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SSANDPOINT INSIDE: SANDPOINT

winter guide 2018/19

MOOSING

+

AROUND

Making room for our wild neighbors

a hopping brew scene Two more breweries in town

cross-country skiing Vast trails surrounding us

Jerry kramer

A talk with a Hall-of-Famer

WINTER 2019

MAGAZINE


www.TSSIR.com Anytime Info For recorded information or to speak to the listing agent, call 208.449.0071 and use the 4-digit property code.

www.LakesideEstateAtCapeOfArt.com $6,995,000 ATI #1538 Hope, Idaho

www.PriestLakeWaterfrontEstate.com $2,687,000 ATI #1101 Coolin, Idaho

www.LakefrontLivingAtPonderPt.com $2,675,000 ATI #1049 Sandpoint, Idaho

www.LakesideAtPonderPoint.com $2,575,000 ATI #1447 Sandpoint, Idaho

www.LuxuryLivingAtBlackRock.com $1,999,000 ATI #1509 Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

www.RanchAtHiddenValley.com $1,545,000 ATI #1374 Sandpoint, Idaho

www.SunnysideLakeviewEstate.com $1,395,000 ATI #1274 Sandpoint, Idaho

www.OrchardsCustomHomesites.com $1,195,000 ATI #1113 Hayden, Idaho

www.WarrenIslandShore.com $1,195,000 ATI #1577 Hope, Idaho

www.PonderPointWaterfront.com $895,000 ATI #1532 Sandpoint, Idaho

www.PriestRiverWaterfrontHome.com $624,900 ATI #1033 Priest River, Idaho

www.WaterfrontAtPoulinDrive.com $549,000 ATI #1528 Sagle, Idaho

www.WestshoreWayLots.com $599,000 ATI #1429 Laclede, Idaho

www.MarinaCondoAtHolidayShores.com $399,900 ATI #1186 Hope, Idaho

www.HolidayShoresMarinaCondo.com $368,900 ATI #1588 Hope, Idaho

www.JanishDrLakeviewAcreage.com $349,000 ATI #1231 Sandpoint, Idaho

B

Cindy Bond Associate Broker, Owner GRI, CRS

www.CindyBond.com

C

ommitted to providing a luxury experienceDedicated to achieving results!

208.255.8360 | cindy.bond@sothebysrealty.com | 200 Main | Sandpoint

© MMVII Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Claude Monet’s “Marine View With a Sunset,” used with permission. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated, Except Offices Owned And Operated By NRT Incorporated. Sandpoint office: 208-263-5101, 200 Main Street, Sandpoint, ID 83864.


www.TSSIR.com

817 KaniKsu shOres, sandPOint $1,975,000 Mls #20180856 stunning 7 bedroom timberframe with 100+ feet of lakefront built to entertain family and friends

38 Cattail lane, Priest river $579,000 Mls #20180062 300’ of Pend Oreille riverfront, fully fenced yard, dock and home with open floorplan allowing easy access to outdoor decks, patio and lawn

412 sandPOint ave #132, sandPOint $459,900 Mls #20183400 Beautifully appointed first floor residence at The seasons featuring wood floors and open floorplan. Boat slip and roll up storage unit included!

70 leisure lane, sandPOint $395,000 Mls #20183393 PendinG darling farm style 5 bedroom/3 bath home with wraparound porch sitting on 1.5 flat, usable acres with southern exposure. Country living a mile from sandpoint

240 MOOsewOOd lane, saGle $970,000 Mls #20181206 hilltop home with 8.8 acres, 270 degree views of the lake and access to sourdough Point amenities

nna Geri COurt, sandPOint $534,000 Mls #20180423 One of the few waterfront parcels left within sandpoint city limits sporting over 100 feet of lakeshore and coveted southern exposure

73 Fawn drive, saGle $525,000 Mls #20181700 rare find! .64 acre waterfront lot with 170+ feet of Bottle Bay shoreline. ideal for summer cabin or primary residence. already equipped with new “l” shaped dock.

1118 n divisiOn ave, sandPOint $330,000 Mls #20183051 Fantastic development opportunity! 10 lots on flat buildable .84 acre parcel in area of mixed use within city limits

395 rinCOn drive, sandPOint $99,000 Mls #20182814 6+ peaceful acres in gated community with beautfiul lake and mountain views. Power and telephone to property line

39 KienhOlz drive, hOPe $7,000,000 Mls # 20181615 PendinG One-of-a-kind home on 10 acres in gated community and ¼ mile of arguably the finest lakefront in the area. Can be sold as 2 separate 5 acre properties

Dedicated to the extraordinary the exceptional and the unique.

Chris Chambers www.ExtraordinaryIdaho.com 208-290-2500 chris.chambers@sothebysrealty.com 200 Main, Sandpoint, Idaho

© MMVII Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Claude Monet’s “Marine View With a Sunset,” used with permission. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated, Except Offices Owned And Operated By NRT Incorporated. Sandpoint office: 208-263-5101, 200 Main Street, Sandpoint, ID 83864.


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Big enough to serve. Small enough to care.

Charlie Parrish 208-290-1501

Becky Freeland 208-290-5628

Curt Hagan 208-290-7833

Charesse Moore 208-255-6060

Courtney Nova 208-290-7264

Ron Nova 208-304-2007

Kathy Robinson 208-255-9690

Maddie Gill 208-597-3955

John Dibble 208-290-1101

Danny Strauss 208-290-2946

Brian Jacobs 208-610-3188

Chelsea Nova 208-304-8979

www.Evergreen-Realty.com // www.SchweitzerMountain.com 321 North First Avenue, Sandpoint ID Toll Free 800.829.6370 // OďŹƒce 208.263.6370 // Fax 208.263.3959 Evergreen Realty is pleased to sponsor our local Habitat for Humanity


PHOTO BY FIONA HICKS

contents

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

WI NT ER 2 019, VOL. 29, NO. 1

On the Cover MOOSING AROUND. A majestic bull

PHOTO BY DON FISHER

moose enjoying winter’s splendor. Cover photo by Shawn McCully.

WINTER GUIDE TO SANDPOINT. There’s no need to hibernate during the winter in Sandpoint! Check out our guide for dozens of activities to keep you off the couch on page 114.

features 74

Wily Weasels of the Northwest Cunning carnivores both cute and vicious

78 82 84

These are the Moose of our Lives

36

Self-trained artist in glass

40 44 49

51 6 1 63

67 72

Big, bold, and not-very-endangered, moose are a staple of the North Idaho life

Don’t give a moose a muffin Preserving our wild neighbors’ natural diet

moose stories

First-hand tales of local encounters with Alces alces Patricia Barkley’s 36 years of success in Sandpoint

A gentle thrill

Cross-country skiing offers peace, views, and a winter workout

relearning salish

Tribes work together to bring back ancestral language to the region

another step closer

With Cedar Street now complete, city eyes First Avenue for next set of renovations

Downtown survivors

Longtime area retailers reflect on surviving and thriving downtown

raising the bar

Improvements big and small elevating the Schweitzer experience

miracle on pine street

Group raises over $2 million for community forest

grand openings

Five arrivals (and one departure) that boosted Bonner County

darwin wins science award

Local scientist/professor Darwin Berg inducted into the Academy of Arts and Sciences WINTER 2019 | SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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conte nts

departments 12 almanac

Who, what, where, when and why in Sandpoint

27 

calendar

Annual and upcoming events

31 interview

PHOTO BY DOUG MARSHALL

Jerry Kramer finally gets the call

36

art scene

59 

pictured in history

Patricia Barkley, artist in glass Armistice Day

109 natives and newcomers

Introductions to the old and new in Sandpoint

122

27

126

REAL ESTATE 92 going Tiny

Sandpoint woman builds home from the trailer up

97

on the hunt

Looking for Sears catalog homes in the area

103 sand creek goes residential New development rises on boardwalk

106 marketwatch

Current trends in real estate in Bonner County

DINING GUIDE 119 Around town Dough-liciousness New bagel shop and pastries galore

PHOTO BY FIONA HICKS

92

serving sandpoint Q & A with local delis

122 new breweries get sandpoint hopping Two new breweries add to the Sandpoint vibe

126 the local dish

Eats & drinks around town

130 sandpoint area dining guide Dining around Sandpoint

VIEW OF THE LOFTS AND SANDPOINT AT NIGHT BY BRAD FRERKSON

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121

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Truly

Exceptional Real Estate Services

Simplify your life. Going Above & Beyond is our

JAKE OLIVER (208) 290-5233

Standard.

JEREMY DUNN (208) 610-5501 TOBY ATENCIO (316) 305-5599

208.265.7362 | www.SandpointIdahoRealEstate.com | 113 N First Avenue, Sandpoint, ID 83864 WINTER 2019 | SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

9


PHOTO BY SANDY BESSLER

LANDON OTIS ENJOYS TOP-OF-THE-WORLD VIEWS

conte nts

THE PUBLISHER AND THE BULL MOOSE FACE OFF. BEHAVIOR BY PUBLISHER NOT RECOMMENDED.

Publisher’s note

Live around here long enough and you, too, shall have a moose story— or a few— to tell. Big, ungainly, seemingly indifferent, and slightly comical in their appearance, moose engender a decided affection from most residents. A moose photo posted to Facebook is sure to get you a lot of likes and shares; a short video clip we posted a couple years ago on our Sandpoint Online Facebook page of a young moose in our office front yard reached more than 30,000 people. That’s, simply, because a lot of people like moose. That we did have a moose in our yard— and that it’s not unusual for one to be wandering around town, especially in winter when they’re looking for browse— is testament to the comeback that these big deer have made over the past century. Once reduced to small numbers, good stewardship has helped moose rebound. This issue we tell about this fine success story, along with plenty of colorful moose tales—and some common sense warnings that moose must be treated with caution. Of course, there’s much more to read in this issue. Please dig in to our latest attempt to reflect all the many facets of the truly splendid lifestyle we are so fortunate to enjoy here. Have a terrific winter... and keep an eye out for the moose.

contributors Stephen Drinkard, sometimes writer for Sandpoint Magazine, former grant writer and urban forester for the city of Sandpoint, is a stained glass artist in his spare time—making him the perfect person to share the unique success of Patricia Barkley in “Artist in Glass” (p. 36). katie botkin is the managing editor of MultiLingual, a language and business magazine that ships to 87 countries. She has written for a variety of publications and taught English on three continents. She has bachelor’s degrees in French and journalism, and a Master’s degree in English with an emphasis on linguistics. Her passion for language led her to write “Relearning Salish” (p. 44). By training, becky haag worked as a Wildlife Biologist for 10 years for the Idaho Department of Fish and Game. She now teaches high school sciences—and her passion for wildlife—to students at Clark Fork Jr./Sr. High School. She never feeds wild animals, and explains why in “Don’t Give a Moose a Muffin” (p. 82).

CB

Publisher Chris Bessler Editor Trish Gannon Assistant Editor Beth Hawkins Advertising Director Clint Nicholson Art Director Pamela Morrow Design Team Laura Wahl, Robin Levy, Jackie Palmer Social Media Lisa Howard Office Manager Susan Otis IT Manager Landon Otis Contributors: Nikki Anderson, Staci Bailey, Brian Baxter, Phillip Belena, Bonner County History Museum, Katie

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Botkin, Stephanie Brown, Ed Butler, Sandy Compton, Cody Desorcy, Stephen Drinkard, Susan Drumheller, Dan Earle, Jennifer Edwards, Dan Eskelson, Don Fisher, Brad Frerkson, Becky Haag, Lori Halcro, Ross Hall, Tyler Hanna, Sue Haynes, Fiona Hicks, Cate Huisman, Donald Jones, Dan K, David Keyes, Olivia Keyes, Lyndsie Kiebert, Jennifer Lamont-Leo, Gary Lirette, Marianne Love, Doug Marshall, Shawn McCully, Heather McElwain, Kirk Miller, David Moscowitz, Ari Nordhagen, Ben Olson, Jim Parsons Jr., Amanda J. Paul, Tim Peterson, Annie Pfleuger, Amber Phillips, Ann Porter, Rick Price, John Proctor, Cynthia Schmit, Carrie Scozzaro, Al Seger, Dabne Sparks, Selkirk Powder, Showcase Exposure LLC, Mary Terra-Berns, Woods Wheatcroft, Malte Wingen

S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E | W I N T E R 2 0 1 9

Sandpoint Magazine is published twice yearly, in May and November, by Keokee Co. Publishing, Inc. 405 Church St., Sandpoint, ID 83864 Phone: 208-263-3573 Email: inbox@keokee.com ©2018 by Keokee Co. Publishing Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Subscriptions: $12 per year, payable in advance. Send address changes to the address above. Visit our web magazine published at www. SandpointMagazine.com. Printed in USA by Century Publishing, Post Falls, Idaho.


al manac

THE SURPRISING HISTORY OF A WORKHORSE OF THE LAKE by Jennifer Edwards

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H

ow did a World War II landing craft end up on the shores of Lake Pend Oreille? That story begins prior to the war, when Andrew Higgins, of New Orleans, began building these amphibious landing crafts. A lumber man, he gradually moved into boat building—which became his sole operation after his lumber transport company went bankrupt in 1930. Fortuitously, both the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps expressed an interest in his boats. The Higgins boat was used for many amphibious landings during WWII. In a 1964 interview, President Dwight D. Eisenhower declared it to have been crucial to the Allied victory on the European Western Front. “If Higgins had not designed and built [those boats], we never


A L M A N AC

LEFT: THE DETERIORATING CHERRY ANN WAS ONCE A FAMILIAR SIGHT ALONG THE HIGHWAY JENNIFER EDWARDS ABOVE: THE CHERRY ANN IN DRY DOCK, AND AT WORK NEAR WHISKEY ROCK ED BUTLER

could have landed over an open beach... . Andrew Higgins is the man who won the war for us,� he said. One of these landing crafts was beached in East Hope after the war, when Eugene Butler acquired it from Fred Kennedy, who purchased it from the Farragut Naval Training Station to use for lumber transportation across Lake Pend Oreille. Eugene and his sons, Ed and Kenny Butler, towed logs from Granite Creek, Kilroy Bay, and Whiskey Rock to the Hope Lumber Sawmill. Eugene named the craft Cherry Ann, after his girlfriend; the image of a cherry was painted on the boat because he said it looked better than the word. The original armored plates were removed to reduce weight, the backsides were cut down, and the

ramps in front were welded shut. The cabin was added to provide a home for a crew of two with cooking facilities and bunk beds. It was powered by a 671 GMC diesel engine. In 1971, construction of the new route for Highway 200 through Hope reduced the amount of lakeshore land available for commercial use. The second sawmill in East Hope closed down and the land reverted to private residence. The Cherry Ann was beached just below Highway 200. Gradual destruction from water erosion over the years started to undercut the highway, destroying her resting place and hastening her destruction. In the last decade, she was scrapped, and the Cherry Ann passed into memory. WINTER 2019 | SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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A L M A N AC

shine

PHOTO BY LORI HALCRO

let it

IDAHO’S TURNING OFF THE LIGHTS by Heather McElwain

F

ar from city skyglow, our eyes adjust to blackness, seeing first one star, then countless iridescent points and the Milky Way’s glowing seam. Despite increasing bulbs lighting shorelines and mountainsides, Idaho still boasts some of the country’s last, dark sky sanctuaries. And reflecting Idaho’s motto, “Let it be perpetual” (Esto perpetua) some of that darkness is now preserved. In December 2017, the International Dark Sky Association approved the Central Idaho Dark Sky Reserve, one of just 12 worldwide and America’s first. It encompasses 906,000 acres, including the Sawtooth, Hemingway-Boulders, and White Clouds wilderness areas.

According to IDSA, about a third of the world’s population and 80 percent of Americans no longer see the Milky Way. Because of light pollution, they perceive only a fraction of the night sky we’ve always looked to for stories, navigation, and imagination. IDSA strives to safeguard pristine skygazing and reduce light pollution from yard and lot lights shining skyward, versus down where they’re actually needed. Humans and wildlife need uninterrupted nighttime dark to maintain their circadian rhythms, which balance cells, brain waves, and hormones. Artificial light at night damages fragile ecological communities; is linked with disease like depression and cancer; and disrupts feeding and breeding patterns,

especially for nocturnal hunters like bats, owls, and coyotes. Dark sky reserves and participating communities follow guidelines to limit lumens, shield bulbs for directed light, and use timers to decrease unneeded illumination. Now many Idahoans are embracing a new enlightenment; embracing the value of our astral legacy; switching off lights to savor age-old traditions like viewing the Milky Way as our forebears did; and allowing our dark skies to “continue perpetual.”

Learn more at www.darksky.org

WINTER 2019 | SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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almanac

crazy fast, crazy unusual

GRIND HARD PLUMBING CO. ISN’T AFRAID TO THRILL

L

by Lyndsie Kiebert

ocal boys Ethan Schlussler (middle, above) and Edwin Olding (right, above) are on a mission to share unique motorized projects through their YouTube channel, Grind Hard Plumbing Co. “We focus mostly on motorized things that are crazy fast and crazy unusual,” Schlussler said. “Anything we can think of that’s fun or entertaining.” But to start a successful YouTube channel, you have to do something “ridiculous,” Olding said. Thus, the real-engine-powered Barbie car was born. With ingredients from a pink Mustang Power Wheels, an old go-kart, and a dirt bike engine, the result is petite but powerful. “We’re not just building something pretty, we’re going to use it,” Olding said. “But we figured, while it’s still pretty, let’s get some beautiful shots of it overlooking Lake Pend Oreille at sunset.”

What ensued resulted in a video, posted in May, that had amassed nearly one million views by mid-September. In it, Schlussler takes the tricked-out Barbie car on its maiden voyage on the old highway between Hope and Clark Fork, nearly driving into traffic, and then over a dropoff leading to the railroad tracks. “Once I got in the car I couldn’t hold back,” Schlussler recalls. As Grind Hard gains views and interest, the guys are hoping someday they can call the venture their full-time job. “The goal is to be able to make money doing what we love, which is building crazy stuff, filming it, and having fun with it,” Schlussler said. “And maybe we’ll entertain some people along the way.” Check out the test drive at www.sptmag.com/barbiecar, and follow Grind Hard Plumbing Co. on Facebook and Instagram.

Peace of mind starts with a plan. Having a solid plan in place protects your home and assets for you, your children, and grandchildren. We can help navigate the many options available and ensure that you end up with a plan that’s right for you. ESTATE & ASSET PRESERVATION PLANNING • LONG TERM CARE • ELDER LAW SANDPOINT OFFICE 102 S Euclid Avenue, Sandpoint ID, 83864 • (208) 263-3585 16

S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E | W I N T E R 2 0 1 9

D E N I S E S T E WA R T

LT C E LAW GROUP E S TAT E & L O N G T E R M C A R E


A L M A N AC

PHOTO BY LYNDSIE KIEBERT

Cook your way to fame and fortune

NEW COMMERCIAL KITCHEN OPENS IN PONDERAY

H

by Lyndsie Kiebert

uckleberries are a staple of North Idaho, and a local business that knows all about sharing the purple gold is the first client of Ponderay’s new commercial kitchen. Gem Berry Products is moving into Kitchen Ponderay, a 1,540-square-foot commercial kitchen built by the Bonner County Economic Development Corporation, located in what was formerly the Hideaway Lounge at the Bonner Mall. Kitchen Ponderay is available 24/7 and was funded by grants and donations. According to the BCEDC, some of the equipment in the new kitchen came from the Bonner Business Center Incubator kitchen, where Gem Berry got its start. The incubator closed in 2014. Gem Berry founder and owner Harry Menser said the new location is easily accessible, and he highlighted the 40-gallon, double-jacketed,

steam kettle at Kitchen Ponderay as particularly helpful in making large batches of Gem Berry’s huckleberry BBQ sauce. “There’s a number of features that I find will probably be a bit handier,” he said. Menser is the chief CEO and marketing manager of the company, which he founded with his wife and two business partners, all now deceased. He said he’s happy to continue making and sharing Gem Berry both locally and beyond. Other entrepreneurs looking to cook their way to fame and fortune are invited to call BCEDC at 208-265-6402. “I’ve had this company a long time and I just keep plodding along,” Menser said. “I do it because I enjoy people, I think we turn out a great product and it’s a continuance of a tradition.”

accepting new patients

family medicine walk-ins welcome ALL INSURANCE ACCEPTED

BOARD CERTIFIED NURSE PRACTITIONER

KELLY FUHRMAN | BC-ARNP 1005 Highway 2 West in Sandpoint, Idaho

COME VISIT US, OR CALL TODAY

208-290-3302 www.lakemedicine.com WINTER 2019 | SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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almanac

First in Fashion

Visit us downtown and pamper yourself with unique, carefully chosen apparel collections and accessories to complement you and your contemporary lifestyle.

fun

326 North First Avenue, Sandpoint 208.263.0712

a

www.EvesLeaves.com Stay with us in Sandpoint ... ... the rest is easy

It’s fun to sell

MEET THE NEW OWNERS OF DOWNTOWN SANDPOINT’S ALPINE SHOP by Lyndsie Kiebert

T

Inn Features:

• Free Breakfast with Belgian Waffles • Connie’s Restaurant & Lounge • Kids stay FREE

• Large Spa & Fitness Room • Downtown Sandpoint • FREE Wi-fi • 100% Smoke Free

www.LQ.com 1-800-531-5900 Reservations 208 263-9581 415 Cedar Street • Sandpoint, ID 83864 Professionally managed by hospitality Associates, Inc 18

his summer marked a transition of ownership at the Alpine Shop in downtown Sandpoint. The snow and watersport hub is now in the hands of Zach and Hannah Vollmer, who blend the seriousness of owning a business with a lighthearted acknowledgment of what, exactly, they’re selling. “We always joke that we sell toys,” Hannah said. “It’s fun to sell fun,” Zach added. “A lot of people who buy from us are about to go out on the water, or about to go skiing on the mountain.” The Vollmers both worked in the outdoor industry in Seattle prior to living in North Idaho. Zach said he developed a certain affinity for “ski shop life.”

“It just became a part of job life, but also life life,” he said. The Vollmers decided to move out of Seattle in search of small town living. “We loved our jobs but felt like we wanted to live in a smaller community, like a mountain town,” said Hannah. “We decided whoever could get a good job first, that’s where we’d go.” Begun in 1966 by Bob and Linda Aavedahl, and purchased in 2012 by Brent Eacret, “phase three” for the Alpine Shop began when Zach met Eacret on a ski trip, and things fell

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A L M A N AC

PHOTO BY LYNDSIE KIEBERT

FETCHINGLY GOOD BEER!

ALL TRAILS LEAD TO THE DOG HOUSE OPEN DAILY NOON TO 8PM

Laughing Dog Brewery & Taproom 805 Schweitzer Plaza Drive Ponderay, ID 83852

(208) 263-9222

WWW.LAUGHINGDOGBREWING.COM

into place. Zach became the shop’s new general manager and, after two years, the couple bought the business. Being a part of the community is the Vollmers’ favorite part of owning a local business. “It’s so much fun to develop relationships with locals and feel like we’re making an impact,” Hannah said. “And it’s also fun to work together.” They hope locals and visitors alike will come check out all the “fun” they have for sale. “Whether you’re looking to buy something or not, just come in to say ‘hi.’ We love the people who come to visit this town,” Zach said. “We have a lot of passion, from our employees and us, and I think that definitely shines through.” The Alpine Shop has two locations: 213 Church Street in downtown Sandpoint, as well as in the Schweitzer Mountain Village. W I N T E R 2 0 1 9 | S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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almanac

No nature deficit disorder here! WILDERNESS WINTER TRACKS PROGRAM GETS KIDS OUTSIDE by Sandy Compton

T

he Friends of Scotchman Peaks Wilderness winter outdoor education program for kids actually began over a decade ago as a one-day, adult tracking class led by wildlife researcher Brian Baxter. In the years since, it has morphed to become Winter Tracks, a highly successful, multi-day outdoor education event led by FSPW staff and volunteers, one of whom is still Baxter. “Getting students into the field during the winter has become an important part of our education program,” said Britta Mireley, deputy executive director for the Friends. “We want to deepen their sense of place, build community, and connect them to the outdoor world. Winter Tracks does that very nicely.” Students learn about a variety of different topics in four to six educational modules per program. All modules are taught by knowledgeable community volunteers or FSPW staff members, broaden20

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ing community connections. Though learning modules may vary due to instructor expertise or school preference, recent offerings have covered tree identification, winter birding, animal tracking, Leave No Trace, skulls and pelts, avalanche awareness and orienteering. The Winter Tracks program began its youth-oriented approach in 2014 with six field days at locations as varied as Round Lake State Park and the East Fork of Blue Creek in Montana. About 150 kids from five schools benefitted from the classes. During the 2017-2018 season, there were 12 program days, averaging 30 students per day, including students from 12 schools in three states and four counties. In Bonner County, kids from Sagle, Clark Fork, and Sandpoint attended. FSPW also hosted kids from Troy, Libby, Trout Creek, and Thompson Falls, Montana, and from Mead Alternative and West Valley School District in Washington.


A L M A N AC

BRIAN BAXTER HAS TAUGHT DOZENS OF KIDS TRACKING SKILLS ARI NORDHAGEN

“This wouldn’t have been possible without our volunteers,” said Nancy Schmidt, the 2017-18 Winter Tracks director. “Forty different helpers contributed over 800 hours of teaching, cooking hot dogs, directing small groups, and keeping everyone warm and safe.” This winter, Winter Tracks will benefit by a new curriculum guide created by Tyler Chisholm, who ran Winter Tracks during the 2016-’17 season. Chisholm, who works for the Park Service now, graduated from Western Washington University with a Master’s of Education in Environmental Education, which made her a natural choice to create a standardized set of lesson plans for Winter Tracks volunteer instructors to use in preparation for sessions. “The curriculum gives our instructors a great place to start from, with activities and games to get the kids involved and interested,” said Mireley. “This could be our best season ever.” Learn more at www.scotchmanpeaks.org WINTER 2019 | SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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the snow goddess

and the jumping slug by Mary Terra-Berns

J

umping slugs are unique to the Pacific Northwest and a new species has recently been discovered in our own backyard! Distinguished by the hump on their back, jumping slugs have a defensive squirming dance that gives them the jumping label. For several years Michael Lucid, a biologist with Idaho Department of Fish and Game, and his survey crews from the Multi-Species Baseline Initiative, rolled rocks and lifted logs in the Selkirk Mountains and beyond, documenting northern Idaho’s gastropod (snails and slugs) species. Accurate species identification required DNA and anatomical analysis and the results revealed that Lucid had discovered

The Center for

n

io t i r t u N l a n o i t c n Fu Cl in ic al Gr

22

ts • Pu ad e Su pp le m en

an undocumented jumping slug that had been quietly making a living in the cold niches, cracks, and crevasses of the forest. As a previously unknown species, Lucid had naming rights: Hemphillia skadei or Skade’s Jumping Slug is named after Lucid’s daughter, Skade. Skadei (Skade in English) is the Norse goddess of winter, bow-hunting, and skiing; a fitting name for a unique creature that favors the coolest spots in the mountains. But does it jump? Judge for yourself in this video from the Weather Channel (www.sptmag.com/slugvid). Learn more at www.sptmag.com/sluggov

• Ef fe ct iv e Do re In gr ed ie nt s

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sa ge s

PHOTO BY DAVID MOSCOWITZ

almanac


A L M A N AC

the Stamping man makes his mark by Cate Huisman

A

STAMPER ERIC RIDGWAY GOES FOR THE CHEEK ON ALLI EMCH

s festivalgoers file into the Panida Theater for the annual Banff Mountain Film Festival World Tour, no one offers to show Eric Ridgway their ticket anymore. Everybody knows he’s not the ticket taker: he’s The Stamper. Ridgway has perfected this role, and he’s played it for so many years that people are ready for the parts they know they will have to play in his bit of entrance-door participatory theater. One dark and cold January evening many years ago, Ridgway was just one of the regular volunteers at the Panida when he was assigned the job of stamping hands as patrons entered. Eventually he started asking them whether they would prefer a stamp elsewhere. Stamps ended up on noses, elbows, and various other bits of human anatomy. Puns were made on the word “cheeks,” but Ridgway, a pro-

fessional counselor, has always kept the play appropriate. Still, he has stamped pregnant bellies and surgical scars in a variety of locales. “There’s a sense of camaraderie that we’re in this together and we’re sharing something personal that bonds us as a community,” he said. Some festivalgoers are sheepish when they can come up with nothing more exciting to offer than their nose or their forehead; there is, after all, a limit to the possibilities. And although for them there is little hope of receiving the coveted prize for best-located stamp that is now offered each evening, they still get to play a part. It’s a little extra that comes with being part of the community gathering that “the Banff” has become in Sandpoint. Pick your “stamping spot” and join the fun January 18-20, 2019!

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almanac

Noteworthy PHOTOS FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: MAYA GOLDBLUM COURTESY PHOTO; ROAD AND BRIDGE DIRECTOR STEVE KLATT CONGRATULATES CONTRACTOR RANDY MCDOUGAL OF EARTHWORKS NORTHWEST CITY OF SANDPOINT; THE BROWN HOUSE IS DEMOLISHED BEN OLSON; OTTER FUN KIRK MILLER

local releases music video

Sagle native and Sandpoint High School graduate Maya Goldblum began her singing career at age 3 on the stage at Eichardt’s singing jazz. Now in her 20s and living in northern Ireland, she has just released her first music video of the single, “Honey,” from what will be her debut concept album, “Light, Shadow, Boom, Boom.” Listen to it here: www.sptmag.com/maya.

Organic Agriculture Center

Thanks to a donation from Coldwater Creek founder Dennis Pence, the University of Idaho established the Sandpoint Organic Agriculture Center at the site of the former Sandpoint Orchard. The 48-acre parcel, along with several structures, will be used by U of I for graduate and undergraduate programs focusing on organic

Wildflower S PA AT S E A S O N S

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farming and organic-certified production systems. Located on North Boyer, the orchard features 68 varieties of apples, many of them heirloom.

tunnel to bottle bay

After a summer of often-stopped traffic on Highway 95 near Sagle, construction is now substantially complete on the Bottle Bay Road/Highway 95 Intersection Safety Project. The project, which includes right and left turn lanes on the highway, also features an underpass for the bicycle path.

historic Brown House Demolished

The iconic Brown House, at one time the residence of former Schweitzer Mountain owners Jim and Jean Brown, was torn down

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A L M A N AC

this summer to make way for further expansion of Bonner General Health. Purchased by BGH in 1999, the home, whose grounds became the Healing Garden, most recently housed Bonner Community Hospice. For now, a new building to be constructed will house the hospital’s emergency power generator.

year after 35 years in business. Located at 319 First Ave., the shop was owned by sisters Marilyn Griffin and Arlene Swenson, and reflected their Scandinavian heritage. By the way, it really was “affär,” which means (roughly) “an agreement between two parties.”

when the otters come out to play

This Sandpoint landmark, which first opened in the 1980s, is under new ownership, and excitement is building about future plans. Scott Meekings is continuing to manage the property for new owner Jim Gissey, and says the focus come spring will be attracting new tenants to fill up the Bridge, while continuing to support current tenants ... such as Meekings himself, who owns Creations, the popular children’s site located there. Watch for more in the Summer 2019 Sandpoint Magazine.

When the river otters decide to play on the docks near City Beach, Facebook explodes. Just ask Kirk Miller, whose early October shot of this frolicking crew received over 400 “likes” and 51 “shares.” Read more about these “wily” weasels on page 74.

Scandinavian Affär closes Scandinavian Affär, a gift shop with a Nordic flair, closed this

new owner for cedar street bridge

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WINTER 2018-2019

CALENDAR OF EVENTS 10 SARS Ski Swap. Shop for ski and board deals at annual event at the Bonner County Fairgrounds. www.SARS.snowproportal.com. 16 Runaway Symphony. See POAC Calendar. 17-21, 23-25 LPOIC Annual Thanksgiving Derby. Put on your long johns and come join Lake Pend Oreille Idaho Club for an exciting fishing derby! www.LPOIC.org. 17-18 Bonner County Fairgrounds Christmas Fair. Enjoy two days of festive holiday fun shopping for artisan crafts, visiting with Santa, food, and more at the fairgrounds, 4203 N. Boyer Rd. www.BonnerCountyFair.com. 23 Tree Lighting and Santa’s Arrival. Tree lighting ceremony at Jeff Jones Town Square and visit from Santa opens the holiday season in Sandpoint. www.DowntownSandpoint.com. 23 Redhead Express “Christmastime” Concert. See Hot Picks. 24 Shook Twins “Giving Thanks” Concert. See Hot Picks. 28 The Nutcracker. See POAC calendar. www.ArtinSandpoint.org 29-Dec. 1 Festival of Trees. Three days of festivities at the Bonner County Fairgrounds benefit Kinderhaven: Family Night on Thursday, Holiday Luncheon on Friday, and the Grand Gala on Saturday. www.KinderhavenSandpoint.com. 30 Backcountry Film Festival. SOLE hosts Winter Wildlands Alliance film festival at The Hive to raise funds for SnowSchool Experience. Award-winning films that celebrate the human-powered experience. www.SoleExperiences.org.

december

15 Learn to Ski Day. The Nordic Ski Club teams up with Schweitzer Mountain Resort during a free Learn to Ski Day. Call the Ski and Ride Center to reserve free gear and sign up for a lesson. 208.255.3070 23 Santa Skis! Santa will be on the slopes at Schweitzer Mountain Resort, visiting with skiers. www.Schweitzer.com. 24 Santa’s Balloon Parade. On Christmas Eve, Santa leads a balloon parade to the village from the top of the Basin Express chairlift. This is a great photo op and is free for the entire family! www.Schweitzer.com. 31 New Year’s Eve Parties at Schweitzer. Parties for all ages to ring in 2019 at

Schweitzer Mountain Resort. Tickets go on sale Dec. 1. www.Schweitzer.com. 31 Hive New Year’s Eve Party. Come one, come all as The Hive at 207 N. First Ave. hosts a New Year’s Eve Bash featuring the band Afrolicious. Doors open at 9:30 p.m., with the show at 10:30 p.m. Age 21 and older. www.LiveFromTheHive.com.

JANUARY

4-25 Junior Race Series. Schweitzer Mountain Resort hosts Friday night races in January on NASTAR, sponsored by the Independence Race League. www.Schweitzer.com. 11 Living Voices’ Our Revolution. See POAC calendar. www.ArtinSandpoint.org 18-20 Banff Mountain Film Festival. Now in its 23rd year of showing breathtaking adventure films, the festival raises money for local and international good deeds. Tickets always sell out; get them in advance at www.Panida.org (when they become available). 19-21 MLK Weekend at Schweitzer. Check out all the special activities over the holiday weekend including Saturday night’s Northern Lights fireworks show and torchlight parade, followed by live music in Taps. www.Schweitzer.com. 26 Winter Trails Day. Enjoy free access to showshoe and Nordic ski trails at Schweitzer Mountain Resort. www.Schweitzer.com. 31-Feb. 3 Oscar Shorts. The Panida Theater screens Oscar-nominated shorts—live action, and animated—ahead of the Academy Awards. www.Panida.org.

FEBRUARY

1-22 Starlight Racing. Four weeks of evening racing at Schweitzer Mountain Resort, followed by fabulous parties in Taps. www. Schweitzer.com. 2 Cirque Zuma Zuma. See POAC calendar. www.ArtinSandpoint.org 15-24 Sandpoint Winter Carnival. Every winter, Sandpoint pulls out all the stops to celebrate the season that brings recreation and family fun to our area—winter! Find it all at the continuously updated www. SandpointWinterCarnival.com. 16-18 Schweitzer Presidents’ Weekend Celebration. See Hot Picks.

MARCH

1-2 The Follies. Annual wild ‘n’ crazy fundraiser at the Panida Theater benefits Angels Over Sandpoint. Tickets go on sale Groundhog Day (Feb. 2). www.AngelsOverSandpoint.com. 2 PAFE MegaDemo Day. Largest ski demo day in the region at Schweitzer Mountain Resort with 13 manufacturers’ reps onsite; proceeds benefit Panhandle Alliance for Education. www.Schweitzer.com. 9-10 Stomp Games Banked Slalom. Competitions at Schweitzer Mountain Resort presented by Smith Optics. www.Schweitzer.com. 16 Jimmie Heuga Ski for MS. Schweitzer Mountain Resort hosts daylong community fundraising ski event benefiting families with multiple sclerosis. www.Schweitzer.com. 22 Northern Stars Rising. See POAC calendar. www.ArtinSandpoint.org 23 2,400 Feet of Schweitzer. Sunrise top-tobottom giant slalom fundraiser at Schweitzer Mountain Resort benefits cystinosis research. www.Schweitzer.com.

APRIL 6-7 Schpring Finale and Rotary Ducky Derby. Celebrate the end of another great season at Schweitzer Mountain Resort with fun events and live music! www.Schweitzer.com. 20 Missoula Children’s Theatre’s Blackbeard the Pirate. See POAC calendar. www. ArtinSandpoint.org

MAY

16-19 Lost in the ‘50s. Retro celebration hits its 34th anniversary! Parades, car displays, dances, concerts—this event has it all! www.Sandpoint.org/Lostin50s or Lost50s@ Facebook.

PHOTO BY GARY LIRETTE

November

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HOT PICKS almanac

See complete, up-to-the-minute calendars at www.sandpointonline.com

the queen bee on nye

The Hive is regarded as one of the Pacific Northwest’s premier music venues with its state-of-the-art sound and lighting systems, not to mention unique, beehive-themed decor and modern artwork. Perhaps most interesting of all, it’s located in the heart of downtown Sandpoint! Thus, it’s the perfect place to get your funk on during the 5th Annual Hive New Year’s Eve Ball—featuring one of the music scene’s top live/electronic bands Afrolicious—on Dec. 31. Partygoers, don your festive wear and buzz right into 2019! www.LiveFromTheHive.com.

sister acts

Thanksgiving is about family, so who better to perform that weekend than two all-sister bands! The Redhead Express is a country band of four sisters: Kendra, Alisa, LaRae, and Meghan Walker. They perform a concert from their “Christmastime” CD at the Panida Nov. 23. The next night, Nov. 24, the Shook Twins’ Giving Thanks concert, also at the Panida, has become as much a part of Sandpoint’s Thanksgiving tradition as the turkey! The Idaho-born and Portland-based sisters are accompanied by special guest John Craigie. Find more info on both concerts at www.Panida.org.

Winter Carnival

Schweitzer Mountain Resort celebrates Sandpoint’s Winter Carnival with their annual Presidents’ Weekend, three-day celebration Feb. 16-18. The long weekend is jam packed with family fun—snowshoeing, tubing, NASTAR, plus live music in Taps for mom and dad! Topping off the activities is the Coca Cola “Let it Glow!” kids’ parade and fireworks show on Sunday night. Kids can pick up their free battery-powered “torches” (pre-registration required) and then ski as a group down Ridge Run for a nighttime LED parade, followed by a dazzling fireworks show! www.Schweitzer.com.

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POAC

performance series

World-class entertainment arrives in Sandpoint with the 35th season of the Pend Oreille Arts Council Performance Series. Tickets are available in the POAC office at 334 N. First Ave. Ste. 212, or online at www.ArtInSandpoint.org. Runaway Symphony 7 p.m. (doors at 6 p.m.) Nov. 16 in the Heartwood Center. Runaway Symphony’s songs unfold like chapters in a novel, weaving an orchestral folk odyssey through rich harmonies, dynamic instrumentation, and vivid storytelling. Presented in partnership with Mattox Farm Productions. Eugene Ballet’s The Nutcracker 7 p.m. (doors at 6 p.m.) Nov. 28 in the Panida Theater. For the 31st year, it’s the area’s favorite holiday kick-off! Keep an eye open for the baby mice, bon bons, angels, and party children—all played by local dance students! Living Voices’ Our Revolution This is the story of one of many common citizens who fought to bring the words “All men are created equal” to life—words with even greater meaning to an African-American soldier in 1776. 7 p.m. (doors at 6:30 p.m.) Jan. 11 in the Heartwood Center. Cirque Zuma Zuma Feb. 2 in the Panida Theater. Cirque Zuma Zuma combines the mystique of Africa with the excitement of a cirque performance. 7 p.m. (doors at 6 p.m.) at the Panida Theater. This action-packed show includes Egyptian limbo dances, South African gumboot dances, Gabonese tumbling, South African contortionist feats, and more! Northern Stars Rising 7 p.m. (doors at 6:30 p.m.) March 22 at the Heartwood Center. POAC’s showcase of local talent celebrates the quality and diversity of performing artists in our community. at the Heartwood Center. Rising stars are chosen through auditions and perform with their musical, vocal, dance, or other talents. Audition information is available in January. Missoula Children’s Theatre’s Blackbeard 1 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. (doors open 30 min. prior) at the Panida Theater on Apr. 20. What starts as a lazy day at the beach quickly turns into mystery and adventure when the search for Blackbeard’s treasure begins! Missoula Children’s Theatre and more than 60 local students present an original musical adaptation of “Blackbeard the Pirate.”


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I N T E RV I E W

finally

by David Keyes

S

andpoint’s Jerry Kramer found his way to Canton, Ohio, and the Pro Football Hall of Fame this summer. This gridiron star for the Sandpoint High School Bulldogs (Class of ‘54), Idaho Vandals (Class of ‘58), and the Green Bay Packers achieved what only 318 NFL players have when he donned the golden jacket and unveiled his brass bust in August as a newly inducted member of the Hall of Fame. He’s finally a 1 percenter. A right guard who played for the Packers from 1958 to 1968, Kramer won five NFL championships, garnered five, first-team All-Pro selections, and was named to the NFL All-Decade team of the 1960s. He was immortalized in a photo while carrying Coach Vince Lombardi off the field on his shoulder after a win. NFL fans still recall his block in the 1967 NFL Championship game, where he cleared the way for Bart Starr to follow him in for a quarterback sneak in what was called the “Ice Bowl.” Kramer became eligible for the Hall of Fame in 1974 and was named a finalist 10 times—the most times anyone has ever gotten that far without being enshrined. Just less than 1 percent of pro football players make it to the Hall of Fame. But the journey to Canton wasn’t a straight line for Kramer, his family, or his legion of fans.

JERRY KRAMER ON THE FIELD WHERE HE GOT HIS START, DURING SANDPOINT HIGH SCHOOL’S OCTOBER 2018 SENIOR NIGHT.

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i nterview tion is a hard one to measure. We don’t have any stats, any fumble recoveries, receptions, carries, anything. We are just a part of the team and we are in the middle of everything where maybe a wide receiver or even a tackle is more visible than the guard. There is a pile in there and even your momma don’t know what the hell is going on out there.

What was it like growing up in Sandpoint? It was a bit smaller but always a good football team. Good football focus. Fans supported the school very well and came to the games. The fans were always loud and supportive so it was kind of a big deal to be on the football team. It was a chance to maybe differentiate yourself from the crowd. We all enjoyed the heck out of it, so it was a fun game and a fun time and Coach [Cotton] Barlow was the man of the hour. Life was good.

BULLDOG FOOTBALL PLAYERS FROM 1952 JERRY KRAMER, LEONARD PLASTER, ED MCFARLAND AND BUTCH SCHAFFER

Why did it take so long for you to make the NFL Hall of Fame?

If you ever find out, let me hear about it, will ya? No one seems to know exactly. Heard a lot of possibilities like the Packers have too many players in there now, some of the other teams need some players in there … . One other thing, the posi-

Do you have a favorite memory of Coach Barlow? He was all business with me. We didn’t have a warm and fuzzy relationship but he was solid. I thought he was bright and hard working and stayed right on top of things and didn’t let anything go to chance. Did a helluva job overall.

What did Coach Barlow say that stuck with you?

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I N T E RV I E W We were supposed to play in Wallace and there was a young guy that burned the stadium in Wallace down, so they moved the game to Coeur d’Alene. We found out before the game they weren’t going to let our band in unless the band paid. Coach made that an issue and said they were disrespecting us. [He] gave us a fire and brimstone speech and got us all fired up and we went out and beat Wallace 55-7, just thrashed them. I got to thinking about it later. I am not really a band guy and it didn’t really impact me that the band had to pay but Coach Barlow made an issue of it and got us all pumped up and excited and we went out and kicked Wallace’s ass because they were insulting our band. Like it was a big deal.

At the professional level, what’s the difference in [Green Bay] Coach Lombardi’s coaching style and what you see today? I think Coach Lombardi’s philosophies didn’t really come from Coach Lombardi but from ancient Greek literature—Aristotle, Plato, some of those deep thinkers. There was a set of principles more than a style. There was preparation. This applies to many areas of life and business. We prepared to the nth degree. We watched films for hours upon hours trying to pick up a little fact, [like] the defensive tackle was standing up on the goal line on short yardage plays. He was making a mistake and was doing it for three weeks in a row so we could expect him to do that with us. So we put in a quarterback sneak on the goal line and we win the game with 13 seconds to go. Then there is commitment. Consistency. Discipline.

Pride. Character. Belief in your team and your organization and yourself. Tenacity. Those kinds of things were things Coach Lombardi believed in and taught.

When you played and retired, you became a multimillionaire like these modern players, correct? I wouldn’t say I became a multimillionaire. I was making about $8,000 a year the first year. It would cover the refrigerator payments and the car payments but I had to work in the off season. I had an opportunity to work for Boise Cascade in the executive training program and they were going to pay me $450 a month. Well, I couldn’t live on that. I had a baby or two. When I came back from Green Bay to Boise I started working for Morrison-Knudsen driving a Cat. And I drove a Cat 10 hours a day, six days a week and I got paid just about as much on the off season as I did during the season. We have linemen making $6 or $7 million a year now. It just wasn’t that way when we were playing the game.

How did it feel to have your daughter Alicia give the speech prior to your induction in the Hall of Fame? She has been sensational. She has taken five or six years of her life to get her pop in the Hall. Worked her tail off night and day. Joe Horagan, who is with the Hall, gave me a call [when I was

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i nterview notified] and said “Jerry, you can’t believe how happy I am about your nomination. This will reduce my incoming mail by 90 percent. Those Packer fans have questioned my mentality, my morality, my manhood, my education, my everything. I am so happy to get you off my list.” Miss Alicia kind of spearheaded that.

Why do you give so much to Sandpoint? There is something about Sandpoint that represents home and while I haven’t lived there for a long time it is still home ... and there is something about your hometown that is very special. I did get up there awhile ago to go fishing with a couple of my high school buds and we ended up bullshitting and drinking beer more than we did any fishing but we had a great time. I need to do more of that.

What do you think of the new stadium versus the old stadium?

JERRY KRAMER AND VINCE LOMBARDI ON THE COVER OF SPORTS ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE IN 1968

Well, I thought the old stadium was the cat’s meow. It was huge for us. The lights were sensational. Everything about it was pretty damn cool. Love the location. I enjoyed our stadium a lot and I think I will enjoy the new stadium a lot. It is a sign of standing up and caring about your team, your players, students, and everyone else. It’s a positive thing. [Sandpoint] was a wonderful place to grow up. A wonderful place for anyone to grow up. Everyone cared about the commu-

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I N T E RV I E W

nity and kids and common sense. A little community of folks looking after one another and taking care of one another. A beautiful place.

Is it true you had flashbacks of Sandpoint when you stepped onto an NFL field? Yes. There was a moment when we got lights during an evening game—a sparkling evening game, where the lights were bright and the Star Spangled Banner was being played and I kind of affixed that memory in my mind. It was a very emotional moment for me and I will always have that for the rest of my life. I travel back to Memorial Field when I hear the Star Spangled Banner. Back to that evening. Didn’t expect to do that. At right: You know you’ve made it when you have a Bobblehead. Courtesy of the John Elsa collection

SOME KRAMER STATS:

»» Kramer was the first Idaho Vandal to earn All American honors. »» Kramer’s salary his first year as a pro player was $7,750 with a $250 signing bonus. »» Kramer was interviewed in Sandpoint Magazine in 1998 by Billie Jean Gerke. »» Kramer mementos can be found at Sandpoint High School and the Bonner County History Museum. Many are owned by Kramer super fan John Elsa. »» Kramer authored four books: “Instant Replay,” “Distant Replay,” “Farewell to Football” and a biography on Vince Lombardi. »» Kramer was born on January 23, 1936 in Jordan, Montana, and moved to Sandpoint as a young child. »» Kramer played right guard his entire career. »» Also a backup kicker, he made 29 field goals and 90 extra points for 177 total career points—making him the highest scoring guard in pro football history. »» He was the 39th selection in the 1958 NFL draft. »» Kramer retired in 1969 and lives in Boise.

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PATRICIA BARKLEY’S 36 YEARS OF SUCCESS IN SANDPOINT

PHOTO BY ANN PORTER

by Stephen Drinkard


A RT I ST I N G L AS S

SHE DIDN’T GO TO SCHOOL IN STAINED GLASS, BUT RATHER HER OWN SHOP BECAME HER SCHOOL.

“I

am stubborn and I don’t entertain failure,” said Patricia Barkley, owner of Panhandle Art Glass, explaining why she has lasted 36 years with her stainedglass gallery. When she opened the shop at the current location, 514 Pine Street, in 1982 with partner Dan Ott (who passed in 1991), there was a lot of artistic competition. Sandpoint boasted almost a dozen art galleries, while Spokane had at least four, with an additional two or three in Coeur d’Alene. Today, there is but one stained glass shop open to the public in Coeur d’Alene and one in Spokane. Sandpoint has only two to three art galleries, none open as long as Barkley’s. Stained glass as an art and a craft typically undergoes deep valleys and then high mountains of public interest, and has since the initial heyday of stained glass a thousand years ago in medieval Europe. Stained glass is, as Barkley describes her craft, “jewelry” rather than a staple. Just before the 2008 recession there were lots of commissions. Then, very few. Barkley says she has been able to suffer the shifting economic winds: “I have a low standard of living,” she quipped. “I haven’t ever

overspent. I paid off the mortgage early on my shop and my home.” Unlike a lot of galleries, she doesn’t have to pay high rent. Moreover, she is not dependent on tourism. In the early years, she estimates that 40 percent of her income came from teaching classes and from retail sales, with 60 percent in commissions. Now, 90 percent comes from commissions. In other words, she has adapted to change. She didn’t purposely try stained glass. “I couldn’t get a job and I needed a job,” having just graduated with an Associate of Arts degree in design in 1976 from Green River College in Auburn, Washington. She answered an ad for cutting window glass and that she did, week after week. No creative outlet there, but her steadfast work habits did attract the eye of a gallery in Tacoma. That gallery encouraged her design work and, in fact, let Barkley repair old church windows and Tiffany lamps. She didn’t go to school in stained glass, but rather her own shop became her school. Year by year, client by client, she repeated some typical stained-glass designs and experimented with others. Most importantly, she learned “to figure

TOP AND ABOVE: BARKLEY WITH HER WORK. FIONA HICKS

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features

BARKLEY’S WORK, INCLUDING HER FAVORITE CROSS. ANN PORTER

HER FAVORITE PIECE OF MORE THAN 2,000 PRIVATE AND COMMERCIAL COMMISSIONS IS THE CROSS SHE DID FOR THE FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH ON OLIVE STREET IN 2007.

where you can view Barkley’s work PANHANDLE ART GLASS AT 514 PINE ST. THE HYDRA RESTAURANT AT 115 LAKE ST. SHARON’S HALLMARK SHOP AT 306 N. FIRST AVE. THE CEDAR STREET BRIDGE FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH, 526 S. OLIVE ST.

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out my client’s vision more quickly.” Barkley views her designs as somewhat traditional. “Traditional forms of glasswork inspire most of my clients here, whereas people in larger cities are simply exposed to more varieties and experiments in glass, as well as all kinds of art.” That said, her design work has evolved in 36 years of schooling herself. She wants to please the client, but she has “to please myself” as well. Like any crafts person, as she learns new skills her designs evolve, because she can do different things with her hands and new tools. Like any artist, she is always thinking about design and her work is influenced by everything around her; including, of course, nature. Her favorite piece of more than 2,000 private and commercial commissions is the cross she did for the First Lutheran Church on Olive Street in 2007. “The bevels and jewels in the cross create rainbow patterns on the floor. Beautiful.” She continues in glass because, “I like flat glasswork. I like the whole process, from meeting the clients to design work to managing the logistics of building glass panels, to the cutting of the glass, and the assembling of glass in the came [or frame], and even to the oftentedious process of cementing and cleaning the panels.” While she has experimented in sculptural and molded glass, she prefers flat glass work, which may include painting. “Like a mechanic, one can become an expert in engine repair or, say, transmissions. You choose. I did.” She never sees herself leaving Sandpoint, “Why do that and where to move? Pay higher prices in Seattle? I love the lake, the mountains, and even though we don’t have racial and ethnic diversity here, we do have mental variety. The people are amazing.”


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W I N T E R 2 0 1 9 | S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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features

A Gentle Thrill

A SKIER ENJOYS THE BEST WHOLE-BODY WORKOUT AROUND. PHILLIP BELENA

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C RO S S - CO U N T RY S K I I N G

CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING IS GREAT FUN WITH FRIENDS OR WITH FAMILY. FIONA HICKS

CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING OFFERS PEACE, VIEWS AND A WINTER WORKOUT by Rick Price

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he thrill of racing down the side of a mountain at 60-plus miles per hour, nothing but thin wood between yourself and the snow, is a huge winter attraction for many Sandpoint visitors and locals alike. But for those looking for a slower pace, the gentle pace of cross-country (or Nordic) skiing is enjoying a resurgence both nationally and locally, as evidenced by a huge increase in the use of local trails and a doubling in membership at the Sandpoint Nordic Club. Nordic skiers enjoy the contrast with downhill, lift-assisted skiing as it can be quiet, contemplative, and the best whole-body workout going. Cross-country skiers use thin, light skis that are attached only at the toe. There are two kinds of skis for different techniques, classic and skating. Classic skiers stride forward and their skis leave a parallel track in the snow. Skate skiers move on wider, groomed trails in a manner similar to ice skaters. There is no shortage of places to go in our area no matter what type of skiing you want to do. The Sandpoint Nordic Club grooms loops that make up 4 kilometers of trail in town at the University of Idaho Extension Center property on Boyer Avenue. While conditions in town aren’t always ideal, they average enough snow to ski on for about six weeks every winter. In 2018—a heavy snow year—nature set a record: trails were groomed from November through March. These trails are level and great for beginners, with outstanding grooming. Skiers often sneak out for a quick ski on their lunch hour and ski at night with a headlamp. Trail fees are just $3 and Sandpoint Nordic Club members ski free. Skiers will see everything, from racers training, to kids out skiing after school, to little old ladies shuffling along in fur coats. A separate trail is groomed for hikers, bikers, dog walkers, snowshoers and snowbikers. By the way, it is always considered bad etiquette to hike, bike or snowshoe on top of existing cross-country ski tracks. For the most consistent snow, biggest variety of trails, and most kilometers groomed, Nordic skiers head to Schweitzer

Mountain Resort. Their groomed 25 to 30 kilometers include a backbone trail of 15 kilometers that is groomed daily for both skate and classic skiing. The trails are not suitable for beginner skiers, as the first mile or so are a bit hilly, but once you get out there you can find just about anything, whether it be more hills and twisty trails or wide open, gently sloping terrain. Great views of the lake seem to open up around every turn. This is the highest elevation skiing in the area, so a lack of snow is never a problem. Just be sure to save some mojo for getting back to the village or “Buzzkill Hill” will live up to its name. Schweitzer is the only venue that also rents cross-country skis. Both skate and classic skis are available. At Schweitzer, trail passes are $17 for adults and $14 for those under 18 and over 65. A season pass is $169 and can be added on to a regular pass for a discounted rate. The trails take off to the right of the Great Escape Quad chairlift near the yurt by the tubing hill, and are open to snowbikes and snowshoes. Snow biking is sometimes limited depending on conditions, and they offer a few snowshoe-only trails. Dogs are prohibited from the Schweitzer trails. Here’s a secret: The roundabout at Schweitzer has a short trail that is groomed weekly for skate skiers and sometimes has a track for classic skiing. It is a gently sloping, just-under-a-mile-long out and back road. There is no charge and dogs are allowed. The Nordic club holds their Learn to Ski Day here every year (see sidebar). Western Pleasure Guest Ranch, north of Sandpoint on Gold Creek Road, is another popular destination for Nordic skiers. It sits about 500 feet higher than town and often has great snow even when Sandpoint doesn’t. They groom about 15 kilometers of trails, split evenly between some meadow loops and a trail that winds up in the woods above the main lodge. Both skate and classic skiing are featured on all trails. Dogs are allowed on the hill loop, but not in the meadow. Trail fees are $10 for a day and $65 for the season. Relaxing in their lodge with a cup of cocoa after a ski is one of the highlights of many skiers’ winters. The loop road at the Kootenai National Wildlife Refuge, just WINTER 2019 | SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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features

FOR THE MOST CONSISTENT SNOW, BIGGEST VARIETY OF TRAILS, AND MOST KILOMETERS GROOMED, NORDIC SKIERS HEAD TO SCHWEITZER.

ABOVE: GETTING OFF THE BEATEN TRACK DOUG MARSHALL BELOW: SOMETIMES THE BEST SKIING IS RIGHT OUTSIDE YOUR DOOR BEN OLSON

west of Bonners Ferry, is open for skiing in the winter. The 4.5 mile loop is quite flat and edges along dikes above the Kootenai River and different low points in the refuge. It is free, but there are no groomed trails. You may hit it on a nice day just after a group of skiers, or the trail may be smashed up as it is shared with hikers and snowshoers. There is no fee. Leashed dogs are allowed. If you’re paying attention to conditions, the best skiing is sometimes right on Lake Pend Oreille. When the ice is solid underneath and just after the snow gets too deep for ice skates, the skate skiing can be tremendous. As the snow gets deeper, switch to classic skiing. Slap on your boards at City Beach and head north as far as you want to go. Or take off from Third Street Pier and glide your way to Dover and back. 42

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Many skiers travel to the south end of Lake Pend Oreille at Farragut State Park. The park offers groomed tracks for classic skiing, but not skate skiing. A 10-kilometer loop is set up on rolling, open and lightly wooded land with cutoffs in between so you can tailor the length of your trip. They also have a large, ungroomed, dog-friendly area on the north side of the park road that is open for skiers, snowshoers and snowbikers. Round Lake State Park, in Sagle, is also open to Nordic skiers. Their ungroomed trail around the lake is about 2 miles long. Like Kootenai Refuge, you never know what you will find there. Sometimes the trails are in great shape for classic skiing, and sometimes the other users have left things almost unskiable. Leashed dogs are allowed. Like at Farragut,

the park entrance fee is $5. Whether you want to get out and skate ski on perfectly groomed trails, find some nicely groomed tracks to guide you along on classic skis, or set down your own track stomping across new snow while classic skiing, there is no shortage of places to go to get outside in winter.


C RO S S - CO U N T RY S K I I N G

NORDIC CLUB PROMOTES CROSS-COUNTRY

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he Sandpoint Nordic Club has been instrumental in creating a surge of Nordic skiing enthusiasm. The club has an active youth league, sponsors a free learn-to-cross-country-ski day, hosts clinics, rents skis, keeps the town trails system groomed, and hosts a variety of other fun activities like full moon ski outings. The Youth Ski League gets kids skiing during an after-school/weekend program in January and February. The coaches are top level and include Vicki Longhini, who heads up the program, and Olympic cross-country skier Rebecca Dussault. The SNC race team competes nationally and sent one skier, 15-year-old Annaby Kanning, to the Youth National Championships last year. The kids’ smiles while having fun outdoors is what Longhini loves the most. The club expanded a ski rental program last year. Both skate and classic skis, boots, and poles are available for weekly and yearly rental at Syringa Cyclery in Sandpoint. In addition, each year the club teams up with Schweitzer Mountain Resort to get about 180 people skiing, most for the first time, during a free Learn to Ski Day at the Schweitzer Roundabout. The club also supports the ability of people to ski in town. You’ve probably seen skiers gliding by while driving on Boyer past their trail system at the University of Idaho Extension Center. The club’s goal is to promote Nordic skiing and an active lifestyle. Think about joining SNC for an activity or supporting them with a membership. Their website has information on everything mentioned here, as well as a calendar of clinics, events, and current trail conditions nearby. See it at www.sandpointnordic.com.

by Rick Price WINTER 2019 | SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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features

RELEARNING

PEND OREILLE’S ANCIENT LANGUAGE LIVES AGAIN by Katie Botkin

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n centuries past, English was not a language heard in the areas around Lake Pend Oreille. Other languages and dialects dominated; most notably Kalispel, a Salish dialect spoken by the Kalispel Tribe, whose territory stretched from what is now Washington, through the Idaho Panhandle and over into what is currently Montana. The lake itself, and the river that flows out of it, gets its current name from what early French trappers and settlers called the tribe: the Pend d’Oreilles, after the large shell pendants hanging from their ears. They called themselves the Qlispé, the “Camas people,” after the purple-flowering wild plant whose bulbs provided them with an important food staple. Concurrent with European settlement of the region, the language was split geographically along with the tribe, and the Kalispel people were relegated to reservations in Montana and Washington. The Kalispel language is closely 44

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related to Bitterroot Salish (also called Montana Salish), which is spoken by members of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation in Montana. Kalispel is also closely related to Spokane, and slightly more distantly, Colville-Okanagan, Wenatchee-Columbian and Coeur d’Alene. All are, to some degree, mutually intelligible (that is, they can generally understand each other), which has led some linguists to describe them as dialects of Interior Salish rather than separate languages, although what constitutes a language rather than a dialect is up for debate. Tribal histories say that all these languages, along with the coastal Salish languages and more northern Salish languages, came from one great tribe. The story goes that the tribe spread out, over hundreds of miles, and became many tribes. Linguistically, this makes sense: it’s approximately what happened when Latin spread out and became


R E L E A R N I N G SA L I S H

TRIBAL HISTORIES SAY THAT ALL THESE LANGUAGES, ALONG WITH THE COASTAL SALISH LANGUAGES AND MORE NORTHERN SALISH LANGUAGES, CAME FROM ONE GREAT TRIBE.

Spanish, Italian, French, and the various, less-spoken Romance languages of Europe. Currently, each Interior Salish language or dialect has only a handful of elders who still speak it, if they have any. In the last century, in schools and in society at large, tribal members were discouraged from speaking their native language. As a result, the language nearly went extinct. However, revitalization programs have brought it to life again, something that has been a group effort. Historically, the Interior Salish Tribes visited one another, celebrated together, and intermarried. Now, in their language revitalization and in reclaiming their cultural practices such as traditional canoe-making,

they are working together again. For the past few summers, for example, they have paddled rivers together in dugout canoes. The past two years, the Kalispel have undertaken an annual paddle on their traditional waterways, exploring Hope, docking at Sandpoint City Beach, and paddling downriver to their powwow grounds near Usk, Washington. They were joined by area tribes such as the Colville and Spokane. Some incorporated Salish into their paddling; the young skipper of the Spokane canoe counted off strokes in Salish to his crew, and sang in Salish as the canoe passed Dover. The tribes also borrow language cur-

riculum and best practices from one another, and they attend the annual Salish conference together. Held in the Kalispel Tribe’s casino and resort in Airway Heights, Washington, the Salish conference conducts immersion sessions, holds Salish karaoke, and brings hundreds of Salish speakers from the Inland Northwest together. Language revitalization for the Kalispel Tribe follows parameters set out by Spokane, its Salish sister. JR Bluff, language director for the Kalispel Tribe, said the Kalispel language program started about 10 years ago, and “at least for the past six years, we’ve been knee-deep” in teaching Kalispel. Bluff credits Chris Parkin, “the guy

WINTER 2019 | SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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features

A WILDLIFE CROSSING (ABOVE) ON THE RESERVATION NEAR MISSOULA OLIVIA KEYES. NEXT PAGE: PHOTOS OF THE ANNUAL CANOE PADDLE KATIE BOTKIN

behind Salish School of Spokane,” with developing “our path, our curricular methodology.” Currently the principal and acting business manager of the school, and a former Spanish teacher, Parkin shared his curriculum with the Kalispel Tribe. Afterwards, said Bluff, “we converted it to Kalispel Salish.” The Kalispel Tribe now has multiple language programs going. They hold a K-4 immersion school, where elementary students will learn about 500 Kalispel words in three weeks, said Bluff. For the immersion school, “all of our parents have a pretty big buy-in to what we’re doing.” They have high school and community programs as well, and they also hold a year-long language intensive where students study Kalispel for eight hours a day. Generally, five to eight students enroll in this language intensive, said Bluff. “It’s

FUEl

more of an adult class, and all of them work for the tribe” in some capacity, he specified. Typically, people go through the intensive prior to teaching Kalispel. Bluff and language program coordinator Jesse Isadore organize the Salish conference. Bluff said that he wants all the Interior Salish tribes to be represented in the program. “I want it to come from different tribes, I want somebody from each one of their tribes to present,” he said. As for what kind of content he’s looking for, he says he wants proposals from people who are on the ground, doing the work. So rather than some PhD student with theories, he picks the “Joan Walker teaching kindergarten.” The Salish conference gathers people who might feel isolated into a group of like-minded individuals, Bluff says. At the con-

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R E L E A R N I N G SA L I S H

ference, elders speak in Salish and young children talk to their parents; generations mix and converse together in the ancestral dialects of the region. At last year’s Salish conference, tribal youth from UNITY council spoke to the younger generation, introducing themselves in Salish and openly discussing their struggles. They identified the language as one way to reclaim their cultural identity, and spoke of a calling to live committed, drug-free, alcohol-free, service-minded lifestyles that benefitted their communities. “Helping my people is what makes me feel good,” one teenage girl told the gathering of younger kids. “Love is the most powerful thing in the world. So I encourage you to get out and help your community.” Visit the Kalispel Tribe’s language pages at www.sptmag.com/salish

IN THE LAST CENTURY, IN SCHOOLS AND IN SOCIETY AT LARGE, TRIBAL MEMBERS WERE DISCOURAGED FROM SPEAKING THEIR NATIVE LANGUAGE. AS A RESULT, THE LANGUAGE NEARLY WENT EXTINCT.

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closer WITH CEDAR STREET NOW COMPLETE, THE CITY HAS EYES ON FIRST AVENUE FOR THE NEXT SET OF RENOVATIONS by Lyndsie Kiebert

nyone who visited Sandpoint this last summer was liable to ask, “What the heck is going on downtown?” Dirt streets, heavy equipment, men in yellow safety gear and hardhats roaming amidst the downtown shopping crowds—it was a sight to see. But now, as winter settles in, things are looking more complete, and the city of Sandpoint’s vision for an updated downtown is a few steps closer to reality. Cedar Street saw a complete makeover between June and September, a phase of the city’s downtown revitalization plan that began in 2012. “The goal is to create a vibrant, walkable, bikable, and drivable downtown,” said City Administrator Jennifer Stapleton. “We have a beautiful downtown as it is, but with these changes it’s going to support the development and growth of new businesses, encourage more people to come downtown, and make it that year-round destination.” Sandpoint’s Public Works Director Amanda Wilson noted the use of bulb-outs on Cedar Street increases safety for both pedestrians and drivers, and pedestrian lights at crosswalks are another added safety feature. Wider sidewalks, new street-side seating areas, and more opportunities for businesses to expand outside their front doors creates a meeting place that fosters community, she said. “When [downtown] is something you’re proud of, it creates this sense of, ‘This is my community, and look at how beautiful it is,’” Wilson said. Stapleton noted that businesses along Cedar were accessible for most of the construction through the summer, and the city’s relationship with downtown businesses has only grown stronger through this process. With Cedar Street complete, the city is looking ahead to the next phase: First Avenue. Renovations on First Avenue—as well as on Cedar between Second and First avenues, where crews left off this summer—will happen in 2019. The continued renovations will look largely the same as the changes along Cedar Street, with an emphasis on safety and more places for people to gather. Receptive to the concerns of downtown businesses, the city has agreed the construction will not take place until after the summer season. Apart from the obvious progress in the form of new pavement, sidewalks, landscaping, and other upgraded features, Stapleton said she’s excited to see every tree on Cedar Street lit up for the holiday season. Before the renovation, the city did what it could with a spotty electrical situation, but with an updated system in place now, white lights highlight every tree. Stapleton said things like bright holiday trees create a vibrancy that inspired the creation of a downtown revitalization plan in the first place. “It’s those kinds of things that make a warm downtown, and a celebratory downtown,” she said. Find artist renderings and maps of Sandpoint’s future downtown at www.sandpointstreets.com

W I N T E R 2 0 1 9 | S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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PHOTO BY FIONA HICKS

D OW N TOW N S U RV I VORS

Downtown’s

SURVIVORS

FAMILY, COMMUNITY, LOCAL SUPPORT: LONGTIME AREA RETAILERS REFLECT ON SURVIVING AND THRIVING AS A DOWNTOWN BUSINESS by Carrie Scozzaro

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arger than a village, smaller than a city. That’s how many dictionaries define a town—at a little more than 8,000 residents, Sandpoint is definitely not a city—yet towns offer more than just housing; they include commerce. For visitors and residents alike, commerce creates culture through restaurants, retail and other businesses, impacting all ages, including young adults working their first job and spending their first dollars, who as adults might even join the business community as owners. Although some shops come and go quickly, others have endured, including a cluster of seven First Avenue retail establishments whose combined history of 300 years offers a lesson in perseverance through business acumen, as well as through family and community. At 75 years Larson’s Good Clothes is considered the oldest retail establishment in Sandpoint, yet its roots date to the turn of the century. Patriarch Chris Larson worked with the Jennestads, with whom the family would partner, until 1940, when his sons bought out the J.A. Foster & Co. store and launched their own enterprise at 327 North First Avenue. Dick Larson and his daughter Lindsey Larson share responsibility

SANDPOINT IS FILLED WITH UNIQUE ‘MOM AND POP’ STORES THAT ALSO CREATE A SPECIAL ‘HOMETOWN’ EXPERIENCE,” HUSTON SAID. ABOVE: DEANNA HARRIS, LINDSEY LARSON, MARILYN SABELLA, BEN TATE, LAURIE HUSTON AND MIKE HAMMERSBERG TOAST TO LONGEVITY. RIGHT: DICK AND LINDSEY LARSON.

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features for running the store, both having learned the ropes as teenagers. “I don’t feel I am part of a legacy,” said Lindsey, who worked there in high school and during college breaks, moving away before returning to where she felt she most belonged. “I grew up in and around Larson’s my entire life along with my sister. It’s as much home to me as any house is.” Like Larson, Deanna Harris was also born into the family business. Her parents purchased Bi-Rite Drug in 1967, where she worked until college, returning home to a 23-year career at Schweitzer. Her mother, meanwhile, had purchased Pat’s Hallmark in 1984 (formerly in MickDuff’s Brewing Company’s location). Harris eventually purchased the store from her mother and, after her father died, relocated what’s now called Sharon’s Hallmark into the old pharmacy space, thus coming full circle. The key to their 34 years of longevity is longevity itself, said Harris. Most of their 10 employees have been with them for more than 10 years, while two have been there 34 and 39 years each. That, said Harris, translates to connections with residents and visitors alike.

amount of capital it takes to survive a startup. Many area retailers cited the ‘80s recession, bank failures, high inflation, unemployment, and the so-called 2008 housing market collapse as particularly challenging. Other hazards are simply a function of evolving retail markets and personal taste. Who could have predicted the rise of digital photography, asks Image Maker Photo & Video’s Mike Hammersberg? When he started there in 1991, film photography was popular, camera producers collaborated on advertising, and the store focused on merchandising and quality control, said Hammersberg, who runs the store with wife Randi. When they purchased it in 2008 from founder Clarence Van Dellen— he started Image Maker in 1978— Facebook was just taking off, but digital photography and cell phone camera technology had already altered the photographic landscape. Image Maker adapted and keeps adapting. Now they offer studio photography, one-on-one classes, cameras and accessories, frames and mats, film photography supplies, photo printing, photography books, digital restoration and file transfer services. There may be a whole genera-

“WE KNOW SO MANY OF OUR LOCAL SHOPPERS ON A FIRST NAME BASIS AND HAVE MADE PERSONAL CONNECTIONS WITH THEM,” SAID HARRIS. “VACATIONERS COME TO SANDPOINT YEAR AFTER YEAR AND THEY RECOGNIZE THE STAFF HERE IN THE STORE.” Know your customers, advises Ben Tate, a serial entrepreneur— past endeavors include the Donkey Jaw restaurant in the current Eichardt’s location along with founding Finan McDonald in 1987— and be willing to work. A lot. “The initial five years were really horrible,” he said, noting that businesses can underestimate the 52

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tion, ponders Hammersberg, who have no printed record of images, making file transfer and storage that much more significant. “It’s a moment frozen in time,” said Hammersberg, who added a personal touch is what keeps people coming back to Image Maker. Ditto, said Tate, who credits wife Rhonda with helping infuse Finan

PHOTOS FROM TOP TO BOTTOM, DEANNA HARRIS, OWNER OF SHARON’S HALLMARK; BEN TATE, OWNER OF FINAN MCDONALD; RANDI AND MIKE HAMMERSBERG, OWNERS OF THE IMAGE MAKER PHOTO & VIDEO; KEVIN NYE, OWNER OF OUTDOOR EXPERIENCE; THE CREW AT NORTHWEST HANDMADE WITH OWNER LAURIE HUSTON AT FAR RIGHT; MARILYN SABELLA, OWNER OF EVE’S LEAVES.


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McDonald with energy, moving away from outdoor-oriented items and finding their niche in lifestyle products, including the addition of women’s apparel, which he estimates is 60 to 65 percent of their business. Knowledgeable sales reps and understanding trends have been vital for them. “[The store] just evolved kind of as the town evolved,” said Tate. The same is true for Outdoor Experience’s Kevin Nye, who became sole owner when partner Marc De LaVergne retired in 2016 after 30 years in business (they changed the name from Outdoor Connection, which the prior owner created in the ‘70s). “What keeps the store fresh is that we are always in pursuit of finding the new thing, the next great thing,” said Nye, who listens to sales reps and customers, and attends trade shows to stay current. “It keeps us engaged in the products and the business.” What about online sales, though? This appears to be a time dominated by e-commerce: consumers spent $453.46 billion in online sales in 2017, an increase of 16 percent over the prior year. Nye said their products are better sold and handled in person through staff with direct experience, such as when getting fitted for a bike, or trying on shoes. That’s true for rentals, too: cross-country skis and snowshoes in the winter, and stand-up paddleboards, bikes, and kayaks in the summer. Finan McDonald tried online sales, said Tate, with disastrous results, so now they focus on the in-store experience. “The Internet has an impact on shopping in brick and mortar businesses,” said Northwest Handmade’s Laurie Huston, who took over from her stepfather, Dan Mimmack, in 2015 (he started it in 1994). With more than 100 artists on consignment, plus seven furniture woodworkers, one-of-a-kind items distinguish their business, said Huston, who also sells some of her own photography at the store. For them it’s a balance between out-oftown shoppers, including from Canada, who fuel the demand for locally-produced goods, and locals who support them in return. “Sandpoint is filled with unique ‘mom and pop’ stores that also create a special ‘hometown’ experience,” Huston said. Research bears that out, said Roger Brooks, a nationally-recognized expert on

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tourism, community branding, destination marketing and related endeavors, who had a hand in promoting the Selkirk Loop with the Tri County Economic Development District, and has spoken at Idaho’s annual tourism conferences. “Both locals and visitors want to spend time in an intimate setting: a narrow Main Street (one lane each direction), wide sidewalks with outdoor cafe dining, street trees, a mix of shops and eateries in a beautiful setting,” said Brooks. Once visitors arrive, their top activities downtown are shopping, dining, and entertainment. “This is where nearly 80 percent of all non-lodging visitor spending takes place,” he said. In addition, 70 percent of consumer retail spending takes place after 6 p.m., he added, noting that curb appeal drives 70 percent of first-time sales, making signage, displays, and the ability to capture foot traffic imperative to attracting and retaining customers. That’s made ongoing roadwork during the current revitilization makeover a definite challenge, say area retailers. For Huston, the nonprofit Sandpoint Shopping District has helped mitigate some of those challenges. The group promotes downtown business members through cooperative marketing and seasonal events, such as “Fall for Sandpoint.” “We have several businesses that meet together in creating events as a collective effort,” she said. “I think this is unique to small towns.” Harris agrees. “I feel that my success is contingent on a strong overall retail community,” she said. Harris, who helps run the SSD, started by Zany Zebra’s former owner, Ranel Hanson, is concerned about the recent closures of Zany Zebra and Scandinavian Affär, and the potential impact of empty storefronts. Forming connections with neighboring retailers, said Harris, is just one form of Hallmark’s community involvement, which also includes volunteer work and donating to local causes. That’s been a huge aspect of Eve’s Leaves’ business for founder Marilyn Sabella, who is involved with Sandpoint Rotary Club’s scholarship program for high school students, serves as artistic director of Pend Oreille Arts Council, is a board member for the Festival at


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features

Sandpoint and is active with Idaho Commission of the Arts. Sabella, who has owned Eve’s Leaves since 1980, is also a board member of the Idaho Heritage Trust, which is leading restoration of the Head Start building. What will the next 10, 20, 40 or so years look like? No one would hazard a guess, yet Brooks offered this sage advice: “It’s important that Sandpoint not lose its small-town charm with local shops and eateries,” Brooks said, along with “activities each evening, particularly during the peak seasons. You must stay true to yourself.”

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MERWIN’S HARDWARE WAS ONCE LOCATED ON FIRST AVENUE. ROSS HALL PHOTO (COURTESY DANN HALL).

Our story tells of retail businesses located on the 300 block of First Avenue, but there are many others who have both survived and thrived over the decades in our small downtown. Hen’s Tooth Gallery, owned by artist Ward Tollbom, is located at 323 N. First. Tolbom has been in that location going on 30 years, and had a store in the Cedar Street Bridge prior to that. Interestingly, his current location is “very close” to where his father, then a chef, once cooked in a restaurant as part of the Star Market (located where Evergreen Realty operates today). The Alpine Shop (see story on page 18), a purveyor of outdoor sporting equipment at 213 Church St., was started by Bob and Linda Aavedal in 1966 at Schweitzer Mountain and opened its second store on Church in 1971. Vanderford’s Books and Office Products, 201 Cedar St., will soon be celebrating its 41st birthday. “We are very grateful to live and work in this beautiful area with its caring community,” said Marcia Vanderford, who runs the business with husband Tom. “It’s home.” South Fork Hardware, at 201 N. Third, began life as Merwins Hardware in 1945, and operated in two locations on First Avenue before moving to its present location in 1981. Three generations of Merwins ran the store before it was sold to new owners in 2013. Army Surplus 1 at 501 Oak St. has been in business over 40 years, and has been run by Cornel Rasor since 1981. Rasor also served as a Bonner County commissioner. -Trish Gannon

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P I C T U R E D I N H I STORY

AN END TO WAR ARMISTICE DAY, 1918 by Jennifer Lamont Leo

N

ovember 11, 2018 marked the centennial celebration of the signing of the Armistice that ended the conflict of World War I. While the Treaty of Versailles in June 1919 is considered the official end of the war, the Armistice is celebrated by many nations as the practical end to the war, the socalled one war to end all wars. News of the signing reached Sandpoint at one o’clock in the morning and “was announced by the blowing of the mill and locomotive whistles,” according to the Pend Oreille Review of November 15. A parade of “automobiles, trucks, and other vehicles, with waving flags and honking horns, occurred before the populace congregated for the patriotic speechmaking and street dancing.” (The headline “City Celebrates Real War Victory: Premature demonstration of last week did not detract,” refers to a dispatch announcing peace that went out on November 7, causing celebrations around the world.) Sandpoint organized a bigger, better celebration that took place on July 11, 1919, by which time most servicemen and women had arrived home. The Spokesman-Review reported 8,000 people gathered in Sandpoint to watch “a parade of 450 soldiers and Marines in uniform, divided into two companies led by Captain Matthiensen and Captain John A. Humbird,” plus a small company of elderly Civil War vets and groups like the Red Cross, YWCA, and Salvation

Army. A homecoming celebration organized by the Elks Club and the American Legion included a banquet, a baseball game, a boxing contest, an Indian powwow, a vaudeville performance, and a dance. In addition to those in active service, local farmers, ranchers, and loggers worked hard to meet wartime demand for agricultural and forest products. Everyday citizens got involved; they planted “Liberty Gardens,” conserved food, stepped up to fill labor shortages, donated to war bond drives, met trainloads of soldiers with refreshments, and performed countless other duties. And then it was over. In November 1919, Armistice Day “passed with happy events,” reported the Pend Oreille Review. Although the weather was deemed too cold for a parade, a football game between the high school and the Gonzaga second team, and a grand ball at the Liberty Theater (originally the Rink Opera House, now the site of Kochava on Church Street) highlighted what the newspaper called “the first anniversary of the fall of the Hun.” Today in the United States, Armistice Day has become Veterans Day and it honors veterans of all wars. But at the end of that first worldwide war, close to 800 of our county residents had served overseas, many with the 146th Field Artillery in France. Twentytwo of our community gave their lives, their names preserved on a plaque at War Memorial Field so that none may forget.

Group in front of Crescent Pharmacy in Sandpoint all with American flags, just before Armistice Day parade. Names from left to right: Maxine “Minnie” Mason, Grace Peterson, Mr. Rebsdale, Mildred, Bee Smithson, Miss O’Dell and Iva Mason. Photo from the Bonner County History Museum archives. W I N T E R 2 0 1 9 | S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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S C H W E I TZ E R

PHOTO COURTESY OF SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN RESORT

THE BAR

improvements big and small elevating schweitzer experience by Beth Hawkins

A LOT OF PEOPLE HAVE A HISTORY WITH THAT LIFT,” CHRISMER SAID, WHO IS A LITTLE REMORSEFUL ABOUT THE LOSS OF SUCH A TRUSTY OLD CHAIRLIFT.

W

ith big projects in the pipeline, and loads of smaller improvements already implemented this past summer and fall, Schweitzer Mountain Resort just keeps ratcheting up its stance as a world-class skiing and boarding destination. None of it would amount to much, however, without gobs of snow. And gobs, they got. Last year, during the 2017/2018 season, Schweitzer broke their all-time record with a whopping 417 inches of snow. (The previous record of 412 inches was from the 1998/1999 season.) “We’ve had a couple of really good years on the mountain with lots of snow, and there’s a great energy right now,” said Dig Chrismer, marketing manager at Schweitzer. “Things are very exciting up here.” A lot of the buzz centers around the resort’s big announcement this fall that there are plans in development to replace WINTER 2019 | SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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features

PHOTOS COURTESY OF SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN RESORT

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Snowghost chairlift (locals still call it Chair 6) with two new chairlifts. One lift will start near Cedar Park and unload at the current Snowghost midway stations, with the second lift providing summit access from a location near Will’s Runout and Vagabond. If all goes as scheduled with the proper permits in place, the new chairlifts will be installed during the summer of 2019, finishing in time for the 2019/2020 ski and board season. Change doesn’t always come easy for longtime enthusiasts. “A lot of people have a history with that lift,” Chrismer said, who herself is a little remorseful about the loss of such a trusty old chairlift. “It’s slow, but there are days that I’m grateful because my legs are tired.” Schweitzer ticked off quite a few boxes on their to-do list over the summer, and implemented $1.5 million worth of new additions for the 2018/2019 season, including: The Musical Carpet beginner conveyor lift, right next to the Lakeview Lodge and Musical Chairs in the village, was extended from 250 feet to 380 feet. This gives newcomers to the sport a little more ground to work with to practice their skills. A panoramic webcam was installed at the top of Great Escape summit—an elevation of 6,400 feet. “The 360-degree cam takes a picture every 10 minutes,” Chrismer said. “It’s a gorgeous view!” (Check it out online at www.Schweitzer.com or download the app on your mobile phone.) SPOT (Selkirk Pend Oreille Transit) takes over the resort’s bus transportation with an all-new fleet that was specially ordered just for the Schweitzer route. What’s more, the bus ride is free for everyone to and from the Red Barn parking lot at the bottom of the hill, for skiers, boarders, and folks just wanting to come up and visit the resort for the day. And finally, for all those who complain about spotty cell service, Schweitzer improved the bandwidth of their free Wi-Fi and Internet services for guests thanks to a new provider partnership. Good news for those who love posting Instagram stories from the slopes!


P I N E ST R E E T WO O D S

miracle on Pine Street

GROUP RAISES OVER $2 MILLION TO CREATE PINE STREET WOODS COMMUNITY FOREST by Susan Drumheller

T

he Sandpoint community—with a little help from afar— gave itself a big Christmas present this year: the gift of nature, wrapped in 160 rolling wooded acres off Pine Street. The sale of the Pine Street Woods will be finalized this winter, following a campaign by Kaniksu Land Trust to raise $2.1 million to purchase the property and open it up to the public through a permanent easement. The campaign reached its goal nearly a year before its deadline because of hard work and a compelling vision, said Eric Grace, KLT’s executive director. “You can’t just snap your fingers and raise $2.1 million,” Grace said. “You have an amazing project and an amazing team; that’s how you do it.” The vision is more than a decade old. Julie Meyer, an avid

mountain biker who grew up in Sandpoint, looked into buying the property back in 2004. “I fell in love with the property because of the location,” she said. “My vision was for it to be open space and trails, like this little Golden Gate Park of Sandpoint.” The purchase didn’t materialize, but Meyer stayed in touch with the property owners, Joe and Ida Weisz, and later told Grace about the property. In its early days, Kaniksu Land Trust’s work focused on conservation easements with private landowners to protect natural resources. Those easements typically don’t allow public access. Today, KLT also teaches outdoor education at the Clark Fork Jr./Sr. High School and elementary schools, and launched the Park RX program, which encourages area health providers to prescribe walks along designated trails as part of a patient’s treatment. W I N T E R 2 0 1 9 | S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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“YOU CAN’T JUST SNAP YOUR FINGERS AND RAISE $2.1 MILLION,” GRACE SAID. “YOU HAVE AN AMAZING PROJECT AND AN AMAZING TEAM; THAT’S HOW YOU DO IT.” “They had the vision to stretch that far,” Meyer said. “Outdoor education and Park RX gets into that demographic that doesn’t get outside.” When KLT started looking for a signature property as a home for its outreach programs, the Weisz property stood out for its location and topography. “The beauty of this property is once you get to it, it’s fairly level,” Grace said. Its proximity to the population center and the existing Syringa Trail system were big selling points. The property will be accessed from Pine Street, just past Hunt Lane. In addition to raising funds for the $1.8 million purchase, KLT raised another $300,000 for improvements, including an access road, parking area, and trails. While some forest roads on site will convert to trails, KLT plans to build additional trails, including a less rigorous, wide, level one. The land trust will team up with the Pend Oreille Pedalers bike club and the Sandpoint Nordic Club to develop trails for those user groups, too. Other users will be students of forest management. The land trust secured a $400,000 Community Forest Grant from the U.S. Forest Service, which requires the property to remain a working forest and to benefit the public. Pine Street Woods was the only project in the western U.S. to be awarded funds in 2017. Idaho Forest Group was inspired to make a $150,000 donation because the property will be used to educate the public about active forest management. The future use will reflect its traditional use—Weisz maintained active logging on the property while running a few cattle there, too. 64

“We see this as a rare opportunity to showcase the benefits and beauty of a well-managed forest to the greater public,” Idaho Forest Group owner/CEO Marc Brinkmeyer wrote in his donation letter to KLT. Other major contributions include $500,000 from the Equinox Foundation (a family foundation started by Meyer’s parents), a $600,000 grant from the LOR Foundation, and a $100,000 federal Recreational Trails Program grant. Dozens of smaller contributions, foundation grants, house parties, and other fundraisers filled out the balance of the $2.1 million goal. Topping off the generosity was an unexpected gift from the grandson of homesteaders who settled the land next door. L.E. Krause, an 84-year-old resident of Florida, recalls sitting on his grandmother’s lap as a child at the homestead. While he’d only visited the property twice, he cared about it deeply, turned down an offer from a developer, and a few years ago allowed the bike club to build a trail across it. After getting a letter from KLT about the Pine Street Woods, Krause called Grace, and at the end of their 90-minute conversation, Krause offered to donate the land. “He was losing sleep over what would happen to the property,” Grace said. And with that, the 160-acre Pine Street Woods became 180 acres permanently protected for public use, education and enjoyment. A grand opening is expected in the late spring or early summer. For more information, visit the Kaniksu Land Trust’s website at www.kaniksulandtrust.org. Photo on previous page: Grace leads a group through the project.

S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E | W I N T E R 2 0 1 9

$400K

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$500K

EQUINOX FOUNDATION GRANT

$600K

LOR FOUNDATION GRANT

$150K

IDAHO FOREST GROUP DONATION

$100K

RECREATIONAL TRAILS PROGRAM GRANT

+SMALL DONATIONS SMALL GRANTS FUNDRAISERS


WINTER 2019 | SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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S I G N I F I C A N T LY S A N D P O I N T

GRAND

OPENINGS THE OPENING OF THE RESORT AT SCHWEITZER MADE NEWS ACROSS THE COUNTRY.

FIVE ARRIVALS (AND ONE DEPARTURE) THAT TRANSFORMED BONNER COUNTY

by Jennifer Lamont Leo

M

any locals can recite by heart the North Idaho story: How in the beginning Native American tribes crisscrossed the land, hunting, gathering, fishing, and raising families throughout the region. How, from the arrival of the first white fur trapper in 1809, the British agent and surveyor David Thompson, and through the gold rushes in Montana and British Columbia, explorers, miners, and fortune-seekers joined in the crisscrossing. How everyone seemed to move through the area, not settle down to stay. Until, suddenly, they did. In the late nineteenth century, people from all over stopped crossing through and started putting down roots. Today we boast a town and surrounding area where people dream of living. How did this happen? We asked some history-savvy local residents what they thought contributed most to the development of Sandpoint as a great place to land. Their answers point to five “grand openings” (and one departure) that sealed the deal for folks seeking to settle here.

1 The railroad

the lumber trade, but they determined the layout of Sandpoint as well, which started out on the east side of the tracks, then later spread westward. “Everything you see I owe to spaghetti,” said mid-20th-century film star Sophia Loren. In Bonner County we might say we owe everything to a pair of steel rails. Or maybe to the trees.

In September 1883 the granddaddy of grand openings took place as the Northern Pacific railroad steamed into Sandpoint, quickly followed by the Great Northern and other, smaller railroads. These railroads linked northern Idaho with points east and west, opening up unprecedented opportunities for commerce, tourism, and settlement. Simply stated, “The town became 2 The Humbird Lumber possible because of the railroad,” said Company local historian Nancy Foster Renk. Thirdgeneration forester Doug Bradetich noted The railroads opened the way for logthat not only were the railroads critical to ging operations to ship timber products

to lucrative markets nationwide. In 1900 a group of investors, including John A. Humbird, a former railroad tycoon who’d seen dollar signs in the Wisconsin woods, purchased the Sandpoint Lumber Company, enlarged its operation, and renamed it the Humbird Lumber Company. Humbird acquired land from the railroad. Doug Bradetich, whose family has worked in the woods for generations, said, “The Humbird Company brought tremendous growth to Bonner County in the early twentieth century, attracting workers to the area and stimulating the local economy.” He noted that many who

WINTER 2019 | SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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features

THE SPOKANE INTERNATIONAL WAS REROUTED IN THE MID 1980S

came were experienced foresters from Scandinavian countries. Until its closing in 1930, Humbird was one of Bonner County’s biggest employers. But trees weren’t the only natural resource to be harnessed.

3 The Albeni Falls Dam In 1955, construction was completed on the Albeni Falls Dam on the Pend Oreille River between Priest River and Oldtown. Named after Albeni Poirier, an early French Canadian settler and businessman, the dam was authorized by Congress in response to a major 1948 flood and cost $34 million to build. Located on the site of a natural falls, the dam includes a powerhouse that generates hydroelectricity and a spillway that regulates water storage, flood control, and irrigation. Another benefit? “The dam stabilized the summer lake level in Lake Pend Oreille,” Nancy Foster Renk explained. “This led to growth of summer recreation that depended on reliable water levels for boating and swimming.” Summer recreation, in turn, led to hotels, restaurants, and other attractions—the foundation of the tourism industry which today plays such an important role in our local economy. But the summer season didn’t keep its

WORKERS AT THE HUMBIRD MILL PHOTO DONATED BY KATHERINE RACICOT SWENSON

exclusive grip on tourism for long.

4 Schweitzer Mountain Resort In 1963, the opening of Schweitzer Mountain Resort attracted winter visitors eager to hit the slopes. Taking its name from a Swiss-born recluse who lived on the mountain (“Schweitzer” means “Swiss” in German), Schweitzer Mountain Resort was the project of Jack Fowler, Jim Brown, and other investors. The first chairlift opened on December 4, 1963. Clark Fork resident Diane Newcomer said, “I think Schweitzer made a big impact because the economy seemed to be teetering on the brink at that point [in 1963]. Mining had died and the glory days of logging were slowing down. Beyond the lake, we were not much of a destination, so Bonner County was looking for a new means of income. Schweitzer was the beginning of the boom of tourism in the Sandpoint area.” “Schweitzer eventually transformed Sandpoint into a year-round resort,” added Sandpoint resident Marianne Love. Today, the resort operates in two seasons. Winter visitors enjoy nine chairlifts, 2,900 skiable acres, and 32 kilometers of Nordic trails.

Summer visitors enjoy hiking and mountain biking, and restaurants and other attractions are open during both seasons.

5 The Sand Creek Byway “I think one of the most pivotal moments in more recent history is the completion of the [Sand Creek] Byway,” said Cassi Marler, museum administrator at the Bonner County History Museum. Elevated proudly over Sandpoint, the Byway was first proposed in the 1940s and finally opened in 2008, smoothing traffic flow past downtown. But building the Byway had a surprising side effect. “Besides the complete change from a transportation aspect, archaeologists uncovered 100-plus-year-old objects from Sandpoint’s past [during construction],” Marler said. “As someone invested in the history of Sandpoint, I look at those objects and can better imagine the people who started a life and town here in the early days, building the first homes and stores that line the streets of downtown. Those objects, uncovered only because of the byway project, make the historical stories of Sandpoint come to life.” Many Sand Creek artifacts are on display at the Bonner County History Museum.

2 ALBENI FALLS DAM DURING CONSTRUCTION IN THE 1950S

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THE CONSTRUCTION OF SCHWEITZER LODGE PHOTO DONATED BY JIM PARSONS JR.


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features

NANCY FOSTER RENK

WORK BEGINS ON THE SAND CREEK BYWAY

DOUG BRADETICH

And the one departure?

Rerouting of the Spokane International When we approached local railroad enthusiast Will Valentine to ask about important railroad-related events, we expected to hear about the arrival of the Northern Pacific. Instead, he immediately cited the rerouting of the Spokane International in the mid 1980s. While perhaps less legendary than John Henry or the Golden Spike, the rerouting of the SI looms large in local railroad lore, with good reason: it removed a major obstacle to safety, peace, and drivers’ nerves. The Spokane International, by then a subsidiary of the Union Pacific, ran up from Dover through the west end of downtown Sandpoint, then along Fifth Avenue, before cutting east toward Montana. As automobile traffic increased through town, so did residents’ blood pressure. The SI’s often lengthy loading-and-unloading stops—which included the granary and the building that presently houses Foster’s Crossing—along with numerous grade-level crossings all along its route, snarled traffic and caused extended delays, safety hazards and emergency-vehicle concerns. By 1982 a group of citizens, spearheaded by the late Paul Rechnitzer, had had enough. After a lengthy process involving the city of Sandpoint, the state of Idaho, and the railroads (each of whom wanted someone else to pick up the tab), a section of the SI was rerouted further west of town, along tracks belonging to the Great Northern. Thus a section of town was opened to a free flow of traffic, to the relief of all affected. This is just a small sampling of “openings” critical to local development. So many others could have been included, from Farragut Naval Training Station to the Cedar Street Bridge to companies like Quest and Coldwater Creek. Which do you think did the most to build Bonner County? Photos for this feature came from the Bonner County History Museum archives.

DIANE NEWCOMER

MARIANNE LOVE

CASSI MARLER

WILL VALENTINE

“SCHWEITZER EVENTUALLY TRANSFORMED SANDPOINT INTO A YEAR-ROUND RESORT” 70

S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E | W I N T E R 2 0 1 9


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features

DARWIN AWARDED SCIENCE HONOR

(NOT THAT DARWIN) by Trish Gannon

I

n October 2018, alongside luminaries like former President Barack Obama and accomplished actor Tom Hanks, Sandpoint native Darwin Berg was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, thus acknowledged for a lifetime of work in understanding brain function. Established in 1780 by such founders as John Adams and John Hancock, the academy’s purpose is to both advance and study important scientific and societal issues. Berg, along with President Obama and Hanks, will join a group of around 5,000 members who have been recognized for their work, including George Washington and Ben Franklin, who were among those inducted during the Academy’s first year. Born and raised in Sandpoint, Berg grew up on a ranch off of Lakeshore Drive. His father Karl, who taught local boys how to box, ran grocery stores in town, and Berg attended Sandpoint High School. Through the support and mentorship of teachers there, he received a fellowship in his junior year of high school that sent him to a small college; he would go on to earn his PhD in molecular biology from the University of California, Berkeley, and pursue postdoc studies in neurobiology at Harvard Medical School. Berg is currently a distinguished professor emeritus at the University of California, San Diego, after four decades spent teaching in the Division of Biological Sciences. “It’s amazing that I went to college, because we certainly couldn’t afford it,” said Berg, and he acknowledges the power of influential teachers. “Mary Parker was the best teacher I ever had,” he said, and credited Allan Burleson’s mentorship for sending him to college. “Just one teacher can make all the difference in the world.” Berg’s professional life has been spent studying the brain; specifically, learning about how synapses are formed. “[This is] how information moves,” he explained. “Back in the day, I was so excited about understanding consciousness—50 years later, we still don’t have the answer.” But, as so often happens in science, the search for one thing leads to the discovery of another. Berg’s study of brain formation inadvertently illuminated the way in which exposure to cigarette smoke affects the brain development of young children. “What we learned was that this [early exposure, including in the womb] actually changes the way that neural pathways are formed.” And the result 72

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ABOVE: DARWIN BERG AT HIS LAKESHORE FARM. RIGHT: BERG WITH HIS WIFE SUSAN KIRKPATRICK AT THE INDUCTION CEREMONY.

is that “these children are much more likely to become addicted to smoking themselves.” Additional findings show these kids also tend to be more anxious as adults, suggesting a somewhat vicious cycle at play: increased anxiety may well lead some to self-medicate with addictive drugs, to which they will be more likely to become addicted. Some of Berg’s current work, not yet published, suggests that these “addiction pathways” might create a predisposition toward other addictions as well. Now retired from teaching—though not from science—Berg and his wife Susan Kirkpatrick are spending more and more time on the land where he grew up, and where they still grow hay, just as his father did. And with his new membership in AAAS in hand, and its charge to advance important issues in science, he will continue to try to solve the puzzle of how conscious experience comes about.


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www.NorthwestHandmade.com WINTER 2019

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TENACIOUS, LETHAL ... AND KIND OF CUTE by Brian Baxter

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W I LY W E ASE L S

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: AN INQUISITIVE PINE MARTEN; A SHORT-TAILED WEASEL; A CURIOUS OTTER; A LONGTAILED WEASEL WITH DINNER DONALD JONES

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n the Northern Rocky Mountains area there exists many diverse members of a family of critters that includes one readily identifiable—the skunk. But the mustelid family in the wild is generally far more sly ... and dangerous. Common traits include musk gland systems for scent marking, delayed implantation reproductive cycles that help their young survive, and track patterns exhibiting 1:3:1 toe arrangements (see sketch on p.77), 2-by-2 bounds, and a variety of lopes and gallops. Weasels are extremely intelligent, and most certainly fit the definition of wily as using “tricks or strategies intended to ensnare or deceive.” These cunning carnivores also possess shearing carnassial teeth for tearing and eating flesh. They are stand up, tenacious, lethal hunters and will readily take on animals of much greater size.

THESE CUNNING CARNIVORES ALSO POSSESS SHEARING CARNASSIAL TEETH FOR TEARING AND EATING FLESH.

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PHOTO BY DONALD JONES

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Pine Marten

Interesting, year-round highlights of the marten’s coat include dark chocolate to medium brown fur, with beige or orange throat patches and a tan face. This combination creates deceptive images in the shadows of the tree canopy. Their tough and slinky bodies are wire-like in form and power. The marten’s ability to rotate its hind limbs to facilitate descending trees head first helps in hunting prey. Amazingly, martens chase pine squirrels from tree to tree, hurling themselves with the aid of their tail into an S-shaped pattern which propels them the extra few feet they need to secure their target.

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PHOTO BY DONALD JONES

PHOTO BY DONALD JONES

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North American River Otter

Long-Tailed Weasel

Although the North American River Otter is a gregarious, fun loving mustelid often called the clown of the woods, one must respect their hunting abilities! Its sinuous, torpedoshaped body is propelled by webbed paws and strong limbs combined with vertical undulations of its slender, long tail. The dense fur is a rich brown above, with seal grey or silvery fur below. This provides a natural camouflage. With nostrils and ears closed, these submariners utilize an ambush attack strategy, at times working in groups. Long, stiff facial whiskers can help detect movement of prey such as fish, crustaceans, small mammals, reptiles, and birds. Look for slides, rolls, tail drag, and latrines. May be found miles from water, and is preyed upon by cougar, bobcat, coyotes, and wolves.

Sporting a winter-white camouflage, this mustelid’s long tail is an aid in vertical stances at the base of trees, or in horizontal posture along tree branches as it pursues small mammals and birds. A fearless and stealthy hunter, these weasels cache prey; this food storage limits obesity. This tactic enables both larger males and smaller females to enter the burrows of voles, shrews, and rodents. Their prey is never safe, whether aboreal, terrestrial, or sub-nivean; that is, under the snow.

COMMON NAME

LENGTH / WEIGHT

HABITAT / DENNING

Long-tailed Weasel

11-17”

/ 3 oz. - 1 lb.

American Mink

18-27”

/ 1.5 - 2.5 lbs.

Most land habitats near water; up to alpine zone; ecotones. Dens in old burrows of other animals. Along water bodies; streams, lakes, wetlands, ponds. Dens in log jams, rock crevices, and dens abandoned by muskrats and beavers.

Pine Marten

20-28” / 1.5 - 2.75 lbs.

Old growth, mature, mixed coniferous forest; higher elevation spruce-fir forest. Dens in hollow logs, snags, and tree cavities.

Fisher

24-40” / 4 - 13 lbs.

Coniferous forests including old growth, mature, and early successional with dense canopy; components of snags, down trees, and some hardwoods. Dens in tree hollows, down logs, rocky crevices, or ground shelters

Northern River Otter

35-55” / 2 - 35 lbs.

Streams, rivers, and lake borders with riparian vegetation and side channels. Dens or holts are built in bank burrows of other animals, or natural hollows, and lined with moss, bark, and hair.

Wolverine

35-46” / 20 - 68 lbs.

Generally, alpine tundra, coniferous boreal and mountain forests, with large, isolated expanses of wilderness that support diverse prey. Dens in sheltered areas of rock, fallen trees, and caves. Dens contain multiple chambers and escape tunnels.

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Fisher

Mink

Diversity is a key strategy employed by this mid-sized member of the weasel family erroneously named the fisher! The misnomer is attributed to original Dutch settlers who used the word fisse, and the French trappers who related their word fichet to this mustelid that to them resembled the European polecat. It is generally accepted that fisher do not harvest fish, unless, perhaps, incidentally. This aboreal and terrestrial hunter has blackish brown fur with lighter highlights that camouflages it in trees and on the ground. Fisher often use cat-like screams to intimidate prey such as snowshoe hare, small mammals and birds. It is a specialized predator of porcupines, utilizing retractable claws and a head/eye attack to wear down its prey, eventually eviscerating the porcupine through its soft belly. Prolific scent marking reduces competition for food by discouraging other predators from hunting in their territory.

This generally nocturnal, solitary, semi-aquatic forager is cloaked in a rich dark brown to almost black, dense pelage which both protects it from cold mountain waters and conceals its presence. Look for this mustelid’s tiny, 1.5- to 2-inch tracks in the typical 1:3:1 weasel toe pattern along the water’s edge. Scatologically speaking, search for long slender cords folding back along itself, often black, with tapered ends and a strong, musky odor. The mink’s tubular-shaped body and dorsoventrally flattened head (each side looks different) enable it to swim like a bullet and surprise prey! In this way fish, frogs, birds, shrews, ducks and muskrats are taken. Mink will often utilize dens of other animals.

PHOTO BY DONALD JONES

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PHOTO BY JASON IDZERDA

PHOTO BY DAVID MOSCOWITZ.

W I LY W E ASE L S

Wolverine

Keys to survival strategies of wolverine include physical toughness, tenacity, intelligence, and cunning. Symbols of the essence of wildness, this largest terrestrial member of the weasel family is compactly built, and presents a formidable foe! Its dense fur is medium brown to blackish with two broad beige stripes running from shoulders to rump. It has a broad, flat head with whitish markings, strong fangs that tear through flesh, powerful jaws to masticate through bone, and long, thick, non-retractable claws. This somewhat solitary stalker of the higher country employs selective adaptability and seasonal availability into home ranges of roughly 400 square miles. Hunting trips of 25 miles are not uncommon, and males in search of mates may wander widely. Milder season diets may include rodents, marmots, snowshoe hare, porcupines, grouse, ptarmigan, and berries. In deep snow, they prey upon young moose, caribou, elk, bighorn sheep, mountain goats, and consume carrion. Bears, wolves, and cougar may prey upon wolverines, but know they are in for a formidable challenge!

classes

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5 5

wolverine fisher pine martin

THE 1:3:1 TOE PATTERN, AS SEEN IN WEASEL PRINTS, SHOWS ONE TOE EACH TO THE OUTSIDE, WITH THREE GROUPED IN THE MIDDLE. SOMETIMES, ONE OR THE OTHER OUTSIDE TOE MAY NOT BE VISIBLE.

Baxter instructs outdoor educational classes for diverse groups including North Idaho College, Friends of Scotchman Peaks Wilderness, Project Ascent, Glacier Bicycle Adventure Tours, numerous educational institutions, and conservation groups. Contact him for a schedule or to plan a program at: b_baxter53@yahoo.com or 406-291-2154. W I N T E R 2 0 1 9 | S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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These are the

moose of our lives BIG, BOLD, AND NOT-VERY-ENDANGERED, MOOSE ARE A STAPLE OF NORTH IDAHO LIFE by Sandy Compton

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n the deep, shadowy woods of Idaho—along with Scandinavia, Canada, Siberia, and almost everywhere else with wild country north of the 40th parallel—lives a dark beast of considerable size, and in considerably greater numbers in our part of the world than there were 110 years ago. It is bristly, solitary much of the time, ill-tempered, somewhat fearless and, according to some, quite tasty. It is not a bear. Or a wolf. Or a Sasquatch. Behold the moose, the largest ungulate; Latin name, Alces alces, which means “moose moose.” Or, “elk elk,” which is what the rest of 78

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the world calls what North Americans call moose. Ungulates are creatures with hooves, including the deer family, of which moose are members. Like most of the deer family, moose are herbivores. They have sharp, incisive front teeth in the lower jaw and a hard palate in the upper jaw, used in combination to chop off herbage; and huge molars at the back of both jaws with which to masticate the often tough and fibrous stuff they manducate. They browse on all sorts of trees, shrubs, forbs, and grasses, including tasty underwater plants found in lakes large and small. They hold their heads underwater for up to a minute as they graze in the shallows.


MOOSING AROUND

THE BEST WAY TO APPROACH A MOOSE IS ...

DON’T! That’s good advice. Bulls in rut and females with calves are exceptionally dangerous. They don’t go looking for trouble, but when they encounter what they perceive as a threat, they turn aggressively nasty.

Moose have large feet built to wade through silty muck and deep snow, and legs adapted to swimming, brush busting, and navigating big snow drifts. Long and immensely strong, those legs have highly flexible front knees and shoulders, allowing them to easily pick their front feet out of deep snow or lake-bottom mud. Their tracks are distinguished by their size, with elongated, pointed toes, which often leave wavy impressions because of their flexibility. Moose live between 15 and 25 years. They breed in early October, and have an eight-month gestation period, so calves are born late May or June. Twins are not uncommon. The youngsters stay with their mother for about 18 months, at which point they are “aban-

doned” to fend for themselves. The female will tolerate a female calf for longer, but bull calves get chased off. Though moose are associated with swampy places, they can be found in almost any forest habitat at any time of year. It’s not uncommon to find winter moose tracks in the subalpine forests of Schweitzer in the Selkirks. They are seen browsing on bushes high in the Scotchman Peaks and eating water plants along the shores of Sand Creek. They are also, and often, seen browsing through yards, parks, and landscapes all over Sandpoint. “Moose,” by the way, is singular or plural. “Moose’s” means it belongs to one or more moose. North Idaho is a moose’s paradise. WINTER 2019 | SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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ABOVE LEFT: A YOUNG CALF PLAYS PEEK-A-BOO ANNIE PFLUEGER; MIDDLE TOP: MOOSE MAKE THEMSELVES AT HOME JOHN PROCTOR; MIDDLE BELOW: MAKING TRACKS SANDY COMPTON; FACING PAGE LEFT: STAND OFF STACI BAILEY; RIGHT: KEEPING AN EYE OUT DABNE SPARKS

Big, bold, and not very endangered Moose have a permanently installed “do not disturb” sign on their foreheads. You may not be able to see it, but it’s there, and it’s a good idea to honor it. The only animals to injure humans more than moose are other humans and hippopotamuses, the latter of which are not much of a problem in our area. When upset, in spite of its size, a moose can move very quickly, and those beady little eyes see very well what they might wish to harm. Dog owners, beware. Don’t let your dog chase a moose unless you want to get a new dog. They are big, bold and not very endangered. In fact, there are more moose in North Idaho now than there were in the 1970s. Many more. Which could explain why some have moved out of the woods and into town. And not just Sandpoint, where they sometimes become resident. Larger bergs, such as Coeur d’Alene, Spokane and Wenatchee, have regular moose visitations. During the winter of 2001-’02, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game moved about 100 moose out of the Idaho Falls area. Moose come to town because they like ornamental shrubs, fruit trees, tulips, and Norway maples as much as they do aspen, ninebark, water weeds, and other wild browse. The best way to confront a moose is not to. Idaho Fish and Game personnel, various city police departments and the web page for the city of Sandpoint (www.sptmag.com/reportmoose) all advise to leave a visiting moose to its own devices. That’s good advice. Bulls in rut and females with calves are 80

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exceptionally dangerous. They don’t go looking for trouble, but when they encounter what they perceive as a threat, they turn aggressively nasty. Acting like a papparazzo when you’ve spotted a moose can qualify as threatening. While grizzly bears tend to get most of the ink, with best-sellers like “Night of the Grizzlies” or “The Bear’s Embrace,” moose should always be taken seriously. Do not, repeat, DO NOT approach a moose on the street to give it a pet, and if a moose happens to have a baby in tow, be especially careful to keep your distance. Moose are large. In the animal kingdom, they wear XL hides. The only terrestrial mammals larger are hippos, rhinos, elephants, and the occasional Alaskan brown bear. Males can be seven feet tall at the shoulder and weigh up to 1,500 pounds, plus antlers. Females can weigh in at 1,000 pounds, but they are not much shorter than males. Both genders can and regularly do step over four-foot fences without scratching their bellies. The tulips are always greener on the other side of the fence.

The price of mooseburger and how to get it For those who relish mooseburger, it is not easily come by nor inexpensive. In Montana, Idaho, and Washington, moose tags are issued by lottery. As an example, in 2015, 6,498 Idaho hunters entered a drawing for 873 Idaho moose tags, which included both genders. Of those, 680 tags were filled (meaning a moose was harvested).


MOOSING AROUND

The only animals to injure humans more than moose are other humans and hippopotamuses, the latter of which are not much of a problem in our area.

That might not seem like a big number, but in 1900, it would have been, compared to the Idaho moose population at that time, of which there was almost none. In fact, the state closed moose hunting in 1898 to prevent extirpation. By 1910 a small recovery had been made, and there were an estimated 500 in the state. By 1939, there were about 1,000 and in 1946, IDFG issued 30 moose permits. Since then, the population has expanded exponentially, with a peak of over 12,000 moose in the state in 2002. In 2018, there are still over 10,000. While the moose population has increased, moose fervor seems to have abated. In 1980, over 25,000 hunters entered the lottery for just 170 permits—almost four times the 2015 number. Idaho residents can still get mooseburger for a reasonable price if they don’t count the cost of equipment or their time. In addition to a $30.50 hunting and fishing license, an Idaho resident tag for a moose is $216.50, plus a $16.75 lottery application fee (compare elk tags at $16.50). Non-residents might as well just go buy an entire Kobe beef— their tag costs $2,143.50 plus a $41.75 application fee, after they pay $154.75 for a hunting license. This doesn’t include airfare, guide services, or cigars and single malt scotch for hunting camp. Idaho permits are limited to once-in-a-lifetime for either gender, which means that if a hunter is extra lucky, she may be able to draw permits to take a male and a female moose during her time on Earth. Montana moose are cheaper if not easier to get. A Montana resident license for moose is $125, plus a $10 application fee. Nonresident is $1,250, plus $50.

Management by man and beast IDFG moose management philosophy is to allow the harvest of bulls at levels that will allow populations to continue to expand. Bulls are defined as having at least one antler longer than six inches. Harvest of cows (a female moose, if you didn’t know) is designed primarily to reduce moose population growth, promote human health and safety where moose occur in suburban settings, and limit moose depredations. Moose hunting seasons are long: 86 days for bulls from the end of August to November. Hunting season for cows is about 40 days between mid-October and the end of November. One reason cow seasons don’t begin until mid-October is to reduce potential orphaned calves. Besides humans, moose have only one predator of any consequence, and that is the wolf. Bears and mountain lions also prey on moose, particularly the calves, but worldwide, it is the wolf that is most effective. In Alaska, Canada, and Siberia, which have much higher moose concentrations than our moose “paradise,” the predator-prey dance between moose and wolves is constant. The two species seem to be somewhat symbiotic, with the moose providing sustenance for the wolf and the wolf providing disease and population control for the moose. In North Idaho, there are not so many wolves, which may be one of the reasons why Alces alces has thrived here. In any case, they are a successful conservation story in the Northwest, and in Idaho particularly.

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Don’t give a Moose a Muffin PRESERVING OUR WILD NEIGHBORS’ NATURAL DIET by Becky Haag

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ABOVE: LOOKING FOR A HANDOUT MALTE WINGEN; OPPOSITE PAGE LEFT: DINING ON LANDSCAPE DAN ESKELSON; RIGHT TOP: BANANA LOVER DAN K; RIGHT BOTTOM: AN AFTERNOON NAP SUE HAYNES

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ast summer, after an active couple of hours at our neighborhood beach, my daughter walked a couple of blocks home to grab something to drink. She returned empty-handed, saying, “I couldn’t get in the house because a moose was napping by the door.” This isn’t a child with an overactive imagination. Many Sandpoint area residents share similar tales of our wild neighbors who wander through neighborhoods and downtown. We are fortunate to live where our kids are faced with the conundrum of moose guarding doors rather than the type of violence that proliferates in other areas. Coexisting peacefully with local wildlife can be a challenge, especially for residents unfamiliar with the needs of the animals. The name moose comes from the Algonquin word “mooswa,” which translates to “twig eater.” Twigs, along with leaves, bark, and aquatic plants, provide the primary forage for moose. Coincidentally, landscapers and moose often prefer the same species, such as willow, fruit trees, aspen, and birch, which can cause some landowners angst as they watch Bullwinkle cheerfully devour that beautiful new willow. Unfortunately, some folks feed wildlife food we view as more palatable than their natural diet in hopes of keeping them from eating the orna-


MOOSING AROUND

Coexisting peacefully with local wildlife can be a challenge, especially for residents unfamiliar with the needs of the animals.

mental vegetation we planted. To minimize moose visits to your yard, consider planting species that wildlife find less palatable—fewer tulips and willow, more foxglove and mint. Your human neighbors will also appreciate the mint for refreshing summer drinks. Feeding moose is a dangerous proposition. Children’s book author Laura Numeroff warned us in the book “If You Give a Moose a Muffin,” a moose will then want another and another, and then some jam to go with it. Once accustomed to handouts moose will expect them and can become aggressive if the freebies don’t continue. An aggressive moose, weighing an average of a half a ton, can be dangerous. If left alone, moose will typically move through an area, but sometimes they overstay their welcome. Providing supplemental food for wild animals may make us feel like we are helping them, but it can be lethal and no one wants a 1,000 pound dead moose in their yard. Moose, like cows and all members of the deer family, are ruminants. This means they

acquire nutrients by fermenting plant-based food in their four-chambered stomachs. They can’t digest their diet directly because they lack the enzymes necessary to break down the cellulose found in the cell walls of plants. The first chamber, or rumen, maintains relatively neutral pH, but if the pH falls and becomes acidic, the animal can suffer from potentially fatal rumen acidosis. When moose and deer are fed a diet they are not accustomed to, such as corn, they run the risk of acidifying their rumen to dangerous levels. Many states outside of Idaho have laws in place prohibiting feeding wildlife to protect animals and people. Northern Idaho, especially the Sandpoint area, has abundant habitat where moose can thrive, which can lead to a hearty population of our sometimes unwelcome wild neighbors. People often call Idaho Fish and Game and ask to have a moose removed; however, moving a moose is not a desired course of action. Tranquilizing and transporting a moose presents a new set of dangers to the public and the animal

due to the necessity of shooting darts filled with powerful tranquilizers, which go flying through people’s yards. Moving wildlife in winter is especially challenging due to limited accessible locations to relocate the animals. Relocating wildlife is oftentimes unsuccessful; success rates can be as low as 20 percent in some populations, especially when animals try to return. Relocation of any wildlife is used only when the animal poses a public safety hazard and as a last resort. Moose meander into town for a few reasons other than providing us the opportunity to share their visit. In winter, moose will become tired and hungry as a result of deep snow that makes travel difficult and foraging a challenge, which can result in a “hangry” (more aggressive) moose. Moose find respite in our maintained urban landscape and as winter drags on they may linger, so it’s best to keep your distance, snap a few photos, post them on social media and wait for the “likes!”

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MOOSE

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ENCOUNTERS

picture this Photo: Annie Pflueger

It’s quite likely that everyone with an operable camera or smartphone has a picture of a moose taken somewhere around Sandpoint. But when a moose moves in on a semi-permanent basis, the photo opportunities are endless. And if you happen to be a professional photographer ... well, then, you might come up with something along the lines of an advertising campaign—much like Annie Pflueger did. “A moose came into our lives one fall and made herself at home, drinking from the fish pond and feasting on our apple trees,” said Pflueger. “She decided to hang around for almost two weeks. Since she was a mainstay and reliable for photo opportunities, I decided to put a twist on the traditional Corona commercials featuring people relaxing on tropical beaches.” As you can see in the photo above, Pflueger’s creation was “Corona—Idaho Style.” She added, “I have deep respect for wild animals and am well aware of their potential and do not take it lightly. I might appear relaxed in the chair, but I truly was anything but!”

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Moose have the rightof-way It doesn’t matter who gets there first, it’s generally wise to always allow a moose the right-of-way. Just ask Carla Pennington Kirby. “A few years ago I was skiing Schweitzer, on Snow Ghost, and I was three-quarters of the way down the slope when I heard the oddest sound of horses galloping in my helmet. I shook it off and continued to ski toward a dense thicket of trees, when to my surprise a large moose came running at full speed, out of the trees, directly at me,” she said. “In slowww motion, all four legs went horizontal in a grand attempt to stop before he hit me and in slowww motion, I did a hockey stop with my skies facing uphill, while I placed my poles pointing like a rifle to brace for the upcoming hit. The moose landed in front of me, with my poles hitting his chest (barely) and his head hanging over me like Bullwinkle. We were both spared as he shuffled his hooves backwards and headed down the hill.”


MOOSING AROUND

Moose in the water

I AM NOT A’MOOSED’

Moose and water go together like... ham and eggs? Donny and Marie? Beer and baseball? You get the point. And if you have water on your property ... or near it ... you’ll get the moose, too. Moose like water, and humans don’t deter them from enjoying it. They’ve been spotted frolicking in pools, playing in sprinklers and, as in this photo, making their way through an afternoon river float. “My friends were celebrating their 5th wedding anniversary that weekend by camping and floating on the river they were married on,” said photographer Amber Phillips. ”We may have been a little surprised the moose joined us, but most of us are aware of the animals here so stayed calm and let her do her thing. The moose in this area are used to the folks floating and everyone respects them by giving them space. It was a great surprise on a fun weekend.”

There are a number of things that can irritate a moose and cause it to attack. Primary triggers are a perceived threat to a young one and yapping dogs but frankly, there are moose that seem to be upset by the part in your hair. If you’re out and about and encounter a moose, these signs, according to Idaho Fish and Game warden Matt Haag, are your signal that Mr. (or Mrs.) Moose is not happy, and you should get out of its vicinity, as quickly and quietly as you can: head lowered; ears laid back; raised hair along the back of its neck; or stomping with its front hooves. If a moose charges you,

Photo: Amber Phillips

Photo: David Moscowitz

“ Find something to hide behind,”

said Haag; “a car, a tree, or if all else fails, someone bigger than you. ”

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Photo: Annie Pflueger

“I could rant at length,” said writer Cate Huisman about the moose that visit her south Sandpoint home. “I could tell you about the masses of beautiful pink and white tulips that used to come up every year in my garden (they were here before I was) and how now I’m lucky if I get a half dozen. Or about how my red osier dogwoods were once nicely and consistently shaped, and are now a random bunch of limbs of different lengths.” The destruction of landscaping is a familiar theme when locals relate their stories of moose. “A mama moose and her baby liked to lay under the apple tree,” said Betty Cady of the regular moose visits to her home. “My neighbor [the late Gretchen Hellar, a former Sandpoint mayor] had an absolutely wonderful garden. That moose came in and ate everything growing. She loved it there!” “Did I mention they also finished off two of the three blueberry bushes I planted?” Huisman added. “How they like cabbages even more than slugs like cabbages? How one of them landed on our garden gate during a lovers’ quarrel and bent it out of commis-

sion? (Our neighbors reported this one to us.)” Moose love a garden anywhere, but they’ve obviously learned that the pickings are extra special on the south side of town, and head there for an all-you-can-eat buffet. WINTER 2019 | SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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par saves and “moosed” birdies

don’t moose with momma

In the 1980s and ‘90s, when the Idaho Club golf resort on Highway 200 was still called Hidden Lakes, its tagline was “Where the moose are loose.” The course lies on the lower Pack River, where moose are plentiful, and they made (and make today) frequent appearances on the course itself. Ron Perron was working at the course and tells of a time when he and his wife, Mary, were golfing. “I was on the 9th hole and putting for a birdie,” he said, “when Mary began fiercely whispering my name.” It was an important putt, and if you golf, you will understand that Ron was a little annoyed at the interruption. “What?!” he said in response, and she warned him to back slowly off the green. “A momma and two babies were walking up beside me,” he said. “I backed off very slow.” Is there a benefit to golfing with moose? “I gave myself a birdie for the hole,” Ron said. Automatic birdies were also given to golfers when a cow moose decided one day to give birth on the fairway near the 7th hole. Others at the course remember, with fondness and quite a lot of laughter, another encounter between Perron and moose at the course. “I was driving down the fairway one morning when a mom and two calves came out of the river,” he said. The moose took exception to the moving golf cart. “I had to call on the radio to tell people I was out of commission for a while as I was being chased by a moose.” Moose are fast but, Perron assured us, golf carts are more maneuverable. Newcomers to the course (undoubtedly newcomers to the area, as well) are thrilled about the moose populating the greens. One such newcomer shopping in the pro shop asked the late Jamie Packer, the club’s Canadian golf pro, “What time do you let the moose out?” Packer, never one to disappoint a customer, shouted the woman’s question over to Perron. “I told them I would go out and do it ‘right now,’” Perron said.

Cow moose are notoriously protective of their calves. Many years ago, the late Dennis Nicholls was evaluating a patch of forest. He was making his way down a steep and brushy slope when, near the bottom, he managed to step directly on top of a baby moose, curled up asleep and hidden from sight in the thick undergrowth. The baby let out a squeal, and momma came at a run. “I was never so thankful for limbs on a tree,” Nicholls related, as he climbed a tall pine for safety. But “Mom,” he said, “was in no mood for forgiveness.” She kept him in that tree most of the day. Several times, after hours of waiting and believing Momma had moved out of the area, he would begin the climb down, only to discover she would come charging again. Night fell before he could get out of the tree and make his way home.

Photo: Stephanie Brown

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Photo: Annie Pflueger

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san dpoint I N P I C T U R E S

LIGHT ON ROUND LAKE, PHOTO BY TYLER HANNAH

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P H OTO E S SAY

CATCHING THE TRANSITIONAL COLORS OF WINTER, PHOTO BY NIKKI ANDERSON

A SCHWEITZER SUNRISE, PHOTO BY AL SEGER

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FULL MOON GLOW OVER SCHWEITZER, PHOTO BY CYNTHIA SCHMIT

10 MPH TOO FAST IN NORTH IDAHO, PHOTO BY DAN C. EARLE

Each month, Sandpoint Online bestows a gift certificate for one of the area’s notable eateries on the winner of our online photo contest. Enjoy the work of some of our previous winners, and submit your own best shot for the contest from the home page at www. SandpointOnline.com (Sandpoint in Pictures). A FREE SPIRIT IN THE SNOW, PHOTO BY LANDON OTIS

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real estate

Going TINY SANDPOINT WOMAN BUILDS HOME FROM THE TRAILER UP by Beth Hawkins, photos by Fiona Hicks

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illary Dunbar’s name may ring a bell with folks in town; she’s the Sandpoint resident who has been doling out many of her belongings for free on Facebook over the past several years. “I’ve given hundreds of things away,” she said. As it turns out, there’s a really good reason for her recent giveaway spree—Dunbar has been building her own tiny home. And by tiny, we’re talking 276 square feet! Compared to the average American home—2,687 square feet in 2015, according to the Census Bureau—it’s no wonder she had to get rid of things. The transition from big house to tiny house isn’t always an easy one. Dunbar started questioning her need for massive amounts of space and possessions after raising her three children in the Selle Valley, followed by a divorce. “Our house was big, it was perfect for that phase of our lives,” she said. “But then the bedrooms kept emptying out as each kid left.” After renovating a vintage trailer, Dunbar decided she was ready to tackle the task of building a tiny home—all on her own. She employed her knowledge from being married to a builder for 20 years, plus her frequent views of building tutorials on YouTube, and got the project rolling in 2017 when she purchased a wheeled trailer in Oregon that the home now sits on. It serves as the home’s foundation, to which Dunbar added traditionally framed walls and a roof before winter hit. It was close, though. “The day that I had help hanging the front door, that night it snowed,” she laughed. Slowly but surely, with a relentless gung-ho attitude, Dunbar 92

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real estate tackled just about every phase of the home’s construction. “I’ve hired an electrician and a plumber, but mostly it’s been me,” she said. “I just take one thing at a time.” The tiny home has a lofty, modern feel with a sloping ceiling that’s 13.5 feet high at its tallest point. The kitchen is welcoming and open, with charming, burlap-front cabinet doors, a large sink, and a sleek stainless backsplash. Dunlap painted the interior tongue-and-groove walls a clean white to give the home a contemporary cottage vibe, and the living room seating area is smartly situated beneath the bedroom loft. “A lot of tiny homes have the kitchen under the loft, but when you’re in the living area you’re sitting down—so it just made sense to put that there.” Dunbar’s bedroom area is accessed by stairs that also serve as storage bins, and the loft is just big enough to easily house a queensize bed with room to spare. Windows allow ventilation and natural light, and the tucked-away feel of the space radiates coziness. Naturally, energy efficiency is at the top of a tiny home’s list of attributes, and Dunbar bolstered it up a notch by installing toprated insulation in the ceiling and walls. A petite, wood-burning stove (so small that it looks like something from a dollhouse) is located at the end of the kitchen counter and heats the entire home with just a few small scraps of wood. “This is actually the big model,” Dunbar laughs, noting that the smaller wood stoves are mostly used in boats and RVs. For North Idaho folks who toil every year to fill their wood sheds with cords of firewood, this delicate stove makes a strong argument for going tiny!

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R E A L E STAT E

Dunbar has another compelling reason for living in a smaller home, and it has to do with the broader issue of affordable housing. “Sandpoint has a housing crisis, and it’s so profound,” she said. “I saw it firsthand in Vail, Colorado, and I see it happening here.” From a financial perspective, Dunbar said the obvious advantage of living in a tiny home means a smaller (if any) house payment—which in turn means less time at a job or career. “I work part-time at the charter school, and the house is allowing me to work less.” In addition to spending fewer hours at her job, Dunbar said living in a tiny house definitely affects her lifestyle. “It propels me to spend more time outdoors, and it’s great,” she said, adding that the home’s size also brings her closer to the elements—even when she’s indoors. “I love when it’s stormy out.”’ Nonetheless, she is not living in the home full time due to restrictions in zoning. She advises would-be tiny home builders to “do their research” before undertaking their own project. ”All the home shows make it look romantic, but I tell people to go stay in a tiny home first,” she said. In the end, Dunbar is pleased with a job well done. After wrapping up the project this fall by putting on the home’s exterior shingle siding, she’s looking forward to cuddling up inside her tiny home without having a list of building projects to tackle. “I’m ready for a long winter’s nap.” At left, Dunbar and her dog, Goliath, relax in the tiny home’s spacious-feeling living room.

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R E A L E STAT E

On the hunt for sears catalog

HOUSES by Jennifer Lamont Leo and Trish Gannon

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n 1908, the country’s most popular mail-order catalog, Sears, Roebuck & Co. (the Amazon of its day), began selling complete houses. Over time, customers could choose from 370 different home plans, order, and then pick up almost all the components necessary to build that home from a nearby railroad depot ... some 30,000 pieces in two boxcars, with a total order weight around 25 tons. In early years buyers had to cut to length the lumber supplied by Sears but by 1916, when the company began providing pre-cut lumber, the customer was purchasing a true “kit” home. Prices ranged from $360 to $2,890. It’s likely that at least some of those homes are located in the Sandpoint area, and we have followed some intriguing rumors to see what homes we can identify. Read on to learn about catalog homes, meet our candidates, and discover a checklist of things to look for if you think your own home might have arrived in pieces by train. W I N T E R 2 0 1 9 | S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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THE CATALOGS From 1891 to 1993, American families (including yours?) relied on the Sears Catalog for furniture and toasters and bed linens, but from 1908 to 1940, the Sears Modern Homes program sold around 70,000 homes; most of them prior to 1929. They were the largest seller of kit homes—but not the only one. Chief competitors included Montgomery Ward and Aladdin Homes. Here’s how it worked. From Sears’s annual Book of Modern Homes, the customer selected a style and floor plan. Options ranged from simple cottages to grand, three-story dwellings in popular architectural styles like Colonial, English Tudor, and Arts & Crafts. The sales pitch promised a savings of a quarter to onethird of the cost of a conventionally built home. “Honor-Bilt” was the finest quality: cypress siding, cedar shingles, and pine, oak, or maple flooring and trim. “Standard-Bilt” was recommended only for warmer climates, and the “Simplex” was a lightly framed cottage for summer use. The customer received a 75-page construction manual; blueprints; detailed instructions for plumbing, wiring, heating; suggestions for interior trim, door, window, and paint options; a shipping schedule; and a guarantee that materials would be “sufficient in quantity and quality” or Sears would refund the purchase price and pay shipping costs. The customer prepared the lot and foundation before the first shipment arrived with pre-cut lumber, building paper, nails, and frames. A month later, the second shipment would arrive with finishing items like millwork and plumbing fixtures. While Sears did engage local contractors, owners handy with a hammer could build their own homes and receive a discount. The company estimated an “average man” could build a home from a kit in 90 days. From 1911 to 1933, Sears even offered financing—which eventually led to their downfall in the home building business. By 1940, more complex housing designs and stricter building codes, along with unpaid mortgages, induced them to leave the kit-home business to others.

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THE CANDIDATES

PREVIOUS PAGE: THE BENNETT HOUSE FEATURES A WELCOMING PORCH. ABOVE: AN INTRICATELY CRAFTED STARBURST PATTERN DEFINES THE ROOF GABLE .INSET: OWNERS KAREN SEASHORE AND TOM TILLISCH HOUSE PHOTOS FIONA HICKS

The Bennett House

Born in 1847 in Wisconsin, Sidney Bennett retired with his wife, Lavina, to Sandpoint in the early 1900s, and in 1914 built a home on Lake Street. Located near the North Idaho College satellite campus, the 2,386-square-foot home has five bedrooms and three bathrooms. Karen Seashore, who now owns the home with her husband, Tom Tillisch, said the couple had heard a rumor the house was a catalog house. “But we poured through pages of catalog designs and didn’t find one that matched our floor plan. The floor plan has been changed so radically, the interior offered few clues.” They bought the house in 1987 from Addie and Paul Jacobson. Paul—often called the “hippie doctor”—supported the era’s desire for home births. For years after Seashore and Tillisch bought the house, every Halloween brought curious trick-or-treaters who had stories of births, recoveries, meals, and first aid help in the house. Paul assured the new owners there were no ghosts left in the house since a group of Hell’s Angels types had lived there for a while and scared them all away. Addie asked that none of the house’s resident spiders be killed since they’d always been peaceful roommates. Barbara Farmin lived in the house during World War II, in an upstairs apartment. She claimed there was no third floor so the fancy exterior—particularly the intricately designed ‘sunburst’ facade facing the street (at one time marvelously edged in gold)—would have fronted an attic space. The current owners bought the place because, Seashore said, “the house reached out and grabbed” her. Tillisch was more skeptical of the purchase, but once he saw the log room Jacobson had built for his workshop, he decided maybe they could live there. Although much has changed inside the house—the stairway and wood stove were moved, a greenhouse, sun porch, and bathrooms were added, the attic became bedrooms—the original house was obviously a four-room square, typical of many Sears home designs, and its owners today love it for its quirkiness ... and for the many families it housed over the years, including their own kids and many exchange students they hosted.


R E A L E STAT E

THE MORAN HOUSE (OWNERS JUSTIN AND SHAUNAVEE DICK, INSET) IS REPLETE WITH PERIOD DETAILS FIONA HICKS

The Moran House

Located on Ella Street in what’s now called the Moran Addition in south Sandpoint, the home was built in 1907 by Patrick Henry Moran and his wife, May. Born in 1863 in Wisconsin, Moran came to North Idaho in the 1880s as a logger and, like most in the day, a farmer. The entire area of the Moran Addition was the family farm, and many original fruit trees still remain. Moran served in many roles in his community, including as the first chief of police for the city of Sandpoint. Now owned by Justin and Shaunavee Dick, the house is around 2,600 square feet, and features three bedrooms and two bathrooms—which is two more bathrooms than it had when it was built. The Dicks say they would like to make some changes— updating bathrooms is a priority as their children get older—but in order to get a permit they would have to put in a sidewalk along the Ontario side of the house, displacing hedges that were planted there at least 60—and maybe even 90—years ago. Mike Moran, a great-grandson of Patrick and May, spent a lot of time in the house as a child. “My grandma had me work there a lot,” he said, adding that he found the attic “spooky.” He said the wood-burning furnace in the basement was “a beast. It went through a lot of firewood!”

Think you might have a Sears catalog house? Check out our list of what to look for at www.sptmag.com/catalog

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A spectacular waterfront setting privately situated in tall trees await you in this extremely well maintained, 3 bed, 3 bath 3316SF Riverfront Retreat. With two lots, 1.28 acres and over 219 feet of waterfront in a completely private setting, let this be your new sanctuary where can fish out the back door. There’s also a large, insulated shop with room for all your toys and a heated work space. #20183590 $535,000 Call Alison Murphy 208-290-4567

Ullr Lodge is a Schweitzer Mountain Resort condo which easily sleeps 18 people in five well-appointed, spacious suites all with full private bathrooms! Excellent for a larger family or multiple ownership, this property also operates extremely well as a permitted vacation rental. Offered fully furnished. #20182361 $675,000 Call Alison Murphy 208-290-4567

An attractive and spacious custom built home on just over five acres, less than three miles to downtown! This home features five expansive bedrooms and a sizable bonus room. There’s also a roomy, bright guest home with one bedroom, one bathroom, an office, a loft and an open living and kitchen area. #20183243 $585,000 Call Alison Murphy 208-290-4567

Own Your Own Estates Quality 10-acre parcel on Lake Pend Oreille. Over 1,400 ft of low bank-level waterfront, several small beaches, southern exposure. Two 5-acre surveyed parcels-perk tested. #20182904 $2,200,000 Call Susan Moon 208-290-5037

Spectacular Lake Pend Oreille Waterfront Parcels. Lovely Mountain views 100’ lot, seawall installed.  Second lot across the street is included, separate building lot, and has drainfields installed.  #20171810 $650,000 Call Susan Moon 208-290-5037

5-Acres Nicely Treed, Pend Oreille River & Mountain Views in Rio Hills. West of Sandpoint,  cleared building site, CCRs apply, only fee is $500/yr for road maintenance. #20182592 $175,000 Call Susan Moon 208-290-5037

Spectacular Lake & Mountain Views in picturesque Garfield Bay. 3 bed/ 2.5 home on 7.5 wooded acres. Living Room with floor to ceiling windows, open kitchen with island, seasonal waterfall, fruit trees, & a community waterfront access lot. #20181009 $649,000 Call Bill Schaudt 208-255-6172

Fly-in Private Retreat on over 131 acres - Custom Green-built Country Home - Spacious master suite - Main floor guest suite with private entry - Deluxe Hangar has luxurious upstairs apartment - Mixed acreage with two streams and a pond. #20180780 $1,990,000 Call Bill Schaudt 208-255-6172

Large beautifully landscaped courtyard welcomes you to the well maintained 3 bdrm 2 bath home with huge kitchen, cozy gas fireplace in the living room, & attached 2 car garage. This roomy home is bright & open through the interior with a smart floor plan. #20182798 $289,000 Call Amy Delducco 208-946-9979

Alison Murphy, REALTOR®

Susan Moon, REALTOR®

Bill Schaudt, REALTOR®

208.290.4567 AlisonMurphyIdaho@gmail.com

208.290.5037 susan.moon@sothebysrealty.com

208.255.6175 bill.schaudt@sothebysrealty.com

Amy Delducco, REALTOR®

208-946-9979 amy.delducco@sothebysrealty.com

© MMVII Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Claude Monet’s “Marine View With a Sunset,” used with permission. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated, Except Offices Owned And Operated By NRT Incorporated. Sandpoint office: 208-263-5101, 200 Main Street, Sandpoint, ID 83864.


R E A L E STAT E TWO PINES, PLANTED DECADES AFTER THE MERRITT HOME WAS BUILT, ATTEST TO ITS AGE. PORCH DETAILS ARE SIMILAR TO STYLES FROM SEARS. INSET IS OTIS AND LIZZIE MERRITT ON THEIR WEDDING DAY.

The Merritt House

Otis Merritt, born in New York in 1857, made his way to North Idaho with two brothers in the 1880s. They took a train as far as Cripple Creek, Colorado, and came the rest of the way on foot. Once here, the brothers homesteaded land in the Hoodoo Valley; many are familiar with the Merritt Brothers mill they started in Laclede. In 1910, Otis built a three-story home said to be from a Sears Catalog kit. In the book Hoodoo Valley History, written by Virginia Overland, the house was described by Patti Bennett, whose family purchased it in the 1950s: “The woodwork was very nice and the rooms were large. ... The bedrooms all had large walk-in closets often used for games of hide and seek. The house seemed to be constructed for entertaining.” Sandy Curtis, who owns the house now with her husband Alan, agrees with that. “I wish you could see it when all the kids are here,” she said. “It’s a great family home.” Curtis, who allows her grandkids to shoot Nerf guns at the (indestructible) kitchen ceiling, said they moved there with “the majority” of their 11 children (some

were already grown) and hopes to see it filled with great-grandchildren one day. “This house is solid,” she added. “There’s four flights of stairs, and none of the floors or stairs creak when you walk on them. I would bet this house will still be here a hundred years from now.” When the Curtises added insulation to the attic, Sandy said the installer came down after doing the work and asked, “Is this a Sears house?” Because this was prior to her learning the home’s history, she told him no, saying only two families had lived there previously—neither named Sears. Naomi Harris, Merritt’s granddaughter, and her daughter, Diane Roy, say memories of the house are important to all their family. “My parents were married inside where the little window bump-out is,” said Naomi, who grew up in the house with her seven siblings, and keeps a painting of it in her front hallway. “We all loved it there.” The home has changed over the years. The 3,106-square-foot house now has two bathrooms; originally, there was no bathroom nor interior plumbing, and no electricity.

The experience, knowledge and proven results To turn your dream into a reality. 208.255.7340 | barryfishercustomhomes.com | Sandpoint, Idaho WINTER 2019 | SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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ABOVE: CONCRETE BLOCK HIGHLIGHTS THE MASON’S SKILLS. RIGHT: THE DAUGHTERS HOUSE OFFERS A SIMPLE FACE. INSET: OWNER VALERIE BUCHOLTZ.

The Daughters House

Located on south Boyer, this 1,099 square foot home, built in 1915, has two bedrooms and one bathroom. The property was originally owned by Freeman Daughters, who purchased three lots on Boyer in 1907. Born in 1873 in Indiana, Daughters came to Idaho as a missionary, and was the first resident clergy in Sandpoint. He was a teacher and served as principal of Sandpoint High School, and made an unsuccessful bid for Secretary of State. In addition, he was secretary of the Green Monarch Mining Co., the Dean of Education of the University of Montana, Missoula, and co-author (under the pen name “Reginald Drew”) of the book Anne Boleyn. The Daughters home and rear carriage house feature the “rusticated concrete block” so prevalent in suspected local Sears Catalog homes (the homes on Moran and Lake also feature this block). This block could be purchased from Sears, but more often buyers purchased molds with which to make their own. Historian Nancy Foster Renk pointed out that concrete block construction

was gaining quite a foothold in the early 1900s, and Sandpoint had its own concrete block manufacturer, so this part of these homes may be more reflective of this style of building. But according to the Historical Commission, beams in the house were found with the distinctive Sears stamping that told the builder where they were to be placed, giving this home a leg up toward being identified as a true Sears kit home. The house was recently purchased by Valerie Bucholtz, who said she had “always driven past it and liked the look of it, the bungalow feel.” Because the interior has changed over the years, with improvements made by each successive owner, she is looking at slowly returning it to a design that’s more “era-appropriate.” She may keep the kitchen cabinets, however, which were handcrafted by Eli Jukich for his daughter, who moved into the home with her husband, Mike, in 1933. Jukich and his wife Mary owned Grouse Creek Ranch and Dairy and the Wayside Inn, and in 1928 he was the local distributor for the Hupmobile, an all steel automobile manufactured by Hupp Motor Car Co.

THE VERDICT

Award-winning

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Rosemary Radford, who literally wrote the book(s) on Sears Catalog houses, explained, “Sears started selling building materials in 1895 (through mail order) but for it to be a true “Sears kit house” it has to have both Sears plans and building materials.” Based on that criteria, there is insufficient information to determine if any of these homes are true Sears Catalog homes. The Moran house, built in 1907, does not meet that strict definition. Both the Bennett and Merritt houses, as they stand today, do not match home plans sold in the catalogs, but both have changed substantially since built. The Daughters house is our most likely candidate, based on reported stamped lumber. Until homeowners decide to remodel their home to find such hidden clues, our conclusion must be “undecided.” We do know our possible Sears homes are old, well built... and lovely. If your house is a candidate for a kit home, share it with us @SandpointMagazine on Facebook.


R E A L E STAT E

Sand Creek goes

NEW DEVELOPMENT RISES ON BOARDWALK by Trish Gannon

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ising from the rubble of what was once one of Sandpoint’s favorite “hot spots,” the Sand Creek Lofts at Sandpoint Marina bring creek-front living to downtown. Located where the Garden Restaurant—demolished in 1997 after water damage and neglect led to condemnation of the building—once stood, the Lofts feature 13 condos on four floors, all with water views, in the first residential building located along the boardwalk. Designed by Scott Wohlschlager with Boden Architecture, built by Idagon, and owned by Dover W I N T E R 2 0 1 9 | S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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AT TOP AND ON PREVIOUS PAGE: THE LOFTS RISE ABOVE SAND CREEK. BRAD FRERKSON. THE CONDOS FEEL SPACIOUS AND OFFER WATER VIEWS. SHOWCASE EXPOSURES LLC

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Bay Development, each of the units—one or two bedrooms—features a water view; so does the single, 680-square-foot commercial space located on the Lake Street level. While a few of the units were reserved for vacation rentals, most are selling to private owners ... and selling quickly. It’s the location that appealed to native Jack Leaverton and his wife Diane, who purchased one of the new units. “It’s a great building,” said Jack, “but the location is what really attracted us. Walking paths, bike paths, City Beach, restaurants, downtown ... you name it and it’s there.” There are 22 restaurants located within walking distance. The couple, who live in Hope on property where Jack grew up, don’t plan to live in the Lofts full time—at least, not yet. “We’re getting older,” Diane said, “and we’re looking at the future, when it might be more important to us to live in town.” In the meantime, they’ll use it periodically themselves, and it will make a nice base “for family who come to visit and don’t want to camp in a tent in the yard,” said Diane. Nadine Grimaldi and her husband, Tom, moved to Sandpoint from Florida in March. It was “the amenities and health care system,” that drew them to choose a home in Sandpoint, and the location that drove them to purchase a unit on the top floor of the Lofts. “Just last week I walked to the post office, the hardware store, the bank, and the farmers’ market,” said Nadine. “Where else can you do that?” Nadine said that while most condos appear to be “box to box to box,” that’s not the case with the Lofts at Sand Creek. “They’re not large,” she said, “but they feel spacious. And they’re really well designed to bring in lots of light. This was a really easy choice for us because [these condos] fit our lifestyle.” Marie Garvey, the director of sales and marketing for Dover Bay, said plans are underway for a construction of a second building along the marina next year. “It’s such a great location,” she explained. “They’re right downtown, so within walking distance to shopping and restaurants and City Beach. Yet they’re also peaceful. Construction included extensive acoustical work so the units are quiet inside.” Because Dover Bay Development/Sandpoint Property Management also owns the marina, Garvey added that boat slips are available for lease along with each condo. Learn more at www.sandcreeklofts.com


real estate

MARKET WATCH: PRICES CLIMB HIGHER

F

or a middle-income family looking to buy a home, the Sandpoint area’s average home sales price of $375,000 is a potential budget buster. In contrast, the influx of real estate shoppers from more expensive housing markets such as Seattle and California find our area’s price tags to be relative bargains. It’s a predicament with a shortage of solutions as Bonner County housing prices climb ever higher. “The market’s continued to strengthen over the past several years,” said Steve Battenschlag, president of the Selkirk Association of Realtors. The number of residential sales for 2018 (from April 20 to September 20), compared with the previous time period in 2017, increased 25 percent, with the average sales price of $375,061 representing an 11 percent increase over last year. “Our problem is immigration from Seattle, California, Illinois, those high-cost cities,” he said. “They’re retiring here, and the $375,000 home is nothing for them. They’re bringing Seattle and California money here.” Out-of-state residents are also purchasing bare land at a faster pace: the number of Bonner County land sales shot up 40 percent in 2018 compared to the previous year, with an average sales price of $129,940. That includes all types and sizes of land: the price for a city lot averages around $118,000 and an acre in the county around $47,000. “Buyers are looking ahead three to five years for retirement,” Battenschlag said of the land sales boom. “It makes them feel like they’re being active about getting out of the hustle and bustle of these major cities. It gives them a chance to dream.” Forrest Schuck, president of the Multiple Listing Service, said land

by Beth Hawkins

prices have stayed reasonably priced mainly because of the increasing price of construction. “Some builders’ costs are up 20 percent year over year, and labor is from 13 percent to 20 percent more,” Schuck explains. “That is, if you can find someone. Most builders are out two years; everybody’s busy.” Battenschlag agrees that there’s a squeeze on finding a local builder, and is wary of where the future of the building industry is heading. “My concern is the [new federal] tariffs. I do know that wire and timber may be going up, but a year from now, we’ll know if tariffs are having a significant impact. That will make building so much more expensive,” he said. According to the Associated General Contractors of America, the price index for construction materials increased 8.8 percent from May 2017 to May 2018. And news reports since track continued price increases. For families priced out of buying a home in Sandpoint, starting with bare land is a time-honored strategy for many to bootstrap their way into home ownership. Start small, with a plan that allows for expansion as it becomes more affordable; many people living here today started with a small structure that eventually became a barn, shop, or garage once more funds were available for building their dream. If that is not an option, or not appealing, Shuck advises looking outside Sandpoint proper, where prices are more affordable. “I send people to Bonners Ferry, although land is spiking up there as well. And I like Priest River, things are starting up there work wise. They’re 30 percent less [in price]. But neither has the glitz and glamour of Sandpoint.”

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R E A L E STAT E

Selkirk Multiple Listing Service Real Estate Market Trends Vacant Land—Bonner County

residential sales—All Areas Sold Listings

2017

2018

577

607

5

Volume - Sold Listings

$181,828,071

$207,321,978

14

Median Price

$271,000

$285,000

5

Average Sales Price

$315,126

$341,551

Average Days on Market

118

106

8 -10

2018

% Inc/Decr

Sold Listings

196

274

40

Volume - Sold Listings

$18,512,860

$35,603,599

92

Median Price

$65,000

$83,475

28

Average Sales Price

$94,453

$129,940

38

Average Days on Market

225

186

-17

Residential Sales—Schweitzer

Sandpoint City Sold Listings

2017

% Inc/Decr

2017

2018

110

112

% Inc/Decr 2

Volume - Sold Listings

$31,838,716

$31,148,527

-2

Median Price

$255,000

$269,950

6

Average Sales Price

$289,442

$304,897

5

Average Days on Market

101

95

-6

2017

2018

Sold Listings

22

23

Volume - Sold Listings

$7,206,700

$7,288,700

Median Price

$282,500

$272,000

Average Sales Price

$327,577

$31,690

Average Days on Market

155

143

% Inc/Decr 5 139 -4 -90 -8

Residential Sales—All Lakefront

Sandpoint Area 2017

2018

% Inc/Decr

Sold Listings

336

378

13

Volume - Sold Listings

$113,635,061

$141,773,274

25

Median Price

$286,250

$320,000

12

Average Sales Price

$338,199

$375,061

11

Average Days on Market

117

108

-8

2017

2018

Sold Listings

54

43

% Inc/Decr -20

Volume - Sold Listings

$29,157,161

$28,440,604

.-2

Median Price

$487,500

$595,000

22

Average Sales Price

$539,947

$661,409

22

Average Days on Market

103

135

31

Residential sales by area based on information from the Selkirk MLS© for the period of April 20, 2017, to September 20, 2017, versus April 20, 2018, to September 20, 2018. Real estate stats for Bonner and Boundary counties. Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed.

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N AT I VE S + N E WCO M E RS

natives and NEWCOMERS by Marianne Love

L

iving the dream—that’s how this issue’s Natives and Newcomers view the opportunity of residing in Sandpoint. For one, that dream has lasted nearly a lifetime. For others, capturing it took time, planning or fortunate circumstances. Our participants sell real estate, fix teeth and smiles, improve vision and help coordinate an annual county event. When work is done, they enjoy leisure time embracing Sandpoint’s restaurants, its people, natural beauty, and local culture. For each, living here is truly a dream fulfilled.

Native, Amber Trost Prins, O.D. Vision plays an important role in Dr. Amber Prins’ life. As an optometrist serving patients in Coeur d’Alene, Priest River, Bonners Ferry and Sandpoint, she loves helping children with eye conditions experience a good start in school. “Many eye conditions that cause symptoms such as double vision, difficulty focusing or problems tracking while reading can be fixed with either glasses or vision therapy,” Amber said. “I really enjoy working with the pediatric population.” With firm family roots in the area, Prins’ vision for the future has focused on spending her life near those roots.

After completing optometry school in Arizona last year, she and husband Greg, whom she met while a student at the University of Idaho, pointed their moving van straight toward North Idaho, where both now live and work. “Wow, we are so lucky to call this home,” she said. “I think it is easy to take this beautiful place for granted, until you live somewhere else and realize how great it really is.” Her return, after eight years of higher education, fulfilled Prins’ dream of living “a simple, comfortable life surrounded by friends and family.” She graduated from Priest River Lamanna High School in 2009. Her greatgrandparents, Bob and Leora Bandy, were well-known ranchers at Edgemere.

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natives

+

newcomers Amber hopes to contribute new chapters to the local family history as a mother herself. “I absolutely love children and look forward to being a mother more than anything,” she said. “I plan on staying in the Sandpoint area the rest of my life. I love the community feel, the beautiful outdoors and having the luxury of being close to my family.”

Describe an unforgettable past event: Some of my best memories involve my sister and cousins coming up to City Beach for the day, then going out to eat. The county fair was always fun as well. I used to show market swine and loved camping there for the week. Discuss someone who influenced you: My GreatGrandma Leora Bandy did so much for the community. She was the kindest person I have ever met, a very hard worker who put family first always. She was very involved with clubs and organizations, always trying to promote positive change. What a great

community leader I had to look up to!

Name places you think should top any newcomer’s list to visit: Green Monarchs is one of the most beautiful areas

of Lake Pend Oreille. Visit Schweitzer Ski Resort, rent snowshoes from Alpine Shop and snowshoe Syringa trails in the winter, or ride bikes there in the summer.

Advice to newcomers: As Sandpoint is becoming more and more popular, it’s even more important to maintain the community-oriented town it has always been. Shopping locally is important to keep this town going all year round. Sandpoint is very welcoming, so try to get involved. Your suggestions to improve our community?

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Native, mike parkins Mike Parkins likes to downplay his personal achievements in deference to his family members and friends. “I prefer to live my life lowkeyed in Sandpoint and enjoy the beauty of the surrounding area,” said Parkins, founder of Four Seasons Realty. His hobbies include traveling with his wife Susie, a recently retired Alaskan Air flight attendant, and following his grandchildren’s activities. “I take great pride in watching my family and friends accomplish their goals,” he said. Parkins’ favorite Sandpoint venue is Memorial Field, definitely a natural for this avid sports enthusiast who played Bulldog basketball and baseball as well as college ball at Spokane Community College. Parkins attended Kinman Business College, pursued accounting, and landed a job with Pack River Lumber Company. He also coowned PJ’s Bar & Grill. But the majority of his career has been in real estate: 35 years! At 71 and still working with real estate out of his Sandpoint home, this Army veteran thinks of himself simply as “a decent person who tried his best to be a good citizen.”

Describe an unforgettable past event: The Sunday afternoon Mt. St. Helens blew. By 4:30 p.m. the sky turned dark. Ash started to fall. Street lights turned on. An eerie feeling surrounded the town. People did not know what was going to happen. Many were wearing surgical masks. Discuss someone who influenced you: Charlie Stidwell

had a big influence on me as a child. As my junior high principal, he kept me on my toes because I never wanted to be sent to his office for a one-on-one meeting. He also opened the gym on evenings when he would work in his office. We would just wait outside the school for him to show up and let us play.

Name places you think should top any newcomer’s list to visit: Visit the Hope area, Schweitzer Mountain and

N AT I VE S + N E WCO M E RS

greg prins, Newcomer Walla Walla native Dr. Greg Prins has always enjoyed fixing things, like automobiles (including a 1956 Willys Jeep), old tools, antiques, and camping gear. Since last year, he’s been fixing teeth and improving smiles as a dentist at Mt. Baldy Dental Center and Kaniksu Dental Clinic. Prins, 27, and his wife Amber, a Priest River native, met at the University of Idaho, earned their bachelor’s degrees, and moved on to Midwestern University in Glendale, Arizona, to complete programs in dentistry and optometry, respectively. After he visited Sandpoint with Amber several times, the couple set a goal of finding positions in the area, where they could be close to family and eventually start a family of their own. “We started our job searches pretty early while we were still in school,” Prins recalled. “We were fortunate enough to find positions at great offices here in town. Thanks to the welcoming nature of the community, it has been a seamless transition.” Area fishing, camping, hiking, canoeing and boating opportunities have also made adjusting easy for this outdoorsman who loves grilling in the summer and cooking big meals in the winter. Eichardt’s tops his list of favorites for dining out. “I haven’t found a place I don’t like, which is another thing I love about Sandpoint,” he said. “I’m really thankful to be a part of a community with so much character.”

What do you tell friends about Sandpoint? Quite a few friends are from dental school in Arizona and haven’t experienced much snow, so I tell them about our white winters. I also tell them about massive Lake Pend Oreille and how there is something awesome to do year round. Share some details about your first Sandpoint visit: About nine years ago, Amber and I walked around City Beach.

Advice to newcomers: Relax and enjoy the beauty of our

It was winter. I remember thinking the lake was enormous, reminding me of the ocean with the beach. It was foggy, and I couldn’t see all the way across. I’m pretty sure we checked out some of the shops downtown, ate at MickDuff’s and caught a movie at the theater.

Your suggestions to improve our community?

What changes have you noticed about yourself since moving here? Coming from the high-stress dental

Sandpoint City Beach.

area and the slower pace of life.

Improve the financial opportunities for our youth to be able to live in the Sandpoint area and raise their families.

school environment to Sandpoint, I’ve mostly noticed I’m more myself here. I can relax and enjoy life a lot easier.

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natives

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newcomers

newcomer, shelli cowell As a new face helping coordinate the Bonner County Fair, Shelli Cowell’s first year in Sandpoint has been a whirlwind. She began working as fair office manager in May. Cowell, 33, a Minnesota native and newlywed, brings experience with nonprofits, public relations, fundraising, marketing, graphic arts, and the travel industry after working for several years in the Seattle area. Cowell discovered Sandpoint while dating her now husband

What do you tell friends about Sandpoint? I tell them how Sandpoint is nestled on the north edge of beautiful Lake Pend Oreille and how it’s surrounded by the blue of the water and the green of the surrounding valleys and mountains. I tell them about my home in Kootenai and about downtown Sandpoint, adding how much they would enjoy visiting some of my favorite places. I tell them about City Beach, relaxing by the water or enjoying a lakeside drink at Forty One South. I also tell them about Cone & Coffee, great local beers at MickDuff’s, Joel’s burritos, Evans’ Brothers espresso, bike trails along the water, and hiking in the surrounding mountains. Share some details about your first Sandpoint visit:

I was dating my now husband. Driving over the Long Bridge was spectacular. The water and the train passing by alongside us on our drive into town was memorable. My husband took me to Loaf & Ladle, where we shared a delicious meal.

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Most difficult adjustment? The most difficult adjustment has been moving away from my close friends from school.

Matt Cowell, owner of a Bonners Ferry family business. “In the months leading up to our engagement, I fell in love with Sandpoint,” she recalled. After their December 2017 marriage, the two settled in Kootenai with their springer spaniel Kip. During leisure time, she likes “throwing chicken and veggies on the grill,” enjoying the lake and taking in the coffee shops, restaurants or cultural offerings in downtown Sandpoint. “Having an authentic and caring community is valuable to me,” Cowell said. “Being involved in my local church and having connection to my husband’s family is important as well.”

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What makes you happiest about living here?

Beginning a career and settling down in an area where I love living. I am also happy to have four seasons again.

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What changes have you noticed about yourself since moving here? I’ve had a lot of intentions to

get out and explore but have been busier and more selectively focused than I’d like to be. I think that shift will come with more time and balance.

What makes you most happy about living here? The sunshine. I

came from the Seattle area, where gray and gloom were far too frequent. I also love that my commute has gone from 75 minutes each way to about 3.5 minutes!

Most difficult adjustment:

I miss the hustle and bustle of the big city, and there have been moments when I’ve felt like an outsider because I didn’t grow up in the community. But the adjustment to this quieter pace has also been an unexpected relief. The beauty of Sandpoint’s landscapes and quality of its people have helped to make the adjustment easier.

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Skiing and Riding. Schweitzer Mountain Resort has 2,900 acres and features 92 trails and open bowl skiing just 11 miles from downtown Sandpoint. The mountain boasts 2,400 vertical feet and nine lifts serve two open bowls, treed glades and three terrain parks. www.Schweitzer.com (208263-9555). Cross-country Skiing. Trails at Schweitzer, Round Lake State Park, Farragut State Park, at the U of I property on Boyer and Western Pleasure Guest Ranch. See story on page 40. Ski or snowshoe the 1.5 miles of flat lake shoreline alongside the Pend d’Oreille Bay Trail Backcountry. Nearly unlimited options exist on public lands, up National Forest roads such as Roman Nose and Trestle Creek. Call the Sandpoint Ranger District (208-263-5111) or the Bonners Ferry Ranger District (208-267-5561) for maps and current conditions. Call the Idaho Panhandle Avalanche Center toll free at 866-489-8664. For a guided backcountry experience, take an excursion from Schweitzer via snowcat with Selkirk Powder or check out their heli-skiing offers. (208-

263-6959). www.SandpointOnline.com/rec. Sleigh Rides. Western Pleasure Guest Ranch, 16 miles northeast of Sandpoint on Upper Gold Creek Road, offers sleigh rides in a rural setting for groups and couples. www. WesternPleasureRanch.com (208-263-9066). Snowmobiling. Snowcat trails around Sandpoint and Priest Lake in the Selkirk Mountains are renowned; for more information, contact Sandpoint Winter Riders, www. IdahoSnow.org (208-263-0677) or Priest Lake Trails & Snowmobile Club (509-4663331) or www.priestlake.org. For guided rides at Schweitzer, contact Selkirk Powder. www. SelkirkPowder.com (208-263-6959). State Parks. Three state parks are within close range to Sandpoint: Farragut (208-683-2425), Round Lake (208-2633489) and Priest Lake (208-443-2200) with activities including camping, crosscountry skiing trails and snowmobiling. www. parksandrecreation.idaho.gov. Walking. For cleared paths, try the Pedestrian Long Bridge alongside Highway 95 over Lake Pend Oreille; the paths along the Sand Creek Byway; Travers Park on West Pine Street; City Beach downtown; Sandpoint-Dover Community Trail along Highway 2 West; Lakeview Park, through

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Clark Fork

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Lodging

Schweitzer’s Selkirk Lodge

Bar or Lounge

x

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Coeur d’Alene Casino

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x

x

x

x

Daugherty Management

21

x

x

Dover Bay Bungalows

19

x

x

FairBridge Inn & Suites

60

x

Holiday Inn Express

83

x

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La Quinta Inn

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Lodge at Sandpoint

25

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Northern Quest Casino

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x

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Pend Oreille Shores Resort

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Sandpoint Vacation Rentals

75

Selkirk Lodge

x

Downtown Sandpoint on the lake. Indoor pool, sauna, fitness room, hot tub. All rooms with lake view. Dine at Trinity at City Beach. Also 22-site RV park. www.BestWesternEdgewater.com

x

x

Providing an experience that makes each guest feel at home. Enjoy deluxe amenities and beautiful views. See ad page 87. www.cdacasino.com

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Sandpoint’s luxury vacation home rentals, with properties on the lake and the mountain. See ad, page 5. www.DM-Vacations.com

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x

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Waterfront bungalows at Dover Bay in Marina Village. Fully furnished, lake and mountain views. Fitness center, marina, hiking/biking trails. See ad, page 30. www.DoverBayBungalows.com

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Free breakfast with waffles, 24-hour hot tub, free wireless internet. Family suites. Schweitzer ski packages. At the base of Schweitzer Mountain, two miles from Lake Pend Oreille.

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x

The newest hotel in Greater Sandpoint. 100 percent smoke free. The Ponderay location is at the base of Schweitzer Mountain next to Sweet Lou’s. See ad, page 117. www.HIExpress.com

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Downtown location, high-speed internet. Free breakfast, themed spa suites. Silverwood, ski and golf packages. Kids stay free. See ad, page 18. www.LQ.com

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Accommodations for weddings, retreats and banquets. Lakeside with swimming and docks. Views of lake and mountains for an unforgettable Idaho vacation. www.LodgeAtSandpoint.com

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Northern Quest Resort and Casino is the Inland Nortwest’s only AAA-Rated 4-Diamond Casino Resort. Complimentary Wifi, valet and overnight parking. See ad page 137. www.NorthernQuest.com

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x

Fully furnished condos and on-site athletic club on Lake Pend Oreille. Stay and play packages. See ad, page 43. www.POSResort.com

x

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75 luxury homes and condos in Sandpoint and on the lake. First-class properties at affordable rates. Plan your perfect vacation. www.SandpointVacationRentals.com

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Mountain accommodations, stay-and-play packages. Spectacular mountain and lake views. Outdoor heated pool and hot tubs. See ad on back cover. www.Schweitzer.com

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and around the Kinnikinnick Native Plant Society Arboretum; and overlooking Sand Creek at the Healing Garden next to Bonner General Health. STAY ACTIVE. Sandpoint’s city rec department offers a huge variety of activities, for all ages, throughout the year. A sampling of what’s up for winter includes basketball, volleyball, gymnastics, dance, swimming, art programs, skiing, dancing and more! You can find it all in the winter activities guide at City Hall (1123 Lake St.) or get it online at www.sptmag.com/activity. Wildlife Refuge. Kootenai National Wildlife Refuge, 30 miles north of Sandpoint near Bonners Ferry, has more than 2,700 acres and abundant wildlife and birds. Hiking trails to a waterfall and around a pond, auto tour routes. www.fws.gov/kootenai (208-267-3888).

WaterLife Discovery Center.

On Lakeshore Drive, find interpretive trails and self-guided tours of fish habitat and an interpretive area on the Pend Oreille River. Although not staffed in winter, visitors are welcome. www.FishandGame.idaho.gov. (208-769-1414). Fishing. There’s great ice fishing on Lake Pend Oreille at the north end of the

Long Bridge in front of Condo del Sol. Main prey is perch, though bass and trout are also caught. Ice fishing is also popular on smaller lakes: Cocolalla, Mirror, Gamlin, Shepherd, Round, Antelope and Priest. Lake Pend Oreille’s deep waters rarely freeze, and even in midwinter charter fishing boats pursue its trophy rainbow trout. Ice Skating and Sledding. It takes several days of sustained, below-freezing temperatures without too much snow, but when conditions are right, ice skaters flock to Third Avenue Pier, Sandpoint City Beach or Sand Creek below the Cedar Street Bridge. Round Lake State Park maintains both regular and speed-skating rinks (208-263-3489). For sledding, Schweitzer offers Hermits Hollow Tubing Center (208-255-3081).

indoors

Art Galleries. Truly an arts town, Sandpoint has numerous galleries and artists’ studios. You can take a walking tour downtown: on First Avenue check out ArtWorks, Cedar Glen Gallery/Ferrara Wildlife Photography, Hallans Gallery, and Hen’s Tooth Studio. Art lovers may also visit Pend Oreille Arts Council, 302 N. First Ave.,

W I N T ER G U I D E www.ArtinSandpoint.org (208-263-6139). At Schweitzer, the Artists’ Studio in the White Pine Lodge features local artists. Museums. Enjoy many fine displays depicting old-time Bonner County at the Bonner County History Museum. Open Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free admission on the first Saturday of the month year-round, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Located in Lakeview Park, 611 S. Ella. www. BonnerCountyHistory.org (208-263-2344). Open other Saturdays only in summer. The Bird Aviation Museum and Invention Center features an impressive collection that pays homage to aviation and innovation. Located in Sagle about 17 miles southeast of Sandpoint off Sagle Road on Bird Ranch Road. Open year-round, but by appointment only in the winter. Admission is free (donations welcomed). www.BirdAviationMuseum. com (208-255-4321). Movies. The Bonner Mall Cinema is a six-plex theater inside the Bonner Mall on Highway 95, featuring new releases weekly (208-263-7147). The historic Panida Theater at 300 N. First shows foreign and independent films, plus film festivals (208263-9191). www.Panida.org.

[ Closest Hotel to Schweitzer Mountain Resort ] Newest Hotel in Sandpoint Indoor pool/hot tub

SM

Fitness Center Meeting Rooms Available

477326 Hwy 95 N \\ Ponderay, Idaho 83852 // Phone: (208) 255-4500 WINTER 2019 | SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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Athletic Clubs. Greater Sandpoint has a plethora of opportunities, but the most comprehensive is Sandpoint West Athletic Club, 1905 W. Pine St., with a 25-meter indoor pool, courts, a weight room, group classes, and a sauna and spa. Open daily. www.SandpointWest.com (208-263-6633). See more on the Super Directory at www.SandpointOnline.com. Spas. Get pampered at Wildflower Spa at Seasons, www. thewildflowerdayspa.com (208-263-1103) Breweries and Pubs. Downtown, see brewing in action at MickDuff’s Beer Hall, the production and tasting room, open daily at 220 Cedar St., (208-209-6700) or visit their family restaurant at 312 N. First. www.mickduffs.com (208-255-4351). For pubs that serve a lot of craft beers, try Eichardt’s Pub & Grill at 212 Cedar St. (208-263-4005) or Idaho Pour Authority at 203 Cedar St. (208-597-7096). Taste handcrafted ales at Laughing Dog Brewing in Ponderay; taproom is open at 805 Schweitzer Plaza Dr. 7 days a week from noon to 8 p.m. www.LaughingDogBrewing.com. Two new breweries are now open in town. Utara Brewing Co. at 214 Pine St. (208-627-5070) is described as a British pub-meets-curry house. Open Monday through Thursday, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday-Saturday noon to 9 p.m.; and Sunday noon to 6 p.m. With several beers on tap, it offers Indian food, and is a northern home for Rathdrum’s Westwood beers. Also—beer cocktails! It’s a thing. www.UtaraIdaho. com. Matchwood Brewing Co., at 513 Oak St. (208 -718-2739) is open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., has six of its own beers on tap—light, malt and IPAs—and specializes in meat pasties. (208-263-9222) www. MatchwoodBrewing.com.

shopping Downtown retailers are going all out in the Sandpoint Shopping District, where shoppers will discover a fine array of eclectic shops and galleries with clothing, art and gifts galore. www.DowntownSandpoint.com. Highlights include the Cedar Street Bridge Public Market with retailers such as Carousel Emporium and Huckleberry Depot, art, and food such as Cedar Street Bistro, all in a beautiful log structure spanning Sand Creek. www.CedarStreetBridge.com (208255-8360). Just down the street are First Avenue retailers such as Finan McDonald Clothing Company, Sandpoint Chocolate Bear, Zero Point Crystals, and Northwest Handmade. Antiques abound at Foster’s Crossing, a mini mall with lots of collectibles, on Fifth between Cedar and Oak streets (208-263-5911); and MarketPlace Antiques & Gifts, open daily, at Fifth and Church (208-263-4444). Just out of town, Bonner Mall in Ponderay has several stores large and small and often hosts events; it’s on U.S. Highway 95 two miles north of Sandpoint (208-263-4272).

Wineries and Wine Bars. The Pend d’Oreille Winery and Tasting Room, closed on Wednesdays, is open 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. and features award winning wine paired with live music (not all nights). 301 Cedar St. www.POWine.com (208-265-8545). Cedar Street Bistro 334 N. First Ave., open daily 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. has a wine bar with a view! Wine bar is open Friday/Saturday, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. (208-265-4396).

Your Hometown Mover SandpointMovers.com

Professional Movers

208.265.5506

Serving Sandpoint and Surrounding Areas 118

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Dough-licious!

INDULGING IN OUR LOCAL MARKET OF BAKERY GOODNESS by Beth Hawkins

S

urviving a long North Idaho winter hinges primarily on comfort food, and that includes frequent therapy sessions with breads and assorted pastries. If you consider these indulgences as your reward for slogging through the snow, rain, cold, and cloudy skies, then you’re in luck!

Opening just in time for our seasonal neediness, UPTOWN BAGELS in the Belwood 301 Building on Third Avenue (next door to Pend d’Oreille Winery and The Fat Pig) is a funky, fun, ‘80s-vibe breakfast and lunch eatery that fills a niche in our local market with mouth-watering bagel sandwiches. Owners Marcy Timblin and Angelina Henry share a vision for the shop, aiming to make it a place where customers are greeted with a familiar face and a SW U IMNM 8 | SANDPOINT MAGAZINE TER 2019

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PHOTOS FROM LEFT: UPTOWN BAGEL OWNERS ANGELINA HENRY AND MARCY TIMBLIN; MILLER’S COUNTRY STORE CINNAMON ROLLS; FRESH-BAKED BROWNIES AND SINGLE-SERVING, PINEAPPLE UPSIDE DOWN CAKE FROM DAVIS GROCERY.

smile. “Our mission is about happiness,” Timblin said. “We want that ‘Cheers’ experience.” Uptown Bagels’ sandwiches are made with authentic New York bagels that are flash-frozen and shipped to the store directly from New York. They’re then loaded up with an assortment of meats and cheeses (as well as vegetarian and breakfast options), steamed, and topped with fresh veggies such as lettuce and tomato. For breakfast, check out the Long Bridge breakfast sandwich made with an asiago bagel, bacon, cheddar cheese, egg, avocado, and herbed cream cheese. Lunch offers an equally tempting menu, including the Mr. T sandwich made with a whole-grain bagel, roasted turkey, pickled red onions, lettuce, cranberry sauce, and cream cheese. Or you can build your own with a choice of bagel, cream cheese, meat, cheese, and veggie. Pastry options are always in delightful abundance at MILLER’S COUNTRY STORE, 1326 Baldy Mountain Rd. Depending on which day of the week it is, customers will find a fresh-baked variety of sweets and treats. Mark Tuesdays and Fridays on the calendar for Miller’s cinnamon rolls (there are also take-and-bake cinnamon rolls available in the freezer case); Wednesdays and Thursdays the store makes fresh-baked stollen, which is a folded pastry that’s filled with fruit and cream cheese. Thursday also happens to be Miller’s “pie day,” so check out the seasonal favorites such as pumpkin and pecan. And scones are made every day, rotating between 30 different flavors, along with scrumptious cookies. According to manager Lane Riffey, the store is gearing up for another big holiday rush with fresh-baked pies available for pre-order. Customers can also stop by for daily, fresh-baked loaves of bread

including white, honey wheat, sourdough, and wholegrain. DAVIS GROCERY AND MERCANTILE, located in the historic former home of the Hi-Hopes Market at 620 Wellington Place in Hope, is open for business under the ownership of Ross and Jamie Davis. The retail shop, which plans to expand into a full grocery store by mid-November, offers a tempting selection of pastries baked fresh daily on site including sweet cinnamon rolls, brownies, cupcakes, plus more savory options such as the gluten-free pretzel rolls stuffed with ham and cheese (in fact, there’s always a selection of gluten-free baked goods available). As for pastries’ perfect accompaniment—coffee—the grocery’s staff was trained by Evans Brothers on how to properly brew their grounds, which they serve as a drip or in specialty espresso drinks.

“WE ENVISION IT AS A COMMUNITY GATHERING PLACE,” SAID JAMIE DAVIS Stop by for lunch and check out Davis Grocery’s rotating menu of hot soups, which accompany specialty sandwiches including The Californian with chicken, bacon, and avocado; The Idahoan with roast beef, Thousand Island dressing, and potato chips (which are served on the sandwich); and The Paddler—a fresh bagel baked instore with lox, cream cheese, and capers. If you love fresh-baked breads and pastries but prefer that they’re made with organic ingredients, check out the bakery department at WINTER RIDGE NATURAL FOODS, 703 W. Lake St. The store prides itself on working with local producers and farmers whenever possible, and many of the non-local ingredients the bakery uses are organic. A daily selection of bakery items includes a tempting array of breads, pastries, muffins, and more.

DAV IS G R O C ERY & M ERCA N T I LE Now serving

301 Cedar St., Suite 105 (access from Third Ave.)

Espresso • Baked Goods Sandwiches GROCERY COMING NOV. 17 620 Wellington Place, Hope ID

208.264.0539

www.davisgroceryinhope.com 120

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Open

Mon-Sat 7 to 7

www.uptownbagels.com


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serving Sandpoint DELI Q&A WITH STEFHANIE MEYERS & SANDY GREIFF WINTER RIDGE Stefhanie Meyers, deli manager at Winter Ridge Natural Foods

SUPER 1 FOODS DELI Sandy Greiff, deli manager at Super 1 Foods

Hot, fresh, ready-to-go. The local grocery

stores’ deli departments can be a shopper’s best friend. Not only is the food prepared fresh daily, but the prices are more reasonable than dining out—plus, you can eat at the store or take it home. We talked with two deli managers, Sandy Greiff of Super One Foods, and Stefhanie Meyers of Winter Ridge Natural Foods, to learn more about what these popular Sandpoint delis have to offer.

Stefhanie Meyers

Sandy Greiff

What’s an average day like in the deli?

Where do I begin on an average day at Winter Ridge? I usually work an 11- to 12-hour day, and I’m here by 9 a.m. It’s nonstop 100 percent, it’s constant food movement, constant food production, constant protein cutting.

I’m here from 6:30 in the morning until 3. This is a busy, busy place. We have biscuits and gravy in the morning, and we have high school kids and workers come in, and it’s only 99 cents. So we have a huge breakfast crowd every day.

What’s the most popular item in the deli?

The most popular area is the salad bar, because it’s organic and it’s a complete fresh selection on a daily basis.

Hands down it’s the chicken—our fried chicken and the rotisserie chicken. There are some evenings that we simply cannot keep it in the case. We hear that we have the best fried chicken in town.

How do you know how much to cook and prepare?

When I come in, my mindset is that by the time I leave the building, all of the pans have to be filled. The amount of food I work on preparing is about 600 pounds of food a day, and that’s food to be cooked, not the salad bar.

I’ve been here long enough to know how the seasons go, and the difference between summer and winter is definitely different. It becomes a pretty good guessing game, and knowing what sells. Thursday nights are busy, and Fridays and Saturdays.

What do the ‘regulars’ order?

The sandwiches off of our grill are very popular. Our Banh Mi and the grilled cheese are our top sellers. We are changing menus the third week of November, so there will be more grill selections coming.

Biscuits and gravy, coffee, we have our morning guys. And it’s the 8-piece chicken in the afternoon.

What’s your best advice for ordering at the deli?

We do take phone-in orders, which a lot of people don’t know. All of us work together as one big unit, and one of us will step out to help somebody.

Try a little bit of everything, and we’re really good at offering samples. We want all of our customers to sample when we bring in new salads, we just want everybody to try it. We think it’s all good.

What do you love most about working in the deli?

The integrity around the food that this company chooses to purchase on a daily basis. It’s unusual, as a chef, to be able to work with 100 percent organic ingredients. To be able to work with companies whose employees are paid sustainable wages, they’re functioning under proper labor practices, they’re not using GMOs or antibiotics. That’s food integrity to me.

I love my customers, it’s a great company to work for, but I love my crew. Coming in every day and working with my crew— we all have a great rapport and get along really well. It’s fun, and we get busy here. I’m so thankful to have them behind me and have them working so hard every day.

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Sandpoint’s

beer scene

is hopping NEW BREWERIES ARE TALK OF THE TOWN by Beth Hawkins

Raise your glasses, beer fans! Sandpoint has two new places for you to enjoy hometown suds with this year’s openings of Matchwood Brewing, 513 Oak St. in the Granary District, and Utara Brewing in downtown Sandpoint, 214 Pine St. Both are newcomers to town, adding their unique spin on brews to the notable craft beer of Laughing Dog and MickDuffs. 122

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utara+ match

M

wood

ATCHWOOD BREWING, owned by Andrea Marcoccio and Kennden Culp, opened its doors in October in a renovated 5,000-square-foot building.

The sprawling space houses Matchwood’s state-of-the-art brewery production equipment, and features an open seating area, walk-up window for lunch and dinner orders, an outdoor patio with covered and open seating, as well as a large indoor bar made from western white pine—a nod to the brewery’s namesake, the early 1900s Matchwood area north of Sandpoint, where matchstick production took place. The brewery offers six of its own beers on tap, with plans to add more. “We offer two light beers, two malty beers, and two IPAs,” said Culp, who mentions there are also growlers and crowlers—32-ounce aluminum cans filled at the brewery—available for take-out.

PHOTO BY FIONA HICKS

PHOTO BY DOUG MARSHALL

ABOVE RIGHT: UTARA’S WOODEN TAPS. LEFT AND ABOVE: MATCHWOOD BREWING’S OPENING NIGHT.

On the food side of the business, Matchwood aims for a casual dining approach. “The experience we’re trying to create is an indoor, year-round food truck,” Marcoccio said. “You order at the window, kind of like Joel’s or Spud’s, those folks that have led the way. The concept is simple and affordable meals.” Matchwood’s signature item is homemade pasties, which are hand-held pies filled with hearty ingredients such as beef, chicken, or vegetables. “We wanted to do a working person’s meal. You can have a high-quality, handcrafted beer and a meal that’s substantial and comfortable,” she said. In addition, there are shareable appetizers, salads, burgers, and a kids’ menu. The couple envisions the building as more than just a brewery: they added a community room space upstairs that’s open for reservations so local groups can hold meetings, or friends can gather WINTER 2019 | SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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PHOTO BY FIONA HICKS

utara

mickduffs

laughing dog

ABOVE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: INSIDE UTARA; LAUGHING DOG TAPS; A HAPPY CREW AT MICKDUFF’S’; OPPOSITE PAGE: EICHARDT’S ‘RETIRED’ TAPS SHOW VARIETY; TOASTING THE TASTY BREWS AT SKÅL TAP ROOM IN PONDERAY.

for a large party. “We’re dubbing this a neighborhood brewery that connects to all that downtown has to offer, but also offers walkability and the vibe that’s entrenched in the community,” said Marcoccio. She gives a big tip of her hat to the building’s owners, Steve Holt and John Edwards: “They had a vision for this space, and we all worked together to build the building. It’s been a cool partnership.” Just a few blocks over in the former Lightning Lube, UTARA BREWING opened this past June following a year of renovations on the 2,100-square-foot shop. Owners David Kosiba and Christina Stecher embraced the 1908 building’s industrial vibe, retaining some of its gritty past while incorporating modern elements. “People pay a lot of money for this, and we had it going on to begin with,” Kosiba said with a laugh. That includes the original concrete floor, which is now patched up to cover the underground car servicing pit. “I had to argue with my contractors,” he said. “They wanted to make this floor look all new. But it’s the alligator pit!” Stecher adds, “We worked with it rather than against it. It’s our nod to Lightning Lube.” Kosiba utilized his extensive background in brewing (including three years as head brewer at Laughing Dog Brewing) in starting Utara;

he also worked at Kochava next door and now considers himself the company’s “VP of Hydration.” The couple describes Utara, which in Hindi means ‘north,’ as a British pub-meets-curry house where patrons can find four to five of their core beers on tap at all times, as well as Rathdrum’s Westwood beers (the brewery has a rotating proprietorship with Utara). They also have growlers available for take-home, and beer cocktails that provide a “new beer experience.” On the food side of the business, Utara serves Indian-inspired appetizers such as samosas—triangular-shaped pastries filled with potatoes, peas, and spices—that come with a dipping sauce, and will be adding curry lunches by Thanksgiving. In the summer and on warmer days, Utara opens the large garage bay doors to expand the space. And there are plans to fence in and greenify the backyard as a live music venue next spring. Matchwood and Utara have joined a Sandpoint brewery scene that has long been notable for hometown breweries MickDuff’s and Laughing Dog. MICKDUFF’S BREWING COMPANY, with a brewpub at 312 N. First Ave. and a beer hall at 220 Cedar St., has been brewing local

Serving Breakfast and Lunch Daily. extensive draft beer selection rotating wine list mon-sat 12pm-10pm 301 Cedar St. Suite 102 208.265.PORK 124

Espresso • Beer/Wine • WiFi

Open Daily at 6 A.M. 208 N. 4th Avenue • Sandpoint, ID

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102 N 1st Ave, Sandpoint 208-265-4311 Spudsonline.com


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Could we be No. 1? eichardt’s beer since 2006. MickDuff’s Brewpub continues to draw in crowds with their savory fare, including the popular French tri-tip served on a housemade roll. Regulars to the brewpub will be happy to learn about weekly dinner specials this winter. The nearby beer hall is a regular gathering place that’s upping its entertainment offerings with live music every Friday and Saturday night. MickDuff’s stays on top of the beer trends. “In the last two years, we’ve really amped up the new stuff we’re doing,” said Mack Deibel, assistant brewer, touting the upcoming limited release of a dark Imperial cherry stout and a sour series to culminate in spring with a sour blood orange saison. “And if you love hops, you can count on us to release a hazy, New England-style IPA. They’re really good.” Deibel is most excited about MickDuff’s lagers. “We’ll be known for the great lagers we’ve been pumping out for the past two years. We just came out with a Fall Fest lager that was totally awesome!” The brewery is hosting a North Idaho summit for Idaho Brewers United, and will work on a Benefit Beer around Christmastime as a fundraiser for the trade guild. “It’s an allIdaho collaboration beer,” Deibel said. LAUGHING DOG BREWING, which started in 2005, is the oldest-running brewery in the area with its production facility and taproom located in Ponderay at 805 Schweitzer Plaza Dr. Featuring 12 beers on tap, the company keeps cranking out triedand-true favorites including their Pecan Porter, on tap now, the Dogfather release in late November, as well as the Anubis porter

skål taproom made with Evans Brothers coffee. They also host live music on Saturdays for laid-back afternoons. With Sandpoint’s two new breweries on board, is there room for everyone to make a go of it? Laughing Dog’s Michelle Sivertson believes there’s a place for all four breweries, and is excited about the possibilities. “When you add new breweries in a small town, you become a destination,” she said. “We’re hoping to create synergy between the breweries.” Matchwood’s Marcoccio concurs. “As far as other breweries in town, we see beer as ‘it floats all boats.’ As a beer drinker myself, I don’t go only to one place. I go around town and experience different beers. We’re excited to be a beer town.” MickDuff’s Deibel acknowledges the new breweries will make an impact, but he’s an optimist, not only about the future, but the present, as well. “There are definitely thoughts out there that Sandpoint can grow as a beer destination, and I guess we’ll find out. But in our eyes, it already is.” And Utara’s Kosiba shares in the good vibes. “I can love the light lager I had at MickDuff’s last night, and then come here and enjoy our tangerine pale ale. We can love them all.” For a final note on the subject of beer and where to drink it: EICHARDT’S PUB at 212 Cedar St., doesn’t brew, but has featured an expansive selection of microbrews for more than 20 years. An excellent and varied food menu and frequent live music has long made Eichardt’s a favorite of locals and visitors. Another notable stop for a beer

le ebratin

C American Bistro Breakfast & Lunch Locally Made Gifts

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20 z Years z

With four craft breweries in a town of barely 8,300 souls, it begs the question: Who in the whole country has more locally brewed beer per capita? Just possibly, no one. Forbes magazine reported that Portland, Maine—with 17 microbreweries and a population of 67,000—had an equivalent of 25.5 breweries per 100,000 people, the highest rate per capita of any city in the country. That calculates out to one brewery for every 3,941 residents. Which means it’s not even close: Sandpoint now has one brewery for each 2,075 residents, or the equivalent of 48.2 breweries per 100,000. This chart is from 2016 so the numbers may have changed. But until we hear otherwise, we’ll drink to being number one! Chart source: www.sptmag.com/forbes

tour is SKåL TAPROOM, on Highway 95 in Ponderay, where you’ll find six varieties of beer on tap plus tempting small plates for the hungry. Two more hot spots are the Idaho Pour Authority and 219 Lounge. As we say, the more the merrier!

SINCE 1994

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FROM LEFT: FORTY ONE SOUTH DINNER; POKE TACOS FROM SWEET LOU’S; THE FAT PIG’S BELLY BITS; FISH TACOS AT SKY HOUSE

PHOTO BY DOUG MARSHALL

The Local

JALAPENO’S, 314 N. Second Ave., recently celebrated their 25th anniversary of serving delicious Mexican food to the Sandpoint community—but that doesn’t mean the well-established restaurant isn’t afraid to roll out inventive new items. Check out the appetizer menu for two must-try additions, starting with deep-fried avocados. “They’re ridiculously good!” said Jalapeno’s owner Dave Vermeer. “We take avocado slices and hand-dip them to order in a Dos Equis XX Amber beer batter, then they’re deep fried and served with our house-made spicy ranch dip.” Another new appetizer on the menu is Mexican chicken wings, with two variations to choose from: one is a wet preparation that’s made with a spicy red chili sauce, another is a dry wing dusted with seasoning. Both are served with blue cheese dipping sauce. The SKåL (Norwegian for “cheers”) TAP ROOM, attached to Sandpoint Sports on Highway 95 in Ponderay, has six beers on tap, a variety of wines, as well as cocktails in a can. SKåL also offers customers the option to add brain power (aka Axio Energy Drink) to any of their beverages. If you’re hungry, SKåL serves small plates featuring smoked salmon from The Fish Company with a variety of accompaniments such as olives and cheese along

with crackers. And who knew this convenient location is the in-town source for Pack River Store’s fantastic food? Options are limited, but popular go-tos include the take-and-bake lasagna and chicken pot pie. And when Schweitzer Mountain Resort is open for the season, check out SKåL’s après ski scene from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays with beer specials and appetizers on Fridays and Saturdays. New on the menu at SWEET LOU’S, 477272 Highway 95 in Ponderay, and also their downtown Coeur d’Alene location, is a poke appetizer—made with Ahi tuna and avocado that’s tossed in Sweet Lou’s signature poke sauce and served with toasted pita bread—as well as poke tacos. Poke is a term for raw fish that’s chopped and marinated, and is one of the main dishes of native Hawaiian cuisine. “Last spring break we took a trip to Hawaii and couldn’t get enough of the poke,” said Meggie Foust, who co-owns the two restaurants with her husband Chad. When the couple returned home from vacation, they started studying recipes. “We tried several options and came up with our own version.” In addition to the poke tacos, Sweet Lou’s dishes up mouthwatering mahi tacos that are served over coleslaw with a cilantro lime aioli, and tri-tip tacos

D O W N S TA I R S F R O M B A X T E R S

sushi & Japanese cuisine LI V E MUSI C E V E R Y F R I DAY OPEN DAILY 11AM-8PM photo by Mike Albans

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open wed-sun

shogasushi.com//208 265 2001

41 Lakeshore Drive, Sagle, Idaho 83860

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WINE • CRAFT BEERS • TAPAS SANDPOINT, ID • 208.610.7359

111 CEDAR ST. LOWER LEVEL www.ba xtersbackdoor.com


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Natural beer, food & fun!

dish

topped with homemade guacamole and sauteed onions. SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN RESORT is taking the culinary experience to new heights with executive chef Jordan Hansen at the helm. Hansen has added some new folks to the team, and is fine-tuning menus all over the resort. At the fabulous top-of-the-mountain SKY HOUSE, one new offering is the House Bacon small plate, served with arugula, red pepper confit, and black pepper. Another addition that’s aimed at feeding hearty appetites is the prime rib sandwich (offered daily, but only while it lasts!) featuring meat that’s roasted and smoked overnight, and served with a housemade steak sauce and horseradish cream. In the village at GOURMANDIE, new items include a chocolate sampler plate, flatbreads, and local huckleberry products. Keeping on the sweet side of things, SAM’S ALLEY PIZZA will add a dessert pizza to its popular lineup. Hansen is a proponent of buying local, and is implementing that philosophy into the Schweitzer dining scene. “As for the mountain overall, we are looking into making some moves to do our part supporting responsibly managed and grown beef for the whole mountain,” said Hansen. “We are also making a transition into using a local company

Come visit us today at one of our two locations: Family Friendly Brewpub

312 N First Ave.

Beer Hall & Brewery

220 Cedar St.

MickDuffs.com

Rice crusts & soy cheese now available “Out of this W orld”

•Delivery •Sandwiches •Calzones •Specialty Salads •Homemade Dough •Beer/Wine •Take & Bakes

The Carolyn

215S. 2nd Ave.

263-9321 W I N T E R 2 0 1 9 | S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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Serving dinner 7 nights a week Reservations Recommended

208.265.2000

41 Lakeshore Drive, Sagle www.41SouthSandpoint.com

Local Natural Delicious

Winter Ridge Natural Foods is your onestop-shop to support your healthy lifestyle. Organic Produce Salad Bar Deli Hot Food Bar Local Grass-Fed Meats and Dairy Extensive Wellness and Beauty Departments Exclusive Wines and Cheeses Beer and Kombucha on Tap Robust Bulk Items Healthy On-The-Go Foods And So Much More.

703 Lake Street at Boyer St Sandpoint, ID 128

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(208) 265-8135 www.WinterRidgeFoods.com

out of Spokane for our dry spice needs.” Known for their great breakfasts and mimosas, DI LUNA’S CAFE, 207 Cedar St., has added some winter warmers to their lunch menu. The Di Lunatic Burger (for those who dare!) is made with locally raised beef, habanero pepper jelly, pepperjack cheese, and pepper bacon. Trust us, you’ll be wanting to wash it down with a pint of microbrew! On the lighter side, try a turkey panini with cranberries and Swiss cheese. There’s something to be said for simple deliciousness. In a nod to northern Idaho’s four distinct seasons, FORTY ONE SOUTH, 41 Lakeshore Dr. in Sagle, now rotates their menu four times a year. The winter menu, which starts in mid-December and runs through March, features more comfort food—perfect for a hearty meal after a fun day on the slopes— and includes the Buffalo Meatloaf and Chicken Cordon Bleu (back by popular demand)! For folks who are interested in a more casual dining experience, Forty One South recommends seating in the more casual lounge to snack on a few tasty appetizers such as the warm goat cheese with dried cherry balsamic jam and grilled baguette, or the house-smoked trout plate. THE FAT PIG, located downtown at 301 Cedar St., is excited to be rolling out their new seasonal winter menu including some delicious additions to their popular snacks menu. Rustle up your friends and nibble on the sweet and spicy belly bits—crispy pork belly that’s tossed in a honey sriracha sauce, topped with microgreens, and accompanied with pickled cucumbers. Another fabulous cold-weather warmer is the bruleed bleu, featuring gorgonzola cheese that’s torched with raw sugar, and served with cherry-shallot jam, fruit, and crostini. And right next door, PEND D’OREILLE WINERY co-owners Kylie Presta and Jim Bopp were in the final weeks of the 2018 grape crush and harvest season (as of press time). “We’re excited to release our first vintage as new owners of the winery,” Presta said. In addition, the winery is ramping up festive events as the holiday season approaches. “The tasting room will continue to offer live music on Fridays, piano Sundays, and monthly trivia and paint-and-sip events,” she said. The gift shop will be stocked with lots of new gift items, including decor for the home and also the wine lover. On the food side, Pend d’Oreille Winery


E ATS + D R I N KS

U TA R A

SALMON AT TRINITY AT CITY BEACH

JALAPENO’S DEEP-FRIED AVOCADOS

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offers several cheese plates and will be adding daily soup specials to the menu. Skiers at Schweitzer Mountain Resort who stop by after a day on the slopes can enjoy wine and soup specials when they show their pass. As a special Christmastime treat, pianist Bob Beadling will be playing holiday music December 23, and the winery will have cookies, hot cocoa, and wine specials for all to enjoy. Happy holidays!

EWI

NG COMPA

NY

BRITISH-STYLE ALE AND CURRY HOUSE 214 Pine St • (208) 627-5070

T WO G R E AT BU S I N E S S E S

WHERE

Skis, Bikes & Beer collide Located in Ponderay next to Taco Bell 476930 Hwy 95 • (208) 265-6163

NEWLY EXPANDED STORE & DINING AREA

Breads Scones Pastries Cookies Pies Cinnamon Rolls Coffee Teas Canned Goods Spices Beans Rice Pasta Flour Nuts Dried Fruit Christian Books Housewares Hours:

M-F 8:30-5:30 Join us on

1326 Baldy Mtn. Rd. Sandpoint, ID 83864 . www.MillersCountryStoreSandpoint.com 208-263-9446 WINTER 2019 | SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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Downtown sandpoint dining map eats+ DRINKS

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ND

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Pend dʼOreille Bay Trail

SA

Larch

EE

K

Fir Healing Garden

Poplar

Bonner General Health

Alder

Main

\

To Dover Priest River

S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E | W I N T E R 2 0 1 9

d

oPanida

Theater

Bridge St.

q

y City Beach

r

Pine St. Lake St.

Cedar St. Bridge

First Ave.

Main

S. Second Ave.

7

Second Ave.

5

Town Square

Third Ave. PARKING

Fifth Ave.

2

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a6 0 p8 i =

Farmin Park

Boyer

Pine

u

Cedar St.

LAKE PEND OREILLE

Sand Creek Byway

Visitor Center

Church

Division

Elks Golf Course

3

Oak

130

[

Bonner Mall

Baldy Mountain Rd.

Cedar

dUtara Brewing Co.

To Hope Clark Fork

Kootenai Cut-off Rd

s

Fourth Ave.

sSkål Taproom

t

Schweitzer Cut-off Rd

To Schweitzer

S. Fourth Ave.

1Davis Grocery & Mercantile 2Evans Brothers Coffee 3Miller’s Country Store & Deli 4Mojo Coyote at Schweitzer 5Monarch Mountain Coffee 6Uptown Bagel Co. 7Winter Ridge Natural Foods 8Baxters on Cedar 9Chimney Rock at Schweitzer 0Di Luna’s Café -Forty One South =Jalapeño’s Restaurant qSecond Avenue Pizza wShoga @ Forty One South eSky House at Schweitzer rSpuds Waterfront Grill tSweet Lou’s yTrinity at City Beach uEichardt’s Pub & Grill iThe Fat Pig oMickDuff’s Brewing Co. Brewpub pThe Back Door [Laughing Dog Brewing ]Matchwood Brewing Co. \MickDuff’s Brewing Co. Beer Hall & Brewery aPend d’Oreille Winery

1

To Bonners Ferry Canada

Map not to scale!

Marina

wTo Sagle

Coeur d’Alene


D I N I N G G U I DE

The PHOTOS ABOVE FROM LEFT: FISH TACOS AT JALAPENOS, POKE AT SWEET LOU’S AND FORTY ONE SOUTH BURGER

Bakeries, Coffee, Delis & Cafés Sandpoint has quite the selection of custom coffee roasters and scrumptious pastry choices. Locate by number on map.

1Davis Grocery & Mercantile 620 Wellington Pl., Hope. Café and coffee shop with fresh-made pastries, sandwiches, and gluten-free options. Full-service grocery store opens in November, supplying local produce and handcrafted goods to the Hope community. 208-264-0539

2Evans Brothers Coffee

524 Church St. Located in downtown Sandpoint’s historic Granary Arts District. Enjoy exceptional coffees and espresso, including the popular Headwall Espresso Blend. Locally baked pastries, breakfast burritos, and more. A second location is located in Coeur d’Alene. 208-265-5553

3Miller’s Country Store & Deli

1326 Baldy Mountain Rd. Wholesome goodness with a selection of fine deli meats and cheeses, bulk food items, pie fillings, and delicious fresh-baked pies, breads and pastries— plus soup and sandwiches, and take-home dinners. Inside and outside seating. Open Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 208-263-9446

4Mojo Coyote at Schweitzer 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. Enjoy a fresh Evans Brothers espresso and treat your sweet tooth to a warm scone. Freshbaked pastries, breakfast burritos and lunch specials. Fine selection of beer and wine. 208-255-3037

5Monarch mountain coffee 208 N. Fourth Ave. Open at 6 a.m. daily and roasting top-grade beans. Treat yourself to a classic or custom delight from the Espresso Bar, a cup of premium brewed coffee or tea. Baked goods, breakfast burritos, and specials. 208-255-3037

6Uptown Bagel Co.

301 Cedar St., Ste. 105 (access from Third Avenue). Fresh-made breakfast and lunch bagelwiches made with authentic New York bagels. Plus, there are side salads and desserts to round out a delicious meal. “Choose happy!” Monday through Saturday, 7 a.m. to 2 p.m.

7Winter Ridge Natural Foods 703 Lake St. Natural foods grocery store with in-house deli, bakery, meat department, organic produce, and hot food bar with indoor seating. Open Monday through Saturday, 7 a.m. to 9 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. 208-265-8135

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+

eats

DRINKS

Eclectic / Ethnic / Fine Dining

qSecond Avenue Pizza 215 S. Second Ave. Savor the piled-high specialty pizzas, loaded with fresh ingredients on homemade dough, or calzones, specialty salads, and sandwiches. Glutenfree choices. Beer and wine, take-andbake pizzas available. Free delivery; open daily. 208-263-9321

No matter what type of food you’re craving, Sandpoint restaurants can feed your desires, from sushi to curries to Mexican and more.

8Baxters on Cedar 109 Cedar St. Open Monday through Saturday, serving lunch from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., happy hour 3 p.m. until 5 p.m., and dinner 5 p.m. until 9 p.m. Daily specials, fresh local products. From steaks and chops to halfpound burgers, great salads, and Baxters’ signature Key Lime pie. 208-229-8377

9Chimney Rock at Schweitzer

wShoga @ Forty One South 41 Lakeshore Dr., Sagle. Premier sushi restaurant adjacent to Forty One South. Sushi bar and magnificent sunset views overlooking Lake Pend Oreille. Plenty of non-sushi entrees as well. Open for dinner Wednesday through Sunday. 208-265-2001

eSky House at Schweitzer 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. Ride the chairlift to the Sky House at the summit for a lunch experience unlike any other. Featuring a chef-inspired menu from locally sourced, farm-fresh ingredients. Open during lift hours. 208-263-9555. www.schweitzer.com

10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. Fireplaces, comfortable seating in the bar, and diverse cuisine. Enjoy an extensive menu including high-quality steaks, hearty pasta, scrumptious salads, and exquisite seafood. Open daily inside the Selkirk Lodge at Schweitzer. 208-255-3071

0Di Luna’s Café 207 Cedar St. American bistro cafe offering regional, sustainable foods including hand-cut steaks, homemade soups and vegetarian cuisine. Check out their dinner concerts, posted online at www.DiLunas. com. Open Wednesday through Sunday for breakfast and lunch. 208-263-0846

-Forty One South 41 Lakeshore Dr., Sagle, at the south end of the Long Bridge. Waterfront dining in an elegant lodge setting; exquisite service paired with innovative cuisine make for one of North Idaho’s premier dining experiences. Open 7 nights a week for dinner. 208-265-2000

=Jalapeño’s Restaurant 314 N. Second Ave. A Sandpoint favorite for over 25 years offering both traditional and Americanized Mexican dishes in a fun, family-friendly atmosphere. Full bar, patio seating, banquet facilities, gluten-free menu, quick to-go menu, indoor waterfall and fish tank. 208-263-2995 132

S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E | W I N T E R 2 0 1 9

rSpuds Waterfront Grill 102 N. First Ave. On Sand Creek overlooking the marina. Spuds creates everything from scratch; from every dressing, sauce and soup, to baked potatoes, loaded salads, sandwiches, and desserts. Serving breakfast and lunch daily; a landmark restaurant in Sandpoint since 1995. 208-265-4311

tSweet Lou’s

477272 U.S. Highway 95 in Ponderay. Open every day, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Terrific traditional and regional fare. Serving handcut steaks, freshly ground burgers, wild salmon and smoked ribs. Family-friendly environment. Full bar. A second location is open in Coeur d’Alene. 208-263-1381

yTrinity at City Beach 58 Bridge St. Enjoy breakfast, lunch, and dinner on the shore of Lake Pend Oreille. Waterfront dining with an outstanding view and menu featuring seafood, steaks, salads, and appetizers; great selection of wine, beer and cocktails. Open seven days a week. 208-255-7558


D I N I N G G U I DE

[Laughing Dog Brewing

PUB STYLE From a beer and a burger to a glass of wine paired with a scrumptious dessert, Sandpoint’s got pub-style down to a “T.”

uEichardt’s Pub & Grill

iThe Fat Pig

212 Cedar St. Relaxing pub and grill mixes casual dining with seriously good food. Completely family friendly. More than a dozen beers on tap, good wines, and live music. Upstairs game room with fireplace. Locally supported and nationally recognized since 1994. Open daily at 11:30 a.m. 208-263-4005

301 Cedar St. Suite 102. Open Monday through Saturday. Serving lunch and dinner. Enjoy an extensive draft beer selection in a warm pub environment with a rotating wine list. Refreshing twists on classic pub fare with a complete vegetarian menu. Call for reservations: 208-265-PORK (7675)

oMickDuff’s Brewing Co. Brewpub 312 N. First Ave. Handcrafted ales in a family-friendly downtown atmosphere, natural ales and root beer. Menu includes traditional and updated pub fare—gourmet hamburgers, sandwiches, and handcrafted soups. Open Sunday through Thursday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., Friday and Saturday 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. 208-255-4351

Wineries / Breweries / Bars Sandpoint’s brew scene is growing with four craft breweries in town; add to that our award-winning winery plus our hopping bars and there’s plenty of places for a drink and a bite.

pThe Back Door

Downstairs at 111 Cedar St. It feels like you’re going into a speakeasy from the prohibition years; a warm and intimate space featuring wines and craft beers along with burgers and small plates. Open at 3 p.m., seven days a week. www. BaxtersBackDoor.com.

805 Schweitzer Plaza Dr., Ponderay. The dog-friendly taproom is open and offers a variety of beers. Stop by and taste the delicious huckleberry cream ale, and a wide selection of beers on tap. www. LaughingDogBrewing.com. 208-263-9222

]Matchwood Brewing Co. 513 Oak St. in the Granary District. Experience Sandpoint’s newest brewery featuring six beers on tap, fresh-made pasties, appetizers, burgers, and more. Indoor and outdoor seating; community room upstairs is great for large gatherings. 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., 7 days a week. 208-718-2739

\MickDuff’s Brewing Co. Beer Hall & Brewery 220 Cedar St. Brewery tasting room boasts 10 taps, local bar art, free popcorn and weekly entertainment. Beer Hall is BYOF (Bring Your Own Food)-friendly and has a beer for every taste. Ages 21 and older. 208209-6700

aPend d’Oreille Winery 301 Cedar St. Locally made wines, tasting room and gift shop in the renovated and historic Belwood 301 Building. Open daily from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. 208-265-8545

sSkål Taproom 476930 Highway 95, Ponderay. Six beers on tap, wine, cider, hard kombucha, and water spirits. Occasional live music. Open Sundays and Tuesdays noon to 6 p.m., Wednesdays through Saturdays from noon to 8 p.m., closed Mondays. www. SandpointSports-SkalTaproom.com.

dUtara Brewing Co.

214 Pine St. An ale and curry house, located in the former Lightning Lube building in the heart of downtown Sandpoint. Features handcrafted beer paired with Anglo-Indian cuisine. Stop by and experience this all-new Sandpoint brewery. 208255-2453

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advertiser index 7B TV Hesstronics A Glass Act

66 108

Albertson Barlow Insurance 100

All Seasons Garden & Floral 39 Alpine Shop 47 Alpine Shop 56 Ameriprise Financial 110 ArtWorks Gallery 39 Barry Fisher Custom Homes 101 Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) 58 Boden Architecture 102 Bonner County Fair 21 Bonner General Health 62 Century 21/Riverstone Company 29 Co-Op Energy 26 Coeur d’Alene Casino 87 Community Assistance League Bizarre Bazaar 99 Connie Scherr Artist 39 Dan Fogarty Builder 57, 108 Dana Construction 71 Davis Grocery & Mercantile 120 DiLuna’s 125 DM Vacation Rentals 5 Dover Bay 30 ELTC Law Group 16 Evans Brothers Coffee 127 Eve’s Leaves 18 Evergreen Realty 6

Evergreen Realty Charesse Moore 34 Festival at Sandpoint 113 Fogarty Construction 108 Forty-One South 128 Greasy Fingers Bikes 34 Guaranteed Rate 107 Hallans Gallery 39 Hernandez Condo 69 Hippie Chic 110 Holiday Inn Express 117 International Selkirk Loop 113 Jalapenos 2 Keokee :: media + marketing 108 Keokee Books 134 KPND Radio 32 KRFY Radio 113 Lakeside Medicine 17 LaQuinta Inn 18 Laughing Dog Brewing 19 Lewis and Hawn 23 Lewis and Hawn Sleep Solutions 35 The Local Pages 114 Matchwood Brewing Company 127 Mickduff’s Brewing Company 127 Miller’s Country Store 110, 129 Monarch Marble & Granite 94 Mountain West Bank 43 North 40 Outfitters 3 Northern Lights 53

Northern Quest Resort Casino Inside Back Cover Northwest Autobody 55 Northwest Handmade 73 Panhandle Special Needs 112 Pend Oreille Shores Resort 43 The Reader 114 Realm Realty 11 Realm Realty Seasons at Sandpoint 14 Remax in Action 9 ReStore Habitat For Humanity 99 Rock Creek Alliance 65 Sand Creek Lofts at Sandpoint Marina 105 Sandpoint Building Supply 106 Sandpoint Business & Events Center 48 Sandpoint Movers 111, 118 Sandpoint Online 135 Sandpoint Optometry 55 Sandpoint Storage 112 Sandpoint Super Drug 22 Sandpoint Waldorf School 34 Schweitzer Mountain Resort Back Cover

Selkirk Craftsman Furniture 54 Selkirk Glass & Cabinets 96 Selkirk Powder Company 60 Selle Valley Construction 4 Signature Aesthetics 91 Skeleton Key Art Glass 39 Skywalker Tree Care 54 Super 1 Foods 46 Sweet Lou’s Restaurant and Bar 33 Taylor Insurance 25 Timberframes by Collin Beggs 95, 108 Ting 50 Tomlinson Sandpoint Sotheby’s Cindy Bond Inside Front Cover Tomlinson Sandpoint Sotheby’s Realtors 100 Tomlinson Sotheby’s Chris Chambers 1 Trinity at City Beach 2 Wildflower Day Spa 24 Willamette Valley Bank Becky Farmin 19 Winter Ridge Natural Foods 128

ADVERTISING INFORMATION

Get current rate sheet at www.SandpointMagazine.com Sales Director Clint Nicholson 208-263-3573 ext. 123 or email: clint@keokee.com

Go Exploring with Keokee Guide Books www.KeokeeBooks.com NEW D E ITION

$26

134

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D I N I N G G U I DE

marketplace

Your Buick, GMC truck dealer. New and used sales and leasing. Full service, parts and body shop. Highway 95 N., Ponderay, 208-263-2118, 1-800-430-5050. www.AlpineMotors.net

The Center for Functional Nutrition offers a full line of clinical nutrition products including Klaire, Thorne, Pure, Ortho Molecular, and Apex. 604 N. 5th Avenue.

CB Tans & Lashes is your premier source for sunless tanning and eyelash extensions. NEW location at 204 E. Superior Ste. 8 (across from Verizon before the Long Bridge) 208.610.7612

Elite Tire & Suspension in Ponderay is your locally owned and trusted shop for tires, suspension work and alignment. 800 Kootenai Cutoff Rd. Ponderay, ID 83852 Call Bill or Kelsey at 208-265-3603 or online at www. elitetireandsuspension.com or follow us on Facebook.

Dreams in Beauty Day Spa. Massage, bodywork, facials, scrubs, wraps and make-up for weddings, film and photography. Located 4.5 miles from the center of Sandpoint on Shadow Mtn. Belle Ranch nestled under old growth trees, overlooking a natural spring pond. Electric lift table with skylights, view, A/C. Peggy Richards. 208-263-7270. www. dreamsinbeauty.com A marketing communications firm providing web design and hosting, search engine optimization and marketing, graphic design, public relations, editorial and media consultation. 405 Church St., 208-263-3573. www.keokee.com

Offering the latest books and novels, office supplies, machine supplies and free delivery in Sandpoint. Order online. 201 Cedar St., 208-263-2417. www.Vanderfords.com �

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Got something to sell? Looking for good deals, a place to rent, a job, a ride share ... or even looking for love? Post for free, or browse hundreds of ads in Sandpoint’s own version of Craigslist. Go to www.SandpointClassifieds.com.

Shop Sandpoint Go to www.shopsandpoint. com, for local web links to trusted services, merchants, artists, craftspeople, farmers and green building. Write your own reviews in the new SandpointBlog. Fun reading, recycling, and more!

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SVR is a full-service property management company with 12 years of experience. Offering vacation rental properties and long-term rentals in Sandpoint and surrounding areas, including waterfront homes, lakefront condos, Schweitzer Mountain vacation rentals, homes at the Idaho Club, and many other rental properties. 208-263-7570 or 866-263-7570 www.SandpointVacationRentals.com

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Sandpoint Community Resource Center provides an extensive website offering information about how to receive help in areas as diverse as healthcare, housing, utilities, and clothing, while also connecting those who want to help with groups in need of volunteers. There is even an option to register your organization’s need for volunteer support. Learn more about it at www.sandpointcommunityresource.com 208-920-1840. 9 of 155

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Special gifts for special people. Vera Bradley bags, Big Sky Carvers, Baggallini, Tyler and BeanPod candles, souvenirs, balloon bouquets, Hallmark cards, books, gift wrap, stationery. Visit us downtown at 306 N. First Ave., 208-263-2811.

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sandpoint of view

LEAVE, AND YOU REALIZE IT’S BETTER HERE THAN ANYWHERE ELSE by Gary Lirette

GARY LIRETTE HAS DONE A LITTLE BIT OF EVERYTHING IN HIS 20 YEARS IN SANDPOINT, FROM RADIO WORK TO DONUT SHOP OWNER (WALKER’S DONUTS) TO WINE SELLER TO BUSINESS EQUIPMENT REPAIR. IT CAN BE DIFFICULT TO MAKE A LIVING HERE BUT, HE SAYS, IT’S MORE DIFFICULT TO LEAVE.

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There’s No Place Like

sandpoint

L

eaving Sandpoint for sophisticated Portland was an adventure, and yes, Portland is an amazing city. What I didn’t know was what I might be missing. Like my Ya Ya Sisters, and my neighbors who became friends, and my friends who became family. Surprisingly, I missed the snow, the seasons, the beauty of the lakes and mountains, but most of all, I missed the people. I missed hour-long stories from Ed Ostrom and Trish Gannon. I missed Marianne Love’s writings and the musings of Ben Stein. I grieved for Charlie Packard and lost youth the likes of Kaiti Brosh and Patrick Orton. Missing those lost loved ones reminded me of the incredible generosity of Bonner folk; every cause getting help and dollars, often from people who can ill afford it, and those same friends and neighbors appearing and offering to get rid of that big snow load on my roof … for free. I missed being able to walk a hundred yards any direction practically any day of the year and listen to live music. I felt lost without the events and happenings that pepper every month and place: the Follies, Lost in the ‘50s, Winter Carnival and the Festival at Sandpoint. I reminisced about Academy Award-winners meeting daily at Monarch Mountain Coffee, weaving tales and regaling at the world. I missed sharing recipes about pies with Heather from The Pie Hut, wondering where in the world would people be so humble as to have a master pie maker accept the musings of an amateur. I missed driving down country roads not seeing another soul, sometimes for hours, and along that road people wave, though you’ve clearly never met. Traffic was a vexing part of city living; many times, while inching forward in a two-hour commute, I would think of the Sandpoint versions of traffic malaise. When stuck for an extra 20 minutes on the Long Bridge, the view, at least, brought solace. Or being at a four-way stop where people would say, “You go.” “No, you go.” “No, that’s okay, I don’t have to be anywhere right now.” I yearned for the spectacular sunrises and sunsets of bonny Bonner, those vistas that Kirk Miller has taught us via Facebook are the best in the world. I would search, driving to the coast or distant mountains, but they just didn’t compare. The vistas we wake up with every day are amazing and in our own back yards. I missed the views and the spectacular scenery: Mickinnick and the Scotchman Trail 65, Gold Hill, and the view of the Roman Nose lakes from the summit. In any direction there is incredible natural beauty: the Beehive, the Pack River Flats, the Pend Oreille, dozens of waterfalls, and the Seven Sisters, and up there is the aurora borealis and millions of stars you just can’t see in the city. I had taken for granted being able to drive just 20 minutes to one of the world’s most beautiful ski resorts. Just how many places have that view of our majestic lake and lifts with no lines? Every day I was gone I missed all of this and so much more. Returning home was like being the prodigal son. Everyone gave warm greetings. They welcomed me home. Everyone knew where I had been, they knew my story. And guess what? I missed that, too. There’s no place on earth like Sandpoint. It’s good to be home.

S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E | W I N T E R 2 0 1 9


UNI

Whether you’re into gaming, fine dining and luxury cigars, or feel more like a burger, a movie and a massage, we’ve got it all. So treat yourself to the one-of-a-kind experience you can only find at Northern Quest. NORTHERNQUEST.COM | 877.871.6772 | SPOKANE, WA

UE


Sandpoint Magazine Winter 2019  

Our wild neighbors! Sandpoint, it can be said, is where the wild things are, and you can read some great information about a few of those wi...

Sandpoint Magazine Winter 2019  

Our wild neighbors! Sandpoint, it can be said, is where the wild things are, and you can read some great information about a few of those wi...