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UPPER

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Upper School at Key


ABOUT KEY, QUICK FACTS

UPPER

Contents

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WHY KEY 6 CAMPUS 8 DISTINCTIVE PROGRAMMING Teaching and Learning 11 Interdisciplinary and Integrated 12 Civilizations, Integrated Science 12 Independent Study 14 Advanced Courses and AP Exams 16 Experimental Design 16 Senior Projects 18 CommuniKEY Career Networking 19

ACADEMIC & COLLEGE ADVISING College Advising 21 Advisory Programs 22 Academic Support 23 Technology 25 Library 25

COMMUNITY BEYOND THE CLASSROOM Global Perspectives 27 Diversity, Equity & Inclusion 28 Grade Advisory 29 Student/Faculty Forum 29 Town Meetings 29 Community Service 29

CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES Visual & Performing Arts 31 Activities, Clubs & Academic Teams 33 Outdoor Education 34 Athletics 36

UPPER SCHOOL 10-DAY BLOCK SCHEDULE 38 GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

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COURSE SELECTION PROCESS

41

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BY DEPARTMENT Department of Humanities 43 Department of Languages 48 Department of Mathematics 52 Department of Science 56 Department of Visual Arts 59 Department of Performing Arts 61 Department of Physical Education 63 Non-Departmental Courses 63 Upper School at Key

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iction nded upon the conv The Key School is fou ately curious about that children are inn learn , world; they want to themselves and the ate. r, and they want to cre they want to discove natural urish and guide this Our mission is to no arch and delight in the se exuberance, energy, es each student embrac for meaning, so that d, me or develops into an inf lifelong learning and ciety. tructive member of so thoughtful, and cons ent as adopted School Mission Statem Taken from the Key , 2014. 30 ril Ap on es ste by the Board of Tru

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UPPER ABOUT KEY Key School engages children from 2.5 years of age through grade 12 in a progressive, coeducational, college-preparatory program on its picturesque 15-acre campus located 4 miles from downtown Annapolis.

FOUNDATIONAL

FIRST SCHOOL Key-Wee to Kindergarten

COLLEGE PREPARATORY

LOWER SCHOOL Grades 1-4

MIDDLE SCHOOL Grades 5-8

UPPER SCHOOL Grades 9-12

QUICK FACTS Founding Year: 1958 Enrollment: 645 (51% girls; 49% boys) Geographic Reach: 71 zip codes; 12 countries; 257 sending schools Students of Color: 35% Average Class Size: 16 Student-Faculty Ratio: 6:1 Faculty: 114, 61% with advanced degrees, including 7 with doctorates Financial Aid Budget: $2.2 Million Families Receiving Need-Based Financial Aid: 30% Average Award: $11,175 Endowment: $14 Million More than 40 interscholastic sports teams Extensive Outdoor Education program, integrated with academic studies, involves all students

16 Buildings on 15-acre campus in Hillsmere Shores 70-acre Fusco Athletic Park in Annapolis Roads

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Why Key?

S

ince its inception in 1958, Key School has placed emphasis on inquiry-based learning, integrated studies, creative and collaborative problem solving, and building habits of perseverance and resourcefulness in its students. Current cognitive science and 21st century best practices of teaching and learning now espouse the very tenets that guided Key’s founders, who believed that knowledge should be constructed, not delivered; that real rigor is derived from a deep understanding of the complexity of concepts and problems, not from the sheer volume of content covered; and that flexible thinking was critical for the innovators and leaders of tomorrow.

Key alumni say they are uniquely prepared for the challenges of collegiate programs and well-equipped to meet the demands of today’s innovation-driven economy.

HERE ARE A FEW OF THE MANY REASONS FAMILIES CHOOSE KEY SCHOOL: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 6

Emphasis on skill development over rote content Well-established interdisciplinary and integrated curricula Focus on diversity of thought and global perspectives Exceptional faculty Small classes and 6:1 student-faculty ratio College level Independent Studies Academic Advisory & College Counseling Over 40 activities and clubs Healthy balance between academics, arts and athletics Meaningful technology integration Renowned Visual and Performing Arts Program Championship level Athletic Program with a no-cut JV policy Extensive Outdoor Education Program Safe, picturesque campus 70-acre Fusco Athletic Park Outcomes (page 7) Upper School at Key


UPPER

OUTCOMES 2019 over

82%

81%

of the Class of 2019 received merit scholarships

11% earned National Merit Scholarship Recognition

(national avg. < 1%)

will attend â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most/Highly/ Very Competitiveâ&#x20AC;? colleges/universities

25%

of the Class of 2019 scored 1430+ on the SATs Class Mean of 1313

35%

intend to pursue STEM-related studies including engineering, computer science, marine and environmental science, pre-health/vet, and architecture

24%

will attend Research 1 Universities

98%

of recent alumni parents surveyed

WOULD RECOMMEND KEY

to a friend, colleague or family member

For a complete list of 2019 college acceptances and matriculations, visit keyschool.org/Classof2019

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Campus

There are 16 buildings and 3 playing fields on Keyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 15-acre campus in Hillsmere Shores. Key's Fusco Athletic Park, a 70-acre facility in the neighborhood of Annapolis Roads, boasts 8 tennis courts, a baseball field, and 2 competition fields.

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1. Manse Field 2. Smith House 3. Foundersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Walk 4. Bookstore 5. Carroll House Parking Lot 6. Arts Building 7. Farmhouse

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8. Carroll House 9. Science and Library Center 10. First School 11. First School Outdoor Playground 12. Manse 13. Manse Addition

14. Katharine Hall 15. Maintenance Building 16. Amphitheater 17. Activity Building 18. Greenhouse 19. Main Barn 20. Practice Field


UPPER 21. Art Barn 22. Willow 23. Student Parking Lot 24. Lee Curry Orchard 25. Obstacle Course 26. Beach Field 27. Fusco Athletic Park

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DISTINCTIVE PROGRAMMING

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DISTINCTIVE PROGRAMMING

Teaching & Learning

What makes Key so different from most schools is its approach to teaching and learning­— where critical thinking, problem-solving, collaboration, and communication skills are all valued above rote content, and represent a significant portion of the learning objectives within each class. Key students are able to understand important content knowledge through the process of building an understanding of concepts from research, class discussions, group and individual project work, and through the preparation required to present and defend their answers and points of view using reliable sources. Key students learn to be historians by researching and studying primary documents, not from highlighting dates in textbooks. Key develops mathematicians by requiring them to grapple with novel problems while leaning on skills and concepts they have used before— they are not trained to simply memorize equations and plug in numbers. Our scientists are taught through the integration of concepts from biology, chemistry and physics, and not in separate silos—because, like scientists in the real world, our students need to apply concepts from chemistry and physics in order to defend their findings in biology. While Key is not a school that teaches to tests or subscribes to off-the-shelf curricula, our students still perform well above public and private school averages on the SAT and ACT.

CLASS OF 2019

25% scored 1430 or higher

Mid-Range SAT score of

Mean score of

1313

(Maryland private school avg. 1216)

1210 -1430

11%

National Merit Commendation (national average is below <1%)

(this represents the middle 50%)

UPPER SCHOOL QUICK FACTS • Upper School Enrollment: 216 • Upper School Faculty: 41 • Upper School Student to Faculty Ratio: 5:1 • Average Class Size: 16 • 10-Day Schedule (see page 38-39) • Four 85-minute Class Periods per Day • Advisory, Office Hours and Class Meetings Built into Schedule • Academic Support and Enrichment Available in Every Discipline • Traditional Graduation Requirements (see page 40) Upper School at Key

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Interdisciplinary & Integrated

Making connections among disciplines and leveraging skills that can be applied crosscurricularly were the pedagogical pillars upon which Key was founded in 1958, and remain central to its mission today. The School’s founders believed the optimal learning environment was achieved when the walls between disciplines were broken down and teachers focused on showing the connections among them. Decades later, this approach, now referred to as interdisciplinary and integrated teaching, is viewed as best-practice for 21st Century teaching and learning. Through its interdisciplinary and integrated program, Key’s Upper School challenges students to pursue knowledge, ideas and understanding within and among academic disciplines. Exploring connections through projects and assignments within academic courses and through collaboration with other classes provides a collaborative learning experience that actively engages students in the learning process and encourages them to draw from myriad resources as they solve problems. An Upper School student at Key is as likely to employ the scientific method as a best-practice research strategy for a history presentation as for an independent project in math. This approach to learning empowers students to know far more than rote data—they learn to think about history and the future, drawing on a deepseated knowledge of the human condition and influencers that shape people’s decision-making. Examples of interdisciplinary and integrated programming at Key include:

CIVILIZATIONS Fully integrating history and English curricula is often referred to as humanities—as it is in Key’s Middle School. In the Upper School, Civilizations or “Civ,” is taught in grades 9 through 11. Civilizations courses not only integrate studies in literature and history, but also religion, philosophy, art, politics, economics, law, and the history of science. 12

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DISTINCTIVE PROGRAMMING

Ancient Civilizations (9th), European Civilization (10th), and American Civilization (11th) are team-taught courses that focus on the development of essential skills in writing essays, analyzing and researching primary documents, participating in classroom discussion and presentations, and collaborating on academic projects. Students are regularly asked to write essays drawing on inferences and projections based on their understanding of time periods, cultures, customs, and historical events. (see page 42 for full course descriptions)

INTEGRATED SCIENCE Key’s Integrated Science Program incorporates aspects of chemistry, biology and physics into each of the student’s required science classes in lieu of teaching them separately in grades 9 through 11. Through purposeful integration, the meaning and relevance of abstract topics become evident because students apply their learning as they explore topics traditionally found in other disciplines. For example, in 10th grade Integrated Science: Energy, students immediately apply what they learn about the force of collisions (physics) to understand the behavior of gases (chemistry). Additionally, by presenting the holistic picture of science, Key teachers are able to incorporate more iterative and experimental design and engineering projects throughout the courses than previously possible in the segmented or siloed curriculum. (see page 54 for full course descriptions)

“Imagine an environment where voicing your dissenting opinion is encouraged; composing your music, as a seven-year-old, is essential to the school play; studying the efficacy of herd immunity is debated; and you feel supported in your desire for preserving the Chesapeake Bay for generations to come. For the past thirteen years, this has been the Key School environment. It’s more than textbooks and classrooms; it’s about instilling in me the desire for learning beyond 3 p.m.”

Rayan Zia '18 Dickinson College

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Independent Study

Offered as a one-semester class, Independent Study provides an engaging opportunity for seniors to pursue a specific area of interest through dedicated, in-depth study. While students do work closely with a faculty sponsor, Independent Study is appropriate for highly motivated students who have demonstrated the capability to undertake a rigorous course of study without the structure and direction provided by conventional academic classes. Available to seniors, about 30% of students participate in an Independent Study. Examples include: SCIENCE: Synthetic Biology; Study of Mechanics (Physics C); Marine Biology and Environmental Law; The Biology of Cancer; Proton Therapy; Equine Anatomy and Physiology; The Physiology of Homeostasis; Behavioral Study of Cetaceans MATHEMATICS: A Mathematical Study of Proof Writing; Applied Calculus; Calculus C; Multivariable Calculus; Medical Statistics HUMANITIES: A Study of the Supreme Court; Exploration of Eastern Religion; Female Autonomy in 19th and 20th Century Literature; The Arab Spring; The Belt and Road Initiative in China; Phenomenology VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS: Music Theory 3; Stop-Motion Animated Short Film Direction; Interior Design; The Evolution of the French Song; Building a Television Show Pilot OTHER: American Sign Language

38%

of the Class of 2019 completed an Independent Study during their time at Key School.

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DISTINCTIVE PROGRAMMING


Advanced Courses & AP Exams

Key School has long opted not to offer Advanced Placement designated courses as it would require the faculty to strictly adhere to the College Board courses, which emphasize rote memorization over deep understanding and practical application. Instead, Key School offers 14 college-level courses, from American Civilization and French V to Calculus II/III and Advanced Chemistry. Courses designated as “Advanced” do require students to sit for the AP Exam. Those courses include: Advanced Chemistry, Advanced Biology, Advanced Calculus AB, Advanced Calculus BC, Advanced Spanish Literature, and Advanced Latin. Additionally, Key provides optional AP preparation classes for students enrolled in Physics, Statistics, French V, Spanish Language and Literature, English 12, American Civilization, and Studio Concentration, if they wish to take the AP.

Experimental Design

Experimental Design is a semester-long science elective that provides juniors and seniors the opportunity to craft a lab or field-based experiment drawing from the theoretical knowledge they gathered in Key’s core science curriculum. This rigorous course requires students to pose an essential question, research and create a hypothesis, write a proposal which is peer-reviewed, perform a carefully designed experiment and analyze the results. Proposed experiments are approved by the teacher. Through this construct, students truly experience the scientific process: engaging with dependent variables, replication, reducing bias, controls, error, and statistical analysis. Students are required to collaborate with both an off-campus mentor and Key faculty who provide specific expertise and guidance. During their culminating presentation, students present their findings to a panel of Key faculty and their peers and facilitate discussion about the importance of their project.

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DISTINCTIVE PROGRAMMING EXAMPLES OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN PROJECTS: • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Engineering a sensory-activated robotic arm through computer programming and 3D printing An experiment in generating power through a newly designed alternator The chemistry and biology of bioluminescence A study of the physics of light using reflection and refraction of various lenses Field studies on carbon sequestration, the impact of oyster beds on local environments, and small-scale migration patterns due to climate change Android game design with C++ The building of highly efficient electromagnets Creating a novel way to use proton cancer therapy A comparative DNA study of blueberries using electrophoresis gel Experimenting with different chemical solutions for film development Creating firework colors using metal oxidizers An updated marshmallow delayed gratification study The study of acoustics and electricity Upper School at Key

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Senior Projects

All seniors spend their final two weeks at Key actively engaged in internships, career exploration, independent projects, or community-based service activities. Seniors develop proposals which are subject to review and approval by the Upper School Academic Committee in the early spring. Each year, the senior project period begins after advanced placement exams in May and concludes before Commencement, when seniors return to campus to make presentations about and undergo assessments of their project work.

RECENT SENIOR PROJECTS HAVE INCLUDED: • • • • • • • • • • • •

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Working in the Computational Bio Lab at Johns Hopkins University Shadowing at the London School of Economics Glass blowing Building a robotic arm Restoring reefs in Belize Food writing for the Chicago Tribune Creating a stock market trading algorithm Volunteering at a local hospice Constructing a laser printer from scratch Training to be an EMT Working at a wolf sanctuary in Colorado Researching carnivorous plants

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DISTINCTIVE PROGRAMMING

CommuniKey Career Networking

Connections to Key endure long past Commencement. Alumni serve as important resources for current students, participating in several events annually which include presenting at Career Day and mentoring soon-to-be graduates during Senior Projects. Keyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s official online networking and mentoring platform, communiKEY, is designed to connect and reconnect alumni with one another and other members of the School community. This network provides opportunities for alumni to share career advice, explore mentoring opportunities based on personal, geographic and professional commonalities, and to grow individual professional networks.

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ACADEMIC AND COLLEGE ADVISING

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COLLEGE & ACADEMIC ADVISING

College Advising

Key students receive one-on-one guidance throughout the college search and admissions process from Key's Director of College Advising. Although the majority of interactions take place during students' junior and senior years, there are multiple important touchpoints with all Upper School students beginning in ninth grade. The goal of college advising is to educate and support both students and parents in their search for the right college fit; that is, to guide them as they seek to unearth the best size, preferred location, campus culture, and above all, the most appropriate academic program. In this quest for the right match, there are monthly evening group meetings for parents and students throughout junior year to provide an exhaustive examination of the entire search process, and at least one extended meeting with each family in the second half of eleventh grade, tailored exclusively to the needs of the individual student. Key School is well-known and highly respected within the college admissions circle, and a broad range of colleges and universities send representatives to Key each fall to meet with prospective students. Most college representatives look upon Key as a breeding ground for academic excellence, independent thinkers and creative problem solvers. Between 50 and 60 colleges visit Key each fall, meeting with interested juniors and seniors. Visit keyschool.org/collegeadvising for a full listing of college representatives visiting Key.

10 MOST COMMONLY ATTENDED COLLEGES (2015-2019) • The American University • • • •

College of William and Mary Dickinson College Duke University Goucher College

99%

of graduates pursue college

• • • • •

New York University St. Mary’s College of Maryland Syracuse University University of Denver University of Maryland

90%

of recent graduates were accepted to one of their top choice colleges

81%

will attend “Most/Highly/ Very Competitive” colleges/universities

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Academic Advisory / Student Advising The Advisory program exists to encourage and enhance a student’s academic performance and overall well-being by ensuring that each student has ready access to an adult in the School who knows the student well and can provide informed advocacy, oversight and guidance. In regularly scheduled meetings with advisees, advisors seek to build relationships characterized by openness, concern and understanding. For example, advisor and advisee together assess the student’s academic performance, noting academic successes and determining strategies for improvement.

An advisor can also serve as an important source of information—for parents, other faculty and administrators—in addressing issues that arise during a student’s career at Key. Every member of the full-time Upper School faculty serves as an advisor. Advisories are cross-grade level and include approximately ten students who remain together throughout their time at Key. Forming a close-knit group, advisories provide an opportunity for younger students to receive support from older students, and for older students to act as mentors. Advisories meet twice a week for 35 minutes and may connect an additional three times during office hours.

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COLLEGE & ACADEMIC ADVISING

Academic Support

Academic support is readily available in the Upper School, and most students take advantage of some form of extra help from time to time in their Upper School years. All teachers are available to students when the need for occasional assistance arises and Upper School Learning Specialists are resources for students with specific learning needs. Extra support is also available through “labs” maintained for this purpose, which are staffed by faculty within each discipline. Beyond student-initiated help sessions in these labs, students are occasionally referred or assigned to a lab by a teacher, advisor or learning specialist. Labs are also used to provide enrichment for students who seek additional challenge. Lab sessions are scheduled during students’ study halls or free blocks. • MATH LAB, staffed by two Upper School mathematics teachers, offers small group and individualized instruction and extra help to support students’ progress in mathematics courses. • LANGUAGE LAB for French and Spanish is staffed by Upper and Middle School language teachers. Latin and Arabic teachers are available to students during scheduled office hours. • SCIENCE LAB, staffed by Upper School science teachers, provides support in all the core Integrated Science courses as well as the advanced courses. • WRITING CENTER is available to students on an appointment or drop-in basis for support with writing assignments across the curriculum. The center is staffed by an Upper School humanities teacher and designated senior writing tutors, selected through an application process.

FACULTY OFFICE HOURS Regularly scheduled faculty office hours also provide students with easy access to their teachers outside of class. Key faculty are committed to an open-door policy and encourage students to ask questions and seek support. (see schedule, page 38-39)

STUDY HALL AND FREE BLOCKS All ninth graders, as well as other new-to-Key Upper School students, begin their Upper School careers assigned to structured study halls in place of free blocks in support of their transition to the Upper School. As their first year progresses, and as these new students demonstrate records of good citizenship, behavior and academic standing, they must apply and be granted the free block privilege. Free blocks offer students important opportunities to learn and practice time management and decision-making skills.

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COLLEGE & ACADEMIC ADVISING

Technology

Key School has been teaching its students to think like scientists, technologists, engineers, artists, and mathematicians in an interdisciplinary environment since 1958—long before terms like STEM and STEAM existed. In each course, Key’s curriculum is designed to ask its students to analyze, question and construct meaning from information gathered. Key teachers believe knowledge should be constructed, not delivered, and that real rigor comes from a deep understanding of the complexity of concepts and problems, not from the sheer amount of content covered. To that end, technology is not viewed as a distinct academic discipline, but rather a tool students should have facility to leverage. Within the classrooms, the Upper School technology integrator works closely with faculty to identify and create meaningful educational experiences utilizing myriad technologies to enhance the learning experience. Key has a 1:1 personal laptop program for all students in grades 5-12. Upper School students are required to bring their own laptop to school each day. Key uses Google Apps for Education to foster communication and collaboration among students and faculty. Key also offers its students other technologically-focused activities and learning opportunities including Computer Science, Robotics, Maker Space, Experimental Design, and Independent Studies. Recent examples include: • Engineering a sensory-activated robotic arm through computer programming and 3D printing • An experiment in generating power through a newly designed alternator • Android game design with C++ • The study of acoustics and electricity • The building of highly efficient electromagnets

Library

The Upper School Library is both physically and philosophically the heart of the Upper School. It provides students and faculty with resources for both individual and collaborative exploration of ideas and information; a variety of study spaces; a print and periodicals collection based on the Upper School curricula; and an extensive selection of fiction titles. The Library also has virtual resources to support student research and learning, including databases and a growing e-book collection crafted around class assignments and student interests. The Library is staffed by one full-time librarian and is open to students after school hours until 7:00 p.m. through early May, and until 5:30 p.m. through the close of the school year.

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COMMUNITY BEYOND THE CLASSROOM

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COMMUNITY BEYOND THE CLASSROOM

Global Perspectives

It is imperative that our students be prepared to succeed in a highly interconnected, complex, pluralistic world. Therefore, the Upper School program seeks to foster in students an awareness of both the distinct nature and the interconnectedness of cultures, nations and economies. Such global perspectives are developed in academic courses across the disciplines through readings, essays, discussions, and projects, and through special activities such as international travel, collaborative partnerships and exchanges with students around the world. Opportunities for international travel are usually offered twice a year. These experiences often include elements of service, outdoor education and opportunities for deep cultural immersion. Key’s long-standing affiliation with the Chumbageni Primary School in Tanzania is an example of a partnership that involves students at all division levels. Students also take part in oncampus activities aligned with nationally recognized organizations such as Model United Nations, Model Congress, and Students for Social Change.

“My experiences at Key have shaped who I am more than any other influence in my life. Experiences should hold more value than accomplishments...I learned this first-hand by not receiving a letter grade until freshman year. I enjoy learning for learning’s sake; I learn because I want to grow and understand the world, not for a good grade. In all of my classes I have been asked deep, complex questions, and I have been expected to take my thoughts and synthesize them into clear, concise responses. I have learned that sharing ideas helps me broaden my perspective and rethink my initial conclusions.”

Katharine Young '16 Pomona College

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Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

Since its inception, Key School has encouraged independent thinking and openness to differing ideas and perspectives. Key faculty believe that we learn and grow, both as individuals and as a school community, when students and adults of diverse backgrounds, abilities and identities develop an understanding of and respect for commonalities and differences. This is vital to fulfilling Keyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s promise to prepare its students for the challenges and responsibilities they will assume within an increasingly connected yet diverse and pluralistic world community.

In 2018, Key School hosted the Baltimore Student Diversity Leadership Conference, planned and orchestrated by student leaders from Key and peer schools.

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The Upper School program approaches diversity, equity and inclusion in myriad ways, both explicitly through the academic curriculum and implicitly through student-to-student and faculty-to-student collaboration and interaction. Core course content representing diverse world cultures and specific electives such as African-American Literature and Japan and the West enrich the student learning experience. And, while ever-evolving, purposeful focus on open discourse in Town Meetings, within classrooms and advisories, and one-on-one provide avenues for constructive exchange and community growth. The activities of specific student groups such as the Students for Social Change and affinity groups including Black, International and LGBTQ+ also contribute greatly to this work. In support of this ongoing conversation and continued programmatic evolution, Keyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion is a valuable resource for students and faculty alike. Upper School students and faculty also regularly attend the Association of Independent Maryland and DC Schools (AIMS) and National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS) Student Diversity Leadership Conferences as well as the NAIS People of Color Conference.


COMMUNITY BEYOND THE CLASSROOM

Grade Advisory

Students plan community service and other class projects and initiatives and discuss issues of importance to their particular grade levels in class meetings led by each grade’s Student/Faculty Forum representatives. Each grade level has two class advisors, appointed by the Upper School Division Head on a rotating basis from among the Upper School faculty, who oversee and attend to various aspects of student life and the student experience at Key.

Student / Faculty Forum

The Student/ Faculty Forum is a representative body that meets weekly with the Upper School Division Head to discuss matters of concern to students and/or faculty, plan initiatives and projects, plan Upper School Town Meetings, and consult with one another about issues of importance to the Upper School community. Four student representatives per grade level are elected at the beginning of each school year, and four members of the Upper School faculty are selected at large to serve oneyear terms. Student representatives to the Forum also facilitate Upper School Town Meetings.

Town Meetings

The Upper School community of students and faculty gathers two or three times each semester for an open forum on important topics of interest and/or concern to the community. Agendas for Town Meetings are established by the Student/Faculty Forum, with input from both students and faculty.

Community Service

Community service work offers Upper School students important opportunities to give back to their school, local, national, and international communities, while developing important skills and values. The Upper School plans and undertakes community service projects each year. These annual projects include both “hands-on” work and philanthropic efforts and often emerge through ongoing partnerships with Quiet Waters Park, Hillsmere Shores Improvement Association, ASPCA, Anne Arundel Medical Center, Light House, and Chesapeake Bay Foundation. Beyond these class projects, many Upper School students participate in service projects and efforts through a variety of activities and some academic classes. Students may also enroll in a “Community Service Work” elective. Finally, a number of Upper School students participate in service projects they have initiated and developed on their own. Upper School at Key

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CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

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CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

Visual & Performing Arts

Upper School students enjoy a rich array of opportunities to learn skills and explore talents in the visual and performing arts. An extensive list of offerings, both curricular and co-curricular, are available to students. Annual performances/events include a Key Theater fall production and spring musical; and spring Chorus, Dance, Key Strings, and Jazz Ensemble concerts. In addition, gallery displays throughout the year highlight studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; visual art creations. (see page 58-63 for course descriptions)

VISUAL

PERFORMING

MUSIC

Art I

Acting: Voice & Movement

Chamber Choir I, II, III, IV

Ceramics I, II, Studio Concentration

Acting: Character & Emotion

Music Theory I, II

Digital Photography I, II, Concentration

Dance Activity

Chorus

Key Theater Productions

Jazz Band

Playwriting

Jazz Ensemble

Theater Design

Key Strings

Theater Performance

Wind Ensemble

Digital Video I, II Drawing and Painting I, II Studio Concentration I, II

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CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES FIRST

Activities, Clubs and Academic Teams

The Upper School Activities Program includes a diverse and dynamic array of clubs, student organizations and extracurricular activities. Activity time is incorporated into the school day, three days per week on a 10-day rotation. All students are required to participate in activities through first semester of senior year. Seniors are encouraged to participate and take leadership roles. Many activities are student-led, though all have faculty advisors. While some activities are perennial favorites, new activities that reflect current interests may be introduced by students and/or teachers each year. These additions keep the Activities Program fresh. Some activities meet once weekly; others meet more often. Students are introduced to the activity options at the Activities Fair, held in the opening days of the school year. At that time, students choose and sign up for their activities. A sampling of the more than 40 activities offered annually: • • • • • • • • • •

Model United Nations Math Team Yearbook Writing Seminar/ Zenith, literary magazine Students for Social Change Peer Tutoring Chorus Jazz Band Investment Club LGBTQ+ Alliance

• • • • • • • • • •

Yoga Environmental Awareness Robotics Model Congress Makers Space Students Against Destructive Decisions Spark, student newspaper Mock Trial Black Affinity Christian Affinity Upper School at Key

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Outdoor Education

The Upper School Outdoor Education program is a unique and extensive experiential program that is student-centered and focuses on individual growth, community building, academic integration, and supportive risk taking. Through both required trips at each grade level and an array of optional trips, students are provided with experiences that allow them to take leadership roles within a group, practice active listening and empathy, challenge them to be courageous and resilient, and work together in challenging environments. They live and work together for the duration of each trip and are dependent upon the contributions of each individual for the group’s success. These experiences help stress the “importance of trust, mutual respect and compassion” as described in the School’s Mission Statement. In addition, the program presents students opportunities for emotional and physical growth that go far beyond their day-to-day classroom experiences. They are encouraged to ask questions, create their own solutions and ideas, and explore the world around them. Through rigorous technical and interpersonal skills training, many students choose to become “outdoor peer leaders” and, in that role, mentor and lead the Middle School students on backpacking and paddling trips. 34

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CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

TRIPS INCLUDE NINTH GRADE • The Island Odyssey takes place in early September and is a required three-day interdisciplinary trip to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation facilities at Smith and Tangier Islands. Activities include academic explorations stemming from students’ Ancient Civilizations, Integrated Science: Data, and art courses, as well as community building by living and working together. • The optional ninth grade spring backpacking trip is a two or three-day regional trip for those looking to gain more comfort in the outdoor program or to further develop their technical and interpersonal skills. TENTH GRADE • The tenth grade travels to Carderock for a three-day fall backpacking and climbing trip in the locally famous Great Falls region outside of Washington, DC. Students learn the basics of rock climbing and orienteering as vehicles to develop communication and teamwork within the class. • Rollin’ on the River is a four-day camping interdisciplinary trip during which students travel along the Brandywine River and assume identities—such as mill worker, quarryman, teacher, child, clergyman—from the early Industrial Revolution. This trip includes academic explorations stemming from students’ European Civilization course, science and mathematics courses, as well as community building, living and working together, and committee work. This trip takes place in late May.

ELEVENTH GRADE • Assateague Island is a five-day camping, field biology trip to Assateague Island that includes extensive field work for Integrated Science: Systems, and provides opportunities for community building, living and working together, as well as committee work. This trip takes place in late May. • In the fall, 11th graders paddle in tidal waters near the School on day trips connected to their explorations of local history and enabling a deeper look into the nuances of a "sense of place.”

TWELFTH GRADE • The Senior Leadership Trip is a three-day fall camping and whitewater rafting trip in western Maryland which includes seniors’ reflections on leadership in their final year at Key, as well as community-building, and living and working together. All activities center on the deliberate construction of purposeful, appropriate senior leadership and a “senior year community.”

OPTIONAL TRIPS OPEN TO ALL UPPER SCHOOL STUDENTS • A fall day-long paddling trip on the waters around Thomas Point in Annapolis. • A three-day winter camping trip in western Maryland • Multi-day summer backpacking and/or paddling trips are available, and in the past have included: • 17-day kayak journey down the length of the Chesapeake Bay • 12-day canoe adventure on the Allagash River in Northern Maine • 14-day kayaking and community-service focused trip in the outer islands of the Bahamas.

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Athletics

In the Athletic Program, students find the balance between individual achievement and the needs of the team, between broad participation and deep commitment to one sport. The junior varsity level focuses on skill development and inclusiveness, but also places greater emphasis on preparing students for varsity level competition. At the varsity level, the primary goal is the presentation of competitive teams. Key students value intense competition and, at the same time, they honor good sportsmanship. The program seeks a level of competition that is inclusive while promoting the studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; commitment to mastering skills, understanding tactics, fostering teamwork, and developing character.

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CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

The Upper School interscholastic athletics year is divided into three seasons as follows:

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

Cross Country (boys, girls)

Basketball (boys, girls)

Baseball (boys)

Equestrian Team (co-ed)

Lacrosse (boys, girls)

Field Hockey (girls)

Indoor Track and Field (boys, girls)

Sailing (co-ed)

Swimming (boys, girls)

Tennis (boys, girls)

Sailing (co-ed)

Soccer (boys, girls) Volleyball (girls)

2019 HIGHLIGHTS

40

More than interscholastic sports teams

75%

of Upper Schoolers play a sport; 42% play two or more

17%

Earned All-Conference and/or All-County Honors

14 CHAMPIONSHIP WINS SINCE THE FALL OF 2015 INCLUDING: • Varsity Field Hockey & Tennis 2019 • Back-to-Back Undefeated Girls’ Varsity Swimming in 2017 & 2018 • Back-to-Back Boys’ Varsity Basketball in 2017 & 2018

• MASSA Silver Fleet Sailing Champions, 2019; MDISA Fleet Racing Champion, National Qualifier Top 10, National Invitational Team Racing Qualifier 2016; and MDISA Fleet Racing Champion & MASSA Team Racing Champion, 2015

25

League Championship Appearances

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Upper School Schedule WEEK 1 MONDAY

(10-DAY ROTATION)

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

A 8:15-9:40

E 8:15-9:40

B 8:15-9:40

F 8:15-9:40

A 8:15-9:40

OFFICE HOURS

OFFICE HOURS

GRADE MEETING

9:40-10:10

UPPER SCHOOL MEETING

OFFICE HOURS

9:40-10:10

9:40-10:10

9:40-10:10

B 10:15-11:40

F 10:15-11:40

A 10:15-11:40

E 10:15-11:40

B 10:15-11:40

G 12:25-1:50

C 12:25-1:50

9:40-10:10

LUNCH 11:40-12:25

C 12:25-1:50

G 12:25-1:50

D 12:25-1:50

BREAK

D 2:00-3:25

ADVISORY

ADVISORY

2:00-2:35

2:00-2:35

ACTIVITIES 1 2:40-3:25

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C 2:00-3:25

ACTIVITIES 2 2:40-3:25

D 2:00-3:25


UPPER WEEK 2 MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

E 8:15-9:40

B 8:15-9:40

F 8:15-9:40

A 8:15-9:40

E 8:15-9:40

OFFICE HOURS

OFFICE HOURS

GRADE MEETING

9:40-10:10

UPPER SCHOOL MEETING

OFFICE HOURS

9:40-10:10

9:40-10:10

9:40-10:10

F 10:15-11:40

A 10:15-11:40

E 10:15-11:40

B 10:15-11:40

F 10:15-11:40

C 12:25-1:50

G 12:25-1:50

9:40-10:10

LUNCH 11:40-12:25

G 12:25-1:50

D 12:25-1:50

G 12:25-1:50

BREAK ADVISORY

ADVISORY

2:00-2:35

2:00-2:35

ACTIVITIES 1 2:40-3:25

C 2:00-3:25

ACTIVITIES 3 2:00-3:25

D 2:00-3:25

ACTIVITIES 2 2:40-3:25

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Graduation Requirements

Students are expected to carry a minimum of five and a maximum of six credits each year, and complete a minimum of 18.25 credits to graduate. *Above and beyond the requirements to graduate, most students take additional electives in art, history, math, and science as well as advanced courses.

DEPARTMENT

40

REQUIRED CREDITS*

NOTES

English

4

Ancient Civilizations (9th) European Civilization (10th) American Civilization (11th) English 12 (12th)

History

3

Ancient Civilizations (9th) European Civilization (10th) American Civilization (11th)

Languages

2

2 years of language

Math

3

Required through Algebra II and junior year

Science

3

Integrated Science: Data (9th) Integrated Science: Energy (10th) Integrated Science: Systems (11th)

Visual & Performing Arts

2

Art I is required for all students; 1/2 credit must be in the performing arts

Physical Education

1

Requirement can be fulfilled through athletics and/or participation in clubs.

Life Skills

.25

Semester-long course (9th)

Upper School at Key


UPPER

Course Selection Process

In choosing courses, students need to give close attention to graduation requirements, course sequences, course prerequisites, and special departmental requirements. Course selections for each year’s schedule must be approved by the student’s parent(s) or guardian(s), the student’s academic advisor, and the Director of College Advising. Advisors counsel their advisees on the content of courses offered and the appropriateness of the selection in relation to the advisee’s goals, interests and past academic performance. The Director of College Advising counsels students and their parent(s) or guardian(s) on issues involving college admission requirements and strategies appropriate for successful college applications. • Ninth graders are required to carry five credits, however the majority of students take six credits. The typical ninth grade program includes the double-credit and double-scheduled Ancient Civilizations course (2 credits), mathematics, Integrated Science: Data, a language, and Art I or a second language. • Tenth graders are required to carry five credits, however the majority of students take six credits. The typical tenth grade program includes the double-credit and double-scheduled European Civilization course (2 credits), mathematics, Integrated Science: Energy, language(s), and an elective. • Eleventh graders are required to carry five credits, however the majority of students take six credits. Students take the double-credit and double-scheduled American Civilization course (2 credits), mathematics, Integrated Science: Systems, and, generally, a language. The remainder of the schedule for the eleventh graders is made up of elective choices based on students’ interests, graduation requirements and recommendations of students’ advisors and the Director of College Advising. For example, students may choose to “double-up” in science by taking Physics concurrently with Integrated Science: Systems. • Twelfth graders are required to carry at least five credits, four of which must be earned at Key. The fifth may be obtained through taking a course via concurrent enrollment at a community college (or approved online course) but seniors may not fulfill their core graduation requirements through such a course. All twelfth graders take English 12. The remainder of the schedules for the twelfth graders is made up of elective choices based on students’ interests, graduation requirements and recommendations of students’ advisors and the Director of College Advising. Students cannot carry more than six credits in any semester without the special permission of the Academic Committee. All courses described in this guide are full-year, one-credit courses unless otherwise noted.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Department of Humanities

HUMANITIES

Fully integrating history and English curricula is often referred to as humanities—as it is in Key’s Middle School. A central focus of the Upper School humanities program is the development of essential skills in writing essays; researching, analyzing and using primary documents; participating in classroom discussions and presentations; and collaborating on academic projects. Students are regularly asked to write essays drawing on inferences and projections based on their understanding of time periods, cultures, customs, and historical events. Teachers maintain consistency in coaching students to cultivate the clarity of their expression, the precision of their thoughts, and the originality of their voices. Seminar discussion, which requires students to think on their feet and to make creative use of evidence from course readings and elsewhere, is at the heart of the humanities program. Humanities courses also emphasize collaborative skills through structured group projects. The core English and history courses—Civilizations or “Civ”—are team-taught in grades 9-11 and comprise Ancient Civilizations (9th), European Civilization (10th), and American Civilization (11th). Civilizations courses not only integrate studies in literature and history, but also religion, philosophy, art, politics, economics, law, and the history of science as students learn about the significant developments in Western thought, culture, history, and literary tradition. English 12, a requirement for twelfth grade students, draws upon this same framework to deepen students’ understanding of literature. Elective courses enable students to pursue a diverse range of studies. ANCIENT CIVILIZATIONS (Grade 9; 2 credits) Ancient Civilizations is a team-taught course that incorporates the intellectual, artistic and cultural history of early civilizations around the world. Beginning with the study of pre-historic man and ending with the rise of Christianity and Islam, the students trace the evolution of civilizations and the thoughts, values and attitudes that developed in different regions and passed into our common heritage. The students use philosophy, art, history, literature, architecture, and theater to examine how each civilization addressed the fundamental issues of social, political and religious experience. An important emphasis in the work of this course is the use of collaborative problem-solving activities, beginning with a three-day, cross-curricular “Island Odyssey”

trip to Smith and Tangier Islands, during which students explore issues relating to Neolithic man. Other notable collaborative projects include the Res Gestae Project, in which students craft a biographical museum entry from an important figure from the Roman Empire, and the Greek Theatre Project, in which students perform scenes from Greek tragedies and comedies. During the first semester, students study the civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, China, India, the ancient Hebrews, and ancient Greece, reading such texts as The Epic of Gilgamesh, Siddhartha, readings from the Old Testament, and Sophocles’ Oedipus Cycle. In the second semester, students study the development of Western society from classical Greece through the rise and fall of the Roman Empire to the emergence of Islamic culture. Readings include selections from The Iliad, Plato, Sun Tzu, Beowulf, and Confucius, among many others.

An important focus of the course is the development of the students’ oral and written skills, both in the analysis of primary sources and in creative responses to drama, literature, history, and visual arts. Students also work on building vocabulary and strengthening their understanding of grammar. As the year progresses, students are taught to formulate responses through applying an essay-writing process in which they are asked to address various questions raised by the great thinkers and writers of these eras. EUROPEAN CIVILIZATION (Grade 10; 2 credits) European Civilization is a team-taught, interdisciplinary course that studies the development of European culture from the Middle Ages to the present in order to understand the relationship of Europe to the rest of the world. Beginning with the fall of the Western Roman Empire, the course traces the ideas and values that have contributed to the evolution of European society. Students consider the political, social and religious issues of European culture through reading works in philosophy, literature, law, economics, and history, and by viewing works in theater and art. During the first semester, students study the Medieval period, Renaissance, Reformation, Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, and the French Revolution. In the second semester, students study the Industrial Revolution, the nineteenth-century rise of nationalism and imperialism, and the twentiethcentury wars, political changes, and the end of European imperialism. A wide-range of primary source readings are supplemented by multimedia sources. The study of literature includes sources by Upper School at Key

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Department of Humanities writers such as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Voltaire, Swift, Pope, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, and Yeats. Some examples of works discussed are The Prince, Candide, A Modest Proposal, and Frankenstein. The course emphasizes discussion, writing and collaborative problem-solving. Students are expected to contribute their ideas to discussions of the course readings, and to develop and defend their interpretations of these works both orally and in essays. In the Salon Project, students research an important Enlightenment thinker and act out a dinner party in character. Other collaborative projects include giving Machiavellian advice to a king, debating the effects of the Industrial Revolution through a set of interlinked blogs, and investigating the motives and effects of imperialism through a simulation game. Work in this course continues to emphasize building skills such as editing written work, note-taking from reading assignments, close reading of literary texts and historical documents, and researching. AMERICAN CIVILIZATION (Grade 11; 2 credits; AP Exam optional) American Civilization is a team taught interdisciplinary course that integrates the study of American literature, history and philosophy to illuminate the American experience. The course is taught in a predominantly chronological order, and each unit engages students in discussions of readings in literature, history and philosophy to identify the salient features and main issues of American life. The course traces the evolution of Americans’ understanding of the nature and meaning of their national culture from the colonial period to the present. Work in each unit draws from a custom-designed history textbook and a wide array of primary source material, including literature, art, music, artifacts, internet archival resources, the natural landscape of the Chesapeake region, and the suburban neighborhood surrounding the School to engage students in hands-on explorations of how meaning is written, read and described. Work in the course continues to develop academic skills in writing essays, analyzing texts, researching, participating in discussion, debating, and collaborating on academic projects used in the prior Civilizations courses at Key. In addition to its core interdisciplinary linking of the study of literature, history and philosophy, this course also collaborates with the Integrated Science: Systems class in which almost all juniors are concurrently enrolled. The students study communities, including eighteenthcentury Annapolis, as primary sources on community 44

Upper School at Key

values. The goal of this course is to inform students of the main features of American literature, life and government, and to encourage them to apply this knowledge as thinkers, citizens and future voters. ENGLISH 12 (Grade 12; 1 credit; AP Exam optional) English 12 focuses on the textual, contextual and comparative analysis of literature, examining writing from a variety of sources, periods and genres. The course builds on students’ study of literature in the Civilization programs in grades 9 through 11, shifting the focus of study to the examination of philosophical, artistic and ethical issues across genres, periods and cultures. Reading and discussion are at the heart of the course. Students write about the texts, and then discuss their writing. Students are encouraged to see literary works as artistic products whose authors’ methods can be analyzed in a variety of ways and on a number of levels. Students begin with the book and then are encouraged to formulate questions about and around the text: What are the essential questions raised by this text? How are these questions discussed, and perhaps answered, here? Who wrote this book? Why? What aspects of the culture and the time are revealed in its pages? How is this work related to others that have been studied? Each year, students choose among three sections of English 12, each with a different reading list built around a particular theme. Readings may include texts from the Ancient to the Post-modern period, with an emphasis on exploring a plurality of voices and visions of human experience. In addition, there are “Poetry Mondays,” during which students engage in a study of selected poems from around the world. Students continue the study of composition, work on the steps of the writing process, write frequent essays, and develop a variety of responses to texts including analytical and persuasive essays, creative writing through the text, pastiche, and personal narratives. In addition to discussion, oral presentations and poetry recitations develop students’ speaking skills.

HUMANITIES (ELECTIVES) AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE (Grades 10-12; 1⁄2 credit) In this elective, students explore the African-American experience through a number of sources, including novels, poetry, drama, and film. They begin by studying African folktales, early slave stories in which the transformation of cultural forms can be traced over time, and spirituals, as they reveal shifting religious beliefs and issues of faith. The students study the postreconstruction struggle over issues of racial identity and civil rights by contrasting the thought of two African-


students explore the process of using words to recreate and translate the human experience. Work is directed toward creating a portfolio of writing samples that represents the student’s best effort, during each quarter, in harnessing the strategies and concepts of writing. Through collective examination of resonant passages both from their own works and from assigned readings, the students develop a language of criticism with which to explicate and clarify their own methods and styles. Students are expected to write daily, either on assigned exercises or in revising and developing previous work. Grades are based on portfolio submissions and the quality of work throughout each quarter. CULTURES IN CONFLICT The goal of this course is to deepen students’ (Grades 10-12; 1⁄2 credit) appreciation and understanding of African-American This course is designed to foster discussion of issues writers and their contributions to and influence on concerning cultural conflicts throughout the world and American literature. In addition, students become in our own communities. Each year the course focuses acquainted with the enduring racial issues that pose on a particular cultural conflict, using this core conflict a challenge in this country. Major assessments include to open questions about the nature of cultural conflicts analytical and comparative essays, oral and written in general. Students are responsible for completing commentaries on important works, oral presentations daily reading assignments and participating actively of research, and individual research projects. Students in discussion every day. In addition to reading, the take frequent reading quizzes and are assessed on course also examines how cultural conflicts have been their workmanship and participation in activities and portrayed in Western cinema. As a final project, the seminar-style discussions. students write, create and edit a short film portraying a cultural conflict, told from the point-of-view of an THE ART OF REASONING: individual whose story is rarely told. AN INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC AND DEBATE (Grades 10-12; 1/2 credit) ECONOMICS The goal of this course is to strengthen argumentation (Grades 11 and 12; 1⁄2 credit) and critical thinking skills through an in-depth look This course examines the theories and practices at the structure of arguments, rhetorical techniques at play in the United States economy from both and common mistakes in thinking and reasoning. To microeconomic and macroeconomic perspectives. accomplish this goal, the course is divided into two It then turns to international economics, comparing distinct yet connected segments. Part 1 - Introduction traditional theories of international trade with recent to Logic: An inquiry into the nature of reasoning and trends toward globalization. The emphasis throughout argument, with an emphasis on informal methods of is on the application of theory to the analysis of “real critical thinking. Projects, assignments and exams focus world” events, using articles from newspapers and on recognizing and evaluating argument forms found magazines as well as current online journals and other in written texts and visual media. Particular focus is internet sites. Activities include an online stock market placed on identifying and correcting informal logical game and student presentations. Students are expected fallacies while also exploring how heuristics and other to think independently, formulate essential questions, reasoning patterns can influence decision-making. Part 2 and conduct research in order to develop and defend - Introduction to Formal Debate: An opportunity to utilize their answers. Assessments include several papers, the skills fostered in Part 1 through the preparation for and an essay and short answer test for each of the and participation in formal, organized debates. Elements four course units. Texts include Economics Explained by of this course include research, public speaking, analysis Robert Heilbroner and Lester Thurow, and supplemental of public/political debates, and the ability to discuss readings selected by the instructor. controversial current events in a setting where all sides are considered. ENVIRONMENTAL PERSPECTIVES (Grades 11 & 12, 10 by instructor permission; 1⁄2 credit) CREATIVE WRITING There is a powerful belief in the Key School community (Grades 11 and 12; 1⁄2 credit) that the natural world is highly relevant to the Creative Writing is a workshop-based course in which understanding and appreciation of ourselves, of those Upper School at Key

45

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

American leaders, discussing excerpts from Booker T. Washington’s Up From Slavery and W.E.B. Dubois’s The Souls of Black Folk. The African-American voice in literature became firmly established during the Harlem Renaissance; students study this “re-birth” through readings and also through selected in-depth projects on one particular figure of their choice. Questions of what it means to be “black” or “white” are examined by reading and discussing Nella Larsen’s classic novella Passing. The students then explore the Civil Rights movement and the struggle for equality in the 1950s and 1960s. The course ends with a discussion of contemporary issues and a study of contemporary African- American artists.


Department of Humanities around us, and of the resources that we collectively steward. This belief helps to guide Key’s unique Outdoor Education program, as well as in other academic disciplines. In this course, students explore how humans experience nature, how they connect to the wilderness, and how they appreciate the natural world. The course begins with short works in an overview of the genre of nature writing and then moves into a closer analysis of some of the major works in the genre. The course introduces some of the context for contemporary ideas and beliefs about nature, as well as promotes individual appreciation and exploration of the natural world. Texts focus on wilderness, adventure, solitude, survival, environmental crisis, and stewardship. In addition to reading these texts, students generate peer-reviewed creative and analytical work along course themes. INTERNATIONAL FILM (Grades 10-12; 1⁄2 credit) The image of an artist is often that of a solitary creator realizing his or her individual vision in isolation. However, film is both an art form and an industrial product. Though film critics often credit the director as the ‘artist’ in creating a film, the creation of a modern blockbuster may involve thousands of people, many of whom have creative input. This class begins with the question of how to read a film, focusing on the ways the interpretation of films resembles and differs from the interpretation of literature and other art forms. The students then examine the relationship of a film to its production by looking at a selection of film industries (such as Japan, Bollywood, Nigeria, Calcutta, or American independent filmmaking), watching films from each, and considering ways that each film is shaped by the industry and culture that produced it. Students read critical materials, watch video essays, and read James Monaco’s How to Read a Film and watch three movies from each industry during the semester. Students give three presentations about aspects of the chosen film industries, write an interpretive paper about films they watched, and make a short film reflecting the understandings they develop of how film expresses ideas and culture. This is a humanities class, and does not fulfill any art department requirements for graduation. INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY (Grades 10-12; 1⁄2 credit) The one thing all humans who have ever lived on this planet have in common is they all possess and are a part of a culture—a set of shared patterns of learned behavior. This course is designed to introduce students to the discipline of cultural anthropology: the study of the traditions and customs, transmitted through learning and observation that guide human behavior and beliefs. The course begins with an in46

Upper School at Key

depth study of what culture is, how humans create and absorb and contest it, and the methods cultural anthropologists use to study it. The course offers an overview of the main societal features that allow people to understand culture: political and economic systems, religion, kinship, gender, and art to name a few. The course culminates with students choosing a subculture in the local area to study using the methods of participant observation and interview, producing an anthropological ethnography answering a particular cultural question. Assessments include reading, quizzes and reactions; a mid-term and final exam; and a final ethnography. Texts include Kottak’s Cultural Anthropology: Appreciating Cultural Diversity and supplemental readings selected by the instructor. J.R.R. TOLKIEN'S THE LORD OF THE RINGS (Grades 10-12; 1/2 credit) The Lord of the Rings is one of the best-selling books of all time. It has been adapted into many forms and has inspired countless imitators. It has attracted a fanatical following of readers and has provoked controversy from critics. The book delves deeply into issues of morality and politics and raises questions about language and literature. This course focuses primarily on a close reading of the novel, supplementing this with essays by Tolkien and others and research into the older texts and traditions that influenced Tolkien’s writing. Students are expected to give a presentation, create a project, and write an essay. JAPAN AND THE WEST (Grades 11 and 12, 1⁄2 credit) Having consciously isolated itself from the rest of the world for several centuries before embarking on a radical course of westernization, Japan offers an excellent window into the way cultures influence one another. This class studies Japan’s cultural evolution from Commodore Perry’s “Black Ships” in 1854 through Japanese imperialism and World War II to the present, with particular attention to the interaction between Japan and the West. The course requires some attention to Japanese history, but the central focus is on literature and culture. Against the background of Japan’s development from a feudal shogunate to a modern commercial constitutional monarchy, students investigate changes in Japan’s literature, art, film, comic books, music, etc. To help accommodate the breadth of the material, several of the assessments are projects requiring students to research some aspect of Japanese culture or history and present it to the class. In particular, each student is required to present on some aspect of Japanese history.


the end. Class time is dedicated to the discussion of texts in addition to the practice of literary craft and game design. PHILOSOPHY AND COMMUNICATION (Grades 11 and 12; 1⁄2 credit) The conception of rationality is deeply wedded to a potentially outdated conception of literacy; humans think in words, and thinking is dominated by the written word. This course explores different means of communication and their effects on thinking. Themes include the role of different forms of literature in shaping humans’ ways of thinking about themselves and the world; the effects of different media on rhetoric and reason; and the degree to which traditional concepts of rationality are appropriate in contemporary life. Students look specifically at the way time and human individuals are depicted in different forms, and consider the effects of these depictions on people’s understanding. Students are assessed on the basis of one major paper, a number of short papers, and several projects related to the various types of media that are studied. Students are encouraged to design their own projects. Texts include such works as Plato’s Phaedrus, McLuhan’s Understanding Media, Manovich’s The Language of New Media, and Sayles’s Thinking in Pictures. PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE (Grades 11-12, 1/2 credit) The development of the modern notion of science as a method for systematically accumulating, organizing and testing knowledge has been among the most important and influential developments in the history of mankind. It has led to deep understandings of the world and humans and has given people unprecedented power to control nature. It is, however, often idealized in a way that is detrimental to the actual practice of science. This course looks at abstract ideas about science such as the scientific method and investigates the degree to which the actual practice of science has conformed to these idealizations. Each student is free to focus on their particular interests in any field of the natural and social sciences. Within that field, each student investigates the history and practice of scientific inquiry and the uses and abuses of scientific knowledge. Course readings range from traditional philosophical writings to contemporary articles about the practice of science and the uses of science in society. Each student is expected to carry out research and engage in several related projects. SHAKESPEARE (Grades 11 & 12, 10 by instructor permission; 1⁄2 credit) This team-taught elective allows a deeper look at Shakespeare’s plays than is typically possible in Key’s Civilizations curriculum. One unit each is devoted to his histories, comedies and tragedies, reading one or Upper School at Key

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

LITERATURE OF THE DEVELOPING AND NON-WESTERN WORLD (Grades 11 and 12; 1⁄2 credit) This course takes students on a literary and cultural journey through parts of the world that are not covered in the core curriculum in English and history. By reading poems, stories and plays by authors from countries in the Caribbean, Latin America, Africa, the Middle East, and Asia, students encounter a richness and diversity of voices that help them explore themes such as attachment to traditional customs; the relationship between nature and the community; resilience in the face of suffering; attitudes toward colonialism; expressions of emerging nationalism; and the allure of the West and the “first world.” Classes are conducted in seminar format with students presenting their interpretations of the readings and leading discussions. Students are expected to keep a journal to record their responses to the reading and class discussions. The culminating event of the course is a project in which students conduct in-depth research on an author and present them in the context of their indigenous culture. Texts include works such as: Caribbean New Wave: Contemporary Short Stories; The Heinemann Book of Contemporary African Short Stories; Master Harold...and the boys; The Vintage Book of Contemporary World Poetry; and Modern Literatures of the Non-Western World: Where the Waters Are Born. NEW MEDIA NARRATIVES (Grades 11 and 12; 1⁄2 credit) The hero has had a long journey. Authors have worked for thousands of years to captivate readers with stories of men and women who seek adventure, overcome obstacles, and gain new understandings. Working first within the oral tradition, authors adapted their stories to text, stage, photography, and film as new media emerged with new technology. Video games, despite humble origins in the so-called “low-brow” genres of fantasy and action-adventure (or perhaps because of them), have penetrated the cultural imagination and grown to encompass a hugely lucrative industry. Fascinating questions come with this impact. What happens when you become the protagonist of someone else’s story? Where does authorship end and personal choice begin? Do video games add anything new to traditional literary archetypes, such as the hero’s journey? Do video games represent advances in science and technology, art, or both? This class looks at the video game as a new literary genre built on established traditions. In particular, students focus on the use of perspective, tone, setting, plot, and character by game designers to achieve a desired effect. Homework is devoted to reading traditional texts and playing corresponding video games, though coding for the final project takes precedence towards


Department of Humanities more plays in each unit. Assessments include a written analysis of one or more plays, a project in which students develop designs for sets or costuming, and a performance of a scene from one of the plays that was read in class. Plays to be read might include tragedies such as King Lear or Macbeth, comedies such as Much Ado about Nothing or The Tempest, and histories such as Richard III or Henry V. VOICES OF PROTEST (Grades 11 & 12, 10 by instructor permission; 1/2 credit) Voices of Protest focuses on social and political upheaval throughout the world in the second half of the 20th century. Students study this period through the lens of dramatic literature and the playwrights who chose theater as the medium to bring about awareness of important issues and injustices. Students read plays and submit regular written responses that reflect not only where the works fit into a historical context, but also serve as reactions to their artistic and literary merits. Authors studied include Caryl Churchill, Dario Fo, Vaclav Havel, David Hare, August Wilson, Larry Kramer, and Athol Fugard among others. The course culminates in a final project in which students write a treatment of a play that addresses a social issue for which they feel there is insufficient global awareness.

HUMANITIES (INDEPENDENT STUDY) Offered as a one-semester class, Independent Study provides an engaging opportunity for seniors to pursue a specific area of interest through dedicated, in-depth study. (see page 14) Recent Humanities focused projects include: A Study of the Supreme Court; A Study of the Supreme Court; Chinese Civilization; Decolonization; Exploration of Eastern Religion; Female Autonomy in 19th and 20th Century Literature; The Arab Spring; The Belt and Road Initiative in China; Phenomenology; Literary Analysis of Works of Walt Whitman.

Western culture. Students also explore contemporary American culture through the lens of ancient Roman culture. Key’s Latin program aims to enable those who continue to the advanced levels to read fluently in the provocative constructs of the Latin masters. A grade of C- or better is required to continue to the next level. LATIN I (1 credit) First-year Latin students use the Oxford Latin Course (Second Edition), a method that stresses reading and strikes a balance between more traditional approaches to Latin and the more graded approach of most modern language textbooks. The text is a continuous prose narrative that follows the life of the poet Horace, and this, as well as separate sections appearing at the end of each chapter, integrate aspects of Roman culture directly into the learning of the language itself. Supplementing the textbook is an extensive class webpage containing interactive exercises and drills, games and other online support and links of interest. The students also engage with projects that explore connections between ancient Roman culture and contemporary culture, practice their oral skills through skits, and take the National Latin Exam each spring. LATIN II (1 credit) The second year of Latin continues with the Oxford Course series. Grammatical items encountered include all six tenses, uses of the ablative case, the fourth and fifth declensions, participles, relative clauses, and the passive voice. At the end of the book is a simplified version of Petronius’ Cena Trimalchionis. Supplementing the textbook is an extensive class webpage containing interactive exercises and drills, games and other online support and links of interest. The students also engage with projects that explore connections between ancient Roman culture and contemporary culture, practice their oral skills through skits, and take the National Latin Exam each spring.

LATIN III (1 credit) This course completes the presentation of grammatical material necessary for a full understanding of Latin. Grammatical items encountered include the subjective and its uses in various clauses, indirect statements, CLASSICAL LANGUAGES the ablative absolute, conditions, result and purpose Key School has been committed to the study of classical clauses, and gerunds and gerundives. Students also read selections from a variety of Latin authors, including languages since its founding in 1958. Today, through the poetry of Horace, Ovid, Vergil, and Catullus, and the the study of Latin, students achieve a substantive prose of Caesar, Cicero and Livy. Supplementing the understanding of the vocabulary and syntax of the textbooks is an extensive class webpage that includes English language. Additionally, they become familiar interactive exercises and drills, games and other online with some of the world’s best writers and thinkers and support and links of interest. The students also engage a body of literature that has profoundly influenced

LANGUAGES

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with projects that explore connections between ancient Roman culture and contemporary culture, practice their oral skills through skits, and take the National Latin Exam each spring. ADVANCED LATIN (1 credit; AP Exam required) Advanced Latin offers a year of college-level intensive Latin study that explores the prose of Caesar and the poetry of Vergil, mirroring the current Advanced Placement areas of focus. This course requires close textual study of selected passages from Caesar's De Bello Gallico and Vergil's Aeneid. Emphasis is placed on literal translation, reading aloud fluently, sight reading, and analyzing the texts. The study of Roman cultural, social and political history is incorporated. The study of the genres­—for instance, the ancient epic form of Vergil, the rhetorical qualities of Caesar­—are examined. All students enrolled in the course are required to take the Advanced Placement examination. MODERN LANGUAGES In their study of modern languages—Arabic, Spanish and French—students learn to communicate in another language, gain a greater understanding of sentence structure and grammar, become familiar with Hispanic, Middle Eastern and French literature and culture, and increase their awareness of the world in which they live. Students in upper level courses are encouraged to converse fluently, present orally, read ambitiously, and write in creative and expository modes in the target language. Cultural studies and activities, along with periodic travel opportunities, add enrichment to all levels of the modern language study. A grade of C- or better is required to continue to the next level. ARABIC I (1 credit) Arabic I introduces students to the formal Arabic language used in reading and writing throughout the Arab world as well as the informal or colloquial forms distinguishing each Arabic speaking country. In addition to emphasizing the skills of speaking, listening, writing, and reading in Arabic, the course also introduces students to Arabic culture, including exposure to ethnic foods, forms of entertainment and clothing, as well as the different customs and traditions of this region. ARABIC II (1 credit) Arabic II builds on the knowledge of formal Arabic and the skills acquired in Arabic I or an equivalent Arabic course. Arabic II students continue to learn the grammatical structures of the Arabic language, mastering the more complex grammar and vocabulary required to use the

Arabic language with greater subtlety and complexity. The study of Arabic culture is also incorporated in more depth. Arabic II continues to employ the communicative approach begun in Arabic I, with more instruction and class discussion in the target language. ARABIC III (1 credit) Arabic III builds on the knowledge acquired in Arabic I and II, or equivalent high school courses and students move to the next level of linguistic complexity. They learn more advanced vocabulary and grammatical structures and concentrate on connectors, which enables them to use the language on a more elaborate level. Through watching and listening to Arabic programs, they learn more about the culture. Trying Middle Eastern foods is also a venue to cultural enrichment. Besides the formal version of the language, for the first time, the Arabic III student learns the colloquial or spoken dialect of Egypt. The course follows an interactive approach, where the student is an active participant in class. *Please note: In order to be applied toward the fulfillment of the language graduation requirement, Arabic must be combined with two years of another language. FRENCH I-II (1 credit) French I-II is designed for students beginning their study of French as well as those who would benefit from a review of material from Levels I and II of the language. All four skills— speaking, listening, reading, and writing—are targeted with an emphasis on communication. Material covered includes basic vocabulary, grammar concepts, regular and irregular verb conjugations in the present and past tenses, and French culture. Through projects, movies, theater, skits, and poetry, students discover the basics of French language, literature and culture. FRENCH III (1 credit) The French III students are introduced to French literature and continue to study vocabulary and grammar. Throughout the year, simplified versions of La chanson de Roland, La farce de Maître Pathelin and Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme are read and discussed. This is part of a two-fold project on the Middle Ages and Renaissance periods. The grammar includes the study and review of diverse indicative and conditional verb tenses, personal direct and indirect object pronouns and clauses with conjunctions such as si, quand and aussitot que. Students have the opportunity to develop frequent oral presentations and to view French films.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Department of Languages


Department of Languages FRENCH IV (1 credit) The French IV class is conducted almost entirely in French. In the first part of the year, students read and discuss Le Petit Prince by Saint-Exupéry. They then read literature excerpts from a variety of French writers: La Fontaine, Daudet, Camus, and Pagnol, and are exposed to French-Canadian and African authors such as Laye and Tremblay in Ensemble Litteraire. The last part of the year is devoted to reading, discussing and acting out Le voyageur sans bagage from Anouilh. Grammatical concepts are studied and reinforced with exercises from Ensemble Grammaire. French culture is explored through French films. FRENCH V (1 credit; AP Exam optional) The central goal of French V is to immerse students in French literature and cultivate their literary appreciation. Camus’s L’étranger, Ionesco’s Rhinocéros, Sartre’s Huis clos, and Vercors’s Le silence de la mer are read and discussed. Major essays are assigned at the completion of each book. Along with the literature, students use Une fois pour toutes, a grammar book that helps them improve their grammatical knowledge. The program is supplemented by viewing French films, France24.com and YouTube. Students have the option to take the French Language and Culture Advanced Placement Exam.

and simple written compositions. Students master the present verb tense including compound verb phrases to express the future. Most classwork involves conversations and dialogues in Spanish. Students explore cultural topics such as education, sports, food, and cultural aspects of Hispanic-American life. Written assignments are required each evening to reinforce grammatical concepts and vocabulary. This class focuses on communication skills and is taught in Spanish. SPANISH II (1 credit) In Spanish II, students continue to build reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. They engage in many interactive speaking exercises and expand their writing skills with exposure to new vocabulary, grammar and verb tenses. Through class discussions about topics such as planning a vacation, arranging a home, and health and fitness, students learn how to cope and survive in a variety of situations where a higher level of communicative ability is necessary. Students master the preterite and imperfect verb tenses and learn to narrate past events and describe personal experiences with greater variety and accuracy. Authentic materials, in addition to the cultural readings in the textbooks, are introduced to expose students to language encountered in real-life situations. SPANISH III (1 credit) FRENCH LITERATURE AND FILM In Spanish III, all activities continue with reinforcement (Grades 11 and 12; 1 credit) of previously learned material. Additional verb tenses This class is intended to continue and maintain students’ and grammatical forms are presented, enabling oral and written skills in French beyond French IV. It is students to express needs, preferences, emotions, and designed for students who have achieved a reasonable uncertainty. The culture and literature of other Spanishlevel of proficiency with the language and are eager speaking countries are emphasized at this level, and to continue speaking and reading French. Among lengthier reading materials include cultural topics such the course readings are Voltaire’s Candide, Vercors’s as art, music and literature (short stories and poetry). Le silence de la mer, Laye’s L’enfant noir, and poetry Writing and speaking activities include narration, by Baudelaire and Senghor. Films include Indochine analysis and enactment of stories, poetry, essay writing, and Amélie, among others. Class discussions of such and discussions, all in Spanish. The skills that are readings and films afford students ample opportunity particularly stressed are those of expressing opinions to practice and further develop their fluency. In the and speaking persuasively. In addition to giving the process, students gain confidence speaking French as students the opportunity to develop their speaking, they also acquire an appreciation of French literature reading, writing, and listening abilities, the intent is to and film. Emphasis in this course is on the speaking and expose them to as many opportunities as possible to reading components. explore the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite: Completion of French IV SPANISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE (1 credit; AP Exam optional) SPANISH I Spanish Language and Literature continues developing (1 credit) students’ listening comprehension and oral and writing In Spanish I, students begin to learn to speak and skills in Spanish. The course is designed for students listen to the Spanish language. Basic grammar is who have achieved a reasonable level of competence presented as a foundation for developing conversation from their Spanish III work and are eager to improve

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

their mastery and performance in the language. This class is taught entirely in Spanish, and students are expected to communicate in Spanish as well. Students solidify their grammatical and structural knowledge of the language, with emphasis placed on developing vocabulary, reading authentic material, and synthesizing texts and audio clips in both writing and speaking. Students also acquire an appreciation for Spanish literature as they read, analyze and discuss a wide variety of works in three major genres: narrative, poetry and drama, including a selection of texts from the AP Spanish Literature exam. Through such literary selections, students explore themes such as honor, tradition, family values, and the roles of women in society. Prerequisite: Spanish III ADVANCED SPANISH LITERATURE (1 credit; AP Exam required) Advanced Spanish Literature prepares the students to take the Advanced Placement Spanish Literature Examination. The 38 works selected expose students to a wide variety of genres and types of discourse and enable the students to trace the history of Spanish prose from Don Juan Manuel to modern times through some of its most brilliant writers. Since the course is, for the most part, student-centered, class participation is very important, giving students the opportunity to further develop their communicative competence. Discussions may be conducted by the whole class or one or two students may guide the discussion of the work being studied. The teacherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s role is to guide the discussion from time to time, suggest ideas, and ensure that appropriate Spanish is used. The students also write essays based on the themes, characters and philosophical and psychological issues found in the readings. The skills emphasized are those of expressing opinions and speaking persuasively. In addition to giving students the opportunity to develop their speaking, reading, writing, and listening abilities, the intent is to expose them to as many opportunities as possible to explore the cultures of the Spanishspeaking world. All students in the class are required to take the Advanced Placement Exam. Prerequisite : Spanish Language and Literature

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Department of Mathematics

MATHEMATICS

ALGEBRA I

The sequence of Keyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s math curriculum is spiral. GEOMETRY with GEOMETRY The language and process of problem-solving is TRIGONOMETRY introduced first. As students progress in competence and confidence, they confront problems that require the development of more challenging and complex ALGEBRA II with ALGEBRA II concepts. Students are active participants in the TRIGONOMETRY learning process, and emphasis is placed on learning how to learn. Understanding central concepts is TRIGONOMETRY with FINITE MATH coupled with vigorous work on essential skills in a PRE-CALCULUS problem-solving environment. In individual and group problem-solving activities, students are encouraged to PRE-CALCULUS ADVANCED ADVANCED accept different kinds of solutions to the same problem. CALCULUS AB CALCULUS BC The faculty uses open-ended questions whenever appropriate to facilitate the learning process. CALCULUS II/III The mathematics program at Key is sequential, with students progressing from Algebra I to Geometry Requires additional summer work to complete this path and then to Algebra II. Upon departmental recommendation, following Algebra II, students enroll *Statistics, not displayed above, may be taken at any time after the successful completion of an Algebra II course. either in Trigonometry and Finite Math or Pre-Calculus. Advanced Calculus (AB or BC) is offered to students who have successfully completed the Pre-Calculus course. Calculus II /III is offered to students who GEOMETRY have successfully completed Advanced Calculus (1 credit) BC. Statistics may be taken as an elective following Geometry employs both teacher-guided and Algebra II. Students must earn a grade of C- or better independent discovery-based methodologies but relies to progress to the next course in the core sequence; the more heavily on the former in supporting studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; requirements for advanced courses are more rigorous. acquisition and ultimate mastery of core geometry skills and concepts. Focusing on the tenets of Euclidean The program is supported by the Math Lab, providing geometry, Geometry studies the properties of and opportunities for students to have added help in areas relationships between the shape and size of objects. they find difficult and for moving students who have Students investigate synthetic and coordinate geometry, special interests and abilities beyond the mainstream studying lines, angles and polygons, the area and work of a class. perimeter of two-dimensional figures, and the properties of surfaces and volumes of cylindrical and conic ALGEBRA I solids. Transformations provide a basis for the study of (1 credit) congruence and similarity and the nature of symmetry is Algebra I emphasizes the problem-solving skills explored and put to use in analyzing objects. Emphasis necessary for the study of both mathematics and is placed on the proof of theorems and formulas, science. The course focuses on the language of encouraging students to develop logical and critical mathematics. Algebra I helps students develop the thinking skills. Students learn to write formal proofs that skills and strategies necessary to approach math incorporate both deductive and indirect reasoning. problems involving operations on numbers and Using manual and computer-based drawing tools, variables. Algebra I emphasizes the change from students learn to construct basic figures and accurately computational mastery to higher order analysis and draw transformations. Throughout the course, in the application. Students learn to simplify algebraic context of solving problems and presenting their work, expressions and to solve a range of equations and students hone both communication and algebra skills inequalities including linear, quadratic and absolute to be applied in Algebra II, the next course in the core value. Systems of linear equations and inequalities are sequence. Computer-based dynamic drawing tools solved incorporating both algebraic and graphical and manipulatives are used to illustrate concepts and methods. Applications are introduced so students have investigate relationships. A protractor and four-function the opportunity to explore mathematical concepts. calculator are required. Graphing calculators (TI-83 or TI-84) are required. Prerequisite: C- or equivalent in Algebra I or department head permission. 52

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used to facilitate concept development as well as to aid in problem solving. Graphing calculators (TI-83 or TI-84) are required. Prerequisite: C- or better in Geometry or department head permission. ALGEBRA II WITH TRIGONOMETRY (1 credit) Algebra II with Trigonometry complements and expands the mathematical content and concepts of both Algebra I and Geometry. Students explore and analyze linear, quadratic, polynomial, power, exponential, logarithmic, and rational functions, equations, inequalities, graphs, and systems thereof. A major goal in Algebra II with Trigonometry is for students to develop the ability to move fluidly between symbolic, numeric, graphic, and verbal representations of functions, while gleaning insights that facilitate problem-solving. Students are introduced to arithmetic and geometric sequences and series, as well as basic sine and cosine graphs. Throughout the year, students use mathematics construct mathematical models of real-world scenarios and use these models to answer real-world questions. Graphing calculators and online graphing tools are used frequently in the second semester to facilitate concept development as well as to aid in problem-solving. Graphing calculators (TI-83 or TI-84, no CAS) are required. Prerequisite: B+ or better in Geometry with Trigonometry and department head permission and current instructor’s signature. TRIGONOMETRY AND FINITE MATH (1 credit) Prerequisites: B+ or equivalent in Algebra I and department Trigonometry and Finite Math strikes a balance between head permission and current instructor’s signature. theoretical concepts and applications. A wide spectrum of topics including trigonometry, functions, probability, ALGEBRA II and statistics is covered in detail. The emphasis is on (1 credit) solving real-world problems using mathematical tools Algebra II complements and expands the mathematical such as trigonometry to calculate the great circle content and concepts of Algebra I and Geometry. distance between two global cities or understanding the Students explore and analyze linear, polynomial, significance of the correlation coefficient in analyzing power, exponential, logarithmic, and rational functions, statistical data. Graphing calculators are used equations, inequalities, and systems thereof. A major extensively to help students visualize functions, explore goal in Algebra II is for students to develop the ability applications, and understand concepts. Graphing to move fluidly between the symbolic, numeric and calculators (TI-83 or TI-84) are required. graphical representations of functions, while gleaning insights that facilitate problem solving. Students are Prerequisite: C- or better in Algebra II or department introduced to arithmetic and geometric sequences and head permission. series, as well as matrices, basic matrix operations, and the use of matrices to solve linear systems. Throughout PRE-CALCULUS the year, students use mathematics to construct (1 credit) mathematical models of real-world scenarios and use Pre-Calculus is an abstract course, covering the these models to answer real-world questions. Graphing necessary material to study calculus, a cornerstone calculators and computer-based activities are frequently for advanced mathematics and science. It begins with Upper School at Key

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

GEOMETRY WITH TRIGONOMETRY (1 credit) Geometry with Trigonometry employs both teacher-guided and independent-discovery- based methodologies but relies more heavily on the latter in supporting students’ acquisition and ultimate mastery of core geometry skills and concepts. Focusing on the tenets of Euclidean geometry, Geometry with Trigonometry studies the properties of and relationships between the shape and size of objects. Students investigate synthetic and coordinate geometry; studying lines, angles and polygons, the area and perimeter of two-dimensional figures, and the properties of surfaces and volumes of cylindrical and conic solids. Transformations provide a basis for the study of congruence and similarity and the nature of symmetry is explored and put to use in analyzing objects. Right triangle trigonometry and vectors are explored. Basic logic laws are used to introduce the concept of proof and emphasis is placed on the proof of theorems and formulas, encouraging students to develop logical and critical thinking skills. Students learn to write formal proofs that incorporate both deductive and indirect reasoning. Using manual and computer-based drawing tools, students learn to construct basic figures and accurately draw transformations. Throughout the course, in the context of solving problems and presenting their work, students hone both communication and algebra skills to be applied in Algebra II, the next course in the core sequence. Computer-based dynamic drawing tools and manipulatives are used to illustrate concepts and investigate relationships. A protractor and scientific calculator with trigonometric functions are required.


Department of Mathematics a review of polynomial functions and progresses to more sophisticated functions (logarithms, exponentials and rational functions) to enable a more in-depth understanding of functions. Students study graphs of parent functions and how they can be transformed via translations and scale changes. An emphasis is placed on being able to visualize the graphical representation of a function given its written equation without needing to use a graphing calculator. This is followed with an in-depth study of trigonometric functions and their applications in both geometry problems and modeling of periodic systems. Emphasis is placed on the unit circle model, both as a means of obtaining fundamental identities and as a bridge to the concept of the periodic function. The study of trigonometry is followed by the study of vectors. Simple operations with vectors are learned in both rectangular representation and the polar/trigonometric representation of vectors. The course ends with a thorough review of solving systems of equations with the use of matrices, and an introduction of probability and sequences and series. Graphing calculators (TI-83 or TI-84) are required. Prerequisite: B+ or better in Algebra II or department head permission and current instructor’s signature OR B- or better in Algebra II with Trigonometry or Trigonometry or department head permission and current instructor’s signature. ADVANCED CALCULUS AB (1 credit; AP Exam required) The goals of Advanced Calculus AB are two-fold. The first is the study of differential and integral calculus including limits, derivatives and integrals. It explores the material usually found in the first one and onehalf semesters of a college level calculus course. The course encourages the student to begin to acquire sophisticated techniques necessary to learn mathematics. Careful examination of examples leads the student to hypothesize various conjectures. The second is preparing students to take the Advanced Placement Calculus AB exam given in May. In the spring much of the course is dedicated to studying actual released AP exams. All students are required to take the Advanced Placement exam. Graphing calculators (TI- 89) are required. Prerequisite: B or better in Pre-Calculus or department head permission and current instructor’s signature. ADVANCED CALCULUS BC (1 credit; AP Exam required) Advanced Calculus BC is an extension of Calculus AB. It covers differential and integral calculus at the same level of understanding as Calculus AB. In

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addition, it covers infinite series, power series, functions in parametric and polar form, and an introduction to differential equations. The curriculum is equivalent to the first two semesters of college level calculus. In the spring, a large part of the course centers on studying past released AP exams and taking simulated AP exams in preparation for the test in May. All students are required to take the Advanced Placement exam. Graphing calculators (TI-89) are required. Prerequisite: A or better in Pre-Calculus and department head permission and current instructor’s signature. CALCULUS II/III (1 credit) This course is a continuation of Advanced Calculus BC. Students continue to explore differentiation and integration techniques as well as the convergence of infinite series. Other topics and applications include a review of polar and parametric functions, additional integration techniques, vector algebra, vector calculus, partial derivatives, gradients and directional derivatives, tangent planes, the chain rule in three variables, multiple integrals, and line integrals. The course offers many applications in describing phenomena in the three-dimensional world. Students are assessed through quizzes, tests and unit projects. A graphing calculator is required. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Advanced Calculus BC and department head permission and current instructor's signature. STATISTICS (1 credit; AP Exam optional) This course provides students with the major tools necessary to enable them to collect, analyze and draw conclusions from data found in the world around them. The course is organized around four conceptual themes: exploring data (observing patterns and departures from patterns); planning a study (deciding what to measure and how to measure it); anticipating patterns (producing models using probability and simulation); and making statistical inferences (confirming models). The course follows the Advanced Placement syllabus and, with additional review sessions, some students may choose to take the Advanced Placement Statistics exam in May. Graphing calculators (TI-83, TI- 84, or TI-89) are required. Prerequisite: B- or better in Algebra II and department head permission and current instructor's signature.


INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE (1/2 credit) Computer science is the study of how we tell computers to “think” and function. This course teaches students about the fundamental concepts and elements of a computer language as well as how to put these pieces together to form complete tasks. Students apply these concepts and elements to scientific and mathematical problems chosen by the instructor as well as the students. The course explores the history of computer science throughout the semester to help students better understand how the field began and how it has changed over time. Students are assessed on the basis of daily homework, weekly quizzes and several projects assigned throughout the semester. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Pre-Calculus MATHEMATICAL MODELING (Grades 10-12; 1/2 credit) In this course, students have the opportunity to apply ideas, skills and functions they have learned in their core math courses to a variety of real-world situations. Students learn how to use linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic models to accurately represent data collected and predict behavior of quantities for a variety of applications. Students also explore topics through units on probability and statistics as well as

financial mathematics and delve into the models that allow them to calculate payments, interest, etc. for student loans and mortgages. Students are quizzed periodically to assess the skills required for each unit while major assessments for the course are projectbased. This course aims to enhance students’ ability to verbally express their ideas and observations with the math language as well as to spark interest in furthering math skills for students through a non-traditional setting. Emphasis is placed on playing with ideas, testing those ideas, and then describing observations through graphs, equations, tables, etc. Prerequisite: B- or better in Algebra II OR C or better in Algebra II with Trigonometry OR concurrently enrolled in Trigonometry/Finite Math.

MATHEMATICS (INDEPENDENT STUDY)

Offered as a one-semester class, Independent Study provides an engaging opportunity for seniors to pursue a specific area of interest through dedicated, in-depth study. (see page 14) Recent Mathematics focused projects include: A Mathematical Study of Proof Writing; Applied Calculus; Calculus C; Multivariable Calculus; Medical Statistics.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

MATHEMATICS (ELECTIVES)


Department of Science

SCIENCE

Working with students to observe phenomena in an unbiased fashion, pose increasingly sophisticated questions concerning what they see, and then seek answers to their hypotheses is the framework for the Science Department. In this process, students are encouraged to develop specific skills—critical thinking, problem-solving, working both independently and collaboratively, reading scientific material critically, and communicating effectively in both written and oral contexts. Concepts and processes in mathematics and science complement and augment each other, and the teachers in both departments meet to discuss curricular development and individual student progress and course selection. Key’s Integrated Science Program incorporates aspects of chemistry, biology and physics into each of the student’s required science classes in lieu of teaching them separately in grades 9 through 11. Through purposeful integration, the meaning and relevance of abstract topics become evident because students apply their learning as they explore topics traditionally found in other disciplines. For example, in 10th grade Integrated Science: Energy, students immediately apply what they learn about the force of collisions (physics) to understand the behavior of gases (chemistry). Additionally, by presenting the holistic picture of science, Key teachers are able to incorporate more iterative and experimental design and engineering projects throughout the courses than previously possible in the segmented or siloed curriculum. Advanced electives including Advanced Biology and Advanced Chemistry are offered for students who wish to pursue those subjects in college-level courses. Students are able to take AP exams in Biology, Chemistry and Physics. The members of the department counsel students about options in science courses throughout their Key School career. INTEGRATED SCIENCE: DATA (Grade 9; 1 credit) Through a series of explorations, students experience various aspects of the scientific method from making careful, specific and quantitative observations to mathematical and graphical analysis. They see how the scientific method leads to the formation of hypotheses and theories. After exploring the foundational concepts of observation and inference, students turn their attention to quantitative data. By gathering quantitative observations about position, velocity and acceleration and using graphs and equations, the students derive Newton’s laws of motion. Using similar techniques, they 56

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look at the properties of gases and how pressure is a direct result of molecular motion and Newton’s laws at a molecular level. Next, the students cultivate Brassica rapa plants. They plant, pollinate and crossbreed their plants, keeping careful track of the occurrence of a series of traits. Students come to appreciate long-term experimentation and eventually analyze the data to rediscover Mendel’s laws of heredity. Through all of these units, we emphasize care and precision with language, how to develop well-reasoned and wellsupported explanations, and how, when observations do not seem to fit the general theories developed, evidence can lead to improvements and modifications of the theories—including modifications that will be investigated in the next two years of the curriculum. INTEGRATED SCIENCE: ENERGY (Grade 10; 1 credit) In this course, students explore the many ways in which energy is transferred in the processes that make our world and universe function. After a study of gravitational potential energy, the course turns its attention to electricity. Just as mechanical energy is stored when an object is lifted against gravity, so electrical energy can be stored as a separation or concentration of charge. Students experiment with circuits in parallel and in series and with resistors. Students’ understanding of electrostatic attraction opens the door to the study of the fundamentals of atomic structure, particularly electron structure. The tendency of elements to lose or gain electrons to become more stable is one of the most important ways energy is stored and exploited. Students study those oxidation-reduction reactions by learning about corrosion, building batteries and learning about explosives. They see how those same principles are employed in biological systems through a study of cellular respiration, photosynthesis and cell structure. Students study how muscles use the energy of respiration to produce unbalanced forces and create motion, as described in Newton’s 2nd and 3rd laws. Building a device to protect an egg from a two-story drop helps students understand those laws on more than just a theoretical level. Finally, students study how energy moves through ecological systems. INTEGRATED SCIENCE: SYSTEMS (Grade 11; 1 credit) The final course in the integrated program examines dynamic systems. Picking up discussions from the previous course students look at ecological systems and how the organisms competing for scarce resources find the balance to become an enduring system. They look at how disturbances in those systems cause organisms to evolve until a new equilibrium can be reached. As part of the study of evolution, students revisit the structure


ADVANCED CHEMISTRY (1 credit; AP Exam required) Advanced Chemistry is a challenging college-level course for those students who would enjoy an indepth study of chemistry. This fast-paced and rigorous curriculum is covered in a collaborative seminar format where the students are responsible for reading the material independently and then presenting new concepts and solutions to the problems in class. Due to the breadth and depth of the material covered, this course differs significantly from the chemistry topics addressed in the core, integrated courses and emphasizes the mathematical formulation of the underlying principles of general chemistry and how they relate to each other. Students need to spend a minimum of five hours a week in unsupervised individual study. Concurrent laboratory investigations that build upon skills acquired during the core courses are an integral part of the curriculum and provide an opportunity for the students to further explore and analyze the scientific concepts under study. Topics covered include the structure of matter, stoichiometry, states of matter, chemical bonding and molecular geometry, solution chemistry, thermodynamics, quantum theory and periodicity, reaction kinetics, chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. All students enrolled in this class are required to take the Advanced Placement examination in Chemistry.

Prerequisites: Completion of Algebra II and B+ or better in Integrated Science: Systems OR with instructor’s permission and signature. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN (Grades 11 and 12; 1⁄2 credit) This elective science course gives students the opportunity to craft a lab or field-based experiment that applies the theoretical knowledge they have gathered from Key’s core science curriculum. With careful guidance by the teacher, each student develops an essential question, research the associated topic, create a thoughtful hypothesis, write a peer-reviewed proposal, perform a carefully designed experiment, and analyze their results. This class offers a unique opportunity for students to experience the process of science, and like a true scientist, make mistakes along the way. Whereas most science courses emphasize the development of an understanding of existing theories and knowledge, the main thrust of this course is the development of the tools, skills and processes used to create that knowledge. Students engage with dependent variables, replication, reducing bias, controls, error, statistical analysis, and other aspects of the scientific process. Throughout the semester, an on or off-campus mentor chosen by the student collaborates with the student and teacher to provide specific expertise and guidance. At the conclusion of the semester, each student presents their findings and facilitates a discussion of its importance. Though challenging, this course does not require the mastery of the extensive, detailed information found in most advanced science courses. Students learn concepts as they need them and be guided through the design and implementation of their experiments. Recent experiments include: • Creating a novel way to use proton cancer therapy • Engineering a sensory-activated robotic arm through computer programming and 3D printing • An experiment in generating power through a newly designed alternator • A comparative DNA study of blueberries using electrophoresis gel • The chemistry and biology of bioluminescence • Experimenting with different chemical solutions for film development • Creating firework colors using metal oxidizers • A study of the physics of light using reflection and refraction of various lenses • Field studies on carbon sequestration, the impact of oyster beds on local environments, and smallscale migration patterns due to climate change Upper School at Key

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

of DNA, looking at how it replicates, how mistakes are made and corrected, and the intermolecular forces involved in maintaining the distinctive helix of nucleic acids. Intermolecular forces feature prominently in issues of solubility and membrane structure. Solubility and acid base chemistry explains much about how elements like carbon and nitrogen cycle through the environment. Acids and bases provide yet another example of a system in dynamic equilibrium. Particularly in the case of buffered solutions, the system changes in response to various inputs. Finally, a study of conservation of momentum, wave dynamics, and simple harmonic motion allow students to do quantitative analysis of complex systems. ADVANCED BIOLOGY (1 credit; AP Exam required) Advanced Biology covers the equivalent of a college introductory biology course. A variety of laboratory investigations deepen the students’ understanding of the material. In addition, students design and carry out an experiment of their own during the latter half of the year. All students enrolled in this class are required to take the Advanced Placement examination in Biology. Prerequisite: B+ or better in Integrated Science: Systems OR with instructor’s permission and signature.


Department of Science • An updated marshmallow delayed gratification study • Android game design with C++ • The study of acoustics and electricity • The building of highly efficient electromagnets Prerequisites: Successful completion of Integrated Science: Systems OR with instructor’s permission and signature. ECOLOGY OF THE CHESAPEAKE BAY (1/2 credit) The Chesapeake Bay is one of the most important estuaries in the world. It’s proximity provides students with an authentic laboratory setting for course explorations which act as a springboard to the consideration of related political, economic and cultural issues. The course poses questions such as: What are the biogeochemical characteristics and dynamics of the Bay; How does one define and quantify if the Bay is healthy and sustainable; and, What courses of action are appropriate, in both natural and social science contexts. These questions are addressed through readings such as newspaper articles on the debate between watermen and natural resource regulators, seminar discussions on topics like the effects of the Maryland Smart Growth program, laboratory investigations such as completing a comparative analysis through dissection of local aquatic species, field experiences with the South River Keepers, and research on such topics as developing understanding of analogous ecosystem issues. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Integrated Science: Systems OR with instructor’s permission and signature. GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL SEMINAR (1/2 credit) A deep understanding of the links between the natural and social sciences is imperative in our current global society. This course challenges students to employ and integrate the perspectives, concepts, and tools of the natural and social sciences in a comprehensive exploration of current global environmental issues such as desertification, global climate change, ecosystem imbalance, and watershed pollution, and as important resources in efforts to create a sustainable world. Students select and research environmental issues, engage in laboratory and other projects, share presentations with one another, and engage in frequent class discussions, working toward a full understanding of each issue, its implications for the natural and social worlds, and its potential resolutions. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Integrated Science: Systems OR with instructor’s permission and signature.

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INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY (Grades 11 and 12; 1 credit) This course is designed to introduce students to the dynamic and exciting field of astronomy. Through discussion, reading, interactive computer exercises, demonstrations, and observing the night sky, students acquire an understanding of the basic concepts of astronomy pertaining to the solar system and the bodies within it, as well as the universe as a whole. The course is primarily discussion and discovery-based, but lectures are also used to introduce specific topics and/or clarify some of the more challenging material. One class per month meets at night to enable the group to observe the night sky. This is a required meeting, so students should plan accordingly. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Integrated Science: Systems OR with instructor’s permission and signature. INTRODUCTION TO OCEANOGRAPHY (1 credit) Oceanography is the study of marine environments and dynamics. More specifically, the discipline is divided into four subunits: marine geology (sediments, plate tectonics, etc.), marine biology (plants, animals, etc.), physical oceanography (currents, wave movement, etc.), and marine chemistry (salinity, thermoclines, etc.). This course focuses on learning introductory concepts and building a conceptual understanding of the interrelationships of those subunits. Class time includes interactive lectures on key concepts, discussions related to research and content case studies, labs and projects to apply information, and periodic field trips on the Bay or to area non-profits with ocean missions. As often as possible, related marine environmental impact issues (e.g., the use of marine sanctuaries in developing countries) are presented and discussed. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Integrated Science: Systems OR with instructor’s permission and signature. PHYSICS (1 credit; AP Exam optional) This course provides a systematic introduction to the basic phenomena of the natural world. Students are provided a thorough grounding in the main concepts of classical physics and Newtonian physics, and the discoveries and theories that formed a base for the transition from Newtonian to post-Newtonian physics. The main topics in Newtonian physics are motion, force, conservation laws, and rotational motion. Simple harmonic motion, and electricity and magnetism are studied as Newtonian concepts that lead to an understanding of modern physics. Students who wish to take the Physics B Advanced Placement examination attend extra sessions to review thermodynamics, and


CERAMICS I (1⁄2 credit) Ceramics I offers an introduction to the traditional techniques of pinching, coiling, modeling, flattening, and burnishing clay to form practical ware or decorative sculpture. The emphasis is on usable pieces showing competent ceramic techniques and an understanding of design. The course familiarizes students with the properties of clay and uses of (INDEPENDENT STUDY) glazes, as well as materials and tools used in working with ceramics. The students visualize the final object Offered as a one-semester class, Independent Study through drawing. The emphasis of the class is on provides an engaging opportunity for seniors to pursue hand-building techniques but the potter’s wheel is a specific area of interest through dedicated, in-depth also introduced, including the techniques for centering study. (see page 14) and pulling a basic bowl and cylinder shape. Each student is expected to produce a minimum of ten Recent Science focused projects include: Synthetic clay construction experiments, five of which reach Biology; Study of Mechanics (Physics C); Marine Biology conclusion as bisque-fired and glazed works. and Environmental Law; The Biology of Cancer; Proton Therapy, Equine Anatomy and Physiology, The Physiology Prerequisite: Art I of Homeostasis, Behavioral Study of Cetaceans. CERAMICS II (1⁄2 credit) Ceramics II offers a continuation of the skills learned in Ceramics I. The emphasis is on refining traditional hand-building techniques and mastering basic Key School recognizes the importance of visual arts throwing on the potter’s wheel. The class researches education and believes that the fullest development the work of ceramic artists and recreates some of of each student is dependent upon intellectual their techniques. Glazing and the firing process is endeavors in the visual arts. The Visual Arts also explored. Expectations regarding the quality of Department encourages student artists to think finished work is higher than was the case in Ceramics visually, problem-solve creatively, and elaborate I, the vessel walls are thinner, glaze is applied more on ideas and themes. Teaching goals include the accurately, and lids, handles and spouts are added. provision of a lasting appreciation for the visual Other techniques may include drape molds and arts, a broadened view of the world, an outlet for press molds. The student produces a minimum of ten self-expression and creativity, an awareness of clay construction experiments, six of which reach distinct artistic disciplines, and specific academic conclusion as glazed work. As a final exam, students challenge in the study of art history, two and threeproduce a written report detailing the work of a dimensional forms of art-making, video production, ceramic artist and a ceramic piece emulating the and photography. style of this artist. ART I Prerequisite: Ceramics I (Grades 9-12; 1 credit) This is a foundation studio course in applied 2-D and CERAMICS: STUDIO CONCENTRATION 3-D composition and color theory with a component (1/2 credit) that surveys the history of Western art. Students Building on skills developed in Ceramics II, students use materials ranging from pencils to oil pastels focus on the design process and are expected to to acrylic paints. Technical, perceptual, aesthetic, create a unique and highly skilled body of work, and conceptual skills are developed in a variety of which is documented electronically. This course allows drawing, painting and sculptural techniques. One competent ceramic students to increase their skills quarter of the course work is dedicated to readings, both in hand-building and work on the potter’s wheel, class discussions and projects focused on the history both of which are required. Students should expect to of Western painting, sculpture and architecture. Art research various ceramics techniques, and experiment I is a prerequisite for all Visual Arts classes AND a with production including altering, incising, engraving, graduation requirement for all students. and sprigging. Experiments with glaze layering are also encouraged. Students give a presentation to the class study wave theory, optics, and modern physics. Since the approach is mathematical throughout, a thorough understanding of and comfort with mathematics up to the level of trigonometry is essential. Prerequisite: Completion or current enrollment in PreCalculus; AP test optional.

SCIENCE

VISUAL ARTS

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Department of Visual Arts


Department of Visual Arts on several of these techniques and show examples they have created. They produce a minimum of twelve pieces, with eight reaching conclusion as glazed work. Craftsmanship and creativity are stressed. Work outside of class is expected. Prerequisite: B or better in Ceramics II and instructor’s permission.

digital video camera. A conventional analog camcorder does not interface with the editing computers and, therefore, is not acceptable.) Prerequisite: Art I DIGITAL VIDEO II (1⁄2 credit) Digital Video II expands on the lessons learned in Digital DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY I Video I. Assignments are more self-directed with the (1⁄2 credit) student making suggestions. Students draft creative scripts, Students learn the application of the elements and draw storyboards and take their ideas from concept to principles of design through the medium of photography. finished film using software- editing tools. Assignments They learn the history of photography from the may be based on popular contest ideas, such as the chemical revolution of the nineteenth century to the 48-hour film in which the filmmaker is given a prop, a line digital revolution of the twentieth century. Students of dialogue, and a character, then chooses a genre and learn the technical operation of the digital camera, produces a short film based on these, though in this and the use of select software applications, computers case students have 48 days. Each assignment helps the and digital printers to explore the representational, student become more proficient in the use of the camera, creative and expressive potential of this medium. sound equipment, lighting, directing, and editing. Students (Please note that each student is required to provide are assessed using two rubrics: A class critique and a their own digital camera.) personal critique. Each rubric focuses on four aspects of the assignments: creative, technical, paperwork, and Prerequisite: Art I direction. (Please note: each student enrolled in this course is expected to provide their own digital video camera.) DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY II (1⁄2 credit) Prerequisite: Digital Video I This is a continuation of the visual inquiry begun in Digital Photography I. Students continue to develop DRAWING AND PAINTING I technical, perceptual, aesthetic, and conceptual skills (1⁄2 credit) while undertaking projects that address more advanced This class builds on the Art I experience. It is intended for topics. The class concludes with the production of a both the student who wishes to pursue advanced work portfolio that reflects both the skills and the personal on a portfolio for art school and/or Advanced Placement style of the individual student. (Please note that each exams, and for the student who simply wishes to further student is required to provide their own digital camera.) develop skills beyond Art I. The focus is on an exploration of a wide-range of media, subjects and techniques. Prerequisite: Digital Photography I and permission of Students work with a variety of drawing styles—gesture, the instructor. contour and, especially, sustained drawings. The figure and portrait are addressed as subject matter, and DIGITAL VIDEO I students also work with still life, landscape and non(1⁄2 credit) objective imagery. Color work utilizes pastels, colored This course investigates the history and technique of pencils, oil pastels, watercolor, acrylic, and water-based creative filmmaking and offers students the opportunity oils. While there is no art history component per se, to experience first-hand every aspect of digital significant artists are studied in relation to assignments. filmmaking from conceptualization to distribution. Students view major examples of U.S. and international Prerequisite: Art I filmmaking, and learn creative problem-solving skills in brainstorming, script development and writing, DRAWING AND PAINTING II storyboarding, shooting, editing, and soundtrack (1⁄2 credit) composition. In addition, students learn to use digital This second semester of Drawing and Painting cameras, natural and artificial light systems, and sound focuses on developing skills in a variety of subjects, systems, and utilize movie software on the Apple Power media and techniques. The class culminates with the Mac and iBook platforms to edit projects. These films completion of a portfolio, demonstrating the breadth are aired on campus and in select regional and/or of the students’ experience. national student film festivals. (Please note: each student enrolled in this course is expected to provide their own Prerequisite: Drawing and Painting I 60

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STUDIO CONCENTRATION I (1⁄2 credit; AP Portfolio optional) This is an intensive, college-level class exploring twodimensional composition, representation and expression. During the term, each student creates six works on a single theme—in media and in techniques of their choosing—which may result in the production of a concentration portfolio. Art history references are used for work in the course. This work generally continues in Studio Concentration II. Prerequisite: Drawing and Painting II or Digital Photography II, and permission of the instructor; AP portfolio optional. STUDIO CONCENTRATION II (1⁄2 credit; AP Portfolio optional) This class is a continuation of the individualized studio inquiry begun in Studio Concentration I. The class concludes with the completion of an application portfolio for art school and/or submission of the Advanced Placement Drawing or 2D portfolio. Prerequisite: Studio Concentration I and permission of the instructor; AP portfolio optional.

VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS

(INDEPENDENT STUDY) Offered as a one-semester class, Independent Study provides an engaging opportunity for seniors to pursue a specific area of interest through dedicated, in-depth study. (see page 14) Recent Visual and Performing Arts focused projects include: Music Theory 3; Stop-Motion Animated Short Film Direction; Interior Design; The Evolution of the French Song; Building a Television Show Pilot.

PERFORMING ARTS

Key School recognizes the importance of performing arts education and believes the development of each student is dependent on intellectual endeavors in the performing arts. Teaching goals for the Performing Arts Department include the provision of a lasting appreciation for the performing arts, a broadened view of the world, an outlet for self-expression and creativity, an awareness of distinct artistic disciplines, and specific academic challenge in the study of music, theater and dance. In addition to course offerings in the performing arts, students can also participate in activities such as the

Upper School Chorus, Jazz Ensembles, Key Strings, Key Theater, and Key Concert Dancers. Students who participate in Key Theater stage two productions each year, including the annual musical. In addition to fulfilling graduation requirements in the performing arts, many Upper School students participate in one or more of the performing arts activities each year. CHAMBER CHOIR I (1⁄2 credit) This class gives the more experienced singer an opportunity to be part of a relatively small choral group (6-12 students). The emphasis is not only on working toward a polished performance of challenging choral literature, but also on involving students in a dialogue about the music they are singing. Discussions include formal analysis, dynamics, articulations, vowel placement, and blend. To strengthen students’ ability to read melodic and rhythmic notation, daily sight-singing using Latin syllables is included. Prerequisite: Instructor approval CHAMBER CHOIR II (1⁄2 credit) The majority of students who take Chamber Choir I during the fall semester elect to continue with Chamber Choir II in the spring. This second semester course is designed in the same manner as Chamber Choir I; however, a completely different repertoire is chosen. As each semester of Chamber Choir presents a new repertoire, students may begin and/or move through the sequence (Chamber Choir I, II, III, IV) during any semester. Prerequisite: Instructor approval CHAMBER CHOIR III and IV (1⁄2 credit each) For students who wish to continue their involvement in Chamber Choir beyond the first two semesters (one year), Chamber Choir III and IV are available. These third and fourth semester course offerings are designed in the same manner as Chamber Choir II and may be taken during either semester. Prerequisite: Instructor approval MUSIC THEORY I (Grades 10-12; 1⁄2 credit) This course provides both theoretical and practical experience for students who have a basic understanding of melodic and rhythmic notation. The goal is to enable students to gain further knowledge of the elements of music through a study of music theory, history, introductory composition, basic acoustics, and ear Upper School at Key

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Department of Performing Arts


Department of Performing Arts training. The study of ear training is essential to this course; through the awareness of intervals, pitch relationships, and voice-leading (as experienced directly through the practical application of singing), a student can more fully understand music theory and its applications within harmony and composition. The compositional aspect of this course gives students an opportunity to incorporate the study of music theory within a practical application, enabling them to experiment with what they are learning and hear the results of their efforts. MUSIC THEORY II (Grades 10-12; 1⁄2 credit) Music Theory II is designed for the student who has successfully completed Music Theory I and wishes to move more deeply into four-part composition. The course concentrates on dominant-tonic resolution as applied within: 1) first inversion use of tonic, dominant and leading-tone triads; 2) inversions of the dominant seventh chord; and 3) elements leading to the dominant triad through subdominant and supertonic triads. Prerequisite: Music Theory I ACTING: VOICE AND MOVEMENT (Grades 10-12; 1⁄2 credit) This acting course focuses on vocal and body work to enhance the skills of performance and public speaking. Students practice rhetorical techniques, posture, and how to create a confident and effective public presence. Student work includes delivering speeches and monologues, practicing voice-over work and role playing scenarios with each other. ACTING: CHARACTER AND EMOTION (Grades 10-12; 1/2 credit) This acting course focuses on the process of creating believable and memorable characters through physical and vocal means as well as delving into portraying emotions and psychological states realistically. Students study the Stanislavski System and its impact on modern performance aesthetics. Student work includes the performance of monologues and scenes as well as acting critiques and analyses of existing performances. PLAYWRITING (Grades 10-12; 1⁄2 credit) This course is designed to identify and investigate the tools needed to craft a stageworthy play. Through a series of reading and writing assignments each student explores conflict, character, dialogue, and plotting. Reading assignments include plays from a variety of successful playwrights. Each student is responsible for writing two ten- minute plays as well as a one-act play by the end of the semester.

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THEATER DESIGN (Grades 10-12; 1⁄2 credit) This course focuses on production elements related to design for theater. The course is divided into four units, covering scenic design, costume design, lighting design, and sound design. Students learn basic design principles while learning how to address the unique limitations of live performance. Course work includes reading plays, producing models and visual displays, and learning how to use editing and design tools. THEATER PERFORMANCE (Grades 10-12; 1⁄2 credit) Students who participate significantly in Key Theater productions may earn a semester credit in Performing Arts, satisfying the Performing Arts graduation requirement. Credit eligibility is at the discretion of the theater director, department chair and division head. Performing Arts credits are available to students who have been cast in major roles in at least two Key Theater productions. Additionally, a student must submit a comprehensive, seven to ten page, written reflection on their experiences, describing the processes and what artistic growth they feel they have received through their participation. Prerequisite: Participation in at least two Key Theater productions AND instructor's permission DANCE TECHNIQUE (Grades 10-12, 1/2 credit and/or 1/6 P.E. credit) Students in Dance Technique learn the basics of social dance spanning the last four centuries including the waltz, the Charleston, swing, various latin dances, and dances popular through the 70s and 80s. To supplement movement, they view documentaries and films which expose them to the historical context and societal impact of the steps they are learning. They complete a mid-semester research project in which they present the origin and evolution of a relevant dance style that interests them. The course culminates with a studio performance of every dance style learned.

VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS

(INDEPENDENT STUDY) Offered as a one-semester class, Independent Study provides an engaging opportunity for seniors to pursue a specific area of interest through dedicated, in-depth study. (see page 14) Recent Visual and Performing Arts focused projects include: Music Theory 3; Stop-Motion Animated Short Film Direction; Interior Design; The Evolution of the French Song; Building a Television Show Pilot.


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Department of Physical Education and Non-Departmental Courses

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Physical Education is an integral part of a student’s total education. The Physical Education department faculty seeks to develop in each student an awareness of personal physical fitness and to provide activities, instruction and guidance to aid each student in achieving an appropriate level of fitness. The Upper School Physical Education program is an extension of the experiences and activities performed in the previous divisions within the School. While there are no specific required Physical Education classes in the Upper School, all students must obtain one credit for graduation. Students need 1/3 credit yearly in grades 9-11. Students may obtain these credits in one of the following four ways: • Play two seasons of interscholastic sports in a given year; • Enroll in the dance technique course in a given year; • Sign-up for one activity per semester in the Activities Program that is approved for Physical Education credit in a given year; • Create an Independent Exercise Contract with a Physical Education teacher in a given year.

Assessment is based on student attendance at, and investment in, their service placement as well as the quality of a student’s journal entries and participation in seminar discussions. LIFE SKILLS - CHANGING LIVES (1/4 credit) As part of the School-wide initiative of teaching all students important life skills, the Upper School offers students this instruction through both implicit means, embedded within existing curricula and program. Broad Life Skills topics include human physiology and development, physical well-being, self-awareness and regulation, collaborative skills, and responsibilities of citizenship. Implicit instruction takes place in academic courses, outdoor education experiences, the activities program, athletics, the performing arts, and in the myriad interactions comprising day-to-day school life. Changing Lives, a one-semester course required of all ninth graders, includes units on alcohol and other drugs, sexuality and relationships, technology, and personality profiles and career exploration.

NON-DEPARTMENTAL COURSES COMMUNITY SERVICE WORK ELECTIVE (Grades 10-12; 1/2 credit) This course offers students the opportunity to work for a semester with one of a number human service agencies or programs in Anne Arundel County. Students research various placement options, and with the help of the instructor, make contact and arrange their placements with agencies and service organizations. All placements must be in human service work and must put students in direct helping relationships with the people an agency or program serves. The course is scheduled into a regular block, but students meet in only one of these, biweekly, as a seminar to encourage reflection on and discussion of their experiences. Remaining course blocks afford added schedule flexibility for students whose placements have them working on weekdays. Students work a minimum of three to four hours weekly at their placements and are required to keep journals based on their experiences. The course teacher acts as a liaison with each agency or program, monitoring students’ attendance and investment in work. Grading is on a Pass/Fail basis.

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Profile for Key School

Key School Upper School Guide 2020-2021  

Key School Upper School Guide 2020-2021