew beads

and show favorite bird photos on phones and on the backs of

on silvery spiderwebs suspended in the spartina grass along

cameras. There has been a rumor of a white-faced ibis on the

the pond’s shore. A narrow boardwalk spans the pond, and

island, and Bob is the only one who has seen it. We split up

we make our way to its center as an osprey wheels overhead

after breakfast, heading to work or home to our families. Bob

and lands in a nearby pine. Far off at the end of the pond

and Cacky head off together in search of spoonbills. — J.C.

the white head of a large bald eagle gleams in the morning

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RESEARCH ON THE ISLAND Kiawah also plays a role as an important site for bird research. Aaron Given, one of Kiawah’s wildlife biologists, has been monitoring fall migrations for the past thirteen years. Given catches songbirds in mist nets, records their overall health and places a small metal band with a unique number on one leg before releasing them. This is an important way to monitor populations of various species along the Atlantic Flyway. Since 2009, Given has also performed a “breeding bird count” annually. Over the course of nine early mornings, he visits 238 individual spots on the island—from tip to tip— each for five minutes. Sitting quietly he identifies birds primarily by sound but also by sight, and records his observations. He is currently working through the data to see how individual species have fared over the past thirteen years.


THE USUAL SUSPECTS Keep an eye out for these resident species year-round in the trees and estuaries and at the water’s edge and 1

2

3

mud flats of Kiawah Island. 1. NORTHERN CARDINAL 2. CAROLINA WREN 3. RED-SHOULDERED HAWK 4. GREAT EGRET

4

5

6

5. SANDERLING 6. RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER 7. AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER 8. BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH 9. COMMON GALLINULE

7

8

9

SEASONAL VISITORS For some migrant birds, Kiawah is a stopover for rest and food on a great migration. For others, it is a seasonal 1

2

3

haven for mating and nesting. 1. PAINTED BUNTING 2. RED KNOT 3. YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER 4. CHUCK-WILL’S-WIDOW

4

5

6

5. HOODED MERGANSER 6. AMERICAN REDSTART 7. GREAT-CRESTED FLYCATCHER 8. BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER 9. AMERICAN KESTRAL

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D AY TRIP FRO M O LD-G ROW TH SWAMPS TO RE MOTE SHOR ELI NES, TH E S E S IX E CO LO G ICAL E S CAPE S W ILL B ROA DEN YOUR PE RS PE CTIVE O F TH E LOWCO U NTRY’ S W ILD SI DE. EAC H S ITE H AS A U NIQ U E CU LTU RAL AND NATU RAL HI STORY TH AT H AS B E E N PRE S E RVE D TH RO U G H POI NT ED AND DIRE CT CO NS E RVATIO N E FFO RTS .

STO RY by M E R R I TT WATTS P H OTO G R A P H Y by H A I L E Y W I ST


B O TA N Y B AY 51 M I L ES | 1 H O U R 8 MI N U T E S


1 0 6 6 B OTA N Y B AY ROAD

The grand entrance to Botany Bay would be enough for plenty of visitors: A wide dirt road underneath the canopy of centuries-old live oaks makes for a serene, sun-dappled drive in. Once the entrance to the Sea Cloud and Bleak Hall Plantations, it now serves as a welcome to the 4,600acre preserve that opened to the public in 2008. Once you reach the end of the avenue of oaks, you’ll begin a 6.5-mile driving tour loop of the area’s natural wonders and historical sites. Pull over at the trailhead of the Pockoy Island Trail, a shell-packed, half-mile pathway that meanders toward the coast through an expanse of marsh. The stroll rewards slow walkers with glimpses of fiddler crabs, flashing butterflies, and egrets making graceful landings in the marsh. The view opens onto a beach as eerie as it is beautiful—instead of an expanse of sand, the two-mile-long beach is a “boneyard” of sun-bleached trees toppled by an eroding shoreline. Time your walk to avoid high tide, when the beach disappears under water almost completely. As the tide pulls out, you’ll find shells (carbon dating has placed some shells as far back as 4,200 years), shark’s teeth, Native American pottery, and pieces of slave-made brick. After some treasure hunting (leave all your finds on the sand—it’s illegal to remove shells or artifacts from the beach), drive the rest of the loop to see old tabby structures, agricultural fields now seeded to attract songbirds, a coastal marsh view, brackish ponds, a pine-hardwood forest, and even a kayak launch for ambitious boaters.

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CHARLES TOWNE LANDING 2 2 M I L E S | 3 2 MI N U T E S

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1 5 0 0 O L D TOWNE ROAD

A day trip that doubles as a crash course on South Carolina’s early history, it’s no wonder this site of the historic English settlement along a creek on the west bank of the Ashley River is a destination for school field trips. But go on a day when the classrooms aren’t touring, and you’ll find a peaceful, marsh-adjacent stroll teeming with historical interpretation. Walk through the visitor’s center, then turn left to see an animal forest featuring species native to South Carolina (mountain lions, black bears, and elk) or veer right to begin a 1.5-mile history trail loop. Picnic areas and scenic overlooks are plentiful on this pathway, which is an interpreted journey through the area’s history, beginning with the original people on the land, the Kiawah. In April 1670 the English established “Charles Towne” at this Kiawah tribal village at Albemarle Point, before relocating to where modern Charleston is today. A demonstration garden along the history trail features examples of early crops the settlers attempted to farm here, such as sugar cane and indigo. (Most of the early experiments failed, and it would be twenty years before the settlers discovered the profitability of cultivating rice.) Replicas of original structures, such as slave dwellings and fortification walls equipped with cannons, add an element of imagination, culminating in the recreation of a seventeenth-century trading vessel that would have brought raw materials, enslaved people, and news from home to the colony’s original settlers.

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CYPRESS GARDENS 4 8 M I L ES | 1 H O U R


3 03 0 CY P R E SS GARDE NS ROAD

The blackwater swamp, dense with bald cypress and tupelo trees, is at the center of this 170-acre preserve. Paddle a flat-bottomed swamp boat (available for free) along a marked trail, looking at lily pads, turtles, and birds as you glide between cypress “knees,” the looping roots that protrude above the water’s surface. If it feels eerily familiar, it may be a spark of recognition from its cameo as a location in movies like The Notebook and The Patriot. The romance is interrupted only by glimpses of what may be the bumpy nose of an alligator—or just another sunken log. If, however, you are in the mood for a guaranteed reptile sighting, the small indoor “swamparium” houses all manner of swamp life, from snakes to salamanders, for more up-close and personal viewings. Nearby, the 2,500-square-foot butterfly house celebrates local flora that support the life cycle of a butterfly, complete with illustrations and education on every phase. Like everything else in Charleston, the expansive and inviting attraction is not without history. Originally part of Dean Hall, one of the Cooper River’s largest rice plantations, the park was created in the late 1920s and officially opened in 1932. Hurricane Hugo nearly destroyed Cypress Gardens in 1989, and then, in October 2015, historic flooding submerged the entire park under four feet of standing water and it closed for almost five years. But, more than two million dollars of renovations and repairs later, it is once again open to the public.

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HUNTING ISLAND 95 MILES | 1 HOUR 52 MINUTES


2 5 5 5 S E A I S L AND PARKWAY

Perhaps the most iconic image of Hunting Island, the 5,000-acre barrier island near Beaufort, is the 163-year-old black-and-white painted lighthouse. Perched on a grassy knoll, it is the only publicly accessible lighthouse in the state of South Carolina, and it has been uniquely engineered to survive here: It was built to be easily dismantled, moved, and reassembled as the barrier island erodes. (It has already been moved once, in 1889, more than a mile inland.) Visitors can climb the 175 steps inside the lighthouse for an unrivaled coastal view, but locals know that the real secret here is the eight miles of trails winding through a smorgasbord of Lowcountry ecosystems. In a single 1.5-mile stroll at the south end of the park, you’ll start at a bustling, beloved fishing pier that extends into the ocean for three hundred yards, then pass through a semitropical maritime forest, only to be released across a pedestrian bridge over a saltwater lagoon. From there, you’ll continue to stroll along the small strip of beach while bald eagles and osprey glide into their nests above you. The beach is bordered on one side by towering palmettos jutting up against the fine white sand and, on the other, a panorama of fallen trees that the ocean’s waves are slowly, steadily turning into driftwood. In true barrier island fashion, the landscape is ever-evolving: After Hurricane Matthew hit the island in 2016, the ocean breached the lagoon, cutting the beach expanse in two and creating “Little Hunting Island,” which can be accessed only by foot. If the dynamic nature of the place tempts you to stay for more than a day trip, consider one of the tent, RV, or primitive camping spots available on site.

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BEIDLER FOREST 6 5 M I L ES | 1 H O U R 1 5 MI N U T E S


3 3 6 SA N C T UARY R OAD

As you begin to stroll the 1.75-mile elevated boardwalk loop through Beidler Forest, you might mistake the peaceful soundscape of the world’s largest virgin cypress-tupelo swamp for silence. After a few minutes, you’ll realize what you’re hearing isn’t actually silence at all: Periodic flutters of white ibis wings, woodpeckers, even the gentle dip of water snakes around cypress knees, and dampened steps of deer in the swamp become a chorus of natural noises that will transport you to a more primitive version of South Carolina. Along the loop you’ll inevitably come to appreciate the critical function of these wetlands, which act as a sponge to prevent downstream flooding and provide diverse habitats for wildlife. The acreage, owned and managed by the Audubon Society, is just a portion of the larger Four Holes blackwater swamp, so named because the tannins from decaying tree leaves turn the water a steeped-tea black. This clean and nutrient-rich water is vital for protecting the Edisto River, which the swamplands slowly feed. Beidler Forest is home to small yet stunning ornithological miracles, like the two thousand pairs of prothonotary warblers that return from their five thousand-mile migration on the same week each spring to nest in tree cavities of the tupelo gum and bald cypress trees. The landscape is also steeped in history: Beidler Forest was recently recognized as a site on the Underground Railroad for the so-called “marooned communities,” which sought refuge in the swamp after escaping bondage. They set up encampments near dwarf palmettos, which flooded less frequently, and built low-impact encampments they could abandon at a moment’s notice.

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MIDDLETON PLACE 2 8 MILES | 40 MINUTES


4 3 0 0 AS H L E Y R I VE R ROAD

The Lowcountry has no shortage of eighteenth-century rice plantations, but few stand out the way Middleton Place does. A national historic landmark and home to some of the oldest landscaped gardens in America, Middleton Place focuses on storytelling and interpretation of the place through the lives of the people who lived there. But instead of the typical narrative, focusing solely on plantation owners (Middleton Place was home to two Founding Fathers), visitors also can get a glimpse into the lives of the enslaved laborers who made Middleton Place possible. While a house museum filled with Middleton family artifacts (first-edition works of John James Audubon, pre-Revolutionary furniture, and personal notes and letters) tells one side of the story, and Eliza’s House, a freedman’s dwelling on the property, offers another from the perspective of some of the 3,500 enslaved people the Middleton family owned. The unique interpretation is a result of intensive research by staff historians, parsing through the few records or artifacts the enslaved left behind, and links with the living descendants, both black and white, that the site maintains. Do a guided tour (daily at the top of the hour) to get the full picture before taking a walk through the tree-lined allées of the gardens, where the rigorous upkeep of each symmetrical landscape and tidy topiary is juxtaposed against crumbling remains of the original building, burnt just months before the end of the Civil War. As you reach the end of the plantation, the formal gardens give way to the wild and reflective banks of the Ashley River, reminding you that the timelessness of Lowcountry beauty is, and always will be, the natural landscape.

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LEFTY

WINS

BIG

PHIL MICKELSON’S VICTORY ON THE OCEAN COURSE AT KIAWAH ISLAND GOLF RESORT LAST MAY IS ONE THAT GOLF FANS WILL REMEMBER FOR YEARS TO COME.

PHOTOGRAPHY by PATRICK O’BRIEN STORY by TOM CUNNEFF



Top Left and Bottom Right: Final Round Pursuers Louis Oosthuizen and Brooks Koepka

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HISTORY WAS MADE AT THE 2021 PGA CHAMPIONSHIP. Be prepared to see clips of Mickelson with fist raised and the

president of Kiawah Island Golf Resort and past president of

roaring, cell phone-toting gallery sprinting down the 18th

the PGA of America. “We’re all very, very proud of it.”

fairway again and again. It’ll be interspliced with other truly

The beginning of this golf fairy tale really began in 2017

historic moments, like Jack Nicklaus’s triumph at the 1986

when the PGA of America announced it was moving the

Masters, the 1991 Ryder Cup at Kiawah, or any number of

PGA Championship to May during a reshuffling of the men’s

Tiger Woods’s major victories.

professional golf calendar. The tournament was originally

“It’s right up there with Tiger’s win at the 2019 Masters,”

supposed to take place in August, and when the PGA first

says Chris Randolph, a partner of the master developer of

approached Warren about moving it to May, he thought it

Kiawah Island, South Street Partners, and member of the

would be the best thing for the Championship in general and

2021 PGA Championship committee. “A lot of times, the

The Ocean Course in particular.

majors kind of run together, but this was just one of those iconic performances you’ll never forget.”

“May is just a fantastic time to be at The Ocean Course and on Kiawah Island,” he says. Perhaps it was the Island’s

There are a few reasons for that elevated status: a

splendid weather that helped fifty-year-old Philip Alfred

beloved figure with ties to Kiawah becomes the oldest

“Lefty” Mickelson, with his new svelte physique and badass

major Championship winner ever, spectacular weather that

shades, to craft a final round for the ages—and the aged.

showcased a stunning venue uncluttered by corporate tents,

With four majors already, thirty-one-year-old Brooks

and the pent-up emotion of ten thousand lucky fans at the first

Koepka was just one stroke behind Mickelson as they teed off

attended major since the start of the pandemic.

in the final group. Surely most fans had to be thinking that the

“We’ve been blessed to have one of the most memorable

beefy Koepka was going to do what he does so well in majors:

Ryder Cups ever at The Ocean Course and now one of the most

put on a stripe show and pick up his third Wanamaker Trophy

memorable PGA Championships ever,” says Roger Warren,

while a grimacing Mickelson valiantly struggled. The fact that

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WHEN HE SPLASHED THE SHOT IN FOR BIRDIE, THE PLACE WENT CRAZY. EVERYONE WAS WONDERING, COULD

Photograph left by Mic Smith/Courtesy of Kiawah Island Golf Resort

HE REALLY PULL THIS OFF?

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AS HE MADE HIS WAY TO THE GREEN WITH PUTTER IN HAND AND LEFT FIST RAISED, THE CROWD RUSHED IN BEHIND HIM AND THEN SURROUNDED THE GREEN TWENTY DEEP, EVOKING TOURNAMENTS OF A BYGONE ERA.

everyone was pulling for him to win his sixth major and first

to catch its collective breath at what they were witnessing.

since 2013 made his chances of pulling off the improbable

Two shots clear of Koepka and Oosthuizen on the 18th

even more unlikely. When Mickelson bogeyed the opening

tee, he hit another big drive and then a 9-iron from 176 yards

hole and Koepka birdied, flipping the leaderboard, that exact

to pin high. As he made his way to the green with putter in

scenario looked possible.

hand and left fist raised, the crowd rushed in behind him and

Lefty arrived at the par-three 5th at one over for the

then surrounded the green twenty deep, evoking tournaments

round and looked like he was on his way to another bogey

of a bygone era. One of the first people Mickelson hugged as

after his tee shot came up short of the green in the waste area.

he walked off the green was Kiawah resident Frank Marzano,

But when he splashed the shot in for birdie, the place went

the managing principal of his wealth management firm, GM

crazy. Everyone was wondering, Could he really pull this off?

Advisory Group.

“There was just a lift in his attitude and the attitude of the

Warren was right in the middle of it all and now has a

crowd,” recalls Warren. “It really started to be something that

framed drone photo of the moment hanging in his office on

we thought was possible. I drove past some CBS executives

the second floor of The Sanctuary hotel. “Kiawah Island Golf

who said, ‘You’re going to make history today.’ I still didn’t

Resort was honored to once again have the opportunity to

honestly believe it at that point.”

host the PGA Championship at The Ocean Course,” he says.

It also helped that Koepka, who usually excels in big

“Thirty years after hosting the 1991 Ryder Cup and nine years

moments, struggled on the front 9, playing the two par-5s in

after last hosting the PGA Championship, Pete Dye’s design

three-over. Mickelson made the turn up by two over Koepka

proved that it has stood the test of time and still presents a

and major stalwart Louis Oosthuizen. The turning point

worthy test for the world’s best golfers.”

came at the tricky par-4 10th when Koepka’s approach came

In the end, with the course and the community

up short in the waste area leading to bogey, while Mickelson

shimmering on flatscreens around the world, it was like one

stuffed his and made birdie. Although he bogeyed 13 and 14,

giant ad for how alluring life on Kiawah is. “You could not

no one could mount a charge, and a birdie at the par-5 16th,

have scripted it any better for every stakeholder on the Island

after smashing a 366-yard drive ten yards past Koepka, gave

and for everyone who attended,” says Randolph. “A lot of

Lefty some breathing room as the boutique gallery struggled

people say it’ll be a memory that they’ll always have.” — T.C.

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TH E

TA STE

OF

SU MMER PHO T O GR A PH Y b y S US A N PI T TA R D ST Y L I NG b y K E N N ET H H YAT T



SU M M ER CA PR E SE W ITH PISTACH IO PE STO R E C I P E BY C H E F K E L LY F R A N Z | S E R V E S E I G H T

INGREDIENTS

M A R I N AT E D M OZ Z A R E L L A

2 fresh mozzarella balls, sliced ¼-inch thick

Combine mozzarella, 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil,

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

white balsamic vinegar, and dried basil in a mixing bowl.

2 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar

Salt and pepper to taste and a pinch of crushed red pepper,

1 teaspoon dried basil

if using. Can be done one hour before serving, and up to one

pinch crushed red pepper flakes (optional)

full day ahead.

sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste ½ cup raw pistachios

P I S TAC H I O P E S TO

1 cup packed fresh basil leaves

In a 4-cup food processor, blend together fresh basil, mint,

2 tablespoons fresh mint, chopped

and ¼ cup raw pistachios for 1 minute. Add garlic and lemon

1 teaspoon peeled garlic, minced

juice, puree, then add ¾ cup of extra virgin olive oil slowly

1 lemon, zested and juiced (reserve zest)

until incorporated. Pulse in Parmesan and salt to taste (do

¾ cup extra virgin olive oil

not over mix after adding cheese). Makes 2 cups.

2 tablespoons+ Parmigiano-Reggiano, grated sea salt, to taste

BALSAMIC REDUCTION

¼ cup balsamic vinegar

Bring honey and ¼ cup balsamic vinegar to a simmer in a

2 tablespoons honey

small saucepan. Reduce by half, stirring often. Allow to cool

2-3 large heirloom tomatoes, sliced ¼-inch thick

completely before use.

1 pint heirloom cherry tomatoes, halved ½ small watermelon, peeled and cut into triangles 4 ripe peaches, peeled and scooped with a melon baller Maldon sea salt flakes, to taste 2 tablespoons micro basil, or large basil sliced thin ¼ cup toasted pistachios, chopped fine zest of one lemon, chopped fine

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TO P L AT E

Layer

sliced

tomatoes,

marinated

mozzarella,

and

watermelon wedges. Drizzle them with pesto and chilled balsamic reduction. Place halved cherry tomatoes and peach balls around the plate. Garnish with micro basil, toasted pistachio crumbs, sea salt flakes, and lemon zest.


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ROA ST ED SNA PPER W ITH CA ROL I NA G OL D R ICE R E C I P E BY C H E F M I K E O ’ S H AU G H N E S S Y | S E R V E S T WO

INGREDIENTS

SNAPPER

2 pieces (6 ounces) fresh snapper

Dry snapper on a clean paper towel. Season with sea salt and white

4 tablespoons grapeseed oil

pepper. Heat a medium nonstick sauté pan over medium heat. Add

6 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided

grapeseed oil and allow to heat for a minute. Place the snapper skin

½ bunch fresh thyme

side down, applying light pressure until the skin relaxes and allows

5 tablespoons olive oil, divided

for even contact. Allow the fish to get golden brown, about 5 minutes,

½ cup watermelon radish, medium dice

before carefully turning the fillets over to sear the other side for an

1 cup fresh chanterelle mushrooms

additional 2 minutes. Add 2 tablespoons of unsalted butter and ½

1 cup Carolina Gold rice

bunch of fresh thyme to the pan. Once thyme is lightly browned,

3 fresh bay leaves

remove it and continue basting the fish for an additional minute.

sea salt freshly cracked black pepper

RICE

½ lime, zested

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Bring six cups of salted water to a

1 lemon

boil in a medium sauce pot and add the bay leaf and rice. Cook the rice

3 baby artichokes

on a low simmer for 15 minutes before straining the rice out as if it

1 red onion, halved

was pasta. Return rice to pot and add 2 tablespoons of unsalted butter

3 celery stalks, halved lengthwise

and season with black pepper and lime zest. Spread rice onto a baking

1 carrot, peeled and halved

sheet and place in the oven for 5 minutes just before serving.

1 fennel bulb, halved 6 garlic cloves 4 cups white wine 2 cups white verjus 4 lemons, halved (divided) ½ cup carrot, medium dice 8 pearl onions ½ cup fresh sea beans, blanched

ARTICHOKE BARIGOULE

Peel and trim artichokes. In a large sauce pot, heat 4 tablespoons of olive oil and lightly brown the carrot, celery, onion, and fennel. Next add garlic, white wine, verjus, water, 3 halved lemons, and cleaned artichokes. Season to taste. Cover the pot and simmer for roughly 30 minutes, or until tender. Chill the cooked artichokes in their braising liquid unless serving immediately.

B R A I S E D V EG E TA B L E S A N D M U S H R O O M S

In a separate medium sauté pan, add one tablespoon of olive oil and roast the pearl onions until slightly transparent. Add diced carrot, watermelon radishes, and chanterelles, and sauté until tender, about 2 minutes. Add the braised artichokes and 2 cups of the artichoke braising liquid. Reduce the liquid by half on top of the vegetables. Finish with 2 tablespoons of butter and the juice of half a lemon, stirring constantly until emulsified. Adjust seasoning and add the blanched sea beans.

TO P L AT E

Serve the roasted snapper on top of the cooked Carolina Gold rice, spooning the braised vegetables and mushrooms around the plate. Spoon the sauce over the fish and finish with a ½ of a lemon, squeezed.

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F R E SH PA STA W ITH SH R I M P NAGE R EC I P E BY C H E F G EO F F R OY D EC O N I N C K | S E R V E S E I G H T

INGREDIENTS

PA R S L E Y P U R E E

5 bunches Italian parsley

Blanch 5 bunches of Italian flat parsley in salty boiling water until

2 cups basil leaves

soft. Drain and add to an ice bath. Strain and add to a blender

2 garlic cloves

with minimum water added and puree until smooth. Pass through

½ cup grated Parmesan

a tamis and set aside.

1 cup extra virgin olive oil, divided 250 grams of Caputo 00 pasta flour

P E S TO

3 eggs, divided

Blend basil, Parmesan, ½ cup olive oil, and garlic until smooth.

½ pint of each - carrots, celery, onions

Add salt and pepper to taste. Set aside.

4 tablespoons canola oil 1 cup tomato paste

PA S TA D O U G H

½ cup white wine

Mix flour with 5/8 cup of parsley purée using a robot coupe. Add

4 sprigs thyme

one egg and 1 teaspoon of pesto. Pulse until the dough starts to

2 bay leaves

form. Knead dough and let it sit for a minimum of 3 hours. Using

4 basil stems

a pasta machine, make thin spaghetti.

3 pounds local Tarvin shrimp 5 shrimp peelings

S H R I M P N AG E

½ cup butter

Roast the peelings of five shrimp in canola oil with carrots, celery,

1 tablespoon sherry vinegar

and onions. Add tomato paste and deglaze with white wine. Cover

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

with water and bring to a simmer. Add a bouquet of thyme, bay

1 teaspoon smoked paprika

leaves, and basil stems. Cook for 20 minutes and strain (use a fruit

2 red bell peppers

mill if available).

1 Espelette pepper 1 Fresno pepper aromatic herbs (2-3 sprigs each)

SHRIMP

Peel and rinse shrimp. Saute with butter in a medium saucepan on

8 teaspoons capers, chopped

medium heat until tender, one or two minutes per side.

1 lemon F I N I S H A N D P L AT I N G

Boil 2 eggs for 12 minutes and peel. Separate the cooked yolk from the white and chop separately. Finely dice the Fresno and Espelette peppers. To make pepper coulis, oven roast two peeled and seeded bell peppers at 350° until soft and skin bursts. Once cooled, chop bell peppers and blend with sherry vinegar, Dijon mustard, and smoked paprika. Once combined, add ½ cup extra virgin olive oil. Cook the pasta for about 1 minute until al dente. Strain and shine with butter. Adjust the seasoning and fold the pasta on the plate. Arrange shrimp on top. Garnish with the chopped hard-boiled eggs, chopped herbs (chervil, basil, tarragon, dill, parsley, and chives), capers (1 teaspoon per dish), diced Fresno and Espelette peppers, dots of roasted red pepper coulis, lemon juice and zest. Sauce with the shrimp nage and enjoy.

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SE A R ED SA L MON W ITH A N DOU I L L E R E C I P E BY C H E F J O E D E LU C A | S E R V E S T WO

INGREDIENTS

C AU L I F LOW E R F OA M

4 cups of rough cut cauliflower

In a large saucepan, cover cauliflower with milk and cream

whole milk

(50/50). Bring to a boil and then reduce to a simmer until soft

cream

and season with salt. Puree in a blender. Before serving, reheat the

2 cups andouille sausage, diced

puree and spoon onto the plate.

4 cups corn, cut off the cob 6 tablespoons canola oil, divided

A N D O U I L L E S AU S AG E A N D S W E E T C O R N

4 tablespoons butter, divided

Heat a large skillet. Add 2 tablespoons of canola oil and andouille

1 ½ tablespoons Italian parsley, chopped

sausage and sauté for 5 minutes over medium heat. Add corn and

½ teaspoon garlic, minced

cook for another 5 minutes, or until the corn starts to color. Add 3

1 bunch spinach

tablespoons of butter and parsley and adjust seasoning.

1 tablespoon capers 3 tablespoons golden raisins (optional) 2 salmon fillets 3 tablespoons butter, for basting the cooked salmon fillet one or two large sprigs thyme

S AU T É E D S P I N AC H

Lightly sauté garlic in 2 tablespoons of canola oil for about one minute. Add the spinach, raisins, and capers. Once spinach is slightly wilted, add 1 tablespoon of butter and season with salt and pepper. Place on a towel to absorb excess liquid.

SALMON

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Add 2 tablespoons of canola oil to a hot ovenproof pan over high heat. Place salmon fillets skin side down and sear for 3–4 minutes, or until the skin is firm. Place in the oven for ten minutes for medium rare. Remove the fish from the oven. Gently turn the fillet over and return the pan to the stovetop on medium heat. Place the sprig of thyme on top of the fish and add the butter. Tilt the pan and baste the fish with the butter using a large spoon. Repeat this step three or four times.

TO P L AT E

Spoon cauliflower foam onto the plate. Add the andouille sausage and corn in the center. Place the salmon on top of the corn and place the spinach on top of the salmon.

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M EET T H E K I AWA H ISL A N D CLU B CH E FS K E L LY F R A N Z | T H E R I V E R C O U R S E

The daughter of an Air Force sergeant, Franz spent her childhood in Europe. At a young age, she fell in love with supermarkets, cooking big breakfasts, and experimenting with food. Franz moved to Charleston to attend the Culinary Institute in 2002 and landed a job at downtown darling Magnolias. She spent eight years there as chef de cuisine and then another five as executive chef. In 2019, she won “Marc Collins Chef Award” at Charleston Wine + Food festival. When an opportunity presented itself at Kiawah, she was ready. Franz’s style is simple but eclectic, composed but outrageously flavorful.

M I C H A E L O ’ S H AU G H N E S S Y | VOYS E Y ’ S AT C A S S I Q U E

Growing up in an Italian neighborhood in Akron, Ohio, O’Shaughnessy remembers hours in the kitchen watching his father cook. When he started working in kitchens in his early twenties, it was like coming home. After a brief stint as a line cook at Cypress in downtown Charleston, he moved to a Middleton Place restaurant, where he mastered pastry. After a few years, O’Shaughnessy moved to The Sanctuary on Kiawah as an overnight baker. He fell in love with Kiawah, taking a job at Cassique in 2008. For the past thirteen years, O’Shaughnessy has honed an uncompromising dedication to quality. In July of 2021, he became Executive Chef at Voysey’s.

G EO F F R OY D E C O N I N C K | T H E B - L I N E R AT T H E B E AC H C LU B

Originally from Brussels, Deconinck spent his early career in the hallowed kitchens of Paris, Brussels, and New York City. He worked alongside Daniel Boulud when his famed restaurant Daniel was at its height. He was the executive chef at a Relais and Château property in Maine and then another in New York. He has worked as a private chef and an event chef, and he launched the Park Avenue executive dining room for JPMorgan Chase. He is cool under pressure and studiously passionate about his work. Innovation is the cornerstone of his food.

J O E D E LU C A | T H E M A R S H H O U S E

As a child, DeLuca spent summers fishing for trout and helping in the kitchen of his grandfather’s hotel in White River Junction, Vermont. As a young man, he worked in New York kitchens, dropping out of NYU to help open a pasta restaurant in Long Beach. Fresh pasta became his career. He has owned several restaurants and lived up and down the eastern seaboard, cheffing in New York, Washington DC, and even a brief stint back in Vermont. He settled in Charleston in 2007, with his sights set on Kiawah. After a short stint at Cassique, DeLuca opened the Marsh House in 2017. He puts an emphasis on fresh, whole foods and is drawn to elegant yet accessible preparation.

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southstreetcollection.com Obtain the Property Report required by federal law and read it before signing anything. No Federal or State agencies have endorsed or judged the merits of value, if any, of these properties. This is not intended to be an offer to sell nor a solicitation of offer to buy real estate in any jurisdiction where prohibited by law or where registration is required prior to any offer being made. Renderings and illustrations may differ from completed products. Prices, plans, uses, dimensions, specifications, materials, facilities, features, amenities, benefits and services described and/or depicted herein may be in formative stages and based upon current development plans, which are subject to change without notice. No guarantee is made that certain of the facilities, features or amenities depicted or otherwise described herein will be built or, if built, will be of the same type, size or nature as depicted or described herein. Use of recreational facilities and amenities for may require separate club membership.



FINDING HOME

STORY by HAILEY WIST PHOTOGRAPHY by PATRICK O’BRIEN


J

oan and Jonathan Schochor first visited Kiawah in

on the east end of the island, the west, the middle. Name a

1995. With no prior connection to South Carolina or

property-owner experience on Kiawah, and the Schochors

the Lowcountry, their curiosity was piqued when a

have had it. But in Cassique, they found their forever home.

colleague of Jonathan’s recommended they visit. And after a

The Cassique Garden Cottages reflect the British Arts and

memorable tour of the island with agent Bob Rummell, they

Crafts-style architecture and have all the charm and elegance

were in love. Rummell took them from homesite to stunning

of a manor in the English countryside. The neighborhood was

homesite. The Schochors remember walking out onto the

planned as a built-for-sale concept, with a varied-but-unified

back deck of a cottage and seeing dolphins breaching and

aesthetic and one master builder. The Schochors had five

playing in the creek below. “We were so taken with the beauty

options for the footprint of their home. All of the floor plans

of the island. It’s serenity,” remembers Jonathan. “My blood

were designed specifically for the landscape and natural

pressure probably went down 20 points just being here.” They

elements of the Cassique neighborhood, with an attention

were sold. They closed on a lot on Otter Island a month later.

to ocean breezes and seasonal weather. “The floorplan we

The Schochors hail from the Northeast, a small suburb

chose reflected the side entrance piazza seen frequently in

outside of Baltimore called Lutherville. Jonathan is an

Charleston,” says Joan. “The patio area made us feel like

attorney and Joan is an interior designer. Kiawah became

we had our own private retreat. It really spoke to us.” The

their haven, a place to get away with friends and family, to

Schochors added a pool to the patio, a disappearing edge that

unplug and enjoy nature. Since 1995 they have bought and

looks out into the shady forest.

sold at least twelve properties on the Island. “We tried to

For the Schochors, a vital consideration in their search

count them up the other night,” laughs Joan. “We vary on

for a home was the natural environment. The lot they chose

how many there have been!” They have bought homes and

on Beauty Berry Court had a giant live oak along its western

lots, they have renovated and custom-built. They’ve lived

edge. “We knew we were going to site the house with that

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J O A N D E S I G N E D T H E L AY O U T F O R T H E K I T C H E N , H A N D P I C K E D FINISHES, AND CUSTOMIZED THE ELECTRICAL AND LIGHTING TO A C C O M M O D AT E S E AT I N G A R E A S A N D L A R G E - F O R M AT A R T.

tree as a focal point,” remembers Joan. Working with the

the process. With major permitting and the fundamental

design team, the Schochors positioned the house in concert

floor plan in place, the Schochors had the time, energy, and

with the natural elements. The generous, U-shaped floor plan

head space to focus on the more exciting parts of the building

integrates the oak in an intimate embrace. From the street,

process. “I think of it as a head start,” says Jonathan. “We

the 5600-square-foot home feels folded into the landscape,

got a feel for the basic spaces, some of which changed pretty

rambling out of view into the dense canopy of maritime

dramatically.”

forest. This effect, of course, is part and parcel of the Island’s

The common misconception is that a built-for-sale home

aesthetic. Designing with Nature has been the cornerstone of

is always a move-in-ready situation. But in many instances,

Kiawah’s master plan since day one.

homeowners have the freedom to make quite significant

After custom-building, the built-for-sale process was a

changes to the original plans. In the Schochors’s case, Joan

huge benefit to the Schochors. They “bought off paper”, which

designed the layout for the kitchen, handpicked finishes,

gave them a great deal of freedom to make changes before

and customized the electrical and lighting to accommodate

permits were pulled. With the built-for-sale projects, floor

seating areas and large-format art. She even procured all the

plans have been designed and scale aligns with standards

tile and stone through her favorite Baltimore source.

set out by the Architectural Review Board. “Starting with a

Walking up the drive of the Schochors’s home transports

well-defined plan, we were able to personalize in any way we

you to another time and place. A vine-draped pergola

wanted,” says Joan. “Most people might be a bit intimidated

casts dappled sunlight on a tabby walkway. A wide, curved

by custom-built projects, so this is the best of both worlds.” Not

exterior door opens onto an expansive patio and pool. A

to mention time. The built-for-sale format really accelerates

petite pool house (lovingly nicknamed “the Casita” by Joan

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T H E S PA C E I S F L E X I B L E , L I VA B L E , B U T A L S O F E E L S R O O M Y A N D LUX U R I O US F O R A L A R G E R C R OWD.

and Jonathan) sits at the southern end while the main house

certain things that just speak to you. Those things should

curves around the opposite end of the outdoor space. And,

go in your house.” Joan has custom-built over sixty homes

of course, there’s the tree. Its twisting branches extend over

alongside architects and builders in the Baltimore area.

the patio and an outdoor fireplace made of tabby and stone.

She is part of the process from the earliest stages, planning

The interior of the house is just as grand. A wide farmhouse

spaces and choosing finishing materials for her clients. Her

kitchen opens into a living and dining space with high

design philosophy is all about comfort, livability. “My work

ceilings. The Schochors’s plush furnishings and vivid artwork

is characterized as comfortable and welcoming. You can’t say

(two of the larger pieces are Joan’s) make the room feel cozy

anything more flattering to me than that!”

and comfortable in spite of the size. With five sets of French

For Jonathan and Joan, their Cassique cottage is the

doors opening onto the patio, the house is flooded with light.

perfect landing place for their two grown children and four

A furnished space above the three-car garage boasts another

grandchildren. The Schochors also entertain friends from

two bedrooms and two bathrooms. All in all, the home has

out of town and host company retreats. The space is flexible,

five bedrooms and can sleep ten people.

livable, but also feels roomy and luxurious for a larger

Joan describes her decorating style as transitional, a

crowd. A home should reflect its people. The Schochors have

personal and eclectic blend of no specific era or style. “I feel

designed a home that communicates who they are, what they

that you bring more meaning into your surroundings by not

care about. They have made their living space and, in a sense,

limiting yourself to a certain era,” she explains. “There are

the larger Kiawah experience, their own. — H.W.

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JOUR NEY TO

FR EEDOM THE HER OIC STORY OF AN ENSL AVED MAN WHO PL ANNED A DARING ES CAPE TO FREEDOM AND WH O S PEN T THE R EST OF HI S LI FE TI R ELESSLY WORKING FOR EQUALITY.

W R I T T E N b y C H R I S T I N A R A E BU T L E R


“MY RACE NEEDS NO SPECIAL DEFENSE, FOR THE PA ST HISTORY OF THEM IN THIS COUNTRY PR OVES THEM TO BE THE EQUAL OF ANY PEOPLE ANYWHERE. ALL THEY NEED IS AN EQUAL CHANCE IN THE B ATT L E O F L I F E .” T H E S E E L O Q U E N T WO R D S W E R E S P O K E N BY R O B E RT S M A L L S I N 1 8 9 5 A N D A R E E MB L AZ O N ED O N A M O N U M EN T TO HI M I N A QUI ET CEM ETERY I N B EAUFORT, S OUT H CAR OLINA.

Robert Smalls was born enslaved in Beaufort County,

American Civil War began in earnest when the first shots

South Carolina, in 1839 on the grounds of his enslaver’s

were fired at Fort Sumter in the Charleston Harbor. The

townhouse at 511 Prince Street. Smalls’s mother, Lydia,

fort fell to the Confederacy, and the Union blockaded

worked in the big house, and his father might have been

the harbor in hopes of eventually seizing Charleston, the

his enslaver, Henry McKee, or possibly plantation overseer

“cradle of secession.” The Confederacy outfitted their own

Patrick Smalls. McKee owned a large plantation, but

naval fleet, including the CSS Planter, a steamer with a

Smalls was not a field hand. Henry Louis Gates, Jr. notes,

paddle wheel and wide wooden deck. It had begun cruising

“The McKee family favored Robert Smalls over the other

in 1860 as part of a steam packet line, transporting bales

slave children, so much so that his mother worried he

of cotton from the Pee Dee and Charleston to Boston.

would reach manhood without grasping the horrors of

The Confederacy impressed the Planter, and it became a

the institution into which he was born. To educate him,

blockade runner and transport vessel, heavily armed for

she arranged for him to be sent into the fields to work and

making supply deliveries to various nearby Confederate

watch slaves at ‘the whipping post.’”

coastal defenses.

Smalls was a defiant young man, and, at age twelve,

Robert Smalls became a trusted member of the Planter’s

McKee sent him to Charleston at the request of his mother

crew. Despite his reputation as a skilled pilot, Confederate

to be “hired out,” finding employment and sending most of

forces would never give this title to an enslaved crewman

his proceeds home. Smalls labored as a waiter, lamplighter,

and he served under Captain Charles J. Relyea.

and stevedore. He married an enslaved woman named Hannah, and Hannah’s owner agreed to let him buy her

SM A LLS STEA LS THE PL A NT ER

and their children outright.

Before sunrise on May 13, 1862, Smalls saw his chance.

Smalls began slowly saving the seemingly unattainable

Captain Relyea and his fellow officers retired for the night,

eight hundred dollars he would need to permanently unite

leaving the enslaved crew in charge of the Planter, which

and free his family. He showed maritime talent, working

was stocked with ammunition, a pivot gun, a howitzer,

as a sailmaker, rigger, longshoreman, wheelman, and

and several other long-range weapons. In Be Free or Die:

ultimately a pilot. Smalls gained intimate knowledge of the

The Amazing Story of Robert Smalls’ Escape from Slavery

depths and sounds of Charleston Harbor and its treacherous

to Union Hero, author Cate Lineberry explains the palpable

sandbars, making him a valuable captain—and giving him

fear and tension of contemplating escape in the slave-

a key tool that would help him gain his freedom.

holding South, on a Confederate ship no less: “In the next few hours, Smalls and his young family would either find

CIVIL WAR COMES TO S OUTH CAR OLINA

freedom from slavery or face certain death. The only way

On December 20, 1860, South Carolina became the first

Smalls could ensure that his family would stay together

state to secede from the Union. A few months later, the

was to escape slavery. This truth had occupied his mind

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To p L e f t : B OM B A R DM E N T OF T H E P ORT R OYA L F ORT S , N OV E M B E R 1 8 6 1 , C I V I L WA R | N AVA L H I S T O R Y A N D H E R I T AG E C OM M A N D To p R i g h t : R E B E L DE F E N S E S OF C H A R L E S T O N H A R B OR | G U N E M PL AC E M E N T S M A L L S WOU L D H AV E PA S S E D ON H I S WA Y T O T H E U N ION B L O C K A DE | L I B R A R Y OF C ON G R E S S B o t t o m : R OB E R T S M A L L S | E N G R AV I N G P U B L I S H E D I N H A R PE R ’ S W E E K LY, 1 8 6 2 | U . S . N AVA L H I S T O R Y A N D H E R I T AG E C OM M A N D

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To p L e f t : C ON F E D . B L O C K A DE RU N N E R PL A N T E R C A P T U R E D 18 6 3 BY U . S . S . L AC K AWA N N A OF F M OB I L E | L I B R A R Y OF C ON G R E S S To p L e f t : A M A P OF C H A R L E S T ON S HOW I N G AT L A N T IC W H A R F W H E R E S M A L L S R E T R I E V E D H I S FA M I LY B o t t o m : S T E A M E R “ PL A N T E R ,” CH A R L E S T ON , S .C . | N E W YOR K P U B L IC L I B R A R Y

120

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W E ARIN G CA P TA I N R ELY EA’ S H AT A S A DI S GUI S E, SM A LLS PI LOTED THE PL A N TER TO PICK UP HIS AND HIS SHIPMATES’ ENSL AVED FAMILIES AT ATL ANTIC WHARF, AND THEN THE PA RTY HEADED OUT TO CHARLESTON HARB OR.

for years as he searched for a plan with some chance of

ship to the Union and delivered himself and sixteen other

succeeding.”

enslaved passengers to freedom.

Smalls seized his chance to steal the unmanned boat,

The Charleston Courier reported the embarrassing

with the help of two enslaved shipmates. Wearing Captain

news the following day: “Our community was intensely

Relyea’s hat as a disguise, Smalls piloted the Planter to

agitated Tuesday morning by the intelligence that the

pick up his and his shipmates’ enslaved families at Atlantic

steamer Planter, for the last twelve months or more

Wharf, and then the party headed out to Charleston

employed both in State and Confederate service, had been

Harbor. The Planter cruised stealthily past heavily gunned

taken possession of by her colored crew, steamed up, and

Confederate batteries and Fort Sumter. Smalls knew the

boldly run out to the blockaders . . . Between three and

right signals to flash at the Confederate checkpoints,

four o’clock, Tuesday morning, the steamer left Southern

which were none the wiser that Smalls was captain as he

Wharf, having, it is supposed, on board five negroes,

sailed to the ocean, past Fort Sumter, and onward to the

namely three engineers, one pilot, and a deckhand. Upon

Union fleet that was blockading the mouth of the harbor.

leaving the wharf the usual wharf signal was given by those

As he neared the blockade, Smalls ordered the Palmetto

on board, and the usual private signals given when passing

and Confederate flags to be lowered. In a tense moment,

Fort Sumter. The officer of the watch at the latter post was

the blockade fired on the Planter, not seeing the white flag

called, as usual, but observing the signal and supposing all

Smalls had hoisted.

right, allowed her to proceed. She ran immediately out to

Historian James McPherson quoted a Union witness’s account of the exchange: “Just as No. 3 port gun was being

the blockading vessels. The Planter had on board four large guns destined for one of our new fortifications.”

elevated, someone cried out, ‘I see something that looks like

The Planter was transferred to Port Royal, a Union

a white flag’; and true enough there was something flying

stronghold near Beaufort. Officer Francis DuPont wrote to

on the steamer that would have been white by application

the Navy Secretary in Washington, D.C., of Smalls’s heroics.

of soap and water. As she neared us, we looked in vain for

“Robert, the intelligent slave and pilot of the boat, who

the face of a white man. When they discovered that we

performed this bold feat so skillfully . . . is superior to any

would not fire on them, there was a rush of contrabands

who have come into our lines—intelligent as many of them

out on her deck, some dancing, some singing, whistling,

have been.” Smalls served in the Union navy and was given

jumping; and others stood looking towards Fort Sumter,

command of the Planter as her captain. His biographer,

and muttering all sorts of maledictions against it, and ‘de

Edward Miller, explains, “As he was a knowledgeable pilot,

heart of de Souf,’ generally. As the steamer came near, one

his skills were in demand. On December 1, 1863, he was

of the Colored men stepped forward, and taking off his

piloting the Planter near Secessionville when severe enemy

hat, shouted, ‘Good morning, sir! I’ve brought you some

fire caused the white captain to abandon his post. Smalls

of the old United States guns, sir!’” Smalls had succeeded

brought the vessel out of danger and was awarded with an

in the unthinkable—he had delivered his commandeered

army contract as captain of the Planter. He was the first

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black man to command a ship in U.S. service and remained

state, but community leaders like Smalls never gave up

captain of the Planter until it was sold in 1866. By his

the fight, even as Reconstruction ended and the Jim Crow

own count, Smalls was involved in seventeen military

laws became a reality in much of the South. In 1876 the

engagements during the war.” Gates notes, “Poetically,

Democrats seized control of state politics, marginalizing

when the war ended in April 1865, Smalls was on board

and disenfranchising Black citizens across the state.

the Planter in a ceremony in Charleston Harbor.”

Fortunately, Beaufortonians had Smalls and fellow African American legislator Thomas Ezekiel Miller to push back

RECONSTRUCTION AND A NEW LIFE

against the prewar status quo. Smalls was known as an

For his heroic delivery of the Planter, Robert Smalls and his

effective speaker and managed to hold office even after

family gained their freedom and fifteen hundred dollars,

the resurgence of Democrat control of the state, at least

a small fortune at that time. The Smalls used the money

briefly. He was one of six Black delegates at the 1895 South

to purchase his former enslaver’s Prince Street house in

Carolina Constitutional Convention, where he tried but

Beaufort as their new family home. Smalls entered the

failed to prevent Black disenfranchisement. In his later

new political world emerging post emancipation, as the

years, he served as the Collector of Customs for Beaufort.

formerly enslaved found their footings as freed people, with new rights and the chance to vote and hold office. Old

LEG ACIES

guard white South Carolinians and former Confederates

Robert Smalls had three children with Hannah, and

were none too willing to share the stage with African

following her death, he married Annie Wigg and had one

Americans, so the federal government occupied much of

more child. His descendants still live in South Carolina

the South in a complicated era known as Reconstruction,

today. Smalls’s great-great-grandson Michael Boulware

in which the nation was to transition to a place of equal

Moore spoke of his ancestor’s bravery in a 2019 interview:

rights for all.

“They knew that if they got caught, that they would be not

Robert Smalls proudly served in the Republican

just killed, but probably tortured in a particularly egregious

party, vying for control against the Democrats (who

and public manner . . . It really blew people’s minds because

in the nineteenth century were racially conservative

it just was beyond what people thought an enslaved person

and “lost cause” sympathizers). He worked alongside

could do. There’s so many twists and turns in the story.”

“carpetbaggers,” who migrated from the northern states

Smalls fought for the more than four million compatriots

to promote the rights of Black South Carolinians. In 1868

who were freed after the war to have equal rights and the

Smalls was part of the delegation from Beaufort that

ability to vote unmolested in the South, which roughly

traveled to Charleston to draft a new state constitution,

fifty-five years after his death became a reality thanks to

which offered a wealth of promising laws of equity for

trailblazing Civil Rights leaders of the 1960s who followed

the future. Smalls added the proposal that “all children

in Smalls’s and other freedmen’s footsteps.

between the ages of seven and fourteen must attend

The house at 511 Prince Street still stands, and in 2017

public schools at least six months out of the year,” creating

a Reconstruction Era National Monument was unveiled in

universal education for children, black and white, for the

Beaufort, with a bust of Smalls mounted proudly next to

first time in the state.

it. In Charleston, millions of tourists walk or drive by a

Smalls served on the SC Senate, State House of

new state historical marker at the foot of The Battery that

Representatives, the US House of Representatives, and

is emblazoned with the story of Smalls’s daring Planter

was a major general in the Beaufort militia in the 1870s.

expedition. There is no better story of agency and success

Permanent political change was an uphill battle in the

against all odds, toward equality. — C.B.

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P OETI CA L LY, W H EN TH E WAR EN DED I N A PR I L 1 8 65, S M A LLS WA S ON B OA RD T H E PL A N TER I N A C ER EM O N Y I N CHA R LESTON HA R B OR

HON . R OB E R T S M A L L S - C I V I L WA R H E R O , S TA T E S M A N | C H A R L E S H E N R Y A L S T ON , 1 9 0 7-1 9 7 7 | U. S . N A T ION A L A R C H I V E S A N D R E C OR D S A DM I N I S T R A T ION

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KIDS AT PL AY P H OTO G R A P H Y by C H A R LOT T E Z AC H A R K I W


SCAVENGER HUNT ME ET AT THE TRE E HOUSE IN OCE AN PARK . COLLEC T YOU R FIRST CLU E ON THE L AWN!

CLU E # 1 CLIMB THE TREE TO WHERE THE GREEN CORKSCREW BEGINS. YOUR FIRST TOOL WILL BE AT THE TOP OF THE RIDE BEFORE YOU SLIDE.




CLU E #2 FIRST THINGS FIRST. WITH YOUR CAMERA, TAKE A SELFIE WITH YOUR TEAM! NOW

SCAMPER

ALONG

THE

BALANCE

BEAMS. YOU’LL FIND YOUR NEXT CLUE WHERE THE LONG LOGS LEAN.

CLU E #3 FOLLOW THE GREEN ARROWS AND RIBBONS TO TAKE YOU ON YOUR SCAVENGER HUNT!

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THE RE ARE 9 WOODE N SNAKES HIDDE N ALONG YOU R PATH . E ACH TE AM M UST FIND THRE E !

THINGS TO COLLEC T ACORN A WILDFLOWER FEATHER A FORKED STICK SPANISH MOSS PINE CONE

TAKE A PIC TU RE CLIMBING A TREE NEXT TO A BODY OF WATER WITH SOMETHING ORANGE OR RED ON A BRIDGE



FIND THESE SPECIES MUSCADINE BALD CYPRESS AMERICAN BEAUTYBERRY DOG FENNEL

*See plant ID!


OUTTAKES


TOM’S KITCHEN The brainchild of Kiawah Island Club Executive Chef Doug Blair, this new demo kitchen at Cassique opens up a world of possibility for the eager epicure. The intimate setting, with custom farmhouse tables and an open-plan kitchen, allows for a variety of demonstrations. “The space gives the cooking classes a really organic feel,” says Blair. “And with the patio and fire pit just outside, we can be really flexible with what we offer. We may roast oysters or demo open fire cooking.” Blair has put a lot of thought into seasonal classes that not only celebrate Lowcountry culinary tradition but also connect the membership to regional farmers, purveyors, and chefs. Because it is so enriching to have a connection to a local grower or chef, understanding tradition and terrior makes the experience of cooking and dining that much more meaningful. Not to mention, a lot of fun. Often paired with wine or cocktails, the demos always involve good food and fun conversation. “I’ve really liked developing a one-on-one relationship with the membership,” says Blair. “It has been really rewarding for me.”


and We’ll Listen to You

PHOTOS BY HOLGER OBENAUS

Listen to Your Dreams

E STABLISHED

1982

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KIAWA H 843-768-3800

Y E ARS

I S LAND

O F

SPA CIO US

VAIL

DE T A I LE D

LA K E

A R C H I T EC T U R E

PLA CID

WWW.CA M E NS A R CHIT E CT URALGR O U P . C O M


NAMING WHAT’S POSSIBLE. To turn a vision into reality you need to name it, to say it aloud. With a name, and the will to realize it, that vision can change what’s possible.

For naming opportunities or other ways you can support this vision, scan the QR code or contact Brian Panique at 843-792-0861 / panique@musc.edu MUSC Health is changing what’s possible in the Johns Island, Kiawah and Seabrook communities. The MUSC Health Sea Islands Medical Pavilion, set to open in late 2023, will provide convenient and rapid access to MUSC Health’s emergency care services, select outpatient services, and some of the nation’s top providers in primary and specialty care.



GOOD WORKS

MUSC HEALTH SEA ISLANDS


GOOD WORKS

In fall of 2022, MUSC Health will break ground on a healthcare facility to serve Kiawah, Johns, and Seabrook Islands. Located on Bohicket Road, just west of Freshfields Village, MUSC Health Sea Islands Medical Pavilion will boast a freestanding emergency room with helipad, as well as a robust medical center with primary and specialty care, on-site lab, and therapy rooms. The Sea Islands are beloved, in part, for their slower pace,

year-old grandson suffered a severe allergic reaction while

lack of commercialism, and shady two-lane roads. Kiawah is

visiting. The family drove him forty-five minutes to the

a haven, a retreat from the busy world, and homeowners love

hospital in Charleston, where he recovered, but this risk of

this seclusion. But in the event of a medical emergency, time

delayed treatment further highlighted the issue for Whitlow

to treatment can mean life or death. Kiawah and Seabrook

and Linda.

are nearly twenty miles from the nearest hospital. “People

As Kiawah, Seabrook, and Johns Island communities

living in this area have to travel thirty to forty-five minutes

grow, so too does their need for medical care. Double digit

to reach the nearest hospital, sometimes more depending

population growth is anticipated in the next five years.

on traffic,” says Patrick Cawley, MD, MUSC Health CEO and

Since 2016, emergency room visits, trauma transports, and

vice president for health affairs. “That’s a big problem for

inpatient admissions have increased substantially. What’s

someone having a stroke or cardiac event.” In emergent cases,

more, seasonal visitors to the area do not have established

wait time to treatment can significantly compromise options.

care or the knowledge to navigate the local medical system.

When South Street Partners acquired Kiawah Partners

Every year, life is lost because critical healthcare services

in 2013, they hosted town hall meetings and met with

are not readily available to residents and visitors on Kiawah

homeowners. It became obvious that the lack of medical

Island.

care on or near the island was a glaring issue. Homeowners

This new facility will change that. In the spring of 2021,

Whitlow and Linda Wyatt have been vocal supporters of

South Street Partners donated six acres of land, valued at

the MUSC Health project from day one. Linda has a heart

$4.85 million, to the project. “After seven years of working

condition and the Wyatts have a firsthand understanding

side by side with MUSC, we are thrilled to bring this important

of the need for emergency services on the Island. “Most of

project to fruition,” says Chris Randolph, partner at South

the permanent residents on Kiawah and Seabrook Islands

Street Partners. “This new facility will bring vitally important,

are retired and in need of more frequent medical services,”

world-class medical care to Kiawah and neighboring islands.”

says Whitlow. But medical emergencies aren’t suffered by

MUSC Health Sea Islands Medical Pavilion will provide

older populations alone. Just last summer, the Wyatt’s nine-

around-the-clock access to lifesaving medical care, a team

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GOOD WORKS

MUSC Health Sea Islands will benefit the larger community. In the early stages of planning, South Street Partners and Cawley’s team met with all of the major stakeholders from neighboring communities to understand what they wanted to see from this facility.

of physicians, and a state-of-the-art emergency department.

Medical Pavilion will benefit the larger community. In the

But the facility will also provide non-emergent primary and

early stages of planning, South Street Partners and Cawley’s

specialty care, a convenience previously lacking in the area.

team met with all of the major stakeholders from neighboring

It has been a complicated process. Initial demand studies

communities to understand what they wanted to see from this

didn’t call for a full-fledged hospital. “If I was a pure numbers

facility. “This healthcare facility is not just for Kiawah and

person, it would have been hard to push this project forward,”

Seabrook,” says Randolph. “This is for Wadmalaw. This is

remembers Cawley. “But as I got to know the community

for Johns Island. Everything we’re doing is to benefit these

and the dedication of these residents, I became personally

neighboring communities as well.”

convinced that this facility would be successful.” Considering

Additionally, MUSC Health will also work closely with

the unique factors that define the Sea Island communities,

Seafields, Kiawah’s new senior living community. The two

Cawley and his team committed to the model in its current

projects were not initially coordinated, says Randolph, but

iteration. With the promise of private support, they doubled

the timing couldn’t be better. Residents at Seafields will have

down on services and built out a robust network of care.

access to a state-of-the-art healthcare facility just across the

“We came up with a hybrid structure,” explains Randolph.

street, and MUSC is providing an on-site wellness clinic and

“Major stakeholders and homeowners in the area will help

home health services within Seafields. “This medical center

fund some of the capital need for a more comprehensive

will be a game changer for the elderly who would ordinarily

medical facility.” The more successful the healthcare facility

move from the area to be closer to medical services,” says

is, the more services will be added. The MUSC Foundation

Whitlow. “It is comforting to know that in the event of

is currently fundraising for the building, but Cawley hopes

an emergency, the travel time to life-saving people and

ongoing donations will also support annual operational costs.

equipment will be significantly shorter.” — H.W.

This arrangement has turned out to be a win-win for MUSC Health and the Kiawah community. As Charleston County grows in leaps and bounds, serving patients off the

To learn more about how to support the MUSC Health Sea

peninsula will relieve overcrowding at the downtown hospital.

Islands Medical Pavilion, please contact Brian Panique with

For Kiawah residents, a sometimes hour-long drive to medical

the MUSC Foundation at panique@musc.edu or 843.792.0861.

care will be reduced to minutes. The new facility will open its doors in the fall of 2023. In the meantime, MUSC Health’s

Right | Chris Randolph and Dr. Patrick Cawley at the site of

expertise in Ear, Nose and Throat care is now available to treat

MUSC Health Sea Islands

a wide variety of ENT conditions. MUSC Health Sea Islands

140

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IMAGINING SEAFIELDS Big Rock Partners CEO Richard Ackerman discusses senior housing and the plan for Seafields, Kiawah Island’s new senior living community. The three-story mixed-use seniors housing property will consist of 106 units, including 90 independent living and 16 assisted living units. KL

Tell me about your background.

RA

I’m a lawyer, but my experience is in finance and development. I built a lot of projects in the nineties in South Florida. After the crash, I started working in the public securities market with a real estate investment trust. Then eventually I started doing financial workouts. In the early 2000s, I joined a private equity fund called Apollo Real Estate Advisors. I moved to Los Angeles, and I covered the West Coast and Asia, doing all kinds of different real estate investments, including senior housing. I spent a lot of time turning around a senior housing business called Summerville, which was one of the largest in the business at that time. Eventually I left and formed Big Rock Partners, a private equity fund based in Los Angeles. We focused on multiple things, including senior housing, land investment, office development, and hotels. After the crash in 2008, I looked at the landscape across the investment world and tried to figure out what the best opportunity was for my skill set. Senior housing and development is one of the areas where I thought I could make a difference. So I put a business plan together to develop modern, mixed-use senior housing and built a firm around it.

KL

RA

You’re considered to be a sophisticated, high design boutique shop for senior housing. What makes your model different? Sixty to seventy percent of the stock of senior housing in the United States is over thirty-five years old. It’s antiquated and unsophisticated in its design and financing. I built a business around what’s called the new modern—I hate to use the word luxury because it’s overused. We design one-of-a-kind facilities to fit the style of the community. While there are some very good companies doing the same thing, the market was

big enough for another player. We’re not trying to build a lot. While other builders do seven or eight projects a year, we have the freedom to do just one project a year.

KL

Tell me about the process.

RA

We set out to build a project that veers away from many people’s preconceived notions of what senior housing looks like. Through spectacular design, we try to create a social environment. It’s no different than the hotel industry or clubhouse design. With Seafields, we’re thinking a lot about the interiors and how to create an environment where people can mingle. We build sophisticated movie theaters, dining venues, and fitness facilities. The buildings are wired with the latest technology. We also spend a lot of time on the operational perspective, because we’ll have up to one hundred employees in the building.

KL

What different levels of care will you offer?

RA

When people think of senior housing, they often think of nursing homes. But this model is predominantly independent living, with a small percentage of assisted living.

KL

Define independant living versus assisted living.

RA

First, you have to be able to live completely independently. You get housekeeping, maintenance, and dining options, but you’re not getting any medical assistance—though we do offer health care in our clinic and assisted living platform. You’re buying into a social package with entertainment, wellness, and dining. With assisted living, we’re managing medications, appointments, and transportation also.

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Through design, we try to create a social environment. It’s no different than the hotel industry or clubhouse design. We’re thinking a lot about the interior and how to create an environment where people can mingle.

KL

There are a lot of ways to structure the business side of senior housing. Can you tell me about yours?

RA

It’s called a Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC). A hundred years ago, a Quaker community west of Philadelphia created a nonprofit model based on the idea that members buy into the organization, and it takes care of them for the rest of their lives. That’s how the idea developed. Seafields is a nonprofit organization. We don’t own it. There are no shareholders, because it’s run for the benefit of the residents. The property is controlled by an independent board of directors chaired by Todd Lillibridge, a seasoned real estate professional who lives on Seabrook. The rest of the board reside on Kiawah and Brays Islands, so they understand the local market and bring years of experience in real estate and corporate governance. Since Seafields is a 501(c)(3), we can finance the development with tax-free bonds. We expect this to be the best senior housing project on the East Coast.

KL

What do you think is often the catalyst for buyers to start thinking about senior housing?

RA

Usually some kind of life event gets them thinking. They’re focused on what the next ten years of their lives will look like and what they’ll need. Sometimes

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people bring skilled care into their home. But the thing missing is socialization. In that scenario, they don’t interact with anyone else, which is unhealthy. People who are planners want to be in control of their own decisions. They don’t want to burden their children. And everyone wants to stay here in the Lowcountry.

KL

And now you will have MUSC across the street.

RA

Yes. The medical facility will be right across the street. Additionally, we made a deal with MUSC to build a clinic inside Seafields—which is amazing in our industry. The clinic will also offer primary care services, telemedicine, and dentistry. The two projects are very complementary.

KL

How did this all come about?

RA

Chris Randolph [South Street Partners] advocated for senior housing [on the Island]. We were introduced through my childhood friend who has a home at Kiawah. Chris toured our existing projects and saw we would be a good fit. He has the long-term vision and sees how Seafields adds value to the Kiawah community. And he really does roll with the punches. We worked together for four years to pull this off!


Ackerman (left) with Balfour Beatty Vice President of Operations David Stanton and Big Rock Partners Managing Director Sean Nealon

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K I AWA H I N T H E C O M M U N I T Y

2 0 2 1 K I AWA H I S L A N D E M P L O Y E E O U T R E A C H E V E N T S

In 2021, Kiawah Partners officially launched Advance Kiawah. The goal of the initiative is to make a more direct, conscious effort to expand diversity in all areas of Kiawah Island, including staff & culture, home ownership, supplier diversity, and community engagement. Kiawah in the Community, Advance Kiawah’s community outreach program, connects Kiawah Island with the greater Lowcountry community by initiating outreach, service, and philanthropy projects. Taylor Cochrane, Kiawah Island Club’s Communications Manager, leads this outreach program.

B AC K PAC K BU DDI E S

Through the Backpack Buddies program, our team put together one hundred goody bags for children on Johns Island and ran a Dental Kit Drive, collecting 256 toothbrushes, 274 toothpastes, and over one hundred floss kits. THE A N G EL T R E E

The Angel Tree is an annual tradition at the Kiawah Island Club. Members and employees were invited to take a name from the tree at the Cassique Clubhouse and to shop for a gift for a child from St. John’s High School or Angel Oak Elementary. OUR L A DY OF ME R CY

Over the span of three days in August, thirty-seven employees volunteered with Our Lady of Mercy, helping to unbox, sort, and package food bags. On the day of the distribution event, they helped with setting up and breaking down, loading cars with food, and traffic control. In all, food and dental supply kits were distributed to 287 individuals and household members from the local community.

I’m happier when I’m helping other people, and I want everybody to have that experience. It’s so fun to see our employees interacting with people in the community. Everyone is so full of joy! - Taylor Cochrane, Outreach Lead FE E DING O F T H E MU LT IT U DE S FO R IS LAND FAMILIE S

At Thanksgiving our Kiawah Island Real Estate team participated in the 14th annual “Feeding of the Multitudes for Island Families” organized by St. John’s Parish Church. Our team prepared and delivered 182 meal kits for local families. FRIE RS O N E LE ME NTARY S CH O O L

In July our team worked to clean outdoor spaces and play areas at Frierson Elementary School in order to provide a safe and enjoyable environment for their students. TOYS FO R TOTS

Our Kiawah Island Real Estate team once again held a Toys for Tots drive, making dozens of local children’s holiday wishes come true with a new and special toy.

FO O D I T F O RWA R D

As part of our efforts to combat food insecurity in the Lowcountry, we launched a new Island Food Rescue program called “Food it Forward.” Kiawah Island Club members and guests have the opportunity to donate any unopened and nonperishable food items, and our team members will deliver them to our local food banks.

B LANK E TS FO R MU S C CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

In December our teams spent a fun-filled afternoon spreading joy in the River Course Ballroom with several organized activities to benefit the Charleston community. They created eighty fleece-tie blankets for the MUSC children’s hospital. Photos by Patrick O’Brien




WELCOMING by nature

WE ARE KIAWAH ISLAND

Partner with the leader in island hospitality and resort experiences— Kiawah Island Golf Resort Property Management.

843.768.6087 • ChooseKiawah.com

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ADVERTORIAL

UN PARALLELED GO LF GETAWAY ST O RY by BRYA N H U NT ER

The roar that disturbed The Ocean Course’s typical serenity

Photographs of Alice and Pete Dye, along with his renderings

when Phil Mickelson strode down the 18th fairway in route to

of the course layout, intermingle with memorabilia from the

victory—and the history books—in the 2021 PGA Championship

1991 Ryder Cup and the 2012 and 2021 PGA Championships.

still almost echoed when yet another significant episode in the

Flanking each side of the living area, king bed-furnished

course’s famed history occurred.

guestrooms feature en suite bathrooms and private balconies,

Following months of construction that paralleled its

and they are equipped with a 55-inch flat-screen television

preparation of the course for the major, Kiawah Island Golf

and an alcove table. Upstairs, two further king guestrooms are

Resort opened the doors of four new cottages to guests. The

similarly furnished and open to a private balcony. Following

appearance of the stunning new detached cottages designed

a tiring day on the course, guests will appreciate luxurious

by internationally celebrated Robert A.M. Stern Architects

touches such as Molton Brown toiletries, 800-thread-count

reflects the style of the iconic course clubhouse that the firm

bed linens, and plush towels and logoed bathrobes.

also designed. The cottages nestle within walking distance of

Distinct

from

the

resort’s

other

accommodations

the east side of the clubhouse, with their front façades shaded

offerings, the four cottages serve as the epicenter of a fully

by sprawling porches that overlook the driving range, and the

immersive bucket-list golfing experience at the course that

Atlantic serving as a dramatic backdrop.

hosted the famous 1991 Ryder Cup, the 2009 Senior PGA

The porches open to a spacious common living area comfortably appointed with leather club chairs. An 85-inch

Championship, the 2012 PGA Championship, and the 2021 PGA Championship.

flat-screen TV furnishes the area to allow guests to unwind

“The Ocean Course has remained on every dedicated

after a day on the links. The area, flooded with light by

golfer’s bucket list since the final putt of the ’91 Ryder Cup,”

oversized windows and glass doors, effortlessly transitions to a

says Kiawah Island Golf Resort President Roger Warren. “These

kitchenette and bar equipped with an icemaker, a mini fridge,

cottages, by offering world-class accommodations directly on

a Nespresso station, and an additional 55-inch flat-screen. The

the course and in the shadow of the clubhouse, take an already

hall beyond contains a washroom and laundry closet.

superlative golfing experience to an unprecedented level of

Throughout, the walls of each cottage are decorated with distinctive artwork that reflects definitive moments from throughout The Ocean Course’s illustrious history.

personalized service.” Guests who book The Ocean Course Cottage Experience will enjoy distinctive services and privileges. Prior to guest


ADVERTORIAL

One of the key components that make The Ocean Course Cottage Experience highly personal is the assistance of the dedicated concierge service.

arrival, a dedicated concierge helps plan every minute detail of

Cottage Experience guests receive preferred advantages,

the visit, from tee times, to highly individualized chef dinners,

such as access to The Sanctuary fitness center and indoor

to prearranging preferred beverages and snacks to stock the

pool and limitless range time. But Johnston also emphasizes

bar. Cottage Experience guests also receive highly sought

non-golfing and non-culinary opportunities can be arranged

after, guaranteed tee times at The Ocean Course.

through the concierge as well. For example, if a group wishes

One of the key components that make The Ocean Course

to take a break from the golf course and enjoy some of the

Cottage Experience highly personal is the assistance of the

Lowcountry’s famed natural beauty, the concierge can secure

dedicated concierge service. Well in advance of the guest’s

a morning or afternoon on the water for nearshore or inshore

visit, the concierge can work creatively with the guest to make

fishing, or—one of the resort’s most popular group activities—

the upcoming trip truly unique. In terms of dining, for example,

shooting biodegradable clay targets with a shotgun from a

the concierge has arranged everything from barbecue delivery

boat on the Kiawah River.

from Cherrywood BBQ & Ale House to having a chef come

Still, golf is the central focus of activities. One benefit

to the cottage to prepare steaks to-order accompanied by an

of securing The Ocean Course Cottage Experience is that it

assortment of gourmet sides.

includes a daily round of golf for each guest either on The

“We can even work ahead of time with guests to create a

Ocean Course or at any of the resort’s other four courses.

private meal paired with guests’ favorite wines or spirits,” says

Regardless of what, if any, activities guests choose in

Director of Rental Management Sales Hope Johnston, who

addition to golf, at the close of the day, as the sun begins

oversees the Cottage Experience. “With advanced planning,

slipping behind the distant 14th tee, they know they have

dining can be as elaborate as a group of golfers can imagine,

the comfort of returning to luxury accommodations nestled

or as simple as dropping in at Ryder Cup Bar in the clubhouse

within the quiet, peaceful seclusion of one of the world’s most

for a casual meal—albeit with a world-class view.”

iconic courses. — B.H.

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ADVERTORIAL

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EASTER

P GA C H A M P I O N S H I P AT T H E B E AC H C LU B

T U R K E Y T ROT

T U R K E Y T ROT

N OV E M B E R FE S T

R E D W H IT E & B O O M


R E D W H IT E & B O O M

P GA AT T H E B E AC H C LU B

EASTER

ON AND ABOUT

KIAWAH Throughout the year, Kiawah hosts dozens of soirees, outings, and activities. It was a fantastic 2021! PHOTOG R APHY by CHAR LOTTE ZACHAR KIW

RO C K T H E R I V E R

R E D W H IT E & B O O M

T H E M ATC H AT C A S S I Q U E


RO C K T H E R I V E R

R E D W H IT E & B O O M

P GA C H A M P I O N S H I P AT T H E B E AC H C LU B

T H E M ATC H AT C A S S I Q U E

T U R K E Y T ROT

T U R K E Y T ROT

R E D W H IT E & B O O M


R E D W H IT E & B O O M

P GA C H A M P I O N S H I P AT T H E B E AC H C LU B

RO C K T H E R I V E R

RO C K T H E R I V E R

T H E M ATC H AT C A S S I Q U E

N OV E M B E R FE S T

R E D W H IT E & B O O M


R E D W H IT E & B O O M

P GA C H A M P I O N S H I P AT T H E B E AC H C LU B

T H E M ATC H AT C A S S I Q U E

N OV E M B E R FE S T

P GA C H A M P I O N S H I P AT T H E B E AC H C LU B

T U R K E Y T ROT

EASTER


FINE JEWELRY GOLDCREATIONSCHAS.COM | 843.890.3965 | @GOLDCREATIONSSC


N E V E R L E AV E T H E I S L A N D S We’ve seen the sun come up on Beachwalker and the dolphins play at Captain Sam’s inlet. We don’t blame you; we don’t want to leave either. Roper St. Francis Physician Partners Primary Care has two nearby locations to provide our island neighbors and visitors fast access to quality healthcare. Establish a relationship with a primary care doctor or walk in for your urgent care needs, Monday – Saturday, 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Kiawah Island – Freshfields Village

Johns Island – Live Oak Square

345 Freshfields Dr., Ste. J101

1807 Crowne Commons Way, Ste. F1

(843) 768-4800

(843) 203-2280


Serving clients on Kiawah Island… since the beginning.

Real Property (Residential & Commercial) ■ Litigation / Construction Defects ■ Estate Planning ■ Business Matters Freshfields Village ■ 843.768.6600 ■ www.buistbyars.com



LEGENDARY by nature

WE ARE KIAWAH ISLAND

800.654.2924 • KiawahGolf.com


A DV E R T I S E R I N D E X

Alexandre Fleuren Interiors..................22, 23 Anderson Studio.........................................165

FROM THE LOWCOUNTRY TO ANY COUNTRY

Anglin Smith Fine Art................................147 Aqua Blue Pools.............................................6 Architecture Plus LLC...................................65 Bishop Gadsden..........................................104 Brandywine Oak Private Wealth.................66 Buffington Homes, L.P. .................................3 Buist, Byars & Taylor..................................161 Camens Architectural Group......................135

Lawyers in our Charleston office provide

Cortney Bishop Design.................................24 Croghan’s Jewel Box...................................162

trusted legal counsel to local, national,

D. Stanley Dixon Architect..........................15

and multinational companies. Backed

Dolphin Architects and Builders...................11

by a fully integrated global platform,

Ferguson.....................................................103

we offer unparalleled depth and

GDC Home....................................................13

breadth of experience to businesses

Grossman Building Group..............................4

and the people who own and manage

Henselstone Windows & Doors.....................17

Epic Development Group...............................19

Gold Creations............................................159

Hudson Designs............................................20

them. From Charleston to London to

K&L Gates...................................................164

Melbourne, we deliver innovative and

Kiawah Island Club & Real Estate......FIC, BIC

practical legal counsel.

Kiawah Island Golf Resort.................149, 163 Kingswood Custom Homes.............................9 Knight Residential Group.............................68

K&L Gates LLP. Global counsel here in Charleston and across five continents. Learn more at klgates.com.

Kristin Peake Interiors...................................2 M. Dumas & Sons.........................................21 Mangan Inc..................................................27 Margaret Donaldson Interiors.....................69 McDonald Architects..................................167 MUSC Health..............................................137

Matt Norton, Partner 134 Meeting Street, Suite 500 Charleston, South Carolina T: +1.843.579.5634 matt.norton@klgates.com

R.M. Buck Builders.......................................63 Roper St. Francis Healthcare......................160 Scout Boats.................................................136 Seafields at Kiawah Island.........................148 Seamar Construction Group........................67 Shope Reno Wharton Architecture.................5 South Street Partners........................106, 107 Tammy Connor Interior Design...................26 The Cape......................................................25 The Steadman Agency....................................7 Thomas & Hutton.......................................104 Three Oaks Contractors...............................64 Watts Builders............................................105


843.937.6001 | www.THEANDERSONSTUDIO.com Rivercourse Refuge | Kiawah Island, South Carolina


Photo by Charlotte Zacharkiw / Seabird Society

END NOTE

SUMMER STANDOUTS Beloved brands like Free Fly Apparel, Minnow Swim, and Seabird Society all come from our Carolina coast. These local designers are connected to the unique culture and sensibility of the Lowcountry. We hope that when you shop, you shop local!


796 MEETING STREET CHARLESTON, SC

MCDONALDARCHITECTS.COM (843) 576-9257


For more than four decades, Kiawah Island Real Estate has been the trusted resource for those who seek the Kiawah lifestyle. With a dedicated team of 50+ executives, three on-island sales offices, and exclusive access to the Kiawah Island Club, we are the only real estate firm focusing solely on Kiawah. We get it, because we live it. We look forward to helping you find your forever home on Kiawah. A C U R AT E D C O L L E C T I O N O F H O M E S A N D H O M E S I T E S W I T H C L U B M E M B E R S H I P S A V A I L A B L E .

kiawahisland.com/legends | 866.554.2924 Obtain the Property Report required by Federal Law and read it before signing anything. No Federal or State agency has endorsed or judged the merits of value, if any, of this property. This is not intended to be an offer to sell nor a solicitation of offer to buy real estate in any jurisdiction where prohibited by law. This offer is made pursuant to the New York State Department of Law’s Simplifi ed Procedure for Homeown-


N a tu r e N u r tu r e s COME HOME TO KIAWAH

KIAWAH’S MAIN GATE

THE SANCTUARY

FRESHFIELDS VILLAGE

1 Kiawah Island Parkway

near Jasmine Porch

390 Freshfi elds Drive

ers Associations with a De Minimis Cooperative Interest (CPS-7). The CPS-7 application (File No. HO16-0007) and related documents may be obtained from the sponsor. This project is registered with the State of New Jersey Department of Banking and Insurance Real Estate Commission. Obtain and read the NJ Public Offering Statement before signing anything (NJ Reg#16-15-0011 and 0012). An affi liate of Kiawah Partners.


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KIAWAH ISLAND, SC | 32.6082° N, 80.0848° W

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