Sandpoint Magazine Winter 2008

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M A G A Z I N E

W I N T E R

SANDPOINT Schweitzer

Hurtles into the big time

INSIDE:

SANDPOINT

&

TRAVEL PLANNER

Artists in Love, Voices of the Pioneers, Charting Sandpoint’s Change, the Fathers of Friends, Eating Local, Virtual Sandpoint, ‘Winter Light’ Photo Essay, Calendars, Dining, Real Estate ... and more


Welcoming Families To North Idaho For Over 30 Years

A Name You Can Trust

R E S O RT R E A LT Y

Full Service Real Estate. 25 agents, 3 locations. Specializing in • waterfront • land • commercial • residential • farms & ranches • investment property SANDPOINT

202 SOUTH FIRST AVENUE PHONE: 208-263-6802 TOLL-FREE: 800-544-1855

BONNERS FERRY

6606 LINCOLN ST. PHONE 208-267-8575 TOLL-FREE: 866-375-8575

www.cbsandpoint.com

SCHWEITZER

155 VILLAGE LANE PHONE: 208-263-9460 TOLL-FREE: 866-673-2352


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Contact The Acreage Expert

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BIG GAME OUTFITTING BUSINESS Well-estab-

Perkins Lake Ranch in Moyie Springs Gorgeous 196 ± acre ranch surrounded by USFS on county-maintained road. Year-round springs, pond and creek with wildlife galore! Big house, big new cedar-sided horse barn and hay storage, older barn with silo, two large shops, caretaker quarters. High-volume spring feeds private pond, productive pastures and timber ground. VIEWS! $1,250,000 Beautiful 90 acres of pasture, timber on Deep Creek. 1997 alternative-energy home. Borders state land, has great views and is an easy walk to McArthur Lake and Wildlife Refuge. $575K

40-acre parcel in Vay area Borders large timber company land. Phone, power and easy access, great views, and a good spring that feeds a nice, little creek. $270K

Great farm with Hwy. 2 frontage features a nice, big, well-built 2004 home and shop on 20 acres, which is half fenced for nursery stock and borders 80 acres of public land. Only 6 miles to Bonners Ferry. $450K

20-acre parcel in Vay area Borders large timber company land. Phone, power and easy access, great views, and a good spring that feeds a nice, little creek. $155K

lished, successful big game and upland bird outfitting business. Operating in hunting unit 4A, Panhandle NF, aprox. 90,000 acres of hunting area. Cap rate is about 23%! High-profit business. Huge inventory of equip., supplies (negotiable). $295,000

20 acres in the Selle Valley with unbeatable panoramic views and just minutes to Sandpoint. Has nice timber, rock features, hill and small yearround creek. $310K

Cabin on 10 acres. Electric, phone and well on Upper Gold Creek on a county-maintained road. Property has good views of Selkirk and Cabinet mountains. $160K

21 ± acres, Selle Valley with awesome Lake Pend Oreille, Lost Lake, Selkirk and Cabinet mountain views. Close to Sandpoint, easy access, power and phone is very close, area of very nice estates. $235K Secondary waterfront lot with community water, sewer and deeded access to community beach and dock. Located on the sunny side of Bottle Bay with filtered lake views from the lot and great lake views all around. Beltane acres. $150K

For Land, Ranches and Homes with Acreage

Michael White, Realtor Coldwell Banker

BS Forest Resources & Ecosystem Management Experienced Forester, Rancher & Outfitter Specializing in Land, Ranches and Homes with Acreage 208.290.8599 • www.NorthIdahoLandMan.com

Resort Realty


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The Yellow House, by Vincent Van Gogh

W

hen we take your listing We take it to the world

© MMVII Sotheby’s International Realty %J½PMEXIW, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The Yellow House, © Van Gogh Museum/Superstock, Inc., used with permission. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty %J½PMEXIW, Inc. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity . )EGL 3J½GI -W -RHITIRHIRXly Owned And Operated.

Tomlinson Sandpoint Sotheby’s International Realty 200 Main Street Sandpoint, Idaho 83864 local 208.263.5101 toll free 1.800.282.6880 fax 208.263.3888 TomlinsonSandpointSothebysRealty.com


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Mindy Johnston

Susan Moon

Tiffany Baldwin

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Jim Watkins

Shelley A. Healy

Sue Brooks

Judith Ehlert

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Associate Broker, ABR,REALTOR®

GRI, REALTOR® REALTOR®

Cindy Bond

1:47 PM

REALTOR® John Herron

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Jeff Bond

REALTOR® ABR, RRS, REALTOR®, Waterfront Specialist

10/15/07

Sales Manager, Realtor®

ABR, GRI, Owner, Broker

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Kathy Tully

Tony Villelli

or the ongoing collection of life

Sandy Wolters

200 Main Street, Sandpoint, ID 83864 | Local (208) 263-5101 | Toll Free 1 (800) 282-6880 | www.TomlinsonSandpointSothebysRealty.com Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated


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Who, What and Why in Greater Sandpoint

Contents

SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

PHOTO BY DOUG MARSHALL

VOLUME 18, NO. 1

page 78

F E AT U R E S 78 Taking a Giant Leap

Cover story: Schweitzer Mountain Resort retires its firstborn chair and debuts two new ones in its place. PLUS: Bid farewell to Chair One, and meet Shep Snow, founder of the Independence Racing Team

40 Artful Marriages

Two couples put their creative efforts into their art and in the fine art of marriage

47 Cinematic Town

51 Pioneer Voices Collection of

excerpts from a book of oral histories capturing the ‘Pioneer Voices of Priest Lake’

54 Pull the Hook Sled dogs and

their mushers are thriving in northern Idaho, and one team is training for Iditarod

62 Boots Reynolds

An excerpt from ‘Boots ‘n’ Beans,’ an art book full of beans by the celebrated cowboy cartoonist

67 Changes in Sandpoint

Sandpoint is changing, and demographics paint the present and predict the future

Ben Olson chronicles the lives of five men who raised his generation with striking portraits

85 Winter Light

Photo essay featuring four full pages of dynamic images showing the effects of cool winter light

89 Dann and Hazel Hall

This mother and son are bound by photographic artistry. See images by both artists

95 Ice Fishing

Come winter, here’s how to beat the cold and get better fishing to boot

Scenery and Solitude 99 Skiers take refuge in Schweitzer’s Nordic trails. PLUS: Low-elevation Nordic havens

103 All-Local Diet

One woman makes a yearlong commitment to eating an all-local diet

107 Virtual Sandpoint

A guide to navigating Sandpoint’s Web sites and blogs

162 Winter Stargazing:

Last Page When the sky is cold and black, it’s breathtaking

D E PA R T M E N T S Almanac

12

Calendar

27

Interview

31

Jack and Dorothy Fowler, Schweitzer icons

Natives & Newcomers 109 Real Estate

114

Capturing the luxury lifestyle market

114

Kitchen designs for Sandpoint

120

Schweitzer’s Trappers Creek

125

Conservation easements

129

Travel Planner

135

Lodging

135

Eats & Drinks

144

Dining Guide

150

Serv ice s

155

WINTER 2008

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

www.sandpointonline.com

Film series, tours and a festival make for a theatrical spectacle at Panida Theater

72 My Friends’ Fathers

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Contributors e d i t o r ’s n o t e We have been calling 2007 the “Year of the Babies” at Keokee. The first designer, Jackie, announced in January that she was pregnant, and the following month the second designer, Laura, revealed that she, too, was expecting. The third designer is a man, so he’s not prone to the same condition. Then over the summer, our editorial assistant broke the same news: Amie is expecting in March. The first baby, Sage Glenn Lorien White, arrived Aug. 21. It’s no coincidence that the main color the Sandpoint Magazine designer chose for this issue is sage. Giving birth didn’t slow Laura down for long. She soon jumped into the magazine with both arms, or sometimes one arm when Sage was attached at the breast. This magazine, then, was produced with great joy and is dedicated to the child who inspired its dominant color. Welcome to the office, Sage. Meantime, Jackie gave birth on Sept. 16 to Sahalie Brook Oldfield. Mom and daughter are laying low in Post Falls now, where Jackie plans to work from home. We miss seeing her and her constant canine companion, Kujo, in the office. As for the editorial in this issue, I think our readers will enjoy the mix of see-in-action stories, art features, excerpts and personality profiles. My baby, this magazine, incubated for about three months from inception to birth on the printing press. I’m a proud mom, too. –B.J.P.

www.sandpointonline.com

On the cover: Photographer Cory Murdock is a newcomer who relocated from Lake Tahoe to lend his talents to Sandpoint. An action photography expert, he captured this image of an exchange student visiting from South America as she blasts down Hermit’s Hollow Tubing Center at Schweitzer; see story, page 78.

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Sandpoint Magazine is published twice yearly, in May and November, by Keokee Co. Publishing, Inc., P.O. Box 722, Sandpoint, ID 83864. E-mail: inbox@keokee.com Web: www.keokee.com Phone: (208) 263-3573 Publisher Chris Bessler Editor Billie Jean Plaster Editorial Assistant Amie Wolf Advertising Director Scott Johnson Account Executive Clint Nicholson Art Director Laura White Designer Dan Seward Administration Carole Eldridge Contributors Terri Casey, Sandy Compton, Cassandra Cridland, Susan Drinkard, Susan Drumheller, Trish Gannon, Cate Huisman, Keith Kinnaird, Marianne Love, Kathleen Mulroy, Diana Murdock, Ben Olson, Sherry Ramsey, Boots Reynolds, Carrie Scozzaro and Dianna Winget The entire contents of Sandpoint Magazine are copyright ©2008 by Keokee Co. Publishing, Inc. No part may be reproduced in any fashion. Subscriptions: $9 per year, payable in advance. Send all address changes to the address above. Visit our Web magazine published at www.SandpointOnline.com. Printed in USA

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

Terri Casey

Frequent contributor is a freelance writer and author who bought her first house in Sandpoint in 1982 for $29,000. For this issue, she researched the area’s growing luxury lifestyle real estate market (page 114) from her houseboat in Dover. As you read this, she’s living la vida tranquila in a small town in Baja California Sur, Mexico, where she winters. Interviewing husband-and-wife team Jack and Dorothy Fowler (page 31) and son-and-mother duo Dann – two “n’s” – and Hazel Hall (page 89) made this issue fun for Montana writer and storyteller . He says he most enjoyed writing the piece on stars, though, because it was a reminder to get out there and look (“Winter stargazing,” page 162). See www.sandycompton.com.

Sandy Compton

Trish Gannon

remembers the birth of “virtual Sandpoint” (page 107) with the Panhandle FreeNet and has eagerly participated as both purveyor and participant ever since, though she warns she only kept her blog updated “for about five weeks.” As the publisher of The River Journal, a semimonthly newspaper, she enjoys getting out and meeting the “movers and shakers” of the area’s communities – people such as Hope Mayor Larry Keith (page 17) and writer/politician Jim Ramsey (page 22).

Cate Huisman

had been skiing for more than 40 years before she encountered a detachable chair. The first time she rode one, it went so fast that she was afraid it would crash into the chair in front of her. Researching the article on Schweitzer Mountain Resort (“Taking a giant leap,” page 78) reassured her that ski lifts are only getting safer as they get faster.

Keith Kinnaird

In the 10 years has been living and working in Sandpoint, he’s watched the community change slowly then very quickly as the masses caught on to the area’s charms, and he writes about it in “The changing face of Sandpoint,” page 67. Born in Michigan and educated in Montana, Kinnaird has worked as a journalist and freelance writer since 1994. The 36-year-old, who fully embraces his addiction to snowboarding and fishing, has been challenging editors’ patience at deadline ever since.

Ben Olson is a native Sandpoint photographer, tav-

ern dweller and author of one work of fiction (“Wanderlost,” Alphar Publishing). He is 26 years old, lives in poverty and will never be able to afford land here. He photographed five local men and wrote brief profiles for the piece “My Friends’ Fathers,” page 72. They represent what “old Sandpoint” is to him. “They are real settlers of Sandpoint,” he said. “They and their geography fit. It’s an authentic symbiosis.”

WINTER 2008


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www.ironhorseatsandpoint.com

Iron Horse Ranch is a private gated community. This 388 acre property is limited to 24 home sites, ranging from 5 to 12 acres each. Over 200 acres of this development is dedicated to open space. Features include a private Walsh Lake beach, 100 acres of mountain trails, open meadows, and panoramic views of the Selkirks, the Cabinets and Schweitzer Mountain. Call today to arrange a tour of this magnificent development! Or take a virtual tour at: www.sandpointresortproperties.com

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Who, What and Why in Greater Sandpoint

Set in ‘Blue Heaven’

Plot unfolds in Sandpoint in new C.J. Box novel

B

est-selling author C.J.

www.sandpointonline.com

PHOTO BY K. ROBINSON / TPG

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PHOTO BY DON HAJICEK

Box has taken a departure from his award-winning series of mystery novels featuring Wyoming fish and game warden Joe Pickett. His first stand-alone, suspense novel, “Blue Heaven,” is due in January (St. Martin’s Press) and unfolds in northern Idaho. “A few years ago, while on tour in L.A., an ex-cop and college professor asked me where I lived,” Box said. “I told him Wyoming. He said, ‘Right next to blue heaven country, huh?’ “I’d never heard the phrase before. The ex-cop told me most of his friends had retired, sold their homes in L.A. and moved to North Idaho,” Box adds. “I found that fascinating.” So fascinating, the award-winning author spent time in the Sandpoint area visiting with locals to do research for his new book. “I am always interested in cultural changes in the modern West,” Box says, “and the idea of an area founded on mining, timber and agriculture being affected by newcomers who happened to be retired police fascinated me.” Termed a “nonstop thrill ride” by one reviewer, “Blue Heaven” takes readers along with a teenage girl and her younger brother on the run in the northern Idaho woods. The book’s jacket states they are “pursued by four

in gaudy McMansions, the kids soon find they can’t trust anyone, not least the hundreds of retired Southern California cops who’ve given the area its nickname: ‘Blue Heaven.’ ” Box provides readers unexpected twists along with clashing cultures and dark secrets, writes fellow author Robert Crais. “So far it’s created a lot of buzz,”

C.J. Box’s new novel is set in northern Idaho, known as “blue heaven” by retired cops.

men they have just watched commit a murder – four men who know exactly who the children are and where their desperate mother is waiting patiently by the phone for news of her children’s fate. “In a ranching community increasingly populated by L.A. transplants living

Box says. “St. Martin’s plans to go out with a 100,000-copy, hardcover first edition. The novel has already sold in Germany, France and Japan.” –Marianne Love

Just call him ‘The Accumulator’ Paul Rechnitzer, 89, doesn’t consider himself a historian but rather an accumulator of stuff. When fascinated by a topic, he’s like a detective, searching out information until he solves a particular mystery to his satisfaction. “I don't consider myself an expert in the sense that I know some people are more gifted and more talented. I don't think anyone would enjoy doing it more than I do. I like to meet the people,” Rechnitzer said. SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

WINTER 2008

His first book, “Always on the Other Side: The Story of the Bonner County Ferries,” (91 pages, $27.50), began as a newspaper article. After doing numerous interviews and gathering vast amounts of notes and photos, Rechnitzer said: “I had to do the book. People expected it to come out.” A love for model railroading sparked his Paul Rechnitzer in his model railroading room


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Almanac

Who, What and Why in Greater Sandpoint

He created a monster of a truck Rhodes earns Four Wheeler Magazine honors

PHOTO COURTESY OF SCHWEITZER

A

Al Rhodes shows what his truck can do at Schweitzer and in competition, right.

fessional,” said Rhodes, who is Schweitzer’s vehicle maintenance manager. At the competition, Rhodes’ truck tipped on its side while crawling over giant boulders during the mini-rubicon. They winched the Dodge back on its tires and continued to the final event, the tank trap, a series of water holes set on cliffs. Here, a suspension component sheared in half, ending Rhodes’ race.

So what’s next for Al Rhodes? “My friends and I want to form an off-road club,” said Rhodes. “There isn’t one here. Maybe we’ll go in a parade and drum up some support.” –Sherry Ramsey

builder of the Spokane International Railroad. Corbin raised nearly $8.5 million to build the track from Spokane to Eastport and eventually connected with the Canadian Pacific track in 1906. “Corbin’s Road” was written with the assistance of Jack R. McElroy, who Rechnitzer said provided the impetus, and Jack Woodbury, who provided research material. Rechnitzer’s books are available locally in the General Store (www.SandpointOnline.com), Vanderford’s Books, The Corner Book Store and the Bonner County Historical Society Museum. –Cassandra Cridland

WINTER 2008

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

www.sandpointonline.com

second book, “Take the Train to Town: The Story of the Railroads in Bonner County,” Volume 1, (298 pages, $39.95). According to Rechnitzer, six transcontinental trains a day once moved through Sandpoint. He compares railroading to “herding cats.” “When you think of the enormity of the size of the equipment, the inherent dangers, if anything goes wrong, it’s not a minor thing,” he said. In the already planned Volume 2 (February 2008), Rechnitzer will focus on the area’s luxury trains and the incentives railroads used to encourage riders. “Corbin’s Road,” Rechnitzer’s third book, launched Oct. 21 at the Spokane Railroad Show. The book centers on Daniel C. Corbin,

COURTESY PHOTO

l Rhodes, 49, of Sandpoint is a certified master mechanic who had an old ’58 Dodge and a lifelong dream of racing monster trucks. “I slowly started improving the truck to do more and more off-road things,” said Rhodes. “It just kind of got out of control.” He removed the doors, added a roll bar and a custom link suspension. He installed 2-and-a-half ton truck axles, fully hydraulic steering, and converted the fuel system to propane so he wouldn’t flood the engine on steep climbs. With bead lock wheels and 46inch tires, he decided to go the distance and made it amphibious. Yes, he can drive it underwater, up to 5 feet deep. In the spring of 2007, Rhodes sent a bio and photo of his truck to Four Wheeler Magazine’s Top Truck Challenge. The editors’ favorite 50 were published in the April issue. Readers voted on their favorite, and the top 10 were invited to Hollister Hills, Calif., for a seven-event, timed race June 4-8. Rhodes received a phone call from the editor of Four Wheeler Magazine, who informed him his truck took second place and invited him to the Top Truck Challenge. “In the off-road world this is pretty much the biggest race that’s not pro-

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Almanac

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Who, What and Why in Greater Sandpoint

Fast dogs tops in K-9 Keg Pull

T

ake scores of dogs, and owners, add snow, harnesses, beer kegs and a few hundred spectators. Mix well. Pour into the alley behind Eichardt’s Pub on a winter morning and you get fun, hilarity and the occasional growling match. It’s the annual K-9 Keg Pull sponsored by Eichardt’s. “It’s always a blast,” says Audra Gabica, Eichardt’s employee and dog owner. “And it’s one of the few times all these dogs and owners can get together and socialize.” This fund-raiser for Panhandle Animal Shelter is always on the last day of Sandpoint Winter Carnival, held annually in January. Dogs of all sorts come to pull, depending on size, something between an empty half-keg and a Heineken can down the alley as fast as they can. Sometimes they forget what they are about, but this just adds to the fun. The dog has to complete the course with no physical assistance, but buy as many runs as you like. It’s a fund-raiser. “Last year,” says Eichardt’s employee Doug Clark, “we raised

over $600.” Sometimes, there is the matter of not enough snow. Then it’s beg, borrow or steal some from somewhere. “We’ve been here at 4 in the morning, moving snow,” says Clark, “and weather can be a challenge. Last year, it was 17 below.” No matter. More than 100 dogs showed up, some to run and some just to watch and socialize. Champions change from year to year, but Fred, the farm dog, stands out in Clark’s mind. “His owner would hook him to the keg, then walk down to end of the alley, turn and snap her fingers. That dog would go like crazy.” Fred passed away before the crown

PHOTO BY RYAN MCGINTY

Winter Carnival event harnesses hilarity

One of the smallest and most determined competitors makes a run at the 2007 K-9 Keg Pull.

was wrested from him. The day of the pull is the only day of the year Eichardt’s serves breakfast, which begins at 9 a.m. The pull begins at 10. This winter’s 11th annual event is set for Jan. 20. –Sandy Compton

www.sandpointonline.com

“Fred said they’d never grow,” says Helen Williams, as she gazes

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up at the eight spruce trees that line the sky above her Kootenai home where she has lived since 1930. Forty-seven years ago, Williams accompanied her late husband to Spruce Creek on the north fork of the Coeur d’Alene River, where he was working as a sawyer. It was there she dug up the seedlings and placed them in some old coffee cans she found at a dump site, later planting them around their backyard. Her husband assured her it was too hot for them to make it through a transplant, Williams says, chuckling. Helen Williams proudly stands in front of one The trees have been witness to the comings of the spruce trees she planted 47 years ago. and goings of nearly a half century of Helen’s

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

WINTER 2008

life, planted close to the house she and Fred rented for $5 per month in the 1930s when it had an outdoor toilet and a barrel stove for heating. When the house went up for auction due to unpaid taxes, Williams went down to bid on it. “The guy bidding against me realized I had three children, and he quit bidding. I got the house for $90.” Williams, who has vision problems due to macular degeneration now that she’s 93, can’t see the trees as clearly as she once did, but she knows they are there and they have provided her with comfort through the years. “Fred was wrong,” she says, as she points to some of the tallest trees in the community. –Susan Drinkard

PHOTO BY SUSAN DRINKARD

A woman and her trees


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Who, What and Why in Greater Sandpoint

Almanac

Neighbor John a musician going strong

J

“I have so many different influences,” said Kelley. “I’ve always been drawn to blues. I took all the different styles that I loved and kind of meshed them together to get my sound.” He uses a long-necked gourd as a functional, eye-catching prop. The microphone is stuffed into the big round part through a cut-out hole, and the tip of the neck is removed. Kelley occasionally sings into the neck and creates the sound of a Victrola. “I call it my gourdaphone,” said Kelley. “My girlfriend was making shakers out of gourds and I thought they were cool. I started out with it as a John Kelley performs on guitar and his “gourdaphone” at Arlo’s last summer. horn, but

PHOTO BY SHERRY RAMSEY

ohn Kelley, known locally as “Neighbor John,” has enriched the city of Sandpoint with his music and art for the past five years, singing Wednesday through Saturday evenings at Arlo’s Ristorante on First Avenue, but he’s been around town since 1985. His music is a unique mix of jazz, blues, reggae and who knows what else.

then I started singing through it, and it sounded like an old record.” Unfortunately on Sept. 16, 2007, Arlo’s caught fire due to a faulty strip cord in the kitchen. Kelley’s equipment was ruined. “My gourdaphone smells like it’s been in a campfire, so I’ll have to make a new one,” said Kelley. Arlo’s is reopening in January, and Kelley says he can be found playing in various places around town until then. Kelley and his girlfriend, Karen Silva, also run an art studio out of their home and often host fund-raisers for different groups in town. They’ll be doing an art show called Art 4 Peace at the Stage Right Cellars at 302 N. First Ave. Nov. 16 to Dec. 19. Kelley, by the way, opened the Blues 4 Peace Concert featuring The Delgado Brothers at the Panida on Sept. 7. Meantime, Kelley is working on another CD and making his first children’s album. What does he enjoy most about his job? “It sure beats the heck out of diggin’ ditches.” –Sherry Ramsey

Book commemorates high school’s sports and famed coach He prints the entire book at home on an inkjet printer and takes it to Staples for binding, a time-consuming and expensive endeavor. But he says it was never his intention to make a lot of money on it anyway. “I’m glad it’s done,” he said. “I think it’s of some value. I don’t expect to get any awards or anything. I hope that people enjoy it. I got very good feedback from Bill and Mary (Barlow’s children), and I feel good about that.” “Cotton” is sold locally, for $19.95, at Vanderford’s, The Corner Book Store, Bonner County Historical Museum and online in the Sandpoint General Store (www.SandpointOnline.com).

www.sandpointonline.com

Bob Hamilton, a retired Sandpoint High School journalism teacher and coach, began compiling statistics for the school’s athletic program in the early 1960s. What started as a hobby turned into an obsession that resulted in publishing those statistics, covering 1906 to 1978, in a book entitled simply “Cotton” (March 2007). His magnum opus is named after the “famed coach who brought (Sandpoint High athletics) to prominence.” The book emphasizes the special career of Carl “Cotton” Barlow, who spent 21 years coaching at Sandpoint High. Known for being a soft-spoken but eloquent coach, he was honored in 1988 when his name was adopted for the football facility at Memorial Field. When he died three years later, his ashes were spread over the playing field bearing his name. Researching newspapers and yearbooks and interviewing sources, Hamilton finished compiling material for the book some years after his retirement in 1990. He presented his complete work to then-Athletic Director Jack Dyck and handed sections for each sport to the respective head coaches. In July 2006, he started “playing with the mechanics of how to put all this data into a book.”

–Billie Jean Plaster WINTER 2008

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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Who, What and Why in Greater Sandpoint

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ith a burst of inspira-

tion, in true artist fashion, local sculptor Mark Kubiak bought the former St. Agnes’ Episcopal Church on the corner of 6th and Oak, painted it red and created Redtail Gallery in July 2007. He displays art for a chosen local artist for six weeks at a time but also has several of his own pieces available in the studio.

www.sandpointonline.com

One sculpture with amazing detail is a bronze of David Thompson, a renowned Canadian explorer and mapmaker who once traveled through Sandpoint and established the first trading post in the area. “There’s no known drawing of David Thompson,” said Kubiak. “I read a book and found a journal entry from a man who met Thompson describing him as strange-looking, ruddy-faced with a cut-off nose. That gave me something to go by.”

Kubiak loves sculpting, particularly the earthy mess of chiseled wood, clay or flying chunks of stone. One of his sculptures, “Fingertip Fusion,” was originally done in wood and stands 58 inches high. Later cast in bronze at 34 inches, the work is two arms from the elbow to fingertip, one pointing up and one down. The front half of the 96-year-old building houses Kubiak’s gallery. The back portion is rented to Arts Alliance for art classes. “When the opportunity came up to buy the building, I knew the back half would serve them beautifully,” he said. Kubiak would like to see Sandpoint and the surrounding area become known far and wide as the mecca of the arts world. “My goal is for the Northwest region to be the place to come to see really fine art.”

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–Sherry Ramsey

PHOTO BY SKYE GOLSON

Artist finds new use for old church

Sculptor Mark Kubiak transformed the former Episcopal Church into the Redtail Gallery.

25,000 SF Showroom Featuring Floorcoverings, Appliances and Furniture.

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

WINTER 2008


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Almanac

Who, What and Why in Greater Sandpoint

Poet of Hope a man of many hats

a politician, a hitchhiker and an operations manager. But “Larry Keith – poet of Hope” has always been one of his favorite titles, though he doesn’t think he deserves it. “I’ve always felt that Paul Croy was the poet laureate of Hope. I had the absolute honor of reading with him at his last public appearance. Some of the stuff that Paul wrote … it captured this part of the world.” A resident of Hope as well as being its mayor, he believes hope is one of mankind’s greatest strengths. Keith has held a variety of jobs to pay the bills. But poetry became a constant in his life while serving in the U.S. Army. “It (poetry) wouldn’t go away, like a bush I wouldn’t water but which would not die,” he said in a 1999 interview with Sandy Compton for The River Journal. He calls poetry,

“the oral music of the individual human soul.” Keith has published four books, with an additional book finalized and book six in the works. His poem “Listening Point” was given center stage in the Festival at Sandpoint’s 2006 poster art, created by local artist Dann Hall. “I was so honored he would make that a part of his creation,” Keith said. “I was awed.” Keith and his wife, Karen, live in what some call “the oldest house” in Hope. He has served as the town’s mayor for about six years (not continuously) and was acting mayor before his first term. He quit working for the postal service and currently drives a school bus. “We not only live on the side of the mountain, we live on the edge,” he said, “and that’s fine.”

PHOTO BY TRISH GANNON

H

e’s been a postman and

Hope Mayor Larry Keith has a penchant for poetry.

–Trish Gannon

www.sandpointonline.com

WINTER 2008

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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Who, What and Why in Greater Sandpoint

Extreme makeover: church edition Volunteers build Kingdom Hall in six days Extreme Makeover: Home Edition, Jehovah’s Witnesses have been using a “quick-build” construction method to build their places of worship, called Kingdom Halls. Sandpoint’s recent quick-build, at 1715 N. Boyer Ave., was part of an unprecedented three-Kingdom Hall project constructed simultaneously, with halls in Rathdrum and Coeur d’Alene, over 11 days this past August. “It seemed a little insane at first,” said Dave Hulford, Regional Building Committee member, “but many have said, ‘It worked better than ever expected.’ We agree.” Hundreds of Jehovah’s Witnesses from Idaho, Washington, Montana and Wyoming left behind homes, jobs and businesses to volunteer their time and skills to help local members in what was truly a labor of love. “I’ve been on a lot of construction sites,” said Fern Curtis, a Witness from Stevensville, Mont., “and the atmosphere at quick-builds is so different. There’s no swearing, no smoking.” The method got its start in the early

PHOTO BY BILLIE JEAN PLASTER

Long before the popular TV show

1970s, when more than 50 Witnesses constructed a new Kingdom Hall in Carterville, Mo. On one weekend they erected the main framework and did considerable work on the roof. During the next decade, as members worked together on about 60 halls, obstacles were overcome and more efficient methods were developed. They realized that if the foundation could be done ahead of time, and materials and workers properly organized, they might be able to complete an entire Kingdom Hall in just a few days. During the past year, more than 100

From left: Ted Winget, Chuck Brock, Brian Ward and Kevin Monahan comprised the Local Building Committee that oversaw the Sandpoint hall.

new Kingdom Halls were constructed in the United States under the oversight of Regional Building Committees. All buildings are financed exclusively through donations from congregation members, and the volunteer labor means costs are half what they normally would be. –Dianna Winget

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Horizon Credit Union, just last February, opened its first school branch at Sandpoint High, allowing students – and faculty – to perform standard banking functions at the Bulldog branch during lunch breaks. Heading into its second academic year, the Bulldog branch is operated by students trained as member service representatives and supervised by a Horizon employee during daily activities. The credit union’s staff plans to become more involved in the high school during the 2007-08 school year and hopes to increase the Bulldog branch’s visibility, says Brian Grytdal, Horizon’s vice president of marketing. SHS students even voted on the new designs that will be used for student offerings throughout the credit union’s operations. Targeting a younger audience makes sense, especially since the average American’s debt continues to soar. On opening the Bulldog branch, Grytdal says, “What better way (to give back to the community) than to help students become more familiar with their financial choices and how the decisions they make will affect them.” Horizon even plans to offer financial educational classes for SHS students to address questions they might have about starting their financial lives. SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

WINTER 2008

PHOTO BY SKYE GOLSON

www.sandpointonline.com

Bulldogs run high school branch

Jake Sleyster signs for a transaction at the Bulldog branch as Horizon student employees Jarae Nordgaarden, left, and Kassandra Vogel look on.

Although Horizon Credit Union may open branches at other regional schools in the future, management plans to put all its energy into the Bulldog branch for now. –Amie Wolf


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Almanac

Flat Hat Productions’

Flat Hat Productions has comactors and directors a chance to perpleted two seasons of staging musical form in small venues,” says founder entertainment in Sandpoint. Its debut Rob Kincaid. “It’s wonderful for audiyear featured a concert by Marilyn ences to see shows in an intimate enviBarnes, a soprano soloist from Santa Fe; ronment and have close contact with a Valentine’s Day concert by local performers, and it’s wonderful for the soprano Amy Craven; a staging of the performers as well.” musical “Nunsense”; and a performance by the 150-voice University of Idaho Jazz Choir. Season two included a performance by mezzo soprano Lorraine DiSimone and the production of “A Christmas Memory” by Truman Capote. “I’m trying to bring types of music to Sandpoint that no other organization is bringing, plus provide our talFlat Hat Productions founder Rob Kincaid and wife Amy Craven ented local singers,

How mountain goats do winter

www.sandpointonline.com

Fine Jewellers & Goldsmiths

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“Discover the unique and distinctive.” For over 28 years in Sandpoint, Idaho. 110 S. First Ave. Wed. thru Sat. 10 to 5

www.SunshineGoldmine.com

208.263.6713 SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

WINTER 2008

that mountain goats, Oreamnos americanus, are the only mammal besides polar bears that remain white year-round. They are made for winter, but they don’t necessarily have an easy time of it. Joslin, who works for Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks, has studied goats for 30 years. One of the rarest of photos is a mountain goat in its winter habi“If you’ve got very deep snow,” tat, according to wildlife biologist Gayle Joslin. she says, “they will live for weeks and months in the same spot. I observed one nanny and a kid that lived in a group of four or five subalpine fir for months. The goats eat lichen that grows on older trees, which is very digestible.” Farther east, on the Continental Divide, goats go to the top of the mountains in winter, where the snow blows off and they can browse lichens off the rocks. Here, where there are heavy, wet snows, goats tend to move down and take up residence where they can sustain themselves. Winter goats also take advantage of caves, overhangs and, in some cases, even abandoned mine shafts.

PHOTO BY JIM POSEWITZ

Wildlife biologist Gayle Joslin points out


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third season a charm Flat Hat’s 2007-08 season launches in November with an evening chamber music concert by a small, local chorale ensemble performing master works by Schubert, Schumann and other composers, with a bit of jazz and pop tossed in. Later, Flat Hat will feature Amy Craven and some musical friends in a chamber recital of duet and ensemble pieces and a side of show tunes, plus an evening of dramatic and comedic one-act plays by Harold Pinter, Tom Stoppard and other playwrights. Flat Hat stages its performances in the sanctuary or fellowship hall of First Lutheran Church on South Olive Street in Sandpoint or at the First Presbyterian Church on North Fourth. For schedule, location and ticket information, call (208) 263-3504 or visit www.flathatproductions.com.

Page 21

AT SEASONS

Sometimes you need to take a mini-vacation from your vacation. Within the private resort of Seasons at Sandpoint, lies an exquisite Spa open to the public everyday this winter. After a day of snow skiing, you may just want to take a soothing massage break, enjoy an invigorating facial, or relax in the rejuvenating repose of a steam bath. Any of these mini-vacations will put you back into the swing of things as you soak in the spectacular views of Lake Pend Oreille. All available in The Spa at Seasons.

The Spa at Seasons. Refresh, Rejuvenate, Repeat. Call 888.263.5616 or visit SpaatSeasons.com 424 Sandpoint Avenue, Third Floor of The Retreat

–Terri Casey

www.sandpointonline.com

“They will back into caves or mine shafts,” Joslin says, “so they can more easily defend themselves.” A young goat’s first winters are critical times. Only 50 percent of kids live to be a year old, and only 50 percent of yearlings reach age two. It is not until their third summer that male and female goats reach a point of maturity at which they can breed. In a life span of 12 or so years, a female may have only two or three kids. In and around Bonner County, the proposed Scotchman Peaks Wilderness Area has a goat population, as does the Green Monarch area. Goats have also been seen on the west side of Lake Pend Oreille in the Talache area and in the Selkirk Mountains north of Mollies Lake. Goats are particularly vulnerable in winter, and Joslin urges folks to leave them alone. – Sandy Compton

WINTER 2008

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Who, What and Why in Greater Sandpoint

Retired fighter jet pilot writes about dawn of the Jet Age

A

buried dot meant the

www.sandpointonline.com

only sure survival for an American city,” writes Jim Ramsey in his new book about a year – 1956 – and a group of young men who learned how to fly jets to protect their country. The arrival of the Jet Age also meant the United States realized that enemy bombers could now reach targets within the Lower 48. The “dot” represented an enemy target on the plane’s electronic display; only when it was “buried” on the line showing the plane’s flight path could a hit be assured – what was believed then to be the only chance for survival. He explained that his desire to fly was likely born when, as a teenager, his father took him to an air show, and he got his first close-up look at a real

22

fighter jet. He wrote the book in the third person, however, and related the following: “He was thrilled when the P-51 Mustang … came roaring by. But then came a surprise. A much newer, previously unheard of plane approached the P-51 at incredible speed. … The sleek Lockheed F-80 Shooting Star did rolls around the P-51.” “The Buried Dot,” a story of American interceptor pilots during the late ’50s, takes readers through Officer’s Pre-Flight School, flight training in Moultrie, Ga., and flying jets in Texas on the way to becoming an Air Force pilot. “I must admit,” he writes, “there is a feeling of having done the impossible, of having conquered time, space, distance and the night.” After leaving the Air Force, Ramsey,

a resident of Ponderay, joined the Albuquerque Journal as a sports writer. He later became editor of the same, then worked as an editor at United Press International and the Idaho Statesman. He was also the owner and publisher of Idaho Outdoor Guide Magazine and worked in corporate communications for Boeing, United Airlines and Northrop Grumman. Now retired, he is still a contributing editor for Avionics Magazine. A softcover book at 199 pages, “The Buried Dot” (Publish America, 2007), is available for $19.95 at local bookstores and online at www.PublishAmerica.com. –Trish Gannon

FINAN Mc DONALD CLOTHING COMPANY

301 N. First Ave. Downtown Sandpoint 208.263.3622

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

WINTER 2008

The Plaza Shops Downtown CDA 208.765.4349


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Your

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secret mountain refuge. Rustic, it’s not.

Sales Gallery and Professionally-Designed Models Now Open On Site.

A P R I VAT E R E S I D E N T I A L R E S O RT & S PA

One of the most chic destinations and ownership opportunities is right here, in Sandpoint. Overlooking the shores of Lake Pend Oreille are luxury condominium and townhome residences that await your arrival. Our exquisite spa, boat club, marina, clubhouse and pool are now open.

Move in today! From the $400s to over $2 million | SeasonsAtSandpoint.com


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E X P E R I E N C E T H E M A G I C AT S E A S O N S T H I S W I N T E R . C A L L TO D AY TO A R R A N G E T H E U LT I M AT E S K I W E E K E N D !

Seasons features a resort shuttle to conveniently transport residents and guests to and from Schweitzer Mountain Resort. Toll-free 877.265.4420 | Local 208.265.4420 For a private tour visit the on site Sales Gallery, just north of City Beach.

Tomlinson Sandpoint Prices, plans and specifications subject to change without notice. Offer void where prohibited by law. ORAL REPRESENTATIONS SHOULD NOT BE RELIED UPON AS CORRECTLY STATING REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, MAKE REFERENCE TO THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM AND PURCHASE AND SALE AGREEMENT TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE.


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Calendar

Who, What and Why in Greater Sandpoint

Almanac

See complete calendars at www.SandpointOnline.com

November

December

1-2 “Delirious.” Offbeat drama in Panida’s

1 Celtic Wanderings. Little Cricket Music

Global Cinema Café about a celebrity photographer trying to make it big, at 7:30 p.m. 263-9191

Productions presents Celtic music with the Muses at 7:30 p.m. in the Panida Theater. Albeni Falls Pipes and Drums opens. 263-9191

3 “Lost and Found.” Moondog Productions presents this Teton Gravity Research ski movie, 7 p.m. at the Panida. 263-9191

5 KPND Ski & Board Party. 5 p.m. at Cedar Street Bridge. See Nov. 28. 263-1685

3 Storytellers Series. The Gardenia

7 Big Band Christmas Show. The

Center and the Red Hawk Project host “A Harvest of Soul” featuring Karen Seashore, 7 p.m. at the Gardenia Center. 265-4450

Panida Theater hosts this show in the spirit of the holidays. Time TBD. 263-9191

3 Craig Carothers Concert. Little Cricket Music Productions presents songwriter, 7 p.m. in Panida's Little Theater. 263-9191

7 Music from the Crooked Road. See

8 Schweitzer Holiday Kick-Off. Schweitzer hosts its annual Christmas tree lighting event in the village. 263-9555

8 Storyhill Folk Concert. Little Cricket Music Productions concert at the Panida Theater.

POAC calendar.

9 The Stolen Sweets Concert. Penguin Productions presents the 1930s swing jazz harmonists, 8 p.m. at the Panida. 263-9191 10 Storytellers Series. See Nov. 3. 10 We As Human Concert. The Panida Theater presents this local Christian rock group in concert at 7 p.m. 263-9191

14 Sandpoint Teen Slam. Lost Horse Press presents a spoken word competition for teens at 6:30 p.m. in the Rude Girls Room of Sandpoint Library. 255-4410

17 Holly Eve. The Panida Theater hosts this 27th annual gala benefit at 6:30 p.m., with epicurean delights, auction abundance and local entertainment. Silent art auction preview on Nov. 15 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. 263-9191

17-25 Thanksgiving Fishing Derby. Lake Pend Oreille Idaho Club’s annual fall fishing contest. 264-5796

23-24 Syrah Futures and Library Tasting. The Pend Oreille Winery's holiday season opener. 265-8545 traditional tree lighting ceremony and caroling at Town Square open the holiday season in Sandpoint, followed by store specials and entertainment; sponsored by Downtown Sandpoint. 255-1876

14 Jazz Northwest Christmas Concert. The Panida Theater hosts the Jazz Northwest Christmas concert at 7 p.m. 263-9191

19 KPND Ski & Board Party. 5 p.m. at Craggy Range Bar & Grill. See Nov. 28. 265-3551 21 Shot in the Dark Rail Jam No. 1. The first in a series of three nighttime rail jams in Schweitzer Village. Skiers and snowboarders test their skills on custom rails. 263-9555

31 New Year’s Eve. Schweitzer hosts parties to usher in the New Year at Taps and Chimney Rock Grill, 263-9555; and Angels Over Sandpoint bring back the New Year’s Eve Bash with two bands to choose from at the new Sandpoint Events and Business Center, 266-0503.

hot picks ’Tis the season The community celebrates the season Jan. 17-21 during the Sandpoint Winter Carnival with parades, parties and family events, sponsored by the Greater Sandpoint Chamber of Commerce. Taste of Sandpoint, on Jan. 17, showcases epicurean delights from some of the area’s most excellent restaurants. The carnival’s signature event takes place the following evening, when the Parade of Lights winds through downtown. Over the weekend, plenty of activities can be found around town, including the Adult Spelling Bee on Jan. 18 and Eichardt's K-9 Keg Pull on Jan. 20. Head up to the mountain Jan. 19-21 where Schweitzer puts on fireworks, live music, a torchlight parade and bonfires. Look up www.SandpointWinterCarnival.com or call 263-0887.

Mardi Gras madness Sandpoint goes wild Feb. 1-5 during the annual Madcap Mardi Gras celebration, with outrageous events, contests and performances during a five-day partying spree all throughout town. The Jazz Procession gets things going, followed by kick-off parties. In the days following, partyers dress up for the outlandish Masquerade Ball, get awed by brilliant fireworks, and either watch or participate in perfectly madcap games. Sponsored by Downtown Sandpoint. Call 255-1876 or go to www.Downtown Sandpoint.com. The Mardi Gras festivities wouldn’t be complete without The Follies, an annual adult-themed variety show rated R for racy, risque and ridiculous presented by the Angels Over Sandpoint on Feb. 1-2 at 8 p.m. in the Panida Theater. Call 263-9191 or 266-0503.

Winner takes all

Scotchman Peaks Wilderness sponsor this 7 p.m. benefit concert at the Panida Theater. 263-9191

While the onslaught of spring brings sunny skies and fresh blooms, on the mountain it means the Stomp Games are coming. The multi-categoried annual event takes over Schweitzer Mountain Resort March 14-16. Skiers and snowboarders charge down the slopes, competing in slopestyle, boardercross and rail jam events. See Schweitzer.com or call 263-9555.

28 KPND Ski & Board Party. The rockin’

In perfect harmony

rhythm ’n’ blues station hosts a series of everpopular parties with music and thousands of dollars’ worth of prizes; 5 p.m. at Stage Right Cellars. 265-8116

On March 22, Center Stage of Spokane presents the San Francisco-based a cappella group The Bobs at 8 p.m. at the Panida Theater. Comprised of Richard "Bob" Greene, Matthew "Bob" Stull, Amy "Bob" Engelhardt and Dan "Bob" Schumacher, the group delights audiences with humorous, original songs and non-traditional covers of Beatles and Jimi Hendrix tunes. The Grammy-nominated group garners praise wherever it goes. Look up Panida.org or phone 263-9191.

24 Walking Jim Concert. Friends of

29 Ballet Idaho’s Nutcracker. See

www.sandpointonline.com

23-Jan. 1 Holidays in Sandpoint. A

Time TBD. 263-9191

POAC calendar.

WINTER 2008

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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Calendar

POAC calendar

The 24th season of the annual Pend Oreille Arts Council (POAC) Performance Series continues to transport audiences around the world, with a wide international variety of lively music, unique dance performances and enchanting plays. Tickets are sold at the POAC office, located in the Old Power House, by credit card at (208) 263-6139, or online at www.ArtinSandpoint.org. Other outlets include FC Weskil’s next to the Panida, Eve’s Leaves and Eichardt’s Pub in Sandpoint and Bonners Books in Bonners Ferry. All performances are ADA accessible; listening devices are available for free.

Music from the Crooked Road Wednesday, Nov. 7, 7:30 p.m. This performance is marked by old-time, bluegrass, mountain gospel and flatfoot dance that incorporates musicians, vocalists and dancers from the Appalachian Mountain region of Virginia. The outstanding artists appearing link the past, present and future of deeply rooted American traditions.

Ballet Idaho’s Nutcracker Thursday, Nov. 29, 7:30 p.m. This holiday tradition at the Panida Theater continues with Ballet Idaho pros and talented young dancers from the Sandpoint region. The imaginative storyline, colorful sets, dazzling costumes and spectacular dancing continue to make it a timeless holiday tradition. www.balletidaho.org

The Alley Cats Friday, Jan. 18, 8 p.m. This award-winning a cappella group incorporates musical talent and comic timing into direct interaction with their audiences. They have performed nationally and internationally, with such notables as Chubby Checker, The Beach Boys and even comedian Jerry Seinfeld.

Eugene Ballet’s Swing Kings Friday, Feb. 8, 8 p.m. Eugene Ballet’s company dancers will groove, jitterbug and lindy hop along to the swinging beats of the Big Band era. Get ready to jump, jive and wail!

Daniel Defoe’s “Robinson Crusoe”

www.sandpointonline.com

Saturday, March 1, 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. Missoula Children's Theater returns with another splendid production including many talented, young, local actors to make this timeless children’s story come alive. The children in the community are the stars in this performance, guided by two professional actors trained to teach and inspire.

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Imani Winds Quintet Thursday, March 6, 8 p.m. This Grammy-nominated, cutting-edge wind instrument quintet incorporates musical traditions from Europe, Latin America and North America in their unique repertoire.

Kahurangi Maori Dancers Friday, April 11, 8 p.m. Traditional tribal performers from New Zealand celebrate both Maori and Pacific culture through dance. In addition to the educational performances and workshops for youth, POAC will be working with the community at large to include them in a traditional, Aboriginal welcome.

“H.M.S. Pinafore” Wednesday, April 23, 7:30 p.m. London’s Carl Rosa Opera company brings the Gilbert and Sullivan nautical classic to life, bridging the gap between traditional grand opera and popular music.

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

WINTER 2008

January 9 KPND Ski & Board Party. 5 p.m. at the 219 Lounge. See Nov. 28. 253-9934 9 Sandpoint Teen Slam. See Nov. 14. 12 Winter Trails Day. Schweitzer celebrates with free access to snowshoe and Nordic ski trails. 263-9555 16 KPND Ski & Board Party. 5 p.m. at the Beach House. See Nov. 28. 255-4947

17 Powder Party. Rock station 106.7 The Point hosts a series of parties with music, contests and prizes; 5 p.m. at A&P’s Bar & Grill. 263-2313

17-20 Sandpoint Winter Carnival. See Hot Picks.

18 The Alley Cats. See POAC calendar. 18 Shot in the Dark Rail Jam No. 2. See Dec. 21.

24-26 Banff Mountain Film Festival. Mountain Fever Productions presents award-winning cultural and sports films and speakers, 7 p.m. in the Panida Theater. 263-9191

30 KPND Ski & Board Party. 5 p.m. at the Hydra Steakhouse. See Nov. 28. 263-7123

31 Powder Party. 5 p.m. at the Long Bridge Bar & Grill. See Jan. 17. 265-7929

February 1 Starlight Race Series. Weekly races on Schweitzer’s NASTAR course, followed by post race parties in Taps. Final race has costume theme of “rock stars.” 263-9555 1-5 Madcap Mardi Gras. See Hot Picks. 1-2 The Follies. See Hot Picks. 7 Powder Party. 5 p.m. at the Beach House. See Jan. 17. 255-4947 8 Starlight Race Series. See Feb. 1. 8 Swing Kings. See POAC calendar. 9-10 Chocolate and Wine Tasting. The Pend d'Oreille Winery releases its Terroir Series paired with chocolate delicacies, just in time for Valentine’s Day. 265-8545

13 Sandpoint Teen Slam. See Nov. 14. 15 Starlight Race Series. See Feb. 1. 16 Shot in the Dark Rail Jam No. 3. See Dec. 21.

21 Powder Party. 5 p.m. at Slates Restaurant in Ponderay. See Jan. 17. 263-1381 22 Starlight Race Series. See Feb. 1. 26 Banff Radical Reels. Action films taken from the Banff Mountain Film Festival, 7


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p.m. at the Panida Theater. 263-9191

27 KPND Ski & Board Party. 5 p.m. at Mugsy’s in Bonners Ferry. See Nov. 28. 267-8059

29-March 1 Outrageous Air Show. Aerial acrobatics show at Schweitzer with torchlight parade and fireworks display. 263-9555

March 1 Robinson Crusoe. See POAC calendar. 6 Powder Party. 5 p.m. at the Captain’s Wheel in Bayview. See Jan. 17. 683-1903 6 Imani Winds Quintet. See POAC calendar. 8 Gallagher. Renowned comedian performs at the Panida Theater at 8 p.m. 263-9191

12 KPND Ski & Board Party. 5 p.m. at Slates in Ponderay. See Nov. 28. 263-1381

12 Sandpoint Teen Slam. See Nov. 14. 14-16 Stomp Games. See Hot Picks. 20 Powder Party. 5 p.m. at Connie’s Lounge. See Jan. 17. 255-2227 22 The Bobs. See Hot Picks. 26 KPND Ski & Board Party. 5 p.m. at the Captain’s Wheel in Bayview. See Nov. 28. 683-1903

26-29 Schweitzer 72-Hour Film Festival. Schweitzer invites filmmakers to produce a 5- to-7 minute Schweitzer film within 72 hours. Top films shown Saturday night. 263-9555

April 5 KPND Ski & Board Party. 5 p.m. at Schweitzer. See Nov. 28. 263-9555

5 Powder Party. 5 p.m. at Schweitzer. See Jan. 17. 263-9555

5-6 Tropical Daze. Schweitzer Mountain

www.sandpointonline.com

Resort hosts a celebration featuring live music, races, games and the Rubber Duck Derby Rotary benefit. 263-9555

9 Sandpoint Teen Slam. Finals for competition; See Nov. 14.

11 Kahurangi Maori Dancers. See POAC calendar.

23 H.M.S. Pinafore. See POAC calendar. 25 Hamlet. Idaho Shakespeare Festival presents this Shakespeare drama, 7:30 p.m. at the Panida. 263-9191

26-May 4 K&K Fishing Derby. Lake Pend Oreille Idaho Club's annual contest. 264-5796

See complete calendars at www.SandpointOnline.com WINTER 2008

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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Introductory Prices

$75,000 to $97,000 • 5 acre parcels • Many parcels border State Lands • Close to town, golf, & a recreational lake • Paved roads & underground utilities • Virtually unlimited recreational land surrounding the project • Area of great water producing wells • Some parcels offered with water 2 OWNERS ARE LICENSED IDAHO REALTORS

Visit www.sandpointrealty.com for all Coeur d’Alene & Bonner/Boundary MLS listings

George Gauzza 208-290-8059 208-263-2135


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COURTESY PHOTO

Interview

‘A good idea Schweitzer By Sandy Compton

I

that got out of hand’: Jack Fowler, a dentist who envisioned a ski mountain, and his wife, Dorothy

began. On the table between us, to refresh our memories, was “Looking Back on Schweitzer,” a book Jack wrote in 1991 with the help of Spokane newscaster Ross Woodward. After that first vision at Hope, what happened next? Jack: Me and (architect) Grant Groesbeck and my oldest

son, Tom, hiked in here Memorial Day of 1960. We tried a few weeks before, up Schweitzer Creek, but couldn’t get up that way. We found an old road that came up kind of where the current one is. We walked up that and stayed all night above where the Red Cricket is now and then went up and skied one run. We hiked up the ridge. Not clear to the top, but to where the steep stuff begins. Dorothy: Up around where the B&B is now. Jack: I started promoting and Grant did the work on drawing pictures of things, the lodges and where the chairs would be. Eventually, Grant and I bought some property. Dorothy: A quarter-section of land. Jack: Down where the Red Cricket is, that was going to be WINTER 2008

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f one man were responsible for the ski area in Sandpoint’s backyard, it might be Jim Brown, who provided property and funding for the area; or Sam Wormington, Schweitzer Basin’s first manager. But the person most responsible is probably a guy who had no inkling he would be involved in the ski industry – and it was only because he stopped to stretch his legs. “I was driving home from Big Mountain in 1960,” Jack Fowler said. “The wife and kids were asleep in the back. I stopped over by Hope, and across the lake was all this snow. I thought to myself, Why did I drive eight hours when I could have stayed here?” Something told the Spokane dentist: “Hold that thought.” Nearly 48 years later, Jack and his wife, Dorothy, a sculptor, met me in the Selkirk Lodge, close to where he had his first experience skiing Schweitzer – before anything besides the mountain was here. Dorothy’s bronze, “Children Playing in the Snow,” graces the courtyard in front of the building where this interview

PHOTO BY SANDY COMPTON

Schweitzer Manager Sam Wormington, left, and Jack Fowler promote the new mountain at the Minneapolis ski show in 1964, the year after the mountain’s opening. At right, Jack and Dorothy Fowler ride the Great Escape Quad overlooking Schweitzer’s south bowl.

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Interview the bottom of the chair. We weren’t the first people interested. Jim Brown had been up here on snowshoes and thought about it, but he never did anything. But, Floyd Gray was a big advocate. Without him being mayor, we probably wouldn’t have a ski area. Who were your other allies? Dorothy: Bud Moon was one. Jack: Yes, Bud Moon. And the guy

who had the motel. Dorothy: Bob Cox. Jack: Yes (laughs). I found this piece of equipment, for bringing folks up here – an old Army thing ... The Weasel. I’ve seen pictures of it.

(A “Weasel” is an articulated, trackdriven snow vehicle developed for military use during World War II.) Jack: I talked Bob Cox and Bud Moon into buying it. We took it to Bud’s house and started working on it. I don’t know what we gave for it, but it wasn’t worth a darned cent more. So, Dorothy, how did you two meet? Dorothy: I worked in Jack’s dental

office. Ours was a second marriage for both of us. We each have three children (laughs). So most of the kids up here in the early days belonged to us. We had our wedding in Sandpoint at the Methodist Church and our reception in the old lodge. Jack: That was a good building. I was a little upset when they tore it down. www.sandpointonline.com

They tried to tear it down. They had to burn it. It was too well-built (Jack and Dorothy laugh). Jack: Before we built that, I did a lot

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of traveling and saw buildings that had icicles about this big around (holds his hands a foot apart), and one where snow came off and smashed a car – a bunch of stuff like that. I told Grant, “You gotta put flat roofs on these things.” We also put a flat roof on the Red Cricket. Dorothy: We also built the Blue Beetle. Jack: And the Overniter and St. Bernard. SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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PHOTO BY SANDY COMPTON

Interview

All with flat roofs. And you built the Chapel.

skiing. Do you still ski?

Dorothy: We had six children we

on Chair Two. Dorothy: I’m 81 and I could still ski – I get jealous when Jack skis – but I’m still sculpting, and I’m afraid of falling, so I quit a couple of years ago.

Speaking of sliding, let’s talk about

What was your favorite run? Dorothy: Over from the top of One

and down through the trees into the bottom of Stiles. Headwall! Dorothy: Headwall. Yeah. We were

both good skiers. Powder skiers. Jack: I was always wandering out to

different places. (The) people I was with sometimes didn’t like where I took them.

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wanted to take to church, but you couldn’t have any downhill traffic before noon in those days. Jack: So the kids didn’t go to church during the ski season. Dorothy: There was a Catholic service in the Bierstube at noon (laughs). All the Protestants would go out and get in line at noon. Then, Jack donated the land for the Chapel. We started talking with our friends and got a committee going, and it grew. Jack: A young man named Metcalf was killed up here, and his parents donated a bunch of money, which built the basement, in 1976. We thought kids on the hill would come. They didn’t, but we started getting church youth groups. Lois Hatch (who handles the reservations for the Chapel) has a day right after Labor Day when she takes reservations, and within a couple of hours, it’s filled for the winter. Dorothy: And a lot of the summer, too. We hired the dormitories built about eight years ago. We can put 50 kids and their counselors in there. The Chapel itself was built all by volunteer labor. This will show we were idiots; putting on a roof after the first snow (points to a picture in the book). We had ropes tied around us to keep us from sliding off.

Jack: I ski a little. But at 85, mostly

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Interview I have the same problem. Dorothy, how long have you been sculpting? Dorothy: Since I was 55. I came to it

late (points at Jack); he didn’t give me time to myself. I’m staying out of that argument (Jack laughs). Dorothy: I majored in art in college

PHOTO COURTESY OF SCHWEITZER

and saw what Jack’s drive had accomplished here, so I set my goals very high. I wanted to be a nationally known sculptor before I died and to set an example that you can do anything at any age if you set your mind to it and work hard.

www.sandpointonline.com

How are you doing? Dorothy: I have work all over the

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world. Boeing sends my sculptures to world leaders when they buy jets. They also commissioned me to sculpt the Princess Mother in Thailand. Jack: I got a free trip to Thailand. She said, “I’ll do it, but I have to take my husband.” Dorothy: (Laughs) No, I said, “I need to take my business manager.” The first monument (a sculpture that is life-sized or larger) I did was for the Ronald McDonald House, and the second monument was this one up here. Since then, I’ve done monument work for air museums and also cathedral doors. For Our Lady of Lourdes in Spokane, I did four 14-foot doors; a cathedral in Great Falls; and one in Northern Israel. Jack: (Laughs) Got a good trip out of that one, too. Dorothy: The last I did was astronaut Michael Anderson, who went down with the Columbia – an 8-foot monument in Spokane. NASA is putting a second one at Boeing Field beside the Museum of Flight. That will be dedicated in May. Jack: NASA is going to fly us over for that. Dorothy: Jack likes the perks (both laugh). We’ve really been a great team. We make our way to the Quad, passing where the next generation of lifts is being SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

Sam Wormington and Jack Fowler ride Chair One for the final time on April 8, the last day of Schweitzer’s 2006-07 season, as Tom Chasse, Schweitzer’s general manager, stands by.

installed. Jack says: “The first lift cost $175,000. They’re spending $6 million.” I point out that they are getting two lifts for their money, and he laughs. On the way up the Quad, we talk about the lift we are riding. Jack: They needed this, but I’m not too sure they needed that new lodge yet. I think they got ahead of themselves. But that’s just my idea. Dorothy: They might have waited and left the old lodge. Jack: The Beirstube was so crowded that if I saw you across the room and wanted to talk to you, it would take a half hour to get to you, but in the meantime, I’d meet everybody in the place. Dorothy: That’s progress, honey. But it doesn’t have the same atmosphere.

From the top of the Quad, Jack and I walk to where he can see the new runs created when the Idyle Our T-Bar was installed. Jack tells tales as we walk.

WINTER 2008

Jack: Before there were any lifts back here, a kid rode up One, skied down to there (the Stiles Saddle), walked up here, then skied down and dropped in there (Shoot the Moon). By golly – I don’t know where Sam was that day – I got some guys lined up, and we went looking for him. We found him over here. He was OK, but it took lots of bodies to do it. So, you were involved in running this place? Jack: Not really. If you’re looking for lost skiers, that’s pretty involved. Jack: I suppose, but Sam was running

the place. Once he made his mind up, he would just say, “This is the way it’s going to be done,” which was good. We walk past the top of Six, and I point out the new runs. Jack: Holy catfish.


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Interview Back with Dorothy at the picnic table, Dorothy and Jack open the book “Looking Back on Schweitzer.” Jack: (Points to a construction picture of the old lodge) We got the building started about early August, but when elk season came, we didn’t have a crew. Everybody in Sandpoint went hunting. They point out familiar faces: Scotty Castle, Wayne Parenteau, Werner Beck (who ran the ski school), Jim and Margaret Toomey (who bought the first lift tickets sold at the new area), the Baysingers (a family of 10 who skied on a very affordable $150 family pass) and Dr. Merritt Stiles (for whom the run Stiles is named), who became president of the United States Ski Association. Tell me about Merritt Stiles. Jack: (Chuckles) He was overweight

and decided that wasn’t the way to be. Dorothy: So he took up skiing – in his 40s – for his health, and then he promoted it. Jack: We got him on the Schweitzer board of directors.

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

Who did pick the line of Chair One? Jack: It was a guy who worked for

Riblet (the chair lift manufacturer). Grant and I wanted to put it down on our property, but he thought it was better placed there. There were a lot of ideas that went in here. We are riding down the Quad, and I point to the top of the ridge. Have you skied Jack’s Dream, Jack? Jack: Yeah, but just once. It can be challenging, but I think you’d be happy to know that. You called Schweitzer in your book, “a good idea that got out of hand.” Jack: Yeah, Grant and I thought at

first we were just going to put a T-bar up here for the family and a few other people and that was going to be it.

How about Sam (Wormington)? Jack: We were looking for someone

Are you happy it got out of hand? Jack: Yes, I am. Dorothy: I am, too. So many people

to run the place, and for a while, I thought it would be me, but I didn’t know anything about running a ski hill ... besides, I was supposed to be practicing dentistry. Dorothy: Supposed to be. Jack: Yeah (laughs). Sam was running an area in Canada. I’d been up there skiing a couple of times, met and talked to him. Me and Stiles got him

have gotten pleasure out of this. ... He’s influenced a lot of lives. On Jack’s 80th birthday, we had a celebration for him, and Schweitzer gave him one of the old chairs, painted blue of course. We took it home, and Jack put it between two pine trees as a swing. All of our grandkids know that’s part of the original Schweitzer. I’m glad we are, too.

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down here for an interview, and we hired him as manager. We were already working on the chair, and he came up and supervised the rest of the job.

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They put art in the fine art of marriage Story and photos by Carrie Scozzaro

I

while he writes, paints and plays music. “Some items are off limits,” said Napolitan, but very few, or only for a while until one realizes the changes in the work really are needed. On a tour of their home, Kramer points to an ethereal abstraction which sat unfinished for a long, long time while Napolitan insisted something was not quite right. “We turned it upside down,” he said, smiling broadly, “and there it was. She was right.” Like contemporary sculptors Claus Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen, this couple exemplifies collaboration. They built their unique dome-shaped home from a kit, decorating it with bright colors, filling it with art and art materials, and surrounding it with Napolitan’s kaleidoscopic flower garden. Artwork throughout reflect varying degrees of collaboration. There are canvasses built by Napolitan but painted by Kramer. One of Napolitan’s sculpted characters was finished by Kramer, who painted the face. The collaborative effort goes beyond the surface, said the couple: Relationship is a priority “even at the sacrifice of career,” said Kramer. Hardly new to the arts, both Kramer and Napolitan graduated with degrees in art and have been working and exhibiting since the 1960s. After graduating from California State University in San Francisco with a bachelor’s in political science, Napolitan did work in art and English at various universities before ending up at Portland State University in the 1980s to study photography. Kramer also attended Cal State in San Francisco, after which he began exhibiting throughout the Northwest. Although the couple attended the same university in the 1960s and had been exhibiting in many of the same areas for years, they didn’t actually meet until 20 years later in Portland,

Above, Robens Napolitan and Tom Kramer share a lighthearted moment at home. Left, Andrea Lyman bought this Michael Pinchera painting, “Where I Stand is My Home,” not realizing it was his work.

Ore. Kramer was teaching a cartooning class and Napolitan had been asked to volunteer handing out art materials. “It was in October 1974, the day we turn the clocks back,” said Napolitan, “and Tom was early for his class. We talked. I drove him partway home, and he called a week later. We’ve been together ever since.” In 1994, they participated in their first POAC exhibition and soon made the area their home. Kramer explained how their choices to live as they do – free of the constraints of urban living and a more commercialized gallery system that go hand-in-hand. “We’ve asked ourselves, ‘What constitutes success?’ We have a life.” This contemplation of success in the context of artful partnerships is not new to them. In 2004, Lost Horse Press hosted an event at what is now the Outskirts Gallery entitled “The Artful Marriage,” part of a series of “salons” called Wild Mind: Rebel Creativity in the Age of Commerce. “The Artful Marriage” featured Napolitan’s poetry and artwork coupled with Kramer’s writing and artWINTER 2008

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t shouldn’t be surprising to find domestic partnerships amongst artists. After all, it’s fairly common to meet someone through “work,” even if that work happens to be painting, sculpting or making photographs. Artists, however, are still not that common – labor statistics show visual artists comprise only a fraction of the workforce. Thus, mainstream familiarity with artist couples might only be for those creative pairs whose notoriety precedes them. Some famous examples include photographer Alfred Stieglitz and painter Georgia O’Keefe and painters Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera (whose “domestic partnership” lacked in domesticity what it made up for in Hollywood appeal). Closer to home, a number of artful partnerships exist in the Northwest, many of which were profiled in Spokane’s 1997 Cheney Cowles Museum exhibit entitled “Two Studios/One Bed.” Included were Nancy and the late Ed Kienholz, of Hope, and Sandpoint’s Stephen Schultz and Rome Stuckart, who was profiled in the Winter 1999 issue of Sandpoint Magazine. In fact, the Summer 2007 edition of Sandpoint Magazine profiled artists whose partners are also artists – Scott Kirby and wife Dominique Verdier, who does photography, and fellow sculptors Mark and Trudy Heisel. Inspired by this phenomenon and intrigued by the idea of the “art of marriage,” we set out to explore the inner workings of two very different local artist couples. ••• “Nothing leaves the house until the other OKs it,” said Tom Kramer, nodding to Robens Napolitan, his wife of 33 years. They both agree it takes a lot of trust to be able to critique each other’s work – she writes, paints, sculpts and is a professional gardener,

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Art

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work. They wrote: “Within an atmosphere of constant and intense collaboration, (we) still find a way to honor and respect each other’s unique and individual voice, mining creative depths that neither one knew were there.” While it is true that the couple take their work and their marriage seriously, they don’t take themselves too seriously. From “The Artful Marriage,” they describe what they see as the “superglue” that’s kept them together: “love, followed by humor, constant communication, a mutual respect, and a shared delight in what we call ‘dumb stuff,’ like silly songs, nicknames and playfulness.” ••• “We both see art as a spiritual activity,” said Andrea Lyman, a multitalented woman whose participation in the Sandpoint arts community includes a long history of art, education and music. “Basically, creating art is a human activity that expresses the divinity within.” Her husband, Michael Pinchera, concurs. With a background combining art, sociology and psychology and training to become a Waldorf teacher, Pinchera has been affected by Waldorf founder, Rudolph Steiner. In his artist’s statement, Pinchera explains how Steiner’s world view of “anthroposophy … focuses on the spiritual reality behind everyday life. Access to this reality is possible through logical thought and the training of one’s awareness, by looking at oneself and the world.” For Pinchera, one of the primary manifestations of this approach is his use of color. Greatly influenced by Paul Klee and Wasily Kandinsky (both of whom also followed Steiner), Pinchera makes paintings that use the immediacy of color and shape to “create a bridge between what we see and experiences that are beyond the visible,” he writes.

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

WINTER 2008

“Where I Stand is My Home,” 1998, for example, marks the most recent phase of Pinchera’s work. “There is a myriad of rich experiences that arises from married life and deeply affects my growth as an individual,” said Pinchera. The painting also marks an important development in the couple’s history. Lyman, a founding member of Sandpoint’s Waldorf School and its music teacher for 12 years, purchased the painting at an auction. Although she had met Pinchera, who joined Waldorf in 1996, she was unaware the painting was his. Nor did she know what he’d written on the reverse of the canvas: “My heart is like a nut, go ahead and break me open.” To say that the conditions surrounding their meeting were difficult would be an understatement. Lyman was grieving the loss of her husband, Stephen Lyman, a noted wildlife artist whose work remains in demand and is supported by Timber Stand Gallery. “We were both very hesitant and cautious to enter into the relationship,” said Lyman. With a strong sense of faith, the couple moved cautiously forward. “Both of us felt like Steve was guiding us and encouraging us to be together,” said Lyman. The down-to-earth elegance that Lyman conveys in her being is reflected in her artwork as well. Although she also works with textiles and Lyman responds to textures and color in her handmade jewelry, top, while Napolitan uses color to express state of mind in "Sanctuary," left. Like Napolitan, Kramer takes advantage of the computer to develop densely saturated color imagery with his whimsical work entitled, "Don't Even Think About It," above.


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Art

has recently begun experimenting with encaustic, Lyman is better known for her jewelry, which she has been producing for more than 25 years. “I have always loved color, form and texture, and I find it in textiles, beads, buttons and an array of other materials I work with,” said Lyman. “For me, it is about the process and my responses to the materials.” Although the two artists share a philosophical approach and reverence

for color and form, they maintain a certain autonomy in their choice of medium, their processes and even while working in their shared second-floor studio. Pinchera points out they don’t influence each other artistically but rather encourage each other creatively. “Our individual aesthetic expression in our personal art forms may be very different, but we do share an appreciation of each other’s creativity,” said Pinchera. “There is an atmosphere of

support and encouragement between us, which would probably exist even if one of us was not an artist.” Lyman agrees, adding that although they don’t critique each other’s work, they do discuss it. “Any commentary might take place after I have finished a piece of jewelry, and he might say he likes the design, or likes the color combinations or something like that. And when he is painting, I usually reserve any comments until after the piece is completed. He usually asks me to give him feedback and, after some consideration, I might comment on certain areas of the painting, how it makes me feel, what images it conjures up for me, how I respond to certain uses of color and shape in the painting. But we never really give each other ‘artistic advice.’ ” “October” by Robens Napolitan

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Art Michael Pinchera and Andrea Lyman share a quiet moment in the kitchen of their Sandpoint home, which they recently renovated, including their shared second-floor studio.

One project the pair have collaborated on extensively is the renovation and decoration of their Colonial-style home. “Being that we are artists,� said Pinchera, “it not only adds more enjoyment to the relationship, it also adds to the creative atmosphere in our home and lifestyle.� Adds Lyman, who describes their relationship as blessed, “I think artists view the world through different eyes, and so it is a great thing to have someone as a partner who can honor and support that way of looking at things.� Although they differ in terms of how they collaborate, both couples serve as inspiration for all. Having chosen paths less traveled, they nonetheless have achieved success on their terms, with creative efforts that extend to the ultimate masterpiece: a marriage.

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Films

Film series, tours and a festival make for a theatrical spectacle By Cate Huisman

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espite the lamented loss of its downtown fourplex, Sandpoint could call itself a cinema town. While mainstream films still play at the new multiplex out at the mall, the Panida, downtown’s last remaining theater, plays host to film series, tours and, most recently, Sandpoint’s own homegrown film festival. It’s a big selection of cinematic offerings for such a small town.

The snow sports films A kind of de facto snow sports series has the longest history. Bob Aavedal at the Alpine Shop can’t remember how long his business has sponsored the Warren Miller ski films – he thinks it’s close to 25 years. This year, “Playground,” Miller’s 57th annual film, featured “ski racing king and perceived industry bad boy” Bode Miller as well as a visit to Ski Dubai, a year-round indoor ski area on the Persian Gulf. These were accompanied by the usual combination of droolworthy powder, desperately steep drops,

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visits to famous resorts, and numerous shots of expert skiers and boarders making one perfect turn after another. According to well-known local freeheeler and real estate agent Brandon Moon, Miller has visited and shot footage at Schweitzer Mountain Resort several times (sometimes Moon’s been in it), but the footage has usually been cut. The one local segment that did make it into a film didn’t include what one might expect, such as flights over the cornices into the south bowl or acrobatic aerials in the terrain park. Instead the camera followed a group of nuns from Mount St. Michael’s Convent in Spokane whose claim to fame was their attire – they skied, as they lived the rest of their lives, in their full-length blue habits. But there have been a couple of films in which the local hill did feature significantly. One was “West Coast Boogaloo,” shot at Schweitzer by Spokane rider Nick Rizzuto. It was brought to Sandpoint by Ground Zero, a local board sports store whose staff reviews snowboard films each year and usually screens at least one at the Panida. Another, called “Yeah Dude,” included sequences shot at Schweitzer after the area closed to the public last spring. It took advantage of the locale to get some great views of the lake as a backdrop for airborne skiers and riders. Numerous other snow sports films come through town with varying regularity. This fall’s lineup included “Since We Last Spoke,” in which a group of young telemarkers did things in terrain parks that their great grandparents never thought of doing back when everyone’s heels were free. In addition to flexing their knees in deep powder like traditional telemarkers, these denizens of the “the new freeheel culture” demonstrated that they could do anything in the park that their fixed-heeled friends could do.

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Films Films from Teton Gravity Research, now being sponsored yearly by Moon, feature the biggest names in the sports entertainment industry and focus on big mountain skiing, not only at well-known destination resorts but also at unknown spots in unlikely places, such as India, Turkey and Morocco. In a tribute to the inventor of the genre, every now and then they poke fun at Warren Miller films as well. This year’s film, “Lost and Found,� featured the record snows of 2007 in the undiscovered Tordrillo Range of Alaska. Karen Bowers, manager of the Panida, says all the ski and snowboard films attract pretty rowdy crowds. They’re typically accompanied by loud, pulsing music, and they always have shots of skiers and riders jumping off cliffs or dropping straight down chutes and narrowly avoiding the avalanches they have triggered. Usually they can be

relied on for at least a couple of spectacular yard sales. Who wouldn’t get pumped at the prospect of cartwheeling down a 60-degree slope with gear flying in every direction? These screenings also offer another incentive to get excited about the upcoming winter season: They all include drawings for door prizes, and no one waits these out in the lobby. A full house at the Panida includes only 550 people, and the odds are good that regular attendees will win something eventually. Retrieving their prizes is often a challenge for winners, however, especially when the show is sold out and the Panida is packed. “I’ve had to stop the throwing because people have gotten hurt,� says Bowers of a past approach to prize delivery. She’ll still allow t-shirts to go airborne, but now sponsors have to arrange for surface delivery of other prizes.

The Banff Festival films A somewhat more sedate crew attends the touring films from the Banff Mountain Film Festival, which usually come through during the last weekend in January. This festival is all about mountains, so there’s some audience overlap with the snow sports films. But the Banff films aren’t all about skiing and snowboarding; they focus as well on other mountain sports, on the alpine environment, and on human cul-

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Films tures in the world’s many and diverse mountainous regions. They come with their own announcer, who invariably says that he or she loves coming to Sandpoint. According to Michael Boge, who alone constitutes the staff of Mountain Fever Productions, which brings the Banff films to Sandpoint, this isn’t just hype – Sandpoint really is a favorite destination for Banff Festival people. “It’s a lot of fun,” said Boge, and he’s pleased that it has “grown from one night to three nights without repeating a film.” In contrast, these films fill a theater for only one night each in the far larger community of Coeur d’Alene and the far tonier Sun Valley, where Mountain Fever also presents them. Only rarely has Boge shown a Banff film twice. “Lost People of Mountain Village,” a satiric comment on conspicuous development and consumption at a fictitious location in the Rockies, elicited one of the biggest audience responses the Banff has ever seen here. It was shown at Sandpoint on the second night of the tour at the height of the recent real estate frenzy, and Boge, a member of the Sandpoint City Council, showed it again the third night due to popular demand. “I often wished I could show that at City Council,” he said. A kind of a genre-crossing evening is offered by the Radical Reels tour, a subset of the Banff. These films usually

arrive in March, and they can be relied upon for footage not only of extreme skiing and riding but also of extreme performances in other outdoor sports. March being a rather dreary time of mostly mud in Sandpoint, the Radical Reels help local athletes reenergize for spring skiing and also get ready for their warmer weather pursuits.

The Global Cinema Café Now in its 13th year and growing in popularity is the Global Cinema Café, a unique series of films selected by Bowers alone. She shows these films, which come from all over the world, on a fluctuating schedule that starts in January, picks up during the summer, and drops off in the fall and early winter as the theater fills up with other events. This is an eclectic group that may include winners of festival prizes or films with a social mission or focus, such as Michael Moore’s “Sicko.” Some are relatively unknown foreign films; at one time, local restaurants served special

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Films meals from the appropriate cuisine on the nights these films were screened. Bowers includes controversial films such as “Brokeback Mountain” and “An Inconvenient Truth,” while making sure to prepare audiences so they know what they have chosen to see. The most memorable ones, for her, have been those that she calls “difficult to watch”; she recalls “Paradise Now,” a Palestinian film about suicide bombers, and “Divine Intervention,” a love story set on the IsraeliPalestinian border.

The Schweitzer Lakedance International Film Festival

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The latest addition to Sandpoint’s screen scene is the Schweitzer Lakedance International Film Festival, a celebration of independent filmmaking held in the early fall. Organizing father-and-son team Fred and Trevor Greenfield started this festival in 2006, and it grew in 2007 to include 54 films from nine countries. Trevor explains what distinguishes an independent film: “They’re very different from mainstream cinema in their choices of stories. They can get away with a lot of things that studio filmmakers can’t.” He also emphasizes the advantages of seeing a film as part of a festival: “It’s a live event. You get a chance to interact with the filmmakers, the actors, the cinematographers. This is a chance to really get something personal out of the experience.” To maximize these kinds of opportunities, the Schweitzer Lakedance festival includes workshops, panel discussions and Q&A sessions with filmmakers as well as screenings of films. Trevor is infectiously enthusiastic about northern Idaho’s prospects as a filmmaking venue, and the area has a surprisingly large number of independent film supporters. A nonprofit group called, simply, Sandpoint Films provides education and guidance to individuals interested in the filmmaking process, and its support has been instrumental in making the festival a success. Another group, whose name has

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the unlikely acronym KNIFVES (Kootenai and North Idaho Film and Video Entertainment Society), lobbies for government support of filmmaking in the region, and it sponsored a luncheon at the festival that was attended by members of the press and local government. Given this environment, it’s not surprising that the festival had several entries by northern Idaho filmmakers. These included “Old Things,” an 8-minute short that was a cooperative effort of KNIFVES, and “The Pick-Up,” a work from local director Kat Rossi with music by Sandpoint band No Cover, which was supported by Sandpoint Films. At least two entries had double local connections – they were both shot by Idaho filmmakers and had northern Idaho subjects: “Raising Lucy” chronicled the experience of a couple raising an orphaned gosling on Lake Coeur d’Alene, and “At Lionhead” described the years in the early 1920s when film actress Nell Shipman had a rustic studio encampment at nearby Priest Lake. The award for best northern Idaho filmmaker went to Sandpoint native Esther Johnson for her film entitled “Montana” (in this case referring to a person, not the state). “We were beyond ecstatic with the success of the festival,” said Trevor afterward. “It’s been an enriching process for all of us, a cultural event and a careeradvancing event for many of us.” The entrants in particular were pleased with their reception in the community. “Everyone was impressed with the way we treated the filmmakers. They felt like they were part of something special.” It’s fair to say that all of Sandpoint’s cinematic events provide something special. They provide entertainment during the long hours of winter darkness and the worst moments of summer heat, but they offer something else as well. The thread that runs through them is that they aren’t couch potato films; they’re not for people who just watch. They’re films for people who think, dream and do, often outdoors – films that are uniquely fitting to the people of this town beneath the mountains and beside the lake.

Serving Bonner County for more than 20 years

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Books

‘Pioneer Voices of Priest Lake’ New book captures oldtimers’ stories of the lake’s early days

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Harriet (Klein) Allen on getting to the lake It was a rugged trip. Everyone who was able got out and walked up the hills to save the horses, and when it was a four-horse stage, you got out and the men pushed if it got stuck in the mud. When it was motorized there were no doors – sort of leather buggy seats crosswise on a truck bed and a running board, of course, high above ground, so it was quite a leap to get up to your seat. The person on the end of the seat held on to a metal bar as you journeyed along. I don’t believe we ever stopped at the Halfway House to eat after the advent of the motor, but it was a whole day trip by horse stage, and then we did stop about noon. When it was a horse stage, we took the train (from Spokane) the day before to Priest River and stayed all night at the St. Elmo Hotel (salmon pink color, owned by Beardmore) right by the station. I remember Mama and Grandma, in linen dusters for the trip, pushing a bureau against the door, as the lumberjacks were pretty noisy and roistering at night. We got up to breakfast in the dining room with long tables, syrup jugs, WINTER 2008

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ublished in August 2007, “Pioneer Voices of Priest Lake” is a collection of oral histories that provides a fascinating window into the past of Priest Lake. The book features the voices of Leonard Paul, the founder of the Leonard Paul Store in Coolin, and the next generation of lake voices captured by the Priest Lake Museum through an oral history project that began in 1983. The book offers glimpses of Priest Lake before World War II through the words of those who actually experienced it. The book’s editor, Kris Runberg Smith, is a descendant of the Beardmore family, which was influential in historic Priest River, and Howard Gumaer, her great-grandfather, who arrived at Priest Lake in 1897. An associate professor of history at Lindenwood University in St. Charles, Mo., she and her family gather regularly at Coolin Bay. Published by Keokee Books in cooperation with the Priest Lake Museum, “Pioneer Voices” is loaded with 144 black-and-white photos and includes a comprehensive index. At 224 pages, the softcover book sells for $17 at bookstores and the Bonner County Historical Museum in Sandpoint, and several locations around Priest Lake, including the Priest Lake Museum. It can also be bought online at www.SandpointGeneralStore.com. Following is a collection of excerpts chosen through feedback from various readers.

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Books

sourdough hot cakes, coffee and bowls of stewed prunes. Mama neatly shooed flies off the food as we ate and hurried out to get on the stage. By noon we had reached the Halfway House and got stiffly off to go into a good noon meal for $1 or 50 cents. I’ve never had such big, round molasses cookies since. While Mama changed the baby in the privacy of Mrs. P’s (Effie Prater) guest tent, I watched the men draw water from the well. It was curbed up with wood and a hook, and they would bring a galvanized or wooden pail and then a windlass. They changed horses there, and we went on to reach the lake about suppertime. It took 12 hours versus 45 minutes now.

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Harriet (Klein) Allen on the Leonard Paul Store in Coolin

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Coolin was only a cluster of log or board and batten shacks (in 1910). The general store run by Leonard Paul was rather new, a solid log building, the rear set well into the bank of the hillside with a long wooden porch about wagon-step level across the front. At one end you entered a standard door to the store half with two long counters, a post office cage and marvelous glass display case on one counter. Large double doors opened at the other end of the porch to the warehouse and storage area. Name anything you needed and he had it. Tin pants for loggers, boots, socks, thread, needles, screen, water pipe, lamp chimneys, crocks for sourdough and dill pickles, flat irons, lanterns, Hershey bars, gum, hairpins, canned peaches and tomatoes, beans, rice, sugar. Coffee was in large metal boxes to be ground in a fierce-sounding coffee mill and poured into a bag. Of course, coffee beans sold to you to take home to grind fresh each day. Crackers were in square metal SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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boxes, flour in huge sacks, salt in smaller sacks, sugar in 100-pound sacks, Log Cabin syrup in little tin log cabins, pink round peppermints or hotter white peppermints, rope in coils, nails in kegs, stove pipe and sundries.

Marjorie (Paul) Roberts on moonshining There was a lady whose husband was head clerk at the Davenport, and Dad and Mother knew them. And that’s where most of the liquor went; moonshine came down the lake. The same guys that were picking huckleberries were making the moonshine, and they’d send down so many kegs or bottles. I don’t say that the Davenport was the only one that was getting it, but I do know for a fact that it was Pete Chase. His specialty (was) to take it to the Davenport. He’d get himself arrested about the first of November so he could spend the winter in jail. And then he’d come back on the stage, and Mother would have him up for lunch. While his boat was being fixed and ready to go, he’d say, “Well, I’m back from college.” He always said that.

Leonard Paul on the Priest River Forest Supervisor Benjamin McConnell They stressed (Ben) McConnell’s accuracy with his .38 Colt automatic. Well, it is a fact! Whenever he would ride horseback up the lake, there wasn’t a mailbox along the line that wasn’t shot up. He was always shooting. One afternoon when I went to the post office, which was across the road from the hotel on the hill, the stage wasn’t in yet, so everybody was in the saloon waiting for the mail to come and the bar was all lined up. McConnell was standing at the end of the bar and, of course, he was buying the drinks. So when I came in he

said, “Leonard, have a drink.” The only place was at the far end of the bar, so I dallied up there and the bartender slid a bottle of rye and a little chaser of water. The glass, of course, had a heavy glass bottom. I poured my drink and looked down in front of all the fellas to McConnell to the end and said, “Here’s luck, men.” He pulled out his gun and shot the glass right out of my hand in front of all of these people. Of course, all I held was the heavy glass bottom, but it didn’t bother anybody. The bartender gave me another glass, I took my drink and finally we got the mail. And that was the end of that. He was unpredictable, no kidding.

Marjorie (Paul) Roberts on growing up We went fishing and hiking and camping out. We had bicycles. Every kid had a rowboat. Almost everybody went down (to Paul-Jones Beach) to swim because that’s where the action was. The beach was nice and the kids could go on the slide; there was no charge and no one would bother them. You could go on the big diving ramp, bigger kids and bigger people that wanted to, and that’s where everybody swam. This beach and dock was where all the kids spent their summer afternoons and evenings. There was a beach party every night at Paul-Jones Beach when I was a kid. There was somebody who would have a beach party. If nobody did, well, the caretaker would start one in front of one of the places and everybody would come down and sing along. We’d end up by going swimming in the dark, then go home and to bed around 10 o’clock. It was a big deal. But it wasn’t only us kids; anybody that wanted to just came. And if you brought marshmallows, so much the better – if you didn’t it was all right.


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Terrene Mack, Broker • Priest Lake Realty (208) 443-6052 office • (208) 610-3634 cell • (800) 444-1623 toll free Offices: Coolin, ID Off Cavanaugh Bay Road | Priest Lake, ID Corner of Hwy 57 and Courtlen Court Photography by Tom Holman

www.DiscoverPriestLake.com/smw07

Being a full-time resident at Priest Lake allows me to give you the insight needed to reveal the Priest Lake lifestyle. Whether you’re buying or selling, I can help you with all your Priest Lake real estate needs. Call me anytime.


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Pul l t he hook

Sled dogs and their mushers thriving in northern Idaho By Cassandra Cridland

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ull the hook – pull the hook – pull the hook! The air is frost. Sunlight sparks prisms off the ice-encrusted snow. The cerulean sky boasts not a single cloud. Ahead is an endless white trail of packed powder. The dogs are anxious, yapping and lunging against their harnesses. “Hike! Let’s go!” The sled tears free. Snow sprays. Sounds diminish to the swoosh of the sled’s runners and the exertion of the team. Exuberance swells and daily worries fade. You and the dogs are running flat-out and free. “These dogs want to run. There is nothing more exciting than pulling that snow hook up and taking off with your team. It’s just incredible,” says Jeanne Arnold, president of the Inland Empire Sled Dog Association (IESDA). Arnold started in 1991, when her roommate was gifted with a year-old male Siberian husky named Snowy. A friend who owned sled dogs suggested they teach him to pull. A couple of years later, Arnold bought a female Siberian husky, and she worked with puppies and dogs until she had a team. She ran her dogs recreationally for years until she heard about the Priest Lake races. Once at the races, she met several other mushers (sled drivers) and members of the IESDA and decided to become part of the club. Arnold competes in four to five sprint race events per year. Started in 1966, the IESDA began

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hosting the Priest Lake races in 1969, making 2008 its 40th year running – and one of the oldest sprint race competitions in the Lower 48. Within the Inland Northwest, there are a series of points races known as Pacific Northwest Championships (PNC). The races held annually at Priest Lake, the first weekend of February, are part of that series. Each year, 50 to 60 sled dog teams compete for points, trophies and purses. According to Arnold, the races have evolved over the years. They no longer hold freight races or weight pulls, but in addition to their traditional mid-distance (22 miles), sprints (four, six and eight miles), sportsmen races (for purebred dogs) and malamute events, they also offer skijoring competitions. In order to skijor, a person straps on a pair of cross-country skis, buckles on a

specially designed quick-release belt, and attaches himself or herself directly via a towline to the harness of two or three sled dogs. Racers will reach average speeds between 20 and 30 miles per hour while skijoring a three- to five-mile course. Keith and Karen Hertel rescue huskies and place them in good homes. Through their connections they’ve developed a strong interest in sled dog racing and skijoring. Using a two-dog team of a Sepala and an Alaskan husky, Keith has become an avid skijor participant. “My first race was at Priest Lake last January,” said Keith. “I didn’t have real high expectations and just wanted to find out what it was like zooming down a trail on skinny Nordic skis being pulled by these fast

Kala Fisher tucks behind her sled to decrease wind resistance at last year’s fun run in Priest Lake.


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Catch dogsledding fever Vicky Massey of Sierra Kennels calls the sport of dogsledding “borderline addictive.” She began with a couple of dogs and now breeds, races and shows Alaskan malamutes and Alaskan huskies. “Beginning about January 1 each year, Steve and I go to the races every weekend,” said Massey. “The dogs just love to run.” While there is no consensus on the number of teams in and around the Sandpoint area, local mushers (sled drivers) place the number somewhere between 10 competitive teams and upwards of 25 including recreational teams. The Inland Empire Sled Dog Association (IESDA) is a great place to get information on the sport. The IESDA sponsors two local events both held in Priest Lake at the U.S. Forest Service airstrip at Hanna Flats Road. The last weekend of January is the fun run (Jan. 26-27) and the first weekend of February is the point races (Feb. 2-3). These are great opportunities for spectators to meet the teams and share in the excitement. Check www.inlandempiresleddog association.itgo.com. Want to try your hand at being a musher? Contact Dan, who is training for the 2008 Iditarod, and Gina Phillips, owners of True North Expeditions (www.truenorthexpeditions.com) and

participate in a Musher 101 Camp. Learn how the kennel is run, become comfortable with the dogs and learn to drive the sled using verbal commands. For those who prefer a guided trip from the comfort of the sled’s basket, a custom package can be arranged, starting with a two-hour ride or more. Call (208) 267-0947 for more information. For equipment, information, race statistics and anything else sled dog related, area mushers often log on to www.sleddogcentral.com. For information on purchasing dogs, Massey at Sierra Kennels can be reached via e-mail at snowman@electronictransfer.com. –Cassandra Cridland

Gina and Dan Phillips of True North Expeditions

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dogs. The first day I started out good, but then managed to catch an edge and crash a little ways into the course. After dragging me a little while, the dogs stopped and looked at me like, ‘What are you doing?’ We took off again and after a little while the dogs started running towards the side of the trail and eating snow. Soon they were stopping, eating snow and cooling off. This time I looked at them and said, ‘What are you doing?’ ” The second day of the event went better for Hertel, and he and his team finished with the fastest time of the day. In addition to the PNC points race in February, the IESDA also sponsors a fun run at Priest Lake the last weekend of January that is open to all participants and the Spokane Dirt Rondy (a dry race using dog-pulled wheeled carts) in November. At the other end of the dogsled racing spectrum are endurance racers. Dan Phillips switched to dogsled racing from professional motocross after an injury left him with 17 broken bones and months of rehabilitation. “I wanted to do something that would keep me in shape. Krabloonik Touring Kennel (Snowmass, Colo.) hired me as a guide,” said Phillips. “I had no chance of actually making it, but for some fluke reason, I ended up making the (touring) team with these mushers. They are world-class dogsled mushers. Usually seven to 12 guys a year are picked to be on this team. I just

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fell in love with it. It was to stay in shape for motocross and ended up I never raced (motocross) after that again. I jumped in from touring, to professionally racing sled dogs to working as a trainer for running the Iditarod.” After several years of learning both the sport and business end of dogsled racing, Dan Phillips and his wife, Gina, moved to Moyie Springs and opened True North Expeditions. The 2006-07 dogsled season kicked off their operations at Schweitzer Mountain Resort, running two guided sled teams at a time, three times a day. The two-hour rides were a huge hit. Phillips is currently training for the 2008 Iditarod. The 1,122-mile trek from Anchorage to Nome is the ultimate dogsled event. The Iditarod is a grueling 10 to 16 days when mushers and teams will face sub-zero temperatures, high winds, no visibility, unpredictable wildlife and all in combination with sleep deprivation. Mushers are allowed to start the race with a team of 12 to 16 dogs and must have at least six dogs on the towline when they finish the race in Nome. Dogs that need to be dropped from the race are left in the care of veterinarians at checkpoints and are shipped to owners to collect at the end of the race. In order to qualify for the 2008 Iditarod, a musher must be 18 years of age as of the starting date (March 1) of the race. They must either have completed a prior Iditarod or completed the Yukon Quest International Sled Dog Race prior to the current Iditarod, or between July 1, 2005, and Feb. 14,

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Returning from the course, Kala Fisher of Newport, Wash., and her dog team smile as they near the finish line for the 2007 Priest Lake Fun Run Dog Sled Races.

2008, have completed two approved qualifying races in the top 75 percent of the field with an accumulated total of at least 500 miles. “This is my first attempt,” said Phillips. “I worked as a trainer. A trainer puts on about 3,000 miles a season on average, training a team to go to the Iditarod. I’ve trained four finishing teams for the Iditarod. Twenty-six of our dogs are Iditarod-finishing dogs.” Phillips began his training regimen on Sept. 1. Using an ATV in neutral gear, he runs his team of 16 Alaskan huskies two miles a day for a week. Each week the dogs will increase by two miles a day until they are able to do 20 miles a day. When the snow falls, they’ll switch from ATV to sled. They will then increase by 10 miles a day each week until, by Feb. 1, the dogs are able to run 100 miles per day. Phillips intends to compete on the 2007-08 circuit, which travels through Washington, Montana, Colorado, Wyoming, Alaska and parts of Canada with his focus on acquiring the necessary qualifying races.

“This (northern Idaho) is a great area for us,” said Phillips. “We are very central with the races going on with the big racing circuit.” Dogsled racing is a synchronized sport. A musher must be self-motivated, self-reliant and physically coordinated. Driving the sled often requires creative thinking, as you want to be one thought ahead of the dogs. All of Phillips’ huskies are treated like the athletes they are; they receive a specially formulated diet of natural supplements and electrolytes to keep them in peak condition. During the race season, each dog ingests roughly 9,000 calories per day in a series of small meals and snacks. As needed, the dogs are treated to massages, acupressure and acupuncture work, and chiropractic. The start of any race is filled with the excitement of dogs lunging and yapping, straining to be on their way. Spectators quickly catch the enthusiasm of the teams. Mushers comment that their dogs love to meet their fans, and some are real camera hounds. Catch the action at the Priest Lake races.


Festive Lane Home, Bottle Bay Under construction, est. comp. December, 07. Absolutely first class everything – fixtures, appliances, finishes. Huge views. 6BR/5.5BA. Owner shares in an additional undivided 1/3 ownership in over an acre of common area in this magificent and private 3 home subdivision. Price includes $20,000 credit toward your own dock! $1,970,000 #2073176 5 Acre Building Lot 5+/- acre parcel very close to Sandpoint in a private, secluded, quiet location with outstanding access. All usable land, great building site, mature trees, natural gas across road. A wonderful site for that dream home, close-in but with a feeling of being far away. Lots of wildlife. Terrific view. $265,000 #2072394

Schweitzer Building Lot Incredible view in unique residential development. Ski in/ ski out. Spires is an 80-acre Planned Unit Development. Includes schematic plans for home designed by noted mountain architect Tim Boden. $249,000 #2074823

Secret Cove Extremely private unique estate on Lake Pend Oreille. 4700 Sq.Ft. home + 2BR guest/ caretaker`s home + boathouse with apartment, all on 1.69A and 180FF of waterfront with private breakwater and beach. Dock with boat lift. 10 minutes from Sandpoint, Southern exposure. Absolutely breathtaking. WOW factor is a 10 of 10!! See www.secretcovesandpoint. com. $2,790,000 #2065266

Idaho Club Building Lot Incredible .45 acre Idaho Club lot on Pack River estuary, within chip shot of Clubhouse. Cul-de-sac quiet privacy, wooded ambience. Includes access to all Club amenities including swimming pool, tennis, and Clubhouse. Buyer qualifies for Golf Membership. $399,200 #2072005

Cabin in Hope

Seasons at Sandpoint Condominium New luxury 3BR/2BA waterfront condominium, located in the heart of downtown Sandpoint, numerous upgrades, private beach, beach and dock dining and cooking buildings, clubhouse with upscale day spa, fitness center, concierge services, private marina and unbelievable owner services. Price includes deeded boatslip in the Seasons at Sandpoint Marina. $915,000 #2074320

Totally turn-key, 2BR/2BA, fully furnished home on 100 ft. of waterfront on Ellisport Bay. Electric heat and propane fireplace-stove, completely equipped kitchen, with all dishes, cooking ware, utensils, even an espresso machine. New TV and sound system. Artwork and wall hangings by local artists, Trex deck and dock, borders US Forest Service land, end of road privacy. $850,000 #2065417

Tomlinson Sandpoint Office: 208-263-5101 Cell: 208-290-7024 Email: stan.hatch@sothebysrealty.com Stan Hatch

Associate Broker

Each ofďŹ ce is independently owned and operated. 200 Main Street, Sandpoint, Idaho.

Your luxury & recreational property professional


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Reliable as the Moon rise

Sandpoint is the greatest place to live! We welcome you to come and enjoy the many pleasures of Bonner County, where there is something for everyone. In 1910, the Moon family came to Sandpoint for all the same reasons you come here today – pristine setting, hunting, fishing, recreation and quality of life. Give Susan or Brandon a call and let them help you find your piece of paradise and start your own history in Bonner County.

See these listings online at www.SusanMoon.com Perfect 11± Acre Horse Setup! Level parcel is 2/3 pasture & 1/3 wooded. 3,000+ SF home with 2 master suites; one is ground level for Mom with separate laundry, kitchen & spacious living room. Guest bedroom, walkthrough pantry, open kitchen, dining, living room. Plenty of natural light, vaulted ceilings, natural gas stoves, hot tub on the deck for relaxing. 3-car attached garage, 30’x40’ heated shop, large barn, 20’x24’ tack room/dog kennel. Fenced and cross fenced. $675,000 #2074035

Year-Round or Retreat Home. Nicely wooded corner lot with community beach access to Cocolalla Lake. Freshly stained cedar -sided home featuring open living area, T&G vaulted ceilings, new wood stove, 3 bedrooms 3 baths, Oak cabinets, tiled countertops and kitchen floor. Guest quarters downstairs with 3/4 bath, bedroom, kitchen & family room. 2-car attached garage and a separate shop. $398,500 #2074180

Gorgeous Lake Pend d’Oreille & Mountain Views. Two south facing 1acre parcels in Hope with cleared building sites. Power, phone & cable are close by. City water hookups are paid and sewer hookups fees are transferable $284/yr. The best views you ever dreamed possible! $400,000 & $390,000 #2073315 & 2073316

Lake Pend d’Oreille Waterfront Condos at Holiday Shores in Hope. One upper floor unit fully furnished, 2 bedroom, 2 bath + loft with 2 queen beds & living room hideabed. Deck to enjoy the gorgeous sunsets. Second, a ground floor furnished unit, 2 bedrooms 2 baths, with queen bed, hideabed, and bunk/double futon in guest room. Deck on the water and courtyard in the back. Both have 1-car detached garages. Homeowners dues: $250/mo. $549,500 #2073979 | $469,500 #2074623

Each office is independently owned and operated.


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ore than a REALTOR ollowing a sucF cessful entrepreneurial career of starting and leading technology companies, Stan built a home on Lake Pend Oreille and relocated to Sandpoint, Idaho, in the mid 1990s.

Having been a season-pass holder at Schweitzer Mountain for over twenty years, Stan was recruited to assist the Resort with its growth and management, including a number of Real Estate development issues. This led to him earning an Idaho Broker’s License and the beginning of what has turned out to be a thriving second career.

www.sandpointonline.com

Stan’s fundamental philosophies that have produced an impressive number of delighted clients are: excellent listening proficiency; analytic creativity in formation of solutions to meet client’s needs; and competence in communicating and negotiating an agreement fair and acceptable to all parties to the transaction. The result is Stan’s extremely high level of proven and demonstrable client satisfaction. Stan brings this professional experience, combined with his education (BA, MBA – Washington State University and Ph.D. – Gonzaga University) to every Real Estate transaction. Equally comfortable with Buyer and Sellers, you will find Stan a tremendous asset to you when searching for a member of your team to work efficiently and effectively to accomplish your Real Estate goals. Cell: 208 290-7024 Stan.hatch@sothebysrealty.com

200 Main Street, Sandpoint, Idaho, 208-263-5101 Each office is independently owned and operated.

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208.255.7561 SandpointRealEstateOnline.com Cindy.Bond@SothebysRealty.com

MLS #2072627 Stunning masterpiece on Lake Pend Oreille, overlooks the city of Sandpoint. This extraordinary 6,000-square-foot timber frame home boasts an indoor pool, 3 kitchens, a theater, master suite with steam shower and fireplace, spectacular city and mountain views and much more for $2,695,000. Details at LakefrontMasterpiece.com

MLS #2070986 With unique architectural character, this serene 20+ acre estate overlooks a neighboring lake. Offered at $1,199,000. See more at KirpalsWay.com.

MLS #2073518 With striking design utilizing extensive use of natural wood and stone, this luxurious mountaintop home boasts prestigious panorama and Lake Pend Oreille views from its secluded 20-acre homesite. Adjacent to a 107-acre refuge. Offered at $2,575,000. Additional 20 acres available. See more at SanctuaryAboveTheLake.com.

MLS #2073517 Gorgeous home with 133+ feet of water frontage, guest house and close to downtown Sandpoint. $995,000. More info at WaterfrontRetreatAtFryCreek.com.

MLS #2071952 Experience the ultimate in materials and craftsmanship with this brilliant, custom floor plan including 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, pool room, media room and a spacious loft. Features solid, handcrafted walnut cabinets, Brazilian cherry hardwood floors, hand-stamped copper fascia and extensive use of stone. Offered at $1,750,000. GoldHillEstate.com

MLS #2071668 Enjoy the view in this home on the water. Has many custom features such as a gourmet kitchen. Private 100-foot beach & dock. $995,000. See ElliottBayWaterfront.com.

MLS #2074154, 2074510, 2070723 Seasons at Sandpoint RESALES. Luxury condos on one of the finest beaches on Lake Pend Oreille offer true resort living with private clubhouse, marina, day spa, fitness center, concierge services and downtown Sandpoint location. Choose between a 2-bedroom, 2-bath corner unit at $699,000, an upper level 2-bed, 2-bath unit at $789,000 or a Penthouse with 2 master suites, a boat slip and underground parking space at $1,250,000. Visit SandpointLuxuryCondos.com.

MLS #2072949 Finely built home boasts panoramic territorial and lake views on spacious, 5-acre homesite, just minutes to Sandpoint. $864,900. Go to HiddenSpringsRd.com.

B

Cindy Bond Associate Broker, GRI

H

elping buyers and sellers see possibilities before they become obvious.

SandpointRealEstateOnline.com

208.255.7561 | Cindy.Bond@SothebysRealty.com | 200 Main | Sandpoint © MMVII Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The Yellow House, © Van Gogh Museum/Superstock, Inc., used with permission. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated, Except Offices Owned And Operated By NRT Incorporated. Office phone, 208-263-5101.


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Books

Celebrated cowboy cartoonist Boots Reynolds pens book Hands down a whole heap of bean recipes and lovable paintings in ‘Boots ‘n’ Beans’ By Billie Jean Plaster

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Cowboy cartoonist Boots Reynolds has been painting for more than 30 years, and now some of his best-loved, humorous art will be forever immortalized in a hardcover, coffee table book, “Boots ‘n’ Beans,” due to be published in the winter of 2008.

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cowboy artist whose work has been described as “Charlie Russell meets Saturday Night Live,” Roy “Boots” Reynolds has had his artwork published in a lot of venues – most notably Leanin’ Tree merchandise – but never his own coffee table book. That will soon change for the 72-year-old artist who has lived on a mountainside in Hope for more than 30 years with his wife, Becky. “Boots ‘n’ Beans” is due to be published this year by Keokee Co. Publishing, Inc., of Sandpoint. The hardcover book holds a collection of Reynolds’ bestknown paintings, such as “No Problem Lady,” and a lot more artwork never before published. Paired with his paintings are bean recipes submitted by friends and acquaintances, famous ranchers, governors and plain old people. Stories accompany each recipe, and notes accompany each featured painting. Reynolds’ images often depict scenes of cowboys and outfitters suspended in humorous settings, from complex horse wrecks to riders on the brink of disaster. The Oklahoma native who grew up on ranches draws his inspiration from real-life experiences as a rodeo clown, roper, horse trainer and bronc rider. A Leanin’ Tree artist for 26 years, Reynolds has had more than 90 pieces of artwork published on the company’s greeting cards, prints and more. His art has also graced the covers of national magazines such as Western Horseman, including one containing a well-disguised naked woman. His originals hang in the Museum of Western Art and have been exhibited at the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum. The


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BOOTS ‘N’

BEANS

“Beans and Frank”: Beans affect almost everyone the same way. They blow up in the bowels by starting a fight between the small and large intestines, creating a gas war that will last way into the night. Some cowboys have learned to manipulate the escaping gasses to sound like a pig hung in a fence or a dog growling at an intruder. Frank is one such person. However, the dog knows it’s not the sound that will get fingers pointed at him but the smell!

an art book “full of BEANS ”

BOOTS REYNOLDS King Ranch

My first recollection of the King Ranch was as a kid listenin’ to grown-ups talkin’ about goin’ to or knowin’ someone who went to the King Ranch sale to buy a colt. Their livestock and agricultural programs are unique and admired the world over. While its livestock has always taken center stage, it’s the people who really make the King Ranch a success, and many of them have been there for several generations. I had the opportunity to visit the King Ranch years ago as a guest of the ranch’s wildlife biologist and have an inside look at their game management program. The wildlife on the King Ranch has as much priority as their livestock. It’s an environmentally well-rounded operation and good example of wise ranchin’. In all pasture and ranch land development, wildlife get equal rights with horses and cattle. Fencerows are left undeveloped or seeded with grains that enhance wildlife population. Water is available at convenient locations, not just for quail, dove and turkey but also for songbirds and other wildlife. While bein’ amazed and astounded by what I was seein’ on my tour, I was in for even a bigger surprise. My biologist guide suddenly pulled off the road and parked next to a thicket of mesquite. “Come on, I’ve got a treat for you,” he said. I slipped out of the truck and quietly closed the door. He started down a cow trail through the brush, and I expected at any moment to come upon a wildlife scene equal to a WINTER 2008

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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Academy of Western Artists named him the Cowboy Cartoonist of the Year in 1996. Other honors include the Trumble Family Award, the Western Horseman Award by Cowboy Cartoonists International and the Penny Onstott Memorial Award from the Professional Rodeo Cowboy Artists Association. In the book’s introduction, Reynolds writes: “The book ‘Boots ‘n’ Beans’ started out as just a humorous painting several years ago entitled ‘Beans and Frank.’ While doing the painting I began to think about beans and how they have been such an important part of our history and existence. Where would we be today without the simple bean? “Well, one thing led to another and I hit upon the idea of a recipe book just for beans. Everbody’s got a favorite one, and there has to be hundreds of them out there from all walks of life. The next thing I knew I was compiling a collection of bean recipes from famous ranches, world champion cowboys, celebrities, state governors, the White House, everyday people and last, but not least, the American cowboy. Most of us would not be where we are today if our forefathers hadn’t had some beans to see them through.” “Boots ‘n’ Beans” will be available this winter at local book stores and gift stores, as well as online: www.Sandpoint GeneralStore.com. The 124-page hardcover book measures 12 inches by 10 inches and will sell for $39.50. With input from the author, the following excerpt has been selected for publication in Sandpoint Magazine to give readers a flavor of Reynolds’ art book “full of beans.”

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FRIJOLES BARRACHOS King Ranch Kingsville, Texas

2 lb. pinto beans 2 T. garlic powder 1 t. salt black pepper to taste 1 large fresh tomato, diced 1 large onion, diced 3 T. fresh chopped cilantro (for garnish) 1 small can Old El Paso chopped green chilies Pick and wash the dr y beans. Put into large pot and cook as per packaged directions. When the beans are tender, add the diced tomatoes, onions and chilies. Let them simmer until vegetables are tender; add the crushed tomatoes and simmer just long enough for the soup to boil. Add the cilantro (do not stir) and remove from heat.

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Ser ve piping hot.

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great African safari in the Kalahari Desert or somethin’. My senses heightened, anticipation grew and I was suddenly aware of the smell of fresh-baked bread! “It’s bread day at the wagon,” he explained, and we stepped out of the brush and back in time a hundred years. Before us in a clearin’ was a fully rigged and functional chuck wagon. It belonged to the fencin’ crew. I don’t know how many different kinds of bread were stacked on the sideboards and still bakin’ on the fire, but it was part of a noonday chuck wagon feast. “You might want to close that,” he said, gesturin’ towards my mouth. “You’re droolin’ on your shirt.” Apparently, a lot of people knew where that wagon would be on bake day and made it a point to be in the area. There were several there that I knew for sure were not on any fencin’ crew. Everyone who runs a crew of ranch hands had a CB radio in their truck, and locatin’ where that wagon is on bread day is as simple as “Breaker, breaker, good buddy.” You should hear some of the excuses the different foremen have for why they have to leave the crew and go somewhere just before lunch break on bread day. If the crew found out where they were really goin’, they would


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get strung up! The cook was prepared for extra mouths, though, as there was a lot of everything, includin’ the bread. And, of course, there was beans. Why else would the cook make so many flour tortillas if he didn’t have beans? Light bread for soppin’ up bean juice and cleanin’ your plate. Fry bread for butter and jelly and the list goes on. Definitely a meal fit for a king! If you find yourself in Kingsville, Texas, the ranch has a self-guided tour you can take in the comfort of your own car. Don’t miss it!

“Eatin’ Out”: I did this paintin’ thinkin’ of Stella Hughes. She’s one of the most noted chuck wagon cooks of all time, and I don’t mean for social events. This gal was on a ranch that was 40 miles from the nearest phone! Her chuck wagon was her other kitchen where she served up Mexican, Indian and cowboy culinary delights – workin’ man’s food.

Fourth-Generation Guest Ranch Located in Pristine North Idaho

True Western 208 263-9066 Hospitality 1413 Upper Gold Creek Rd. Open Open Year-Round Year-Round Sandpoint, ID 8386

Email: stay@westernpleasureranch.com

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Your custom home should be as unique as your dreams. At Western Luxury Homes, we are

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Society

Demographics paint the present and predict the future

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By Keith Kinnaird

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heights, and a different breed of develand Minnesota round out the top 10 quick glance of Idaho opment is taking hold. The older popémigré-producing states during the Transportation Department ulation is expanding, and its youthful five-year period tabulated by state (ITD) driver’s license statistics counterpart is contracting. transportation officials. shows people from all over the country One of the most visible indicators Bonner County has unquestionably are moving to Bonner County. A of Bonner County’s burgeoning popuattained its mark on the map of the closer look at the figures suggests larity can be found in the real estate “Third Coast,” a colloquialism used to Delaware is the only state in the union listings. The average price of a home describe picturesque places beyond the with a resident who didn’t surrender a here has vaulted more than 35 percent East, West or Gulf coasts. license here between in the past two years and doubled in Inland terrestrial expanses 2002 and 2006. Driver’s licenses the last five, according to the Selkirk are the new ocean vistas in The license statistics surrendered in Association of Realtors’ Multiple the eyes of many, accordare skewed by the Bonner County Listing Service. The average selling ing to land-use planners nomadic tendency of 2002-06 price of a home here ranged from and professionals. those who move in and $328,000 to $346,000 in 2007. “They’re now just as quickly move out Washington 1,947 There is evidence to suggest a change and the power of proCalifornia 1,871 attracted by the wide in the real estate climate, though. open spaces like we have, 564 crastination among those Oregon Montana 409 “There’s been quite a market where so much of our who wait until the last Colorado 306 adjustment. We’ve been looking at the land is federal or state second – or longer – to 270 sales of homes against our own buildland. That’s become the obtain an Idaho license. Arizona Nevada 211 ing permits and tracking the numbers. new attraction instead of “These are just (tie) Alaska & Texas 192 We could lay a graph of the number of the Atlantic or Pacific. indicative,” qualifies 144 homes sales over the number of buildIt’s now the interior Doug Benzon, an econ- Florida 98 ing permits and it’s almost identical. I where the wide open omist who manages the Minnesota think that there’s been a cooling, Economics & Research Source: Idaho Transportation Department spaces become the attracEconomics & Research bureau partly with what’s going on in the tant,” said Clare Marley, bureau at ITD. “It isn’t mortgage markets,” said Marley. Bonner County’s planning director. numerically perfect, but it is what has The market adjustments might Bonner County’s abundance of been surrendered.” make it a good time to buy, but that sun-dappled waterways, boilerplate The numbers tend to indicate most doesn’t mean a lot of people can. prairies and rugged mountains means of the demographic infill is coming An affordable housing needs study people will be drawn here. But the from Washington, followed by exodus of urban and California. Former residents of Average house selling price suburban refugees is Oregon, Montana, Colorado, Arizona 2002 2005 2007 Year coming with more bagand Nevada trail as newly (or nearly) gage than a bellhop. bona fide Bonner County residents, $151,896 $246,647 $328,235 Sandpoint Housing costs are but by a vast margin. Alaska and Texas $172,023 $255,564 $346,262 Bonner County reaching breathtaking tie for the next spots, while Florida Source: Selkirk Association of Realtors’ Multiple Listing Service

PHOTO BY DOUG MARSHALL/EL PHOTO GRANDE

The changing face of Sandpoint

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School enrollment following year, the projeccommissioned by the city of tions indicate. Sandpoint found that almost projections The 6-percent decline in half of the full-time residents Year Total enrollment last year had earn less than $35,000 a year, 2002-03 4,019 school district officials plana sum considered low-income 2003-04 3,932 ning for the worst and hopby industry standards. People 2004-05 3,939 ing for the best because in that income bracket, the 2005-06 4,012 attendance figures have such study concluded, could pay 2006-07 3,884 a dramatic influence on no more than $103,000 for a Source: Lake Pend Oreille School public funding and, therehome without being costDistrict /MGT of America, Inc. fore, budgets. burdened – a far cry from the “Because we had such a big drop average asking price for real estate (see last year, we used the most conservaMarketwatch, page 132). tive projection they gave,” said district Census figures crunched by the Superintendent Dick Cvitanich, referIdaho Department of Labor (IDL) ring to the firm which conducted the show Bonner County’s population enrollment projection analysis. “We mosaic, much like that of the state and had our conservative projection, and nation, is in flux. The number of peowe sort of had this hopeful outlook.” ple 44 years old and younger is growThe district used the low-ball proing, but their percentage within the jection of 3,763 students and counted overall population is shrinking. 3,774 students on the first day of The trend is especially pronounced classes in September. But by opening in the 15-and-under set in Bonner week’s end, enrollment climbed to County. The age group represented 23 3,815 students. percent of the population in 1990, but “The bottom line is we started off slipped to 20 percent in 2000 and to 16 OK, but we’re still down in total percent in 2005, IDL figures indicate. enrollment from where we would like School enrollment projections for it to be,” Cvitanich said. the Greater Sandpoint area appear to It’s the second consecutive year backstop the state’s analysis. The total enrollment has slumped in the enrollment history hints at the makings district, but Cvitanich is not ready to of a period of small but steady declines. jump to conclusions. Total enrollment projections for the “You wonder at what level it will Lake Pend Oreille School District hovlevel off, but we just don’t know ered above the 4,000 mark for 2001 where that is yet. What I do know and 2002, but began to slip slightly in from the time that I’ve been here is subsequent years. It regained the lost that we’ve seen two decreases,” he ground by 2006, but dipped again the

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said. “If someone asked me, ‘Do you think this is a trend?’ I would say, ‘Two years does not make a trend, but it has me looking very closely at it.’ ” Although the census shifts in Bonner County more or less track with the shifts occurring statewide and nationally, the high cost of housing is a prime suspect in deterring families with school-age kids from moving here. “With the real estate prices rising so rapidly, it has scared away a few young families and prevented other young families from moving in,” said Kathryn Tacke, IDL’s Panhandle region economist. Cvitanich has a similar belief. “I just know that when you see a drop of approximately 100 students there’s, in my mind, something going on affecting the livability for families,” he said. The older set in Bonner County, meanwhile, is growing in both number and proportion within the total population, according to IDL figures. The 45- to 64-year old age bracket accounted for 20 percent of the overall population in 1990. By 2005, it represented more than 32 percent. The type of housing being developed here appears to be changing with the demographic. Exclusive and leisureoriented developments are on the rise. “Before we had what I consider fairly simple subdivisions. Now we have gates and golf courses. They’re popping up all over, and they’re a different flavor than what we used to


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Population by age in Bonner County ever see,” said county planning director Marley. Year 1990 2000 2010 Community leaders are also 15 and under 6,281 7,512 6,848 seeing an increase in the number 15 to 44 10,862 13,682 14,938 of new people who aren’t depen45-64 5,560 10,779 13,179 dent on a job here or anywhere 65 and over 3,919 4,862 6,152 else for that matter. Some hold Source: Idaho Department of Labor. down jobs where geographic locavalues brought in by the wealthier tion is irrelevant; still more are retired. people,” Drinkard said. “The difference is the people that For its part, the BCEDC has made are moving here are the ones that can it its mission to restore the affordabilafford to live here. They don’t derive ity of living here. their income from here; they don’t “As long as you keep your econhave a job here,” said Karl Dye, execuomy strong by constantly working on tive director of the Bonner County trying to increase the average wage, Economic Development Corporation trying to create more and better jobs, (BCEDC). you can hopefully balance that out,” What’s to be done? said Dye. “If you balance out the preA coalition of public and private vailing job wage along with the interests formed the Bonner increased cost of living, then hopefully Community Housing Agency to mute you can maintain your community.” the gentrification occurring here. The Sandpoint’s transition from a nonprofit housing education and resource-based economy is often advocacy group is studying ways to viewed dismissively as a step down to a develop more affordable housing, such service economy dominated by lowas through land trusts and liberalized paying jobs. However, there is a growdensity limits in certain areas. ing body of evidence that tends to Stephen Drinkard, project coordinadeflate the myth that we are a resort tor for the City of Sandpoint, has taken community with a plethora of service an active role in the affordable housing industry jobs and not much else. issue. Drinkard sees the development of A number of companies, including workforce housing as the best hope in Coldwater Creek, Litehouse Foods, filling the gap. Panhandle State Bank, Unicep “It’s a really crucial thing. If we can Packaging, Quest Aircraft and continue to find ways to get people to Encoder, have brought significant be able to live in and near their workdiversity to the labor market. place in the Greater Sandpoint area, Dye feels those companies’ leaders there will be a counterbalance to the

believing in the community is a large part of what is keeping them here. “All of those people made a commitment to this community. It might not have made the best business sense, and it might not have been the best return on their investment to stay here, but they believed in this community,” he said. Tacke contends Sandpoint’s tag as a resort community misses the mark. “In a way I don’t even like using ‘resort community’ for Sandpoint, because I think it really understates,” she said. “For the size that it is, it’s amazing the variety of operations you have. What really stands out in my mind is the number of corporate headquarters you have there. The growth of those operations certainly has created a large variety of professional and managerial jobs that wouldn’t have existed in the community 10 years ago.”

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Specializing in the Custom Design of: Omega and Dynasty Cabinets – HardwareBuilder Grade CabinetsHolcam Shower DoorsMirrorsCustom Windows and DoorsProfessional Installation

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Carpet One

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T

hese are my friends’ fathers; the “common men” of Sandpoint who raised my generation. They turn screws and wield brushes. They awake early with boot heels worn, hands cracked, nails blackened by errant hammer smacks. They teach our children. They own one suit and wear it only when someone dies or gets married. They sail alone on the lake and fish for the big ones already fished out from decades passed. They live up the mountain, at the end of rutted roads impassible during spring break-up. They’re real men. There isn’t anything pretentious about them. These are the men who understand how to live in symbiosis with their surroundings. They found Sandpoint to be a town to settle in, to raise a family their way, to escape the budding crassness of a society hooked on progress. They never wanted too much and never complained about having too little. They made do with what they got, and felt damn lucky to have gotten it before things changed. Things have changed. This isn’t the same town in which they raised us. Shades of what Sandpoint used to be is in their eyes, when they talk about the destruction of old buildings and new ones going up, each like a square, neat, pastel mushroom – blip! There is real loss in their voices when the local golf course goes private and climbs out of their income bracket, when their neighbors become strangers with giant houses and gates, only showing up for two weeks in the summer and two weeks in the winter. They scratch their heads and try to recognize their town with all the new sidewalks, all


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the new people, so much growth, so many orange cones. Most of them escaped a town like this in the past and now find themselves stuck again in the wheel of progress. To me, they represent the spirit that once inhabited this town – a Western spirit, slowly evanescing as our town gradually becomes just another resort town. That is why I’ve photographed these men. They deserve to be recorded, for their days are numbered. Soon, like the buffalo, like the cowboy, like the West; they will fade away and the new people will take their place. I respect every one of these men, these fathers of my friends, and offer these portraits and notes as my part to capture a part of history, before it becomes history.

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Story and photos by Ben Olson Photo assistant Erin Brannigan

GREEN:

(Green Rainbow, or real name Edward Mulhauser)

www.sandpointonline.com

Green was born in the East and didn’t make it out West until midlife in 1988. He never looked back. “I came to caretake a friend’s place. I was seeking a less crowded situation to raise my son and daughter, bought property, and I don’t have the energy to go elsewhere,” he says. “I’m here. I never intended to settle here, though.” He lives up on top of a mountain, in a series of solar-powered buses and self-built structures. He claims to be a “writer, copy editor, justice advocate, father and earth human.” Green lives alone, in semi-isolation for many reasons, namely that he takes a dim view of society and what it has done to the free man: “There’s no WINTER 2008

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future in destroying what we depend on for life.” Green is an activist: “Those who disobey wrongful laws are heroes, not criminals.” Green is a counterculturist: “We live in a world of spin, where everyone takes it as given … the truth is strange to most people … our posterity is being sacrificed to the big lie.” Green is an environmentalist: “In the long run, life for an intelligent species on a finite planet requires some responsibility.” Green is a fascinating man, full of insight and intelligence. He represents to me what Old Sandpoint used to be; a collection of people who wanted to escape paradise being lost, to raise a family and live somewhere free. He currently tends bar in Sandpoint and remains a conscientious thorn in Bonner County’s side.

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TED: (Ted Bowers)

Ted is a woodworker, a father, a musician and a humble man. “I first moved up to Sandpoint from Aspen in ’74, when all the hippies were escaping what was happening there.” When asked if he sees similarities between Aspen then and Sandpoint now, he replied simply, “Greed always has the same heart, just different faces.” When Ted first moved to Sandpoint, he was hired by an oldtimer named Earl Boles. “I see all these parallels between me and Earl now,” he said. “When I met him, I remember shaking his hand and feeling a finger missing on the right hand. Now I’m the old-timer, and my town

is changing and I’m missing the same finger on the same hand.” Ted lost the finger not on a saw, as assumed, but during a boating mishap: “I was backing my boat into the lake and didn’t have an emergency brake, so I had to prop a rock under the tire to stop it from rolling. Well, I wasn’t quick enough and the truck rolled over the rock with my finger underneath it. There I stood, clutching my bloody hand, watching my truck and my boat roll into the lake.” Ted raised his family in Sandpoint and spends his time building quality wood structures the old way – with talent and ability. He plays a mean stand-up bass and occasionally accompanies The Shook Twins and other local artists playing around Sandpoint.


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DAN: (Dan Shook)

Dan first moved up to Sandpoint from Aspen in 1977. “Aspen had gone haywire. It was going through what we’re going through now ... this growth. It changed from an ex-mining mountain town to a ski village and has never been the same. I escaped like a lot of others did. I was just a ski bum and an artist when I first moved here.” Dan teaches art at Sandpoint High School and creates it on his own time. He went to the University of Idaho

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and studied art most of his life. “There’s an antipathy for organized religion in my art. I like to explore why human beings need spirituality, which is funny because I’m constantly seeking the same. I used to say that spooks had control of my hands.” The two pieces of art depicted in the photo are called “Summer Rain” and were inspired by a hot summer day when a storm blew in. “Half of the lake was bright and sunny, and the other half was dark and gray, spilling rain, and the storm came and bounced off the Cabinets, and there was this triple rainbow. It was beautiful. I had

the image of a couple working outside all day, blistering hot, and how the rain came in and cooled them off.” Dan is the proud father of local musicians The Shook Twins and continues to create art at his property on a slough in Bonner County. “Specialization is for insects,” he says, cryptically.

RANDY: Randy Hedlund

Randy moved up to Sandpoint in the mid-’90s “to escape from Pugetopolis.” Prior to living out in the country toward Priest River, he raised his family in the Puget Sound area. “What was happening in the Puget Sound was an indicator of what was happening to the whole country,” he

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said. “I see cities like Los Angeles as an entity America is primarily influenced from. I think that’s wrong.” He first came through Sandpoint while hitchhiking in the ’70s. “I hitchhiked all over, just to experience it and to see the country. When you hitch, you just go in whatever direction you want, and that usually seems to be the right direction. People had no idea who you were or why you were doing it. You had a clean slate.” Randy remembered passing through Sandpoint then and decades later moved in order to “raise my kids within the safety of the mountains.” A carpenter most of his life, Randy is the father of local folk musician Josh Hedlund. He and his wife, Margo, can usually be seen at Josh’s shows in Sandpoint and surrounding areas.

HARV:

(Harvey Brannigan)

www.sandpointonline.com

Harv is a fisherman, a sailor, a teacher and an activist. “Growing up an Irish kid in Chicago, it was impossible for me not to be political. 1968 saw the murders of MLK and Bobby Kennedy, war in Vietnam. There was a worldwide brutalization of dissent. Students were in the street, refusing to be intimidated by the police. They gave the world a sense of hope. From that point on, I mistakenly believed that future generations would follow suit, trying to expose injustice and make positive change in the world, disregarding their personal safety. What happened? “And so, 40 years later, we are again fighting an unpopular war, and we will probably see neither party choose a candidate that represents the people’s wish to get out of the Middle East. What have we learned?” Harv has worked as a commercial fisherman in Alaska, is an avid sailor and lives in a modest cabin in Bayview. Never one to shy away from an argument, he is active in keeping the spirit of the small Western town alive.

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“Bonner County is being turned into another sanctuary for the rich. Our politicians are being led around by (real estate agents) feasting on the transformation of our old community with all its foibles into a California suburb. Little or no thought is given to segments of the community who will no longer be able to live here. These people are impervious to the fact that they are destroying a way of life, a community that represented what America is all about; off the beaten path, accessible to people of all tax brackets, a heterogeneous mix of ages and backgrounds sharing a special place, a place we love, blemishes and all.” Harv currently works as a teacher at Bonners Ferry High School: “Most learning is an acceptance of another person’s ideas. Very few people think for themselves. People grow up in a community with a certain ideology. Community leaders teach that acceptance of the established ideology and traditional beliefs will guarantee a wonderful future. Lacking that, leaders force acceptance out of fear. When they see doubts about accepted ideas, they warn that everyone needs to conform, or some enemy will surely get us all.” Harv will tell you anything you want to know about the Irish or the Mariners, and he’s always down for a day of sailing. He doesn’t compromise his opinion – ever – and his opinion is always backed by his intense knowledge of the human condition and our lack of understanding. WINTER 2008

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SCHWEITZER:

TA K I N G A

GIANT LEAP

Extreme skier Sammy Carlson launches off a huge gap jump – at least 60 feet wide – at Schweitzer during the shooting of the new Poor Boyz Productions film, “Yeah Dude.”

PHOTO BY CORY MURDOCK

By Cate Huisman


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As Chair One is retired, Schweitzer debuts two high-speed lifts Back when it was called Schweitzer Basin, Sandpoint’s ski area was a locals’ favorite because of its steep chutes, powder-filled bowls and glades for tree skiing. Then it grew into

Schweitzer

Mountain

Resort

and

acquired high-speed lifts, a high-profile reputation and Idaho’s only high-speed six-person chair, but its flaws became more evident: It had minimal options for advancing new skiers and riders, and ridgetop winds occasionally closed lift access to much of its best terrain. When it added two new lifts last summer, PHOTO BY DAVID MARX

however, Schweitzer went a long way toward erasing those shortcomings. No wonder the readers of Skiing magazine have ranked it among the top 25 ski areas in North America this winter. “One of our biggest weaknesses was the gap in terOf course, this wasn’t even a question when high rain from Chair Two (the beginner hill) to the next winds shut both lifts. Schweitzer regulars knew to Festival backbone: Toni Lund, Dyno Wahl, Marcella Nelson and Carol Winget step,” said Schweitzer President and CEO Tom Chasse. check the ski report early, while they were still making New skiers and riders had two options as they worked coffee and rummaging through the dryer for their long to develop their skills: They could make the longish johns. If the dreaded words “wind hold” or “possible trek to the Great Escape Quad, from which there was delayed opening” appeared, they began to consider no descent without at least a short segment of interspending the day cleaning the attic. mediate difficulty. Or, they could make the difficult Schweitzer invested $6 million last summer to climb to Chair One and ride it halfway to the top to ensure that the future holds more opportunities and reach the moderate slopes of Midway, but to get off fewer quandaries for mountain visitors. A high-speed they had to negotiate a legendary off-ramp that was detachable quad called the Basin Express now flies far more challenging than any slopes they had yet aspiring skiers and riders to Midway in four minutes, encountered (see story, page 80). depositing them slightly above and to the north of “I’ve had students who saw that off-ramp and just Chair One’s late but not lamented Midway unloading wouldn’t get off,” said longtime ski instructor Beth station. Users of the upper mountain have a new, Artner, who has watched her fledgling students confaster lift as well: the Lakeview Triple, a fixed-grip tinue on to the steep slopes above without her. Even chair that follows the upper portion of the route of the those who did manage to escape were too terrified to old lift. remember how to turn and, hence, plowed into whatChasse is enthusiastic about the opportunities that ever or whoever was directly in the fall line below the new lifts provide: “That beginner-to-intermediate them. Often this was the body of a previous victim. level of family skier might come here once and say, this

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SCHWEITZER’S GIANT LEAP

New skiers and riders once faced a challenging rite of passage at Schweitzer: After they had figured out how to turn and stop on the beginner hill, and they were ready to move to the next level on Midway or in the terrain park, they needed to negotiate the venerable Chair One. This was an undertaking not to be underestimated. Skiers approaching Chair One had to sidestep or herringbone (skills they thought died when their grandparents quit skiing) up to its loading station above the village, while snowboarders were faced with an aerobically intensive hop-and-drag routine. Once they were at the station, a certain reckless bravery was required to sit fast and hold on as a chair whipped around the bullwheel like a runaway ski and scooped them off to the snowy heights. Neither meeting these challenges nor anything they had learned so far, however, prepared them for the death-defying, double-blackdiamond drop of the Midway off-ramp, the steepest ramp on the mountain. Numerous new skiers and riders made this descent in a non-upright manner, and only extreme vigilance on the part of the liftie in the Midway shack prevented the ramp from becoming clogged with a tangled pile of bodies, boards and skis. Even for the most sentimental of Schweitzer regulars, Chair One is unlikely to be mourned. “Chair One’s always been reliable, like an old ’56 Chevrolet,” said longtime ski patroller John Pucci, but “I’m really glad it’s gone.” Although it was reliable when it ran, it was closed with frustrating frequency because of high winds coming across the ridge at the top of the South Bowl. Forty-four seasons after their first ride on Chair One, Sam Wormington, the mountain’s first general manager, and Jack is a little bit too much for us. This new lower lift is going to give all of these people the opportunity to ski in a lot of low-angle terrain.” To ensure a more comfortable transition from the beginner hill, the loading station has been moved down to village level. At the top of the new quad, “We blasted the knoll down quite a bit,” said Bill Williamson, mountain operations director, to make for an easy exit from the chair and a comfortable descent back to the village. The ride is also faster: Chair One was capable of carrying 660 people per hour to Midway in seven minutes and to the ridgetop in 11 minutes. In contrast, the detachable chairs of the Basin Express can take three 80

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PHOTO BY CORY MURDOCK

Farewell Chair One: Mountain’s original chair departs – and gets parted out

Fowler, a Spokane dentist who first had the inspiration to build a ski resort in the basin above Sandpoint, returned for one last ride on closing day, April 8, 2007. Their words and pictures were duly recorded, and then the lift was dismantled immediately after the area closed for the season. But even if Chair One is forgotten, it’s not gone. Schweitzer President and CEO Tom Chasse and Mountain Operations Manager Bill Williamson have found some imaginative and generous uses for Chair One’s earthly remains. Williamson has installed some of the old towers as anchors for winching cats, others are being used as culverts, and he gave one to the soonto-reopen St. Bernard Pub to hang its sign on. More than 40 chairs have been donated to nonprofit organizations to raffle or auction off as fund-raisers; one of them brought in $3,000 for the Festival at Sandpoint. And Williamson has squirreled away more parts and pieces on the mountain to use as the need arises. So Chair One will always be with us. It’s just working better now that it doesn’t move. –Cate Huisman times as many people per hour (2,000) to Midway in just a bit over half the time (3.7 minutes). The Lakeview Triple carries another 1,200 people from there to the ridgetop in 4.5 minutes. To think of the chair as “detachable” can be a little disconcerting while sitting in such a chair many feet above the snow. But it is their detachability that enables the Basin Express chairs to speed riders up the slope and then slow down for loading and unloading. While the main lift cable continues to travel at high speed around the bullwheels at the top and bottom of the lift, the chairs rounding the top and bottom detach from the cable and travel on a slower track. Skiers and


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riders can amble on, drop their poles, fumble with their bindings, and still be seated safely before the chair rejoins the cable and speeds up. New skiers and riders will find the Basin Express easier to get on and off than even the slow-moving Musical Chairs lift on the beginner hill. Although Chasse believes that Schweitzer’s growth potential is in providing more opportunities for new visitors, he has more in store for its more advanced patrons as well. “There’s a tremendous amount of high-angle skiers that are looking for the trees and the steeps,” he said. “We won’t forget about them. We did some more glade work this summer, and this upper lift will give them a chance to do a lot of laps up there.” Best of all, for new and experienced skiers alike, the new lifts have much better odds of running in high winds. The Basin Express is down in the trees and isn’t exposed to ridgetop winds, and the lowering of the knoll at Midway reduced its exposure to winds in the basin as well. And even the Lakeview Triple will be able to run more often. Its chairs are heavier than double chairs, and Williamson has added extra weight to give them added stability. In addition, the unloading station at the top has been redesigned to end right at the lip of the bowl, eliminating one reason that the old lift was so vulnerable to wind closure: Its top towers were set farther back on the ridge, putting the moving chairs into the path of the highest winds. While the new lifts are the biggest and most obvious change at Schweitzer this year, visitors will notice other changes as well. Probably the first one they’ll see is Schweitzer’s new logo and Web site, both of which debuted this past Labor Day weekend. At the new site, www.schweitzer.com, skiers and riders can buy their lift tickets, find out what lodgings are available and book them in real time, and confirm that the ski report doesn’t say anything about a delayed opening. On their way into the village, they’ll find a new entrance area and traffic circle as they round the last corner into the basin. In the village, the old ski check area with the dining deck atop it has been removed, revealing the appealing original facade of the Lakeview Lodge. In its place, a new dining patio at ground level puts diners closer to the action around the lifts; its best configuration will be determined this winter, and then it will be enclosed with a low stone wall and glass windbreaks.

PHOTO BY DOUG MARSHALL/EL PHOTO GRANDE

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“There’s a tremendous amount of high-angle skiers that are looking for the trees and the steeps,” he says. “We won’t forget about them.” Snowmaking and grooming investments are on tap as well. Two new groomers have been purchased at a cost of $250,000 each, and towers have been installed along the ridgetop to anchor them so they can work steeper slopes. Plans are to buy more snowmaking equipment next year: Chasse is looking to be able to make snow from the top of the new quad all the way down to the bottom of the beginner hill. “What we’re looking for there is to guarantee a Thanksgiving opening,” he said. One change that skiers and riders are not likely to notice is still perhaps the most important: $2 million of Schweitzer’s $10 million total investment last summer was used to extend and upgrade its sewer system. The improvements will serve not only resort operations but also the real estate development that is intended to turn Schweitzer into a major destination resort. The new lifts are an early and essential step in a long-term plan to tap the potential of Schweitzer’s extraordinary size: With 2,900 lift-served acres, Chasse notes that Schweitzer has twice the area and yet only half the visitors of nearby Stevens Pass. Williamson mentions an even starker contrast with Breckenridge in Colorado, where up to five times as many skiers congregate on WINTER 2008

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Snow fuels young ski racers

PHOTO BY CORY MURDOCK

He talks with passion about how he has watched it grow from conception to what it is today – a group of young racers with strong character and a love of skiing. Shep Snow, 57, a Sandpoint resident with an infectious laugh and a heart bigger than the size of the military he served for 28 years, is proud of what the team has accomplished. 18 percent less land. The Independence Race Team, founded by Snow in 1999, gives In addition to improvements being made for boys and girls in Sandpoint the chance to experience the rush of race skiers and riders, another essential aspect of this competition free of charge, ensuring that every child can participate. development is expanding year-round activities. Officially registering as a United States Ski Association indepen“We consciously decided not to do a lot of marketdent team in the 2001-02 season, it has grown into a group of 15 ing for this summer because of the construction,” to 20 racers that gives its opponents serious competition, with the Chasse said in the waning days of August, but nevyounger racers averaging six to seven races per season and the ertheless, summer traffic was “way ahead of our older racers up to 15 races per season. Snow is expecting Michael projections. We feel like Demko and Collin Jurenka, both age 11, to be reaching the podium regularly in the 2008 regional races. we have an opportunity Amongst other achievements, two teenage licensed to grow our summer alpine competitors have made it to the Junior Olympics, business, and we’re and one member of the team is the only 13-year-old boy starting to focus more in the nation ranked third or better for his age group in on summer as we move all four alpine disciplines. ahead.” The increasing Though the rigorous training program is key to their number of summer success, the momentum is carried by the dedication of the amenities will include boys and girls. “I believe the kids should learn the correlamore options for mountion between work and reward,” said Snow, “and the kids tain biking, with the buy into that.” Part of this commitment means earning the emphasis again being money necessary to purchase ski gear, a ski pass and to on maintaining opporcover race entry fees. The Saturday car wash in the tunities for advanced Sandpoint Urgent Care parking lot (space generously donated by Dr. Robert Rust), the group’s main fund-raiser, riders while building Shep Snow maintains a course while working an gives them the opportunity to achieve that goal. more alternatives for alpine ski race at Schweitzer. Common threads weave through this team, such as moderate bikers and the racers’ love of speed and competition, but the strongest is their families. camaraderie. Through the years they develop solid friendships and “Our mountain biking as it’s laid out right now is have a sense of belonging to a group of peers who love skiing. For for high-angle bikers,” Chasse said. “You have to Jake Diel, 13, the best part of being on the team is making friends. have some skills. We’re trying to identify a lowerIn fact, one of his best friends, Raleigh Hanson, is on the team. Akin angle lift-serviced trail.” to an extended family who shares similar views on life and values, In fact, Chasse has a route in mind for this trail, team members’ families share the responsibility of training and although he’s not yet ready to divulge what it is. fund-raising, with many of the parents stepping in as coaches, helpBut the emphasis will be on using the lifts to access ing with gate setup and breakdown, and organizing on race days. trails that provide for a moderate, fun descent withThe Independence Race Team also hosts the Junior Race Series out a climb up. He’s also looking for a low-angle sinat Schweitzer, now in its seventh year, open to all local boys and girls. Over four consecutive Friday nights in January, masters-level gle-track ride through the woods from the village to racers coach teams of eight, focusing on improvement. the fire station, for which Schweitzer will provide a As Independence Race Team is a non-profit organization, Snow’s shuttle to return to the village. payoff comes from seeing the racers and their families grow as a Plans also call for encouraging more conferences unit and as individuals. Though many of the racers “graduate” and and groups to use the resort year-round, and an leave racing behind, they continue to have a passion for skiing, be additional 5,000 square feet of meeting space is it downhill, freestyle or telemark. Snow said, “What we have is 100 envisioned. The resort is already a popular site for percent of kids who come out of here with good character and love weddings – last summer there was a wedding every skiing, and that is our biggest achievement.” To contact the weekend. According to Chasse, “One of the big Independence Race team, look up www.independenceracing.com. appeals is getting married on top of the mountain. –Diana Murdock 82

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Everyone goes up on the Great Escape quad, and then comes down for a reception in the lodge.” But the biggest change planned for Schweitzer is in the expansion of residential areas on the mountain (see story, page 125). There are fewer than 1,000 homes in the basin now, and up to 4,000 more could be added. Last summer the infrastructure was installed for the first 35 of 124 lots to be developed in Trappers Creek, just above the Selkirk Lodge and the Lakeview parking lot. The hydronically heated roads of this development will be melted off through this winter, and skiers and riders will be able to pass through the area and get a sense of what it will be like. In addition, Schweitzer is actively soliciting developers for two more condominium-and-retail buildings to be constructed on the west side of the Lakeview lot. Eventually, what aging skiers and riders will remember as the main parking lot will be an extension of the village, with shops and restaurants on the bottom floors and condominiums above. As development continues, the Gateway parking lot just below will fill with condos and residences, too. Day skiers who in the past have tried to squeeze their vehicles into non-spaces in the upper lots may discover that they prefer the Fall Line lot at the bottom. The long-term plan includes a pair of high-speed lifts that will serve this lot as well as a new residential

PHOTO BY CHRIS GUIBERT

SCHWEITZER’S GIANT LEAP

Steve and Julie Meyers and family pick a route through the North Bowl.

area called Greyhawk, which will be below the beginner hill and the cross-country trails. These lifts will take skiers onto the ridge between the ski area’s two bowls; from there they can head into the village on the cat track or ski off into the runs of the Outback Bowl. With all this development, will Schweitzer’s famously uncrowded slopes get crowded? Given its 7,000 acres in total holdings, Schweitzer’s managers are not concerned; there’s plenty of room to build more lifts and access new terrain. “One thing that’s in our favor is that we have the ability to do that, to expand up onto Big Blue and go onto the west side, so there are tremendous opportunities for the future,” said Chasse. He’s confident that Schweitzer has what it takes to draw snow sports enthusiasts looking for an area and a lifestyle in which they can develop their skills. “It’s not necessarily the place that you’re going to come to learn to ski,” he said, “but I think it’s the kind of place at which you’ll aspire to ski.”

SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN STATS 2007-08 Acreage: 2,900, 84 named trails plus open bowl skiing and riding and two terrain parks Terrain: 20% Beginner, 40% Intermediate, 35% Advanced, 5% Expert Longest Run: Little Blue Ridge Run, 1.7 miles Vertical Drop: 2,400 feet Top Elevation: 6,400 feet Average Annual Snowfall: 300 inches Cross Country Trails: 32 kilometers Lifts: 10 total – “Stella” high-speed six-pack; “Basin Express” and “Great Escape” high-speed quads; the “Lakeview Triple”; plus three double chairlifts, Idyle Our Tbar, a beginner’s Musical Carpet and a handle tow Total Uphill Capacity: 12,502 per hour Hours of Operation: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Night Skiing: Fridays, Saturdays and holidays from Dec. 21, 2007, through March 15, 2008, from 3 p.m. 84

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to 8 p.m. Season: Late November or early December 2007 to April 2008 Lift tickets: Adult $55, junior 7-17 $40, child 6 and under free, college or seniors 65 and over $45. Night rates: adult $15; junior 7-17, college or seniors 65 and over $10; child 6 and under free. Cross-country: $10 adult, $8 junior. Snowshoe: $4 all ages. Tubing: $10. Website: www.schweitzer.com Phone: (208) 263-9555, (800) 831-8810 Activity Center: (208) 255-3081


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PHOTO BY BILLIE JEAN PLASTER

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Mother and son bound by photographic artistry

By Sandy Compton

D

orothy Hazel Bridges was born March 26, 1913, in Kansas City, Kan. But, she says, “About the next week, we moved over to Kansas City, Mo., where my father had a greenhouse. I can smell the carnations yet.” When Hazel – which she prefers to be called – was 5, the family moved to Montrose, Colo., and then to Delta. “Dad had got a job with the county to build up old farms that had gone back for taxes. They’d get into an old house, and Dad would build up the orchards. He was known as the best irrigator in the county – imagine that. He would always plant flowers when we went to a new place – he said flowers were God’s way of sharing love – and Mother would clean up those old houses. “So, I can remember as a child moving all the time from one farm to the next – until we got to Paeonia. There we got a farm, and a few years later, they bought a home in Hotchkiss, which is where I graduated from high school.” Hazel was a 16-year-old beauty packing peaches, “working in the fruit” she calls it, when a lanky fruit picker with a soft Texas drawl saw her in a Palisades, Colo., drugstore. “He just followed me out the door,” says Hazel, “and started whipping up a conversation. And that was it.” It took him a couple of years to reel her in, but in January 1932, she and he stepped off a train into a cold winter night and a warm, small-town welcome and embarked on life together in Sandpoint as Mr. and Mrs. Ross Hall. They were a team, pouring energy and time into community, family and a photography business they would come to own. Over the next two decades, they built up Ross Hall Studios and had three children – Loyce, named for Ross’ twin sister, Robert Ross and Dann, who is now curator of the Ross Hall Collection, proprietor of Hallans Gallery on First Avenue

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Hazel Hall and her son Dann pause at Hallans Gallery in front of a recent exhibit of the elder Hall’s photos.

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and a photographer in his own right. By the mid-1950s, Ross Hall Studios had become a Sandpoint fixture and Ross’ photographs were nationally known. But, Ross and Dann were not the only photographers in the family. Next to his classic prints, Hallans recently displayed a selection of Hazel’s photography. Hazel, at age 94, still has the bright eyes and sense of humor that made that long-ago fruit picker follow her out of the drugstore. Dann, about to turn 60, favors his Dad – tall, thin and laconic.

Hazel Hall took the photo above of horses feeding near a hillside around Sun Valley, Idaho, circa 1978, on one of their many vacations there. Right, Hazel and husband Ross wave goodbye to their young children as they depart for an ice skating date, circa 1945. Ross was the principle photo professional for Sandpoint from at least 1931 to 1960, joined by Hazel in 1932. At one time, they had 100 employees and processed more than 600,000 large format negatives. They sold 35 million postcards during the 1950s. His images continue to sell around the world.

My first question: Why two n’s? Hazel: (Dann laughs) Ask him. I didn’t name

him that. His name was Danny Jay. He didn’t like “Danny,” so he cut off the “y.” It’s even legal now, isn’t it? Dann: It’s legal now. I’ve squatted on the name

long enough. You didn’t name him that?

Hazel: Loyce named him that. I don’t know why she liked Jay, but she did. I’m glad we’ve cleared that up. Hazel, all

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these pictures on display here today are color. I expected to see some black-and-white stuff from you.

Dann Hall was traveling in Connemara, Ireland when he took the image above entitled “Hillside Shepherd,” circa 1998. At left, the knife-like edge of Chimney Rock’s south face stands out in sharp contrast to the blue sky over the Selkirk Mountains, in this circa 1982 photo by Dann.

Hazel: Well, all of those got lost – my black and white. They were in a big box, and it looked like there was just junk in there. Anyway, they got thrown out. These, they’re off of slides. I took all these when we were traveling. I’m the only one who took pictures when we were traveling. Ross took pictures of this county and this state, and over into Montana and Washington, but he rarely took pictures anywhere else. Ross didn’t take any pictures when you were traveling?

Hazel: He didn’t take any pictures. He said, “What will I do with them?” Dann: Tahoe? Hazel: That was an assignment from the postcard company. The same way with Yellowstone. Dann: He didn’t take them in a tourist-like fashion, you mean.

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ence between what I took and what Ross took many times. In fact, “Syringa Time,” which was our best seller for ages, I took that picture, and when we got home and developed it, Ross said. “Where did you get that? Take me back there.” So, he goes back and takes the picture. Dann: Large format. But you saw it first.

Hazel: That’s right. (She laughs) I saw it first. Dann, when did you take your first picture?

Dann: When I was 3, with a little Brownie snapshot camera. I left the front porch, and by the time I’d reached the corner 300 feet away, I’d taken 12 shots of the sidewalk. A study in concrete.

Hazel: I wish you had them now. It would be kind of fun to see what the pattern is. Dann: That’s kind of how the show at the Pend d’Oreille Winery was – 20 shots in 20 minutes. Hazel: Of what? Dann: Of the old Humbird Mill. Those were all done with a little point-and-shoot digital. Still looking down, most of them. At concrete, too. Hazel, do you still take pictures?

Hazel: Honestly, what I’ve done is I buy these little ready-set cameras. Don’t have to do anything but just “ta-chit,” (she makes the sound of a camera shutter) and I’ve gotten some good pictures. This photo titled “Hazel Hiking” was taken by Ross Hall circa 1943 and hand tinted around the same time by Hazel. She and her hiking companion, Evelyn Thomas, were exploring a mountainside around Dover. Ross learned hand tinting in photography school and taught Hazel the method using transparent oils. She says she always wanted to be an artist and “that took its place.” Hazel still gets requests to hand color black-and-white photos.

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Hazel: Yes. Just a small family discussion, folks. (They both laugh) Let’s go on. So, when you lost all your black-and-white work – was it a fire, were you cleaning out the attic?

Hazel: Yes, I just threw them all in a box and took it over to an office that Bob and Dann had, and it got lost. There was a lot of family pictures in there, which made me sad, but there wasn’t much else good in there, I don’t imagine. When did you take your first picture?

Hazel: Ross bought me – before we were married – a little 116-size camera, and most of the pictures that got thrown away were taken by that camera. It had adjustments, and you had to do all the calculations. You couldn’t tell the differ-

WINTER 2008

So how many pictures do you think you’ve taken in your life?

Hazel: Oh, my goodness. Don’t ask me. Tens of thousands?

Hazel: Oh, no! I don’t have any estimate at all. How about you, Dann?

Dann: Oh, in the low thousands, I’d guess. You’re a little more deliberate than many photographers. You wait for light. You don’t take all your pictures, 20 in 20 minutes.

Dann: No. That’s the other end of how I usually set photographs. Most of my stuff, whether it’s commercial shots or travel, will be tripodded, using a 4 by 5. It’s kind of a slow-motion process.


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What’s the longest you have ever waited for a picture?

Dann: Probably, it was with Dad. Three hours when I was 4 years old, and when you’re 4 years old, three hours is like 50 years. It was over on Gold Hill, waiting for the clouds to drift into the right position over City Beach, which is where I really wanted

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to be, over playing on the swings. We’re running out of space. Hazel, what else would you like to say?

Hazel: I taught Verna Mae Davis how to hand tint, and she colored a lot of pictures. We still see each other all the time, and she says that Duane (her husband, late photographer Cap Davis) had opportunities to move

“The Fall” by Hazel Hall

other places, and he didn’t want to because he liked Sandpoint. She says “I’ve never gotten over thanking him for not going someplace else.” And I feel the same way. Ross had opportunities in Butte and a couple of places on the Coast, but he didn’t, and I’ve thanked him many times. Sandpoint is grateful, too. Hazel.

“The Ruins at Twilight” by Dann Hall

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Ice Fishing

Come winter, beat the cold and get better fishing

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Mickelson and his son Curtis caught more than 100 perch on Lake Pend Oreille at the north end of the Long Bridge. They kept 30 to 40 of the biggest ones, then spent a couple of hours at home filleting them. Their freezer was well-stocked! Wondering what time of day to hit the ice? Generally, mornings and late afternoons are best, but during the winter months you can fish all day. The chances of getting a bite are actually better than during the summer, as there’s less food available for the fish, so they should be eager to go after your bait. But if you don’t get a bite within 15 minutes or so, you should probably move to another location. Equipment needs for this sport are pretty minimal. Jim Aiken, an avid sportsman who owns a barbershop in Sandpoint, says these are the basic ice fishing supplies you’ll need in northern Idaho: a fishing license if you’re over 14; 4- to 8-pound fishing line; a 4- to 5-foot, ultra-light spinning rod; an auger or spud bar; ice cleats; the best, well-insulated boots you can afford; warm gloves, hat, coveralls and jacket; a bait bucket that will double as a seat; bait; jibs and spoons; hooks; a sled for hauling your supplies; a safety rope; and food and water. Aiken says a pair of binoculars is particularly useful. Why? He uses them for spotting other fishermen WINTER 2008

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ce fishing is not for the faint of heart or the cold of foot, but it is the perfect sport for the fisherman or woman who’s adventurous and doesn’t mind a little cold weather. From the end of December through mid-March, great ice fishing can be found on lakes within an hour’s drive or so from Sandpoint. Some of the best fishing in northern Idaho is on Lake Pend Oreille and smaller lakes, such as Cocolalla, Mirror, Gamlin, Shepherd, Round, Antelope and Priest. If you want to try your luck on the big lake, head for the small bay left of the Long Bridge as you drive north into Sandpoint. Near Bonners Ferry, the fishing is good on Bonner, Dawson, Brush, Perkins and Smith lakes. You’ll mainly be fishing for perch, but bass, sunfish, crappie, pike, mackinaw and whitefish are also lurking under the ice. Looking for lake trout? Try Round, Mirror, Cocolalla and Priest lakes, where local fishermen say to try a synthetic bait called Powerbait. Perch aren’t finicky eaters; they’ll bite on worms, maggots and bits of other fish. Ice fishermen like perch because they make good eating, there’s no size limit – though 10 to 12 inches is a good length – and you can catch as many as you can eat. One winter’s day, local residents Matt

By Kathleen Mulroy

PHOTO BY RYAN MCGINTY

Joe Henninger of Rathdrum waits patiently for his next catch while ice fishing at Round Lake State Park.

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COURTESY PHOTO

Ice Fishing

Sandpoint resident Nancy Hadley and Al Van Voren, a Boise biologist, pose with a 28-pound Idaho lake trout she caught. A veteran ice fisher, Hadley once fell through old, crystallized ice and was rescued by her husband, Jim Aiken. The incident was a reminder to always follow the leader’s footsteps.

on the ice. After all, where there are fishermen, there are probably fish! Of course, fancier equipment is certainly available. Aiken’s wife, Nancy Hadley, a Sandpoint financial consultant, sometimes uses a portable, lightweight ice hut. Her husband prefers open-air fishing, likening sitting in the hut to “fishing in an outhouse!” Other extras you might want: a hook sharpener; bobbers; a Vexilar (sonar fishfinder); an underwater camera; GPS; a heater for your ice shelter; a lawn chair; a small, collapsible shovel for removing snow on the ice; and twoway radios to talk to your buddies. Ice fishing is a wonderful family sport. Fifteen-year-old Curtis Mickelson has been fishing with his dad for years and says he looks forward to it every winter. If you bring young children along, be sure to pack extra gloves and plenty of snacks. And

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they’ll enjoy playing with a sled if they get tired of fishing. Don’t let your kids wander off without supervision, though. It’s especially important to keep them away from open water where the ice can be thin and unstable. Speaking of safety, there are some general rules to follow. After arriving at the water’s edge, survey the ice. Look for wet areas, then avoid them as the ice may be too thin where it’s wet. The ice should be a minimum of 4 inches thick, which will safely hold a group of people. Test the ice thickness by using an auger or a spud bar (a crow bar with a chisel at the end) to make a hole. You’re required to make a legal-sized hole, which is 144 square inches (12 inches by 12 inches). If you move around much on the ice, occasionally drill holes to check the ice thickness. Another safety rule: People in a group should follow the leader’s steps and stay several feet apart. That way their weight will be distributed evenly on the ice. Always have a rope with you, just in case you need to haul out something larger than a fish – like a friend or relative. Aiken and a buddy were faced with this situation last year. Hadley and her friend had dropped behind and were busy talking and drinking coffee. They forgot to follow the leaders’ tracks and got onto some old, crystallized ice. The next thing Aiken knew, both women were in the icy water. He and his friend rushed to pull them out. They needed to move fast because after about 60 seconds in the water, heavy winter clothes become even heavier. By the way, if you’re alone on the ice and fall into the water, don’t use your elbows to pull yourself out; this will just push more ice into the water. Instead, try to roll yourself out. Another safety tip: If the ice is slick or uneven, strap ice cleats onto your boots to get a better grip. Follow these rules and you’ll have a safe, fun ice fishing experience.


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Margaret Williams kicks and glides her way back to Schweitzer Village on Overland Loop from Picnic Point.

Scenery and solitude

Skiers take refuge in Schweitzer’s Nordic trails

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By Keith Kinnaird totally fine,” Gerber said, even when it’s not. “It could be snowing, it could be nasty out and you’re nice and warm because you’re working so hard, and you stop in the middle of the trees and it is quiet as can be. “I have to say that I have stopped so many times and thought ‘I’m in the best mood doing this.’ It’s really surreal,” said Gerber. Although a good portion of Schweitzer’s terrain leans toward the challenging, there are plenty of routes, both classic and skate, that will appeal to those with more leisurely instincts. Chief among the latter is the Picnic Point out-and-back trek, which is marked by gentle ups and downs. The excursion covers 5 kilometers (3.1 miles) and has an elevation gain of about 320 feet. Start at the village trailhead, follow Overland to Grr Trail and don’t forget to pack a lunch. “Their payoff is at Picnic Point – that view of Lake Pend Oreille,” said Jacqui O’Neill, another local who is well-acquainted with Schweitzer’s trail network. Overland Loop, which continues

past Picnic Point, traces the perimeter of Schweitzer’s trail system and returns to the village by way of a cat track shortcut. This ramble has more sustained climbs and descents, but it’s not a death march or a teeth-clencher. Overland Loop also is studded with sidetrack opportunities. Cougar Gulch ranks among the most challenging, while Huckleberry Hill, which is accessed off of Cloudwalker, has some good twists and also can provide shelter from some of the harsher elements. “There’s a bunch of really nice kilometers around Bear Ridge, Grr Trail and upper Overland,” said O’Neill, who has 14 years of experience on Schweitzer’s trails. Cloudwalker, as its name indicates, boasts dramatic views and ratchets up the cardio. But there are dividends that extend beyond the eye candy. “The way back is really fun. You’re just kind of cruising with gravity,” Gerber said. Skiers traipsing on Schweitzer’s trails can also expect to share the road with commuters of the fourlegged kind. Snowshoe hare are a WINTER 2008

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olitude is only a few strides away even when Schweitzer Mountain Resort’s slopes become clotted with visitors. Schweitzer’s 32-plus kilometers of Nordic trails coil through cloistered stands of thick forest and offer wideopen views of Lake Pend Oreille, the Cabinet and Selkirk mountain ranges, and the valley below. “I love going out there, especially when it’s really busy on the ski slopes and you just kind of want to get away. You can go out on a cross-country ski trail, and it’s just so peaceful and beautiful,” said Lisa Gerber, a Nordic skier from Sandpoint who has been gliding Schweitzer’s trails since 2001. Gerber has also found refuge when weather conditions become less than ideal. While chairs blow sideways on Snow Ghost and riders shrink into their seats in a futile attempt to ward off the knifing cold, Gerber is embracing the mood-elevating and weathernullifying properties of the cross-country trails. “All of a sudden the weather’s

PHOTO BY DOUG MARSHALL

Nordic Skiing

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common sight, but there have also been sightings of bigger and more elusive wildlife. “You’ll see moose out there, but really only in the early season,” said Gerber. “I’ve skated all the way out Cloudwalker following huge moose divots in the trail.” O’Neill remembers seeing a bobcat padding along on one of the trails. “I was gliding on that top part of Overland, where it overlooks the Selkirks. As I was going, I saw this animal in front of me,” she said. “It was so fun. I was on my skating gear so I was gliding pretty fast, and I was catching up with him. He loped along the trail in front of me.” Nordic skiers will also be seeing improved trail markers. “We’re updating the signage to ease navigation through the trail system,” said Schweitzer Mountain Resort’s

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Jennifer Ekstrom. Consistency is another feature of Schweitzer’s Nordic network. The trails are routinely groomed and trackset, a fact that O’Neill said was underscored when she hit some trails in Sun Valley a few years back. “The moment that day I put my skis on to go slide away, I fell on my butt before I even took a step because their stuff had been groomed so much earlier and it had iced up, and that’s when I truly realized how great Schweitzer’s trails are,” O’Neill said. As long as Schweitzer isn’t being carpeted with a berber of powder or coated in freezing rain, chances are you’ll find good trail conditions. “You’re guaranteed a good ski,” said O’Neill, who remembers when Schweitzer’s trails didn’t receive reliable maintenance. Checking the daily grooming

Low-elevation Nordic havens The Panhandle is blessed with plenty of low-lying Nordic opportunities for those who aren’t up for the challenges of crosscountry skiing in an alpine environment. They each traffic through breathtaking views and variety, so there’s no need to worry about sacrificing anything amid the drop in elevation. Priest Lake Nordic Center The Priest Lake Golf Course, located about 30 miles north of Priest River, transforms into the Priest Lake Nordic Center when winter hits. The center offers 15 kilometers of groomed trail and skating lanes, plus a


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Nordic Skiing

new telemark hill for skiers interested in trying another form of free-heel skiing. Backcountry excursions and lessons with staff certified by Professional Ski Instructors of America can also be arranged through the center. The Nordic center’s system ties into trails at Hill’s Resort and the U.S. Forest Service’s Hanna Flats trails, resulting in a circuit which covers more than 40 kilometers. Call (208) 443-2525 or look up www.priestlakegolfcourse.com/nordic.htm. An individual day trail pass costs $5. Priest Lake State Park This park system is found on the east side of Priest Lake and sits at 2,440 feet above sea level. There are 80 kilometers of groomed trail emanating from the Indian Creek Unit that wind through forests popu-

lated by cedar, hemlock and larch. Pets are allowed as long as they’re on a leash because of an abundance of wildlife including white-tailed deer, moose and black bear. Call (208) 443-2200 or go online to www.idahoparks.org/parks/priestlake.aspx. Round Lake State Park Situated about 10 miles south of Sandpoint and at 2,122 feet is Round Lake State Park. There are more than 4 kilometers of trail that appeal to beginner and intermediate cross-country skiers. The trails, which are groomed when weather conditions permit, roughly follow the shoreline of the circular 58-acre lake, the product of glacial activity during the Pleistocene Epoch. Pets are OK here, too, but leashes are required. Call (208) 263-3489 or check

www.idahoparks.org/parks/roundlake.aspx. Farragut State Park This state park lies 30 miles south of Sandpoint at the south end of Lake Pend Oreille, on Highway 54 east of Athol. There are more than 7 kilometers of groomed trails designed with novices in mind and also to show off views of the lake and the Cabinet and Selkirk mountain ranges that bracket it. Be sure to note snow levels, however. Trail conditions are influenced heavily by the park’s position at 2,054 feet. Learn more at (208) 683-2425 or online at www.idahoparks.org/parks/farragut.aspx. All state parks have a $4 day use vehicle entry fee; annual passports are $25. –Keith Kinnaird

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report provides the best assessment of trail conditions, Gerber adds. Rare are the occasions when conditions are so poor the trails cannot be skied. “When the conditions on the slopes are bad, usually the crosscountry skiing is good – especially if you’re skating because if the snow is

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firm, it’s perfect for skating,” said Gerber. O’Neill, who used to manage Schweitzer’s cross-country trails, recalls many a user remarking at the value here. “The people that would come here from out of town or that had moved

here from Jackson Hole or Sun Valley just thought they were getting a steal from our trails,” said O’Neill. If you’re competition-oriented, Schweitzer’s annual racing series is another way to get your Nordic thrills. But they’re more about pleasure than hand-wringing over fractions of a second and the right wax to use. “Our Nordic ski races are really all about fun. They’re not like the highpressure ski races that some areas might offer,” said Ekstrom. Last season’s three-chapter race series emphasized the enjoyment factor by structuring a group finish in the village. “The second and third races had a staggered start based on the finish times from the previous races so it creates an exciting finish where people of all different skill levels will hopefully be coming into the finish line at a similar time and creating that excitement,” said Ekstrom. The Panhandle has more crosscountry trails than you can shake a carbon fiber touring pole at, but few systems have such easy access to a fullservice village offering nourishment, rest and just about anything else you may need. “A lot of places you go to don’t really have amenities. You’re just driving to a trailhead and going,” said Gerber. The village might be close by, but it’s easy to return to the company of nature. “You have to kind of stop and savor the moment and enjoy the total silence – especially when it’s a holiday week and it’s totally crazy in the village,” she said. “It’s just nice to get out of there and you can pretty quickly.” Schweitzer Mountain Resort’s Nordic trails are open daily from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The single-day track fee is $10 for adults and $8 for seniors and juniors. Season passes are $125. Check trail conditions online at www.schweitzer.com.

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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PHOTO BY AMIE WOLF

Local Diet

Emily Levine collects food for her next meal during the beginning of a yearlong pledge to eat only local foods.

Taking a bite out of Sandpoint

By Amie Wolf

One woman’s yearlong commitment to eating an all-local diet

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preservatives and packaging to keep it “fresh,” and uses up fossil fuels in transit. That collective toll has a growing number of people across the country, Levine included, turning to local farms and farmers markets for their food needs. All-local diets are rapidly becoming a nationwide trend, thanks in part to two recently published books: “Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A year of food life” by Barbara Kingsolver; and “Plenty: One man, one woman, and a raucous year of eating locally” by Alisa Smith and J.B. Mackinnon. Oodles of Web sites, such as www.ruralroots.org and www.localharvest.org, have popped up on the Internet as well, encouraging people to eat more local foods and providing resources and advice on following all-local diets. Concerned with the excessive mileage put on the food we consume and the negative effects of commercial agriculture on small, sustainable farms, Levine has pledged to eat an all-local

diet for one year beginning on Sept. 1, 2007. “I have found it fulfilling in my life to have a strong connection with the food I’m eating,” said Levine, who will focus on foods found within a 250-mile radius from Sandpoint. This is not the first time Levine has committed to eating locally grown food. While living in Minnesota a couple years ago, Levine and a group of others followed an all-local diet for a year, learning plenty in the process. “I can’t buy produce from grocery stores anymore because I know how good local foods taste. It just doesn’t compare,” she said. Levine has also felt better physically and spiritually, and she believes it is a political statement as well. “Agricultural industries in the U.S. are having adverse effects on the planet. People are destroying our land with genetically modified foods, pesticides and herbicides. It’s thoughtless,” she said. So, what does she eat? As an apprentice at Prancing Pony Farms, a horse-powered, biodynamic and sustain-

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n a sunny, late-summer afternoon, Emily Levine walks down row after row of plentiful vegetables springing up from the fertile soil at Prancing Pony Farms just west of Sandpoint. Periodically, she bends down to pull up and toss aside a stray weed as she meanders through and across the long lines of crops with familiar ease. Levine uproots a hearty-looking head of green leaf lettuce, unearths a bunch of carrots and yanks out a few stubborn beets – all destined to become part of her dinner that evening. Food doesn’t get much fresher than that, considering the majority of produce and meat sold in grocery stores travels an average of 1,300 to 1,800 miles before ending up on your plate. And those “food miles” – or the distance food travels from where it’s grown to where it’s consumed – take a toll. As food is trucked and flown across the country in refrigerated compartments, it loses flavor, depends on

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able farm owned by Brandon and Fosha Mimbs, Levine enjoys a variety of freshpicked produce, including beans, tomatoes, cucumbers, lettuce, beets, carrots, potatoes, corn, squash, cabbage, broccoli, and kale to name a few. She also gets milk, eggs and chicken from the farm and has learned how to make her own cheese and yogurt.

Grains such as wheat and barley come from the fertile Palouse region, and rye, wheat, emmer and flax come from Bluebird Grain Farms in Winthrop, Wash. Levine also takes advantage of the things that grow wild in northern Idaho, noshing on freshpicked huckleberries, mushrooms such as morels and oysters, wild ginger and

even cattails. For beverages, Levine sticks with the basics. Besides water and the fresh milk from Prancing Pony’s cow, she makes her own teas by drying herbs she collects – mint, chamomile and lemon balm. Of course there are challenges to eating locally, especially when you live in an area where the long winter

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months limit eating anything fresh. Levine begins storing food away during the plentiful summer by freezing, drying and canning foods to last her until warmer weather brings new crops. Regardless, committing to an all-local diet is important to Levine. “I think that food is an issue that affects everybody. You’re making a choice,

choosing not to support the habits of our culture,” she said. Following an all-local diet requires making other sacrifices as well: saying goodbye to nuts, coffee and chocolate. Ditto for other main staples such as rice, sugar, avocados, bananas and citrus fruits. To alleviate some of the restrictions

from following an all-local diet, one can choose to make conscious exceptions. Levine allows herself salt, pepper, and other exotic spices found far from the pristine Panhandle as “trade items.” Although olives are alien to northern Idaho soil, she opts to buy olive oil from a small, sustainable olive farm in California. While outside of

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the 250-mile radius, she knows where the olive oil came from and how it was prepared, and she appreciates it. “Eating a local diet is about awareness and enjoying your food,” said Levine. “If you eat something with intention it has a greater power.” Following an all-local diet can also be hard on one’s social life. Being invited to someone’s home for dinner or going out with friends can be challenging. Often a host will make sure to point out if any part of the meal had local origins. Levine, known as the “Local Food Girl” to many of her friends, enjoys inspiring others and getting them to think about their food. Eating away from home got a tad easier for Levine this summer after a number of area restaurants pledged to participate in the “Local Food Challenge.” Levine approached many Sandpoint eating establishments to participate in the 2007 Local Food Challenge, which encouraged restaurants to incorporate locally grown foods into their menus on specific dates. Eichardt’s, Oishii Sushi, Ivano’s Ristorante and others signed up. Levine offers advice to individuals interested in starting their own all-local diet: “Start small. A year of local foods is really intimidating.” She suggests identifying one item or category that you can start to buy locally and move on from there. Meat is often a first choice. Another way to “eat local” is by linking up with farms that offer a community supported agriculture (CSA) service where people can buy a subscription from the farm and get a box of fresh produce each week. Chances are this won’t be the last all-local diet Emily Levine takes on as her dedication to eating fresh foods and supporting local farms continues. Participating in the local food movement is worth every bite if it helps change the future of the average American’s eating habits. Levine added, “I hope what develops out of this is a community food system where people become conscious of food and community simultaneously.”

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Virtual Sandpoint

ILLUSTRATION BY DAN SEWARD

Vi r t u a l Sandpoint Navigating Sandpoint’s Web sites and blogs

By Trish Gannon

S

andpoint may be small in population, but its virtual reality is huge. Hundreds of local businesses, groups and individuals have created such a sizable Web presence that you can now visit Sandpoint without leaving the comfort of the chair in front of your computer. Here are some Web sites, and sights, worth a look.

Sandpoint Insider

COMMUNITY SITES:

Sandpoint Online SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS:

www.sandpointonline.com

GOVERNMENT:

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Virtual Sandpoint

BLOGGING IT:

MEDIA:

www.sandpointonline.com

SOCIAL NETWORKING:

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Natives & Newcomers

Natives and Newcomers This continuing feature brings together a pair of natives and a couple of newcomers for an intriguing study in contrasts. This time we chose a teenager for each category, plus a longtime resident who owns a small business and a retired newcomer. One topic was what they would change about Sandpoint if they could: Two of them brought up traffic, one targeted development and another lamented the weather. Two say they’ll be here for the rest of their lives; the other two aren’t so sure. We invite you to compare their thoughts and consider their different perspectives.

By Dianna Winget Photos by Skye Golson

based activity?

Do your future plans include Sandpoint?

If you could change something about Sandpoint, what would it be?

N AT I V E S www.sandpointonline.com

JAYE PIETSCH-SCHUCK Any advice for newcomers?

What’s your favorite local business?

HANNAH VOGEL

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Natives & Newcomers

What’s your favorite local business? Do your future plans involve Sandpoint? Any advice for newcomers?

If you could change something about Sandpoint, what would it be?

www.sandpointonline.com

What’s your favorite Sandpointbased activity?

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Natives & Newcomers

N EW CO M E RS JAKE SEMONES If you could change something about Sandpoint, what would it be?

What brought you to Sandpoint?

What’s your favorite local business?

What’s your favorite Sandpoint-

www.sandpointonline.com

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Natives & Newcomers

based activity?

Do your future plans include Sandpoint?

CAROL MESSERSMITH What’s your favorite local business? What brought you to Sandpoint?

If you could change something about Sandpoint, what would it be?

www.sandpointonline.com

What are your favorite Sandpointbased activities?

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Estate

Luxury lifestyle market

Story by Te r r i C a s e y

Photos by Jon R. S a y l e r, A r c h i t e c t A I A

How Sandpoint is capturing this real estate niche

www.sandpointonline.com

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un Valley. Aspen. Jackson Hole. Lake Tahoe. Sandpoint. Even though it’s the newcomer in the group, Sandpoint now plays in the major leagues of Rocky Mountain places where people of means look for primary, second and vacation homes. High-end real estate developments in the area are vying for the hearts and wallets of these wealthy prospective buyers, while local leaders and citizens try to sort out how to welcome the demographic change here while preserving and protecting the essence of what draws people here in the first place. “Even in what the nation is calling a down market, our prices for luxury real estate have not adjusted – on the contrary, they’ve maintained or accelerated,” says Dale Pyne of Dale Pyne SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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Real Estate Investments, current president of the Selkirk Association of Realtors, which comprises Bonner and Boundary counties. “When prospective buyers who can be anywhere want to be take a look at us, they’re often awestruck; what they find here is tremendous natural beauty and space. People quickly see that there are so many opportunities for four-season activity that you don’t have enough time to pursue them, and very few places in the nation pose that challenge. Relatively speaking, we are still unrecognized and therefore still very much a value.” Luxury-lifestyle buyers love natural beauty and space, but according to developers, they also love amenities. “Of course people come here for waterfront, but people also want amenities like skiing, fishing, a quaint

village, almost always art galleries and the arts and culture, good restaurants,” says Jeff Bond, broker/owner of Tomlinson Sandpoint Sotheby’s International Realty in Sandpoint. “We have all those things.” But different amenities appeal to different luxury buyers, developers say. For some, the top amenity might be privacy, space for grazing their horses or healthy rivers for fishing; for others, it’s a sense of community that’s available even to part-time residents; for yet others, it’s easy access to entertainment and restaurants. Each luxury real estate developer faces the challenge of distinguishing their offering and getting the word out, and many in Bonner County are working hard – and spending mightily – to grab the attention of luxury real estate buyers across the United States.


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Real Estate

Selling the dream

T

he Idaho Club is a 900-acre

This new home built in Dover Bay, opposite, and the one above in the Sandpoint city limits both have lakefront – a prime amenity in the luxury market.

the arts at the festival and the Panida, and being downtown.” The Crossing at Willow Bay, a 180-acre, 82-homesite, gated development on the Pend Oreille River about 15 miles west of Sandpoint, has teamed with DMB, a real-estate marketing firm based in Scottsdale, Ariz., that advises high-end developers on how to tailor their property and market their offerings to luxury buyers. The Crossing, which has prices starting at $250,000, advertises in national publications including The Wall Street Journal and USA Today as well as The Seattle Times and magazines such as Sunset, San Diego Magazine, Phoenix Home & Garden, and Alaska Airlines Magazine. “When we started marketing, we expected two-thirds of our clients would be second-home buyers and one-third primary-residence buyers, but we find it’s half and half,” says sales associate Jennifer Leedy. Their WINTER 2008

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development about 10 miles east of Sandpoint that comprises the former Hidden Lakes Golf Resort plus acreage on Moose Mountain across Highway 200. The company also owns property at Trestle Creek on Lake Pend Oreille, where it has applied for permits to build a mix of waterfront condos, attached homes and homesites. Parcels of land at The Idaho Club range in price from $295,000 to $1.2 million, and lodge homes run from $700,000 to $1.25 million. “The Idaho Club is a fully amenitized community, and people are buying a lifestyle – premium golf, the lake, distinct seasons, skiing, abundant natural beauty,” says Brad Arnold, director of sales. “We’ll have a swimming pool and beach club, spa and fitness facility, concierge services, dining, tennis, kids’ camps, cooking classes, a community dock, an alpine club at Schweitzer for our residents to use. All that goes back to lifestyle.” At Seasons at Sandpoint, a luxury

waterfront resort condo development on Lake Pend Oreille east of City Beach, prices range from the mid$400,000s for a one-bedroom, twobath condo to more than $2 million for 4,100 square feet with home theater, outdoor summer kitchen, two-car attached garage and other high-end features. Seasons has an 82-slip private marina, two concierges on staff, an inhouse spa, and a $6-million clubhouse that offers a monthly menu of resort activities. Sixty-five residences at Seasons have been sold and more are on contract, says Chris Chambers of Tomlinson Sotheby’s, the exclusive listing agent for Seasons, owned by Bella Vista Group Inc. of Tampa, Fla. “We’re seeing a mix of people using their Seasons condo as their primary residence or second home – people who are not enjoying taking care of acreage anymore, who prefer to be part of a community and so are moving back into town,” Chambers says. “These people may travel two or three months a year, and while they’re in Sandpoint they want to spend their time boating, water skiing, enjoying

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average buyer profile: professional, often from the high-tech world, in their 40s with families or in their 50s as empty nesters, having retired early or planning retirement. There are baby boomers and younger folks whose stock portfolios did well or whose homes in urban markets appreciated considerably in value in recent years. Most are from Arizona and southern California (“reverse snowbirds”) or nearby Washington. Some plan to come for six weeks in summer and the same in winter. They want all the amenities, Leedy says – someone to pick up and deliver their laundry, concierge services to book horseback riding for the grandkids or a massage at home for themselves, sports courts, a gourmet restaurant, beach club, and more. Buyers in Phase 1 and 2 of The Crossing at Willow Bay get membership to the

This home at Ponder Point, finished in 2006, has wide-open views of Lake Pend Oreille.

Willow Bay Yacht Club, which provides a slip in the new marina – a big draw, according to the development’s study of five lakes in the area that showed virtually no private moorage available. “An amazing number of our buy-

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ers spent time on a lake as a child and have an idyllic memory of it, and they want to create an upscale version of that in this stage of their lives,” Leedy says. “Because we’re a waterfront community and waterfront is at


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Real Estate a premium, we focus on that.”

A piece of paradise

C

hildhood memories were indeed at work for Matt and Kelly Cubbage of Houston, who partnered with three of Matt’s friends to buy a waterfront home in Hope last year. Matt, a 36-year-old spine surgeon who grew up in Deer Park, Wash., north of Spokane, spent many a boyhood summer weekend camping and water skiing with his family on Lake Pend Oreille and wanted his three children to experience the beauty of northern Idaho as well. Texas lakes, he says are “terrible, shallow, snake-filled reservoirs that never cool down. The clay soil makes them red or brown, and the topography is flat, flat, flat. “I wanted my kids to have the pleasure of the kind of lake I grew up enjoying, but it’s not just the lake – it’s being cool in the evening, needing

to put on a sweater, going hiking, going trout fishing in the little rivers there,” Matt says. The Cubbages and their friends – another spine surgeon from California, a corporate treasurer from Houston, and a periodontist from Portland – will each have private weeks at their large house in Hope. And sharing the mortgage payment allowed them to purchase a home that’s big enough to enjoy shared vacations there as well. “I’m meticulous in how I make decisions. Obviously I knew the Sandpoint area well, but we evaluated several other areas and kept coming back to Lake Pend Oreille because it offers water-skiing in summer and skiing in winter. Very few places in the U.S. offer so much in each season, especially for the price,” Matt says. “My friends and I work really hard, and when you’re stressed out, it’s comforting to know you have a piece of paradise, a sanctuary to go to.” Retired homemaker Marilyn Warren,

Designed with an entryway leading down into a great room, this Sandpoint waterfront home uses locally sourced materials including fir beams, exposed recycled steel and a staircase of sliced, columnar basalt.

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58, had no previous connection to Sandpoint when she began to read articles about it in national publications and googled it on the Internet, later connecting with real estate agent Ron Hanson of Tomlinson Sotheby’s. A Nashville, Tenn., resident for the last 20 years, Warren visited Sandpoint last year with her daughter, and Hanson showed her many properties, one of which clicked. “If something feels right, I don’t hesitate,” she says of purchasing her waterfront home in Hope. “But it wasn’t just the house – we liked how people are so down-to-earth here, so wonderfully real, so nice. Everyone seems to be in a good mood and they want to share it with you.” Warren returned to Sandpoint in September 2006 to close the deal and stayed two months. She came back this past June and left in August but will possibly return this winter to play

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in the snow, and she says next year she may spend the whole year here. “I want to enjoy the latter part of my life by being physically active, and I love the crisp mornings here, when you get out and walk and say thanks for another wonderful day,” she says. “As I stay here more, I want to give back, to get involved with the local animal shelter, organizations working on women’s issues, and the church I attend in Clark Fork.”

“The million-dollar figure is not that striking anymore.” Jeff Bond says he decided in 2007 to affiliate his real estate firm, formerly Tomlinson Black Sandpoint, with Sotheby’s International “because we were getting more $1 million-plus list-

ings that required a more sophisticated marketing approach than we could manage.” The week that Tomlinson listings hit the Sotheby’s Web site, Bond and his agents got e-mails from London and Spain. One need look no further than the numbers to get the sense of the area’s trajectory: According to MLS records, from 2000 to 2003 in Bonner and Boundary counties, only two homes valued at $900,000 or more sold. From January 2004 to July 2007, 57 such homes sold, and in late August of this year, 96 such homes were listed. The same increase is true of vacant land: From 2000 to 2003, five parcels of vacant land under 5 acres sold for $500,000 or more. From January 2004 to July 2007, 32 such parcels sold, and in late August, 56 of them were listed. continued on page 122


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RR e a l E s t a t e E Kitchen designs

for the Sandpoint lifestyle Making it the home’s social center is the trend B y Te r r i C a s e y

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itchen design in Sandpoint, whether new construction or remodel, seems to reflect a simple principle: The kitchen is heart and hub of the home. That’s always been so, says Marti Kellogg, of Marti Kellogg Interior Design in Sandpoint, but “it’s evolved from the farmhouse profile, where the kitchen was in the back of house, to the tract house of the 1940s that had the kitchen isolated, usually next to a dining room, to now, where the trend is to make it central and open and sociable.” In designing kitchens, Kellogg likes to eliminate upper cabinets (“Most women aren’t 6-foot-2,” she says) in favor of a big pantry with floor-to-ceiling shelving, which she calls much more usable. “It’s what Europeans have done for long time,” Kellogg says. “I also like to have at least one area of negative wall space so you can drop a piece of art in there. Then it’s not just a work space – it’s creative, joyful, a place you want to be.” Is designing for sociability and aesthetics a trend? “Yes, it’s a trend, a great trend, and it surely gives a kitchen a much better feeling,” says Kellogg, who is certified in feng shui, the ancient Chinese art of placement. “An open, central kitchen helps energy move among your kids sitting at the dining room table doing their homework, your husband watching the news, and you cooking dinner in the kitchen. There are no barriers.” Pamela Bond, owner with her husband, Alan, of Kitchenwerks in Sagle, notices a few features that signify Sandpoint kitchen design. “The arts and crafts influence in bungalow-style

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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homes, reflected in lots of built-ins and the clean lines of Shaker-style doors, is starting to be seen here,” she says. Also, materials that simulate nature, such as glass in backsplashes and cabinets, granite, engineered stones such as crushed quartz, and solid surfaces with veining and particulate, are big, Bond says. The cabin look continues to have its fans in northern Idaho, says Chris Curto, part owner and manager of Selkirk Glass & Cabinets, which opens in January in a 6,000square-foot building located behind Sandpoint Furniture in Ponderay. “Here, the popular type of cabinetry is rustic, with distressed knotty alder or hickory, new but made to look old,” he says. It’s possible to design a kitchen that’s more about appearance than function – a keeping-up-with-theJoneses phenomenon that sees double dishwashers and double ovens in two-person homes – but the opposite is also true: A kitchen remodel can consist of a new range and countertops and can bring a huge smile to the face of the resident cook. To change cabinets, floor covering, countertops and appliances, though, be ready to spend about $25,000 to $30,000, says longtime Sandpoint custom builder Dan Fogarty, who does a few substantive remodels each year. To enlarge the footprint and put in a skylight, the bill will be closer to $50,000, he says. Christine Kester, owner of Sandpoint Interiors, often works with clients to modify an architect’s

kitchen plan to keep the work triangle (refrigerator-stove-sink) out of the traffic flow. Kester says many clients from urban areas buying second homes in Sandpoint are gearing their kitchens to entertaining, with an island or peninsula bar or a separate bar area, and many want a modern look with contemporary touches. One of the biggest challenges with remodeling is continuing to live in a home while the kitchen is torn up. Deborah McShane, vice principal at Sandpoint Middle School, undertook the first remodel of the kitchen in her 1957 home in south Sandpoint in 2006. The project lasted about eight weeks, during which McShane made do with a microwave on her dining room table. “That experience certainly gives you an appreciation for having a working kitchen,” she says. Now, not only does she have a fresh, functional room, but on display are her collection of antique teapots and various cooking utensils from Turkey, where she taught in the early 1990s. “Even the small, ordinary things in a kitchen can be beautiful,” McShane says, “and being surrounded by beautiful things inspires creativity. That’s the fun part of kitchens and cooking.”


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This kitchen in a Dover Bay home is open to the rest of the room and features a generous island, all ideal for entertaining.

PHOTO BY JON SAYLER, ARCHITECT AIA

Real Estate

Tips for kitchen designs Marti Kellogg, interior designer:

Get together the pieces you love – a piece of granite, photos of appliances or fixtures – and see how it looks together. Hire a local drafter to draw your floor plan. Then throw out the conventions and create what you want. Chris Curto of Selkirk Glass & Cabinets:

The kitchen will be the most expensive room in the house. Cabinets are the hardest things to change once they’re in, so pick as good as you can afford. Choices are hard to sort through – so get some guidance. Dan Fogarty, Sandpoint homebuilder since 1981, who does kitchen remodels: www.sandpointonline.com

The mechanics and layout of a kitchen are the builder’s obligation – where is the sink, so plumbing and windows can be in the right spot? Start with items that have the fewest options: appliances, plumbing fixtures, cabinet colors, wood species, countertop media. Choose these, then move onto “wide choice” items such as floor coverings and paint. From Christine Kester, interior designer:

Keep the work triangle separate from traffic flow. Make it easy to come from the garage into the kitchen or mud room or pantry with groceries. Keep desks out. Plan space for storage.

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In late August, there were 106 million-dollar home and condo listings in Boundary and Bonner counties, ranging from $1 million to $12 million, with an average of $1.8 million and a median of $1.75 million. “There are also lots of land sales going on now that will end up having multimilliondollar homes on them,” Bond says. “With the cost of building a quality home today, the million-dollar figure is not that striking anymore.” At Dover Bay, a 285-acre development on the Pend Oreille River in Dover, 3.5 miles west of Sandpoint, eventually about 500 condominiums, upscale cabins and waterfront homes will be located on the former site of an old lumber mill. Dover Bay is not gated, its marina is public, and bicyclists, joggers and fishermen from Sandpoint use the trails there. “We’re not targeting only luxury buyers. Our prices start at $295,000, and we’re selling a community with sidewalks, bike trails, the Dover City Beach, and a café where, for the price of a cup of coffee, anyone can look out at the lake and enjoy the same view as the person in the $5-million home,” says developer Ralph Sletager, who worked at the old Dover sawmill during breaks from college. “But if you own your own jet, you can be comfortable here, too.” Whatever anyone might think they know about identifying and marketing to the luxury buyer, one thing is true: “luxury real estate buyer” means something different today than it did 20 years ago. “With the explosion in wealth around the world, we don’t know who the buyer is – it could be an entrepreneur, someone who just sold their company, someone whose investments have appreciated considerably – or where they will come from, but we do know they can live anywhere in the world they want to,” says Philip White, chief operating officer of Sotheby’s International, based in New Jersey. “Statistics show us that, unlike 20 years

ago, less than 10 percent of luxury buyers come from ‘old money.’ Today, the money is new, and it’s regionally defined – in New York City, it’s from Wall Street; on the West Coast, it’s often from high-tech.” A key Sotheby’s marketing vehicle is Preview magazine, which is published seven times a year by Sotheby’s Auction House. The publication’s average reader has a net worth of $5 million and annual income of $1 million and owns two or three homes. The firm also advertises in the global edition of The Wall Street Journal, which has 3 million readers with high incomes and net worth. The bricks-and-mortar Sotheby’s real estate network, of which Tomlinson Sotheby’s in Sandpoint is a part, comprises 400 realty offices worldwide – 194 of those in the U.S. – which are linked to the Sotheby’s International Web site, www.sothebysrealty.com. There, luxury buyers shop by lifestyle elements – waterfront, mountain, skiing, golf, boating, wineries, casino/ gambling, game farm/safari and many more. Click on “lakefront,” and the site delivers 706 listings in 11 countries; buyers can then refine the search by choosing from 52 amenities as well as property type and home size and style. White says the firm has referred about 3,000 visitors to the Web site to their affiliates in the last two years, with an average resulting sales price of around $1 million. As much as everyone in the luxurylifestyle real-estate market would like to pin down who their target customer is, these buyers resist definition, White says. “Even our Sotheby’s Auction House, who pride themselves on knowing who the great art collectors of the world are, recently sold a painting for $73 million to a buyer they didn’t know. Wealth around the world is more dispersed today than ever before, and it looks different,” White says. “Someone could come into a real estate office in shorts and sandals, and they’re worth a lot of money.” All the homes pictured in this story were designed by Jon R. Sayler, Architect AIA.


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Real Estate

By Cate Huisman

PHOTO BY MATHEW HALL

SCHWEITZER’S RESORT REAL ESTATE Trappers Creek and other developments capitalize on a magnificent mountain

O

nitely achieved that,” said Fortune. He got 75 inquiries in the two or three days after the ads ran. After years of planning, Schweitzer is moving ahead in tapping its widely recognized huge potential: Relative to most other ski areas, it has an enormous amount of land and a small number of skiers and

The area above Schweitzer’s village undergoes site work for the infrastructure of Trappers Creek in the summer of 2007; the site plan for the 124-unit residential area is shown below.

www.sandpointonline.com

ne evening last July, Bonner County resident Jim Zuberbuhler picked up a copy each of The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal to read on an airplane flight from St. Louis to Hartford. As he opened The Times, he was surprised to see a full-page ad with a view he had seen many times – of Lake Pend Oreille from the top of the quad at Schweitzer. When he opened The Journal, there was the view again in another ad. Like his colleagues in the town below, Schweitzer’s designated real estate broker, Tom Fortune, is recruiting buyers from all over the country to build second homes at the ski area. “People are tired of the big crowds in Colorado,” he said, and when that view draws them to Schweitzer, they “just kind of fall in love with the area.” The goal of those ads, which were placed by Schweitzer’s marketing firm, was to raise awareness, “and they defi-

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the smart time to buy property at a mountain resort is before everybody starts jumping onto the bandwagon.

The massive bowls and breathtaking views at Schweitzer Mountain Resort, Idaho are well known to many mountain enthusiasts. But with the announcement of significant new investment in lifts, snowmaking and grooming, more and more people are taking notice. No wonder. The charming village is set for expansion. And the real estate opportunities offer something long gone at other major mountain village resorts: Prime ski-in, ski-out lots ready to build your mountain retreat on. This is the time to be thinking Schweitzer. We’re an easy drive from Spokane Airport. Visit us at www.schweitzerland.com, or call us at 1-888-255-7301 for details on upcoming land releases. Obtain the Property Report required by Federal law and read it before signing anything. No Federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property. Warning: the California Department of Real Estate has not inspected, examined, or qualified this offering. This is not intended to be an offer to sell nor a solicitation of offers to buy real estate in Schweitzer Mountain Resort to residents of Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, New York, New Jersey, and Oregon, or to residents of any other jurisdiction where prohibited by law.


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Real Estate

ance. They must be built of materials that at least look like they came from within 500 miles of the basin. Conceptual drawings suggest that this will generate the gabled stone-and-wood look that is already present in the Selkirk, White Pine and Lakeview lodges. Each home is expected to have two or three levels and to be built into the hillside, and height restrictions will mean that every house will have the same wide view of the basin and lake below that readers of The New York Times and Wall Street Journal saw. These will be true ski-in, ski-out homes; a skiers’ and riders’ route will run around the homes and through a tunnel under the main road to bring them back to the village near the entrance to the Chimney Rock Grill. This will provide homeowners with easy access to the village on foot, on skis or on bikes in the summer. “Trappers will be pedestrian oriented; you should be parking your car for the weekend,” Fortune said. When the lifts are running for night skiing, owners will even be able to ski back home after going out for dinner in the village. Trappers Creek, of course, is just the beginning. The long-term plan calls for up to 4,000 more housing units in the basin, which has fewer than 1,000 homes now. Density will be concentrated in the village, where several more condominium-and-retail buildings will eventually fill the upper two parking areas and the slope between them. The density will decrease farther from the village, with the duplexes and triplexes of Trappers Creek nearby and more single-family homes farther out. Construction of the White Pine Lodge five years ago was an initial step in this plan. Sixty percent of these units were sold before the lodge was built, and the rest were sold within a year or so. The units have proved to be popular; as Fortune pointed out last August, “There’s only one 1-bed-

www.sandpointonline.com

snowboarders. Schweitzer owns 7,000 acres, including 2,900 in the ski area and the remainder in the basin around it. “This is really rare in the ski industry,” said Fortune. “There are not many resorts that are on 100-percent private land. Most of them have Forest Service or some component of other public lands.” The fact that it owns the land makes it easier for Schweitzer to develop its facilities, as it is freed of the often lengthy permitting processes that are required on public lands. This has given it the freedom to build new lifts when it sees fit and as it has the resources; the continuing development of the ski area benefits the sale of land, and the sale of land, in turn, benefits the ski area. Skiers and riders returning to Schweitzer this year will notice the first change as they come around the last turn on the road into the basin, where a traffic circle has been built near the fire station. This will serve as the entrance to the Schweitzer of the future, with roads leading to the village, the fire station, and ultimately to a new high-speed lift, parking lot, and housing development called Greyhawk near the bottom of the Musical Chairs lift. Above the village, skiers and riders will be able to see the work that has been done for the first of the new residential areas, Trappers Creek. Infrastructure development was completed last summer for the first 35 of 124 units to be built here, 10 of which were already reserved by late August. Developed lots will start at $600,000, and the cost of homes ultimately will run from about $900,000 for a triplex unit to around $1.5 million for a single-family home. Although buyers may choose their own architects and contractors, covenants will restrict designs so that not only Trappers Creek, but all the buildings throughout Schweitzer’s holdings have a harmonious appear-

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room unit available on the market for sale right now, and only two 2-bedroom units, so there’s a market for these.” Schweitzer is actively looking for a contractor to start on two more comparable buildings “as fast as we can get somebody on board,” as Fortune put it. These four- and five-story buildings will have parking underground, shops and restaurants on the ground floor and residential units on the next several floors. Prices will vary depending on market forces and on what developers choose to build; current prices of comparable units at other Idaho resorts, such as Tamarack, are running up to $1,000 per square foot. The Greyhawk development, already well into the planning stages and probably to be marketed starting next summer, will have 1- to 4-acre lots intended for high-end, single-family homes. Being farther from the village, Greyhawk is meant to have a different feel – it will provide more privacy than developments closer to the village, with large homes in deep, old-growth forest; some lots will have views as well. New lifts are planned to connect this area with the Outback Bowl and the village, and they will also provide access for day skiers from a new lower parking lot that will replace the upper lots as they fill with high-density housing. Developed Greyhawk lots – meaning lots with water, sewer, power and phone lines installed – will start at around $1 million. The mortgage meltdown of the late summer did not have much of an effect on Schweitzer sales, according to Fortune. Sandpoint as a second home market is stronger and more stable than markets in other parts of the country. “People buying lots and condos up here are pretty well-qualified,” he said. So the march to show the mountain to the world will continue, and the next time Jim Zuberbuhler’s on a plane, there’s a good chance he’ll see that local view in a national publication again.


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Real Estate

CONSERVATION EASEMENTS: Property owners are ensuring their places stays pristine

PHOTO BY SKYE GOLSON

By Susan Drumheller Nicky Pleass takes a morning hike on her property that is now protected by a conservation easement.

F

growing in popularity as longtime residents and newcomers alike seek ways to protect their properties’ natural values and give their heirs the option to keep the land, instead of being forced to sell because of inheritance taxes. “I’ve been in the conservation profession for 27 years now, and this is the busiest I’ve ever seen,” said Robb McCracken, director of the Clark Fork-Pend Oreille Conservancy, the area’s newest land trust. “North Idaho and western Montana are growing fast,” he said. “People see that and they start thinking, ‘Well, it’s not going to be here forever, and maybe this (conservation easement) is something we need to seriously consider.’ ” Pleass and her husband, Mick, were struck by what they found when they visited Sandpoint in 1988; a lake to satiate their passion for sailing, a ski area, plenty of mountains to hike and a community of “vibrant” people, she said. “We had no intention of buying or moving when we, like so many other people, fell in love with the area,” Nicky said. Almost on a lark, they found a parcel for sale on the northwestern backdrop of Sandpoint – a mountainous

wall of greenery and granite outcroppings. They retired to Sandpoint two years later. Before long they owned a total of 348 acres on the mountainside, full of towering ponderosa pine, Douglas fir and – down in the stream gullies – cedar and hemlock stands. The forest provides cover for moose, bear and mule deer that crisscross the mountainside and the seven-plus miles of private trails where Nicky hikes nearly every dawn. In the interest of creating wildlife security and a public hiking trail, Pleass and her husband, Mick, decided to donate 160 higher-elevation acres to the Forest Service to link two isolated federal properties at risk of being traded into private ownership. The transaction occurred after Mick’s death in 1996, but his dream of a four-mile public trail switchbacking up Greenhorn Mountain from the northwestern edge of Sandpoint was eventually realized. A two-and-a-halfmile extension to the popular Mickinnick Trail is now in the works. While the land donated to the Forest Service is open to the public, the land in the conservation easement will remain Pleass’ private hiking paradise.

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rom her perch on the lower flanks of Greenhorn Mountain, Nicky Pleass was displeased with what she saw on the horizon. There to the south, over the grid of streets and shade trees in Sandpoint, and across the shimmering surface of Lake Pend Oreille, she saw the face of northern Idaho’s future – and it was looking pockmarked. “I was looking over at Gold Hill and seeing those houses popping up like mushrooms,” she said. “And over here, on the east side, the roads being blasted out of the mountain will be there forever.” To prevent her own land from becoming similarly marred, Pleass pursued a conservation easement on her 188 acres of mountainside. Now and forevermore, her land is protected from development, roads and mining, no matter who owns the property. Not only that, but she made it possible to keep the land in her family because of tax breaks. Working with the Inland Northwest Land Trust, Pleass created a document that carefully spells out how the property can be used in the future. One additional homesite may be built but no new roads. Such conservation easements are

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Estate

The Inland Northwest Land Trust took interest in the Pleass easement donation because it was adjacent to federal land, creating a large tract of protected wildlife habitat. The land trust also recognized the aesthetic value of the easement. “A legitimate conservation value is conserving the view shed,” said Vicki

Sola, director of development and communications for the land trust. “One of the goals was to keep the natural beauty of the mountain.” Pleass is happy to know that she’s not the only one keeping area land trusts busy. “It’s snowballing and that’s great,” Pleass said. “Otherwise, the

reason people move to this area is disappearing – the animals and the green mountains.”

A few facts about conservation easements In order to realize tax benefits, a conservation easement must be donated to or purchased by a nonprofit land trust or a public agency, such as Idaho Department of Fish and Game, legally qualified to hold such interests. Land trusts help with the process of establishing an easement and tailoring the easement to accomplish specific objectives. Land trusts also monitor the easement annually forever to assure the restrictions are being met and natural values are preserved. Each land trust has a strategy based on conservation laws and scientific standards. Most land trusts prefer to work with larger parcels that have water resources, wildlife habitat, working farms or other natural values. Smaller parcels may qualify if they are environmentally significant – such as containing bull trout spawning beds. It costs money to place property in a conservation easement, because of the need for appraisals, title searches and other services, but most of the time the federal tax benefits exceed the costs, McCracken said. The most active land trusts in northern Idaho are the Inland Northwest Land Trust, the Clark Fork-Pend Oreille Conservancy, The Nature Conservancy and the Missoula-based Vital Ground, which protects habitat and corridors for grizzly bears. Organizations to contact

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Inland Northwest Land Trust: (509) 3282939 or www.inlandnwlandtrust.org

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Clark Fork-Pend Oreille Conservancy: (208) 263-9471 or www.cfpoconservancy.org The Nature Conservancy: (208) 676-8176 or www.nature.org Vital Ground: (406) 549-8650 or www.vitalground.org Idaho Department of Fish and Game: (208) 769-1414 or fishandgame.idaho.gov Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation: (406) 5234533 or www.rmef.org –Susan Drumheller

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Estate

MARKETWATCH

T

he spring’s exposé of the subprime loan issues in the mortgage industry, plus banks’ subsequent tightening of lending to potential homebuyers, has kept a cloud hovering over much of the U.S. housing market. That said, while most of the rest of the country is experiencing decreases in actual property values, Bonner and Boundary counties are outperforming in this way, according to Gina Hurley, executive director of the Selkirk Association of Realtors (SAR). “Although there’s been a slight decrease in number of sales and longer days on the market since 2005, the area has experienced a steady increase in average and median sales prices since 2002,” Hurley said. “Property values aren’t increasing at the same rate they did between 2002 and 2005, but there is growth.” As the accompanying chart shows,

Gearing up for the next wave

homes and land in Boundary County moved faster in this period of 2007 than in 2005. The number of homes sold in Sandpoint and Bonner County this year is 15 percent or less off the pace of 2005; however, vacantland sales in Sandpoint, Bonner County and Boundary County were down by roughly half. Sandpoint’s average home spent 101 days on the market in the first eight months of 2007, nearly twice the time as in the same time frame in 2005 but still only twothirds of the 168-day average of that period in 2002. As of mid-August, SAR’s multiple listing service (MLS), which covers both counties, showed 1,320 residential, 1,704 vacant land, 90 commercial and 26 multifamily listings. Residential listings were up 25 percent from last spring, and vacant land listings increased by 22 percent from mid-April. This increase is part of the natural cycle

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of real estate, said Dale Pyne of Dale Pyne Real Estate Investments, current president of the association. “It’s a direct reflection of what went on two years ago, when we did not have enough homes or land for sale to satisfy the demand created by the national publicity our area received and the surge of interest that followed,” Pyne said. “When you have a high demand, developers react and create a supply. That’s what happened here: Developers bought land, developed it and there are now more homes available.” At the moment, the supply curve is ahead of demand, according to Pyne. “But we needed that inventory, so when someone comes here from Texas to look at property, they can buy a piece of real estate to call their dream home,” Pyne said. “Everything that’s on the market now will be sold, and there will be more.” –Terri Casey


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Real Estate

Bonner/Boundary REAL

ESTATE TRENDS 2007

AVERAGE/ MEDIAN SELLING PRICE

AVERAGE DAYS ON MARKET

NUMBER OF PROPERTIES SOLD

2007

2005

2002

2007

2005

2002

2007

2005

2002

1/1/078/20/07

1/1/058/20/05

1/1/028/20/02

1/1/078/20/07

1/1/058/20/05

1/1/028/20/02

1/1/078/20/07

1/1/058/20/05

1/1/028/20/02

Homes–Sandpoint

328,235/ 257,375

246,647/ 215,000

151,896/ 124,000

101

51

168

116

133

83

Homes–Bonner County

346,262/ 345,500

255,564/ 210,000

172,023/ 146,000

93

72

164

406

481

279

Homes–Boundary County

227,075/ 168,500

164,831/ 145,000

97,051/ 79,000

85

110

144

94

149

47

Land–Sandpoint

245,895/ 130,000

129,476/ 110,000

86,058/ 52,875

126

79

652

20

45

20

Land–Bonner County

200,425/ 126,500

141,095/ 99,900

68,684/ 43,000

114

98

330

254

535

173

Land–Boundary County

104,680/ 86,250

82,956/ 43,000

71,111/ 35,000

123

200

238

64

139

33

AREA

Based on information from the Selkirk MLS for the period 1/1/02 through 8/20/07. Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed.

!"#$ !

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$$$

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No. of Units Spa or Sauna Pool on site Restaurant Bar or Lounge Kitchens Meeting Rooms

travel planner

G N I G D LO

See complete directories online at SandpointOnline.com

COMMENTS Archer Vacation Condos (877) 982-2954 / drarchers@msn.com

Bear Creek Lodge & Restaurant (208) 267-7268

Best Western Edgewater Resort (208) 263-3194 or (800) 635-2534

Church Street House B&B (208) 255-7094

Coit House B&B (208) 265-4035 or (866) 265-COIT

K-2 Inn at Sandpoint (208) 263-3441

Kootenai River Inn (208) 267-8511 or (888) URLUCKY

La Quinta Inn (208) 263-9581 or (800) 282-0660

Lodge at Sandpoint (208) 263-2211

Meriwether Inn (208) 266-1716

Monarch Mountain Lodge (208) 263-1222 or (800) 543-8193

Pend Oreille Shores Resort (208) 264-5828

Sandpoint Quality Inn (208) 263-2111 or (866) 519-7683

Sandpoint Vacation Getaways (888) 896-0007 or (208) 263-6000

Sandpoint Vacation Rentals (208) 263-7570 or (866) 263-7570

Selkirk Lodge (208) 265-0257 or (800) 831-8810

Sleep’s Cabins (208) 255-2122 or (866) 302-2122

Super 8 Motel (208) 263-2210

Vacationville (208) 255-7074 or (877) 255-7074

Waterhouse B&B (208) 265-9112 or (888) 329-1767

Western Pleasure Guest Ranch (208) 263-9066

White Pine Lodge

x x

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x

54 x x

x

Beautiful 3-bedroom, 2-bath waterfront condos on Lake Pend Oreille in Hope. Discount ski and golf tickets available. See ad, page 65. 10kVacationRentals.com/Sandpoint/index.htm Our clean non-smoking rooms include TVs, refrigerators, coffee makers and outdoor hot tub. Excellent restaurant for breakfast, lunch, dinner. “At home atmosphere.”

x

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Downtown Sandpoint on the Lake. Indoor pool, sauna, fitness room, hot tub. All rooms with lake view. Beach House Bar & Grill. 22-site RV park. sandpointhotels.com.

2

Beautifully restored arts & crafts classic, period furnishings, queen-sized beds, private baths, scrumptious breakfasts. Walk to shops, restaurants, beach. churchstreethouse.com.

6

Beautiful 1907 Victorian. Private baths! Gourmet breakfast. Wireless. Massage available. New light thru old windows. New management. coithouse.com

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18 65 x x

x

x

68 x x

x

x

25 x

x

x

x

x

15 48 x 50 x x 62 x x

x x

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Quiet downtown location close to lake, restaurants and shopping. Clean rooms. New linens and towels. Wireless Internet. Friendly atmosphere. k2inn.com.

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New deluxe rooms with private, river-view balconies, 3 casinos (1 non-smoking), 400 gaming machines, rec center and spa. See ad, page 143. kootenairiverinn.com

x

Downtown location, high-speed Internet. Free breakfast, themed spa suites. Silverwood, ski & golf pkgs. Kids stay free. See ad, page 142. hotels-west.com

x

Accomodations for weddings, retreats and banquets. Outstanding views of lake and mountains. For an unforgettable Idaho vacation. See ad, page 134. LodgeAtSandpoint.com

x

Located on Scenic Byway Highway 200. Beautiful views, wildlife and bird watching, biking and more. See ad, page 139. geocities.com/clarkforklodge

x

At-home atmosphere, wireless Internet, cable TV, gift shop. Free Continental breakfast with homemade sourdough waffles. See ads, page 68.

x

Fully furnished condos and on-site athletic club on Lake Pend Oreille. Stay and play packages. See ad, page 139. posresort.com

x

Indoor pool and hot tub. Close to downtown Sandpoint. 5th Avenue Restaurant and Mitzy’s Lounge on property. Kids stay and eat free. sandpointhotels.com

20 x

x

x

Unique vacation rentals available on the lake and on Schweitzer Mountain. See ad, page 49. sandpointvacationgetaways.com

60 x x

x

x

High-end properties that are the perfect lodging choice. Let our staff help plan a memorable getaway. Boat rentals, tee times. See ad, pg. 134. sandpointvacations.com

x

x

Mountain accommodations, stay and play packages. Spectacular mountain and lake views. Outdoor heated pool and hot tubs. See ad, page 163. schweitzer.com

x

167

x

x

x

6

On beautiful Lakeshore Drive. Sleep’s Cabins consists of six log bungalows decorated with original furnishings and collectibles. See ad, page 20. sleepscabins.com

60 x

Free breakfast with waffles. 24-hour hot tub, free wireless Internet. Family suites. Schweitzer ski packages. At the base of Schweitzer Mountain, 2 miles from lake.

60 x x

x

Luxury lakeside homes, cozy mountain cabins and lovely condominiums at the heart of Sandpoint. See ad, page 138. vacationville.com Deluxe spa suites with private hot tub on deck, jetted tub for two in bath. Gas fireplace, AC, kitchenette, free wireless Internet. sandpoint.org/waterhouse

2

x

x

9

x

x

x

Private cabins sleep 2-8. Lodge rooms with private baths, rec room, horseback riding and meals available. See ad, page 65. westernpleasureranch.com

x

x

New accommodations, stay and play packages. Spectacular mountain and lake views. Outdoor hot tubs, access to heated pool. See ad, page 163. schweitzer.com

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PHOTO BY CHRIS GUIBERT

50 x x

Sleep’s Cabins

Coit House

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(208) 265-0257 or (800) 831-8810

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White Pine Lodge WINTER 2008

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FUN On Our Lake

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2008

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PHOTO BY WOODS WHEATCROFT

travel planner

Wi n te r G u id e more information, contact Winter Riders (263-5868) or Priest Lake Trails & Outdoor Recreation Association, (4433309). For guided rides at Schweitzer, contact Selkirk Powder Company. www.selkirkpowderco.com (263-6959 or 888-Go-Idaho). State Parks. Three state parks are within close range to Sandpoint – Farragut, Round Lake and Priest Lake. Farragut is located four miles east of Athol, with 4,000 scenic acres alongside the southern tip of Lake Pend Oreille. Camping and groomed cross-country ski trails available

O U T- O F - D O O R S

PHOTO BY CHRIS GUIBERT

part of the season. Three high-speed chairs serve the mountain: “Stella,” Idaho’s only six-pack chair; plus one triple chairlift, three double chairs, a Tbar; and a beginner’s Musical Carpet and handle tow. Schweitzer also has Nordic trails, a tubing center, a snowshoe trail, and snowmobile and backcountry ski tours. www.schweitzer.com (800-8318810 or 263-9555). See story, page 78.

WINTER 2008

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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Sleigh Rides. Western Pleasure Guest Ranch, 16 miles northeast of Sandpoint on Upper Gold Creek Road, offers sleigh rides in a rural setting for groups and couples. www.westernpleasure ranch.com (263-9066). Stillwater Ranch also pro-

PHOTO BY WOODS WHEATCROFT

vides sleigh rides in a country setting, Cross-Country Skiing. Kick and glide south of Sandpoint in Sagle on Dufort or skate on 32 km of scenic groomed Road (263-0077). trails at Schweitzer (263-9555); Round Lake State Park has 3 miles of various Snowmobiling. It’s one of the most groomed trails for diagonal stride (263popular and fun ways to reach the won3489); Farragut State Park (683-2425) drous wintry backcountry. Snowcat trails has more than 7 km of groomed trails, 25 around Sandpoint and Priest Lake in the miles south of Sandpoint on Lake Pend Selkirk Mountains are renowned; for Oreille. Groomed trails (15 km) are also maintained at Priest Lake Nordic Center (443-2525) SCHWEITZER and connect to Hannah Flats MOUNTAIN RESORT for more than 40 km of trails. StoneRidge Golf marks trails High atop the Selkirk Mountains above Sandpoint, for cross-country skiing and Schweitzer’s 2,900 acres of terrain beckon skiers snowshoeing (437-4653). Or and snowboarders to shred 300 inches of powder, tour the backcountry on the average annual snowfall. The Inland National Forest lands; Northwest’s largest ski resort, Schweitzer is a Sandpoint Ranger District has mere 11 miles from downtown. Uncrowded slopes maps and more information. offer 2,400 vertical feet among the 84 named www.fs.fed.us/ipnf (263trails, two open bowls, treed glades and two ter5111). See story, page 99. rain parks. Select slopes are lit for night skiing

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Winter Guide (683-2425). Round Lake is located 11 miles south of Sandpoint just west of Highway 95 on West Dufort Road. Round Lake is a small, scenic lake; camping, fishing, sledding and cross-country skiing are all available (263-3489). Priest Lake State Park is located on Coolin Road in Coolin alongside the clear waters of Priest Lake. Camping, cross-country skiing, ice fishing and snowmobiling are all available (4432200). www.idahoparks.org Walking. With dazzling views, the Pedestrian Long Bridge runs alongside Highway 95 over Lake Pend Oreille and continues to Sagle Road. Find paved, cleared paths at Travers Park on West Pine Street, City Beach downtown and along Highway 2 west to Dover. Paths also at Lakeview Park through and

around the Native Plant Society Arboretum and overlooking Sand Creek at the Healing Garden next to Bonner General Hospital. Wildlife Refuge. Kootenai National Wildlife Refuge, 30 miles north of Sandpoint near Bonners Ferry, has more than 2,000 acres and an abundance of wildlife including elk, deer, moose and bear, plus migrating birds. Hiking trails to waterfall and around pond, auto tour routes. www.fws.gov/kootenai (267-3888). Sandpoint WaterLife Discovery Center. On Lakeshore Drive, the center offers interpretive trails and self-guided tours of fish habitat and an educational interpretive area on Pend Oreille River. www.fishandgame.idaho.gov (769-1414).

DRIVING TOURS THE INTERNATIONAL SELKIRK LOOP, a 280mile drive through the majestic Selkirk Mountains of Idaho, Washington and British Columbia, Canada. More than 55 lakes, including Lake Pend Oreille, are found along the tour. www.selkirkloop.org (888-823-2626). PEND OREILLE NATIONAL SCENIC BYWAY, 33.4 miles of spectacular water views on Highway 200, meandering east to the Montana state line along the rocky shores of Lake Pend Oreille. www.byways.org WILD HORSE TRAIL SCENIC BYWAY, 48 miles on Highway 95 from Sandpoint north following the Kootenai Tribe’s historic path on the east side of the Selkirk Mountains all the way to Canada. www.selkirkloop.org HIGHWAY 2/41 PEND OREILLE RIVER SCENIC ROUTE, west on Highway 2 from Sandpoint through historic Priest River and Newport/Oldtown; then south on Highway 41 through the Blanchard Valley all the way to the Spokane River. Brochures mapping the way available at the Greater Sandpoint Chamber Visitor Center.

Fly High www.sandpointonline.com

with Winning Performance

SANDPOINT

Marine & Motorsports Snowmobiles, ATVs, Rangers 195 N. Triangle Dr., Ponderay

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Art Galleries. Truly an arts town, Sandpoint has about two dozen galleries located in town and the surrounding area featuring art in numerous mediums. Art lovers can browse and often visit with artists in many locations. Art aficionados may also visit revolving art exhibits in several year-round gallery locations sponsored by the Pend Oreille Arts Council. Locations in Sandpoint include The Old Power House, Bonner County Courthouse, Taylor-Parker Motor Co. at 300 Cedar St., Connie’s Cafe at 323 Cedar St., University of Idaho Bonner County Extension office at the fairgrounds, and Northwest Mortgage office at 216 N. First Ave.; plus Farm Bureau Insurance on Kootenai Cutoff Road in Ponderay; and

THE MERIWETHER INN 121 Antelope Loop Clark Fork, Idaho

PHOTO BY SKYE GOLSON

INDOORS

travel planner

Winter Guide

Sculptor Mark Kubiak in the new Redtail Gallery

Northern Lights, Inc. in Sagle. www.artinsandpoint.org (263-6139).

www.posresort.com (208) 264-5828 47390 Hwy 200

Hope, ID 83836 www.sandpointonline.com

tel. 208.266.1716 fax. 208.266.0131 Direct TV, Jacuzzi, Kitchenette, Air-Conditioning, Laundromat, Continental Breakfast Gateway to the Cabinet Mountains Backcountry Trails Camp, Fish, Hunt Snowmobile. Lake Access Nearby. Year-round Recreation

You’re Home WINTER 2008

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SANDPOINT WEST ATHLETIC CLUB • Olympic-size pool •Group Cycling Classes • Racquetball, handball, squash • 5,000 sq ft weight room with certified trainers • Group exercise • Child care • Outdoor recreation area Daily and temporary rates available Visit us at www.SandpointWest.com Open 5 am - 10 pm Monday-Friday 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. Saturday & Sunday

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Winter Guide SHOPPING & MOVIES Shopping. Downtown, discover a fine array of eclectic shops and galleries with clothing, art and gifts galore. Explore Coldwater Creek in its new flagship store at 311 N. First, with a wine bar upstairs and live music on Fridays and Saturdays. www.the creek.com (263-2265). Visit the Cedar Street Bridge, recently reopened after a major renovation as the Cedar Street Bridge Public Market with world-class shopping in a beautiful log structure overlooking Sand Creek. www.cedarstreetbridge.com (2558270). Shop for antiques at Foster’s Crossing, a mini mall with lots of antiques, on Fifth between Cedar and Oak streets (263-5911); and MarketPlace Antiques & Gifts, Sandpoint’s newest antique market, open daily, at Fifth and Church (263-4444). Bonner Mall in Ponderay contains many stores plus a six-plex movie theater and frequent events, on Highway 95 two miles north of Sandpoint (263-4272). Movies. Bonner Mall Cinema is a six-plex theater inside the Bonner Mall on Highway 95 (263-7147). The Panida Theater is a historic venue at 300 N. First; the Global Cinema Café features foreign and independent films. www.panida.org (263-9191). See story, page 47. Check www.SandpointOnline.com for movie listings.

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SANDPOINT WEST ATHLETIC CLUB 1905 PINE STREET

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Bonner County Historical Museum. This delightful museum has many fine displays depicting old-time Bonner County, including a display featuring Native American artifacts and history from geologic formation to the present day. An extensive collection of Ross Hall photos are on exhibit, as well as a pioneer kitchen with memorabilia from a bygone era and a real caboose. Open Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Located at Lakeview Park. www.bonnercounty history.org (263-2344). Brewery Tours. Take a tour and taste handcrafted ales at Laughing Dog Brewing in Ponderay, and visit the gift shop open daily. www.laughingdogbrew ing.com (263-9222). Downtown, see brewing in action at Sandpoint’s own brewpub, MickDuff’s at 312 N. First. www.mickduffs.com (255-4351). Spas. Get pampered at The Spa at Seasons, in downtown Sandpoint, www.seasonsatsandpoint.com (263-5616); Kootenai River Inn Casino & Spa in Bonners Ferry, www.kootenairiverinn.com (267-8511); or Solstice Center for the Healing Arts at Schweitzer Mountain. www.solsticewellbeing.com (263-2862).

WHERE

BIG WINNERS PLAY

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Winery Tour. Pend d’Oreille Winery, Idaho’s Winery of the Year in 2003, features award-winning wines, wine tasting, wine sales, tours of the winery and a gift shop open daily, 220 Cedar St. in downtown Sandpoint. The wine bar features different wine specials and live music on Fridays and Saturdays. www.powine.com (265-8545).

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D RIN K S By Carrie Scozzaro

comfort foods

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Eichardt’s (263-4005) will warm you up with good music and good food, like chicken pot pie served openfaced – the flaky crust is only on the top – and mashers on the side. Try Israeli couscous in tomato broth with Italian sausage, a flavorful accompaniment to the popular grilled cheese and tomato sandwich. It’s not hot in temperature, but it’s spicy enough to make your taste buds come alive. The gazpacho at The Landing (265-2000) combines the bite of pepper, cool cucumber and chunky tomato for a zesty dish that’s perfect any time of year.

Signature hot drinks for cold days

PHOTO BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

The Chinese hot-and-sour soup from MaMaSan’s, left, and the sipping chocolate at Café Bodega, right, are both ideal for warming up in winter.

found in the Tuscany region. It’s also the chief ingredient in Ivano’s (2630211) hearty stew of the same name, a winter favorite rich with tomato sauce, rabbit and duck. For lighter Italian fare, try the minestrone – a nice balance to the Italian cobb, spinach with herb frittata or caesar salads. The signature soup at Café Bodega (263-5911) in Foster’s Crossing antique mall is a creamy tomato made fresh daily. The Italian soup is from co-owner Kate Leur’s grandmother’s side, which her husband, Dave, recommends as a side to their hearty sandwiches served on sprouted, multigrain bread.

Warm yourself from the inside out with these cold-weather chill busters from around town. At Monarch Mountain Coffee (265-9382), tea drinkers will warm to the Monarch mateccino, a green chai bengal from yerba maté. Coffee-enthusiasts say olé for vanilla Mayan mochas with a pinch of Mexican spice. Up the street at Café Bodega (263-5911), the sipping chocolate is already warming up. This 100-percent cocoa drink served in espresso-sized cups is decadent and delicious. At Connie’s (255-2227) you shouldn’t have to ask what the best hot drink is. Of course it’s coffee, served hot in a genuine ceramic mug, refilled often. After more than 30 years in the business – with only a minor break in service – Connie’s is all about the tradition. Fall is football season! If you’re feeling “game,” head to Slates (263-1381) for weekend breakfasts washed down with plenty of good ol’ joe (Sundays through January only). For a lighter start to your day, Pine Street Bakery (263-9012) offers racks of homebaked goods, such as croissants, bread and tarts. Relax and enjoy the morning with a cup of Tazzina tea or fresh, hot coffee drinks. Warm drinks aren’t just for starters. Pend d’Oreille Winery (265-8545) sells do-it-yourself spice bags for mulled wine, like the Bistro Rouge they serve for Winter Carnival. Rice wine, also known as sake, is served warm or cold at Oishii (263-1406). And for a little pick-me-up with a kick, Downtown Crossing (265-5080) manager Brian Hibbard suggests The Mafioso: sambuca, Disaronno amaretto, coffee and whipped cream. To die for! –C.S.

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oups and stews are the ultimate cold-weather comfort foods perfectly designed to warm the senses. This feel-good food lets you inhale the fragrant steam, wrap your hands around a warm mug, and savor the warmth on your palate with seemingly endless flavor combinations. Cheese, for example, is an unlikely soup ingredient. MickDuff’s (2554351) porter cheese soup unites cheddar, Gorgonzola and parmesan with a vegetable base for a hands-down favorite that melts in your mouth. Eastern options around town include Oishii Sushi’s (263-1406) miso soup, Sand Creek Grill’s (2555736) spicy peanut soup and Bangkok Cuisine’s (265-4149) wonton. Its tom kha with chicken or shrimp pairs the coolness of coconut with the piquant flavor of lemongrass and lime leaves for the more adventurous types. Don’t forget MaMaSan’s (263-5212) trademark coconut corn and crab chowder or their Chinese hot-and-sour soup, thick with julienne pork, bamboo shoots, carrots, water chestnuts, tofu and scallions. Creole spices aren’t the only hot items at Café Trinity (255-7558). For a restaurant inspired by Southern cooking, Trinity sure has a lot of coldweather options. Their “spunky” crawfish chowder is topped with crispy bacon, scallions, garlic, onions and peppers. Its gumbo – either chicken and andouille or traditional seafood – is served over rice, as are their crawfish étouffée and shrimp creole. Ooh-la-la. Cinghiale is Italian for a wild boar

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elping maintain the energy of Cedar Street Bridge’s Sandy’s Sugar Shack open-air market and its visitors are a variety of food venues, starting with a European-style café that welcomes visitors with the aroma of fresh coffee through the expanded main entrance. Sandy’s Sugar Shack (263-6710) appeals to nostalgics and hot rodders alike with its black-and-white checker décor and memorabilia Americana. Owner Sandra Burnett’s homemade fudge is available by the pound with flavors like amaretto chocolate swirl, chewy praline and orange creamsicle. Sandy’s sells hard-dip ice cream – with flavors like bearfoot brownie and huckleberry heaven – available in cones, banana splits, sodas and milkshakes, plus toppings like crumbled candy bars and cookies! Finally, MaMaSan’s Amerasian Grill (263-5212) is “where east meets west,” according to Nadja Lane, whose peanut sauces and coconut crab corn chowder are hands-down hits with her catering and farmers’ market clients. Reflecting her Thai and Russian-Polish heritage and extensive East Coast restaurant experience, Lane’s menu is a literal United Nations of food. Asian staples like Thai chicken satay and pineapple fried rice, Vietnamese spring rolls, and Japanese sushi are featured alongside such Northeast noshes as Jersey “boardwalk” fries and Philly cheesesteaks. Many of the Asian products, including sauces, are available for purchase. All orders are served in ready-to-go containers for convenient takeout or dining in MaMaSan’s cozy ordering area or at any of the bridge’s many riverview seating areas.

www.sandpointonline.com

–C.S.

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Here’s to your health

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irgil, celebrated author from ancient Rome, advised: “The greatest wealth is health.” Sandpoint is surely rich with opportunities to invest in a healthy body, mind and spirit. Many area restaurants use local and organic foods, offering vegetarian menus, even limiting packaging and processing. Common Knowledge Book Store & Tea House (263-0178), at 823 Main St., for example, has a 95-percent organic menu, according to owner Shelby Rognstad, whose partner Natalia Ocasio, runs the bookstore. This self-described “hub for art and activism” supplements ingredients grown in their garden with local products, reminding of Ithaca, N.Y.’s famed Moosewood Restaurant. At 703 Lake St., Winter Ridge Natural Foods (265-8135) also serves food, mostly to-go, like organic smoothies and juices and veggie hash or southwestern chicken with couscous in the deli. Owner Greg Prummer hopes to offer family-size meals for pickup in the near future. In the meantime, he’s busy keeping this 5,000square-foot space stocked full with produce, meat, bulk and frozen foods, supplements, literature and a few “green” household items. Downtown at 113 Main St., Bill and Carol Truby have been catering to Sandpoint’s health-conscious for more than 30 years. Truby’s Heath Mart and Lunch Café (263-6513) is a local

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The lunch deli at Winter Ridge Natural Foods

favorite for lunch – drop by or phone-in an order. The bulk foods section is a mesmerizing assortment of herbs, spices, teas and esoteric items. And the shelves are full of a small, but satisfying, range of healthful foods, cold items, supplements and beauty products, augmented by a large selection of literature. –C.S. www.sandpointonline.com

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Real Philly guy does real cheesesteaks

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He’s just your “average Joe” who happens to like cheesesteaks. After 27 years in the Forest Service – and a lifetime of eating cheesesteaks– Joe Katz decided to open his own joint. Joe’s Philly Cheesesteak & Hoagie Factory (263-1444) debuted at 102 Church St. this past spring, with traditional beef cheesesteaks, chicken cheesesteaks, and an assortment of cold cut hoagies and breakfast cheesesteaks. Katz, a soft-spoken man with an easy manner and hearty wit, converted the former realty office on Church Street with a bit of paint and modest furnishings. There are a few high-top tables, mostly in 1970s Formica, a counter area, plenty of magazines and newspapers to browse while you’re waiting, and a book about Philadelphia. It’s a great place for takeout, and Joe’s even delivers locally. His recipe generally follows the original: good quality meat (usually sirloin), seasoned and thinly sliced, with melted cheese (provolone, American or Swiss), and served in a genuine, soft, Philly-style hoagie – lightly toasted. Toppings include peppers, onions

Joe Katz working the grill

and mushrooms. You can request marinara sauce or add your own hot peppers, too. Moistened with broth (versus meat grease, like they do back East), his sandwiches are flavorful, fragrant and finger lickin’ good. –C.S.

Cyber restaurant guide

gives diners a heads up

www.sandpointonline.com

What’s cooking around town? Looking for pizza or some ethnic specialty? Find the right food to hit the spot online in SandpointOnline.com’s database-driven restaurant and nightclubs guide at www.SandpointDiningGuide.com. There you’ll find every local establishment – more than 100 restaurants, nightclubs and taverns. The guide is searchable by a tasty menu of criteria: type of cuisine, typical cost and amenities such as live music, kids menu, meeting room, waterfront dining, and others. Whether you like it “spicy” or just want a “happy hour,” give it a click.

Lunch & Dinner Outdoor Dining, Unique Cocktails Live Entertainment

265.5080

206 N. First Ave. Sandpoint

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Trisha McCabe serves Erin Tucker a glass of wine at Stage Right Cellars following an afternoon of power shopping.

DRINKS

The renovations at Stage Right Cellars (302 N. First) include minor reorganizations, expanded seating and the addition of nibbler plates to accompany your wine-tasting. Its updated Web site (www.stagerightcellars.com) features arts,

music, events and a by-the-glass wine list (265-8116). Downtown Crossing (206 N. First) has a new look, including an al fresco dining area and a new menu. Owner Jill Buhrlen, who also runs Hey Cupcake next door, spent three years renovating this favorite locale. Sit at the bar and enjoy tasty pub grub like the New England clam strips, classic Reuben or spicy gyro sandwich. One thing that hasn’t changed is the low-key atmosphere and great musical offerings (265-5080). It’s hard to miss Hey Cupcake! (204 N. First), a sweet-treat shop with a bright pink awning that offers cupcakes, as well as ice cream and candy. Open since spring, Hey Cupcake! recently added breakfast cupcakes, cinnamon rolls and coffee drinks. Their new hours start at 7 a.m. for early risers (265-6767). The Landing (41 Lakeshore Dr. in Sagle) is one of Sandpoint’s newest “old” favorites. Formerly Swan’s Landing on the far end of Long Bridge, The Landing features a full-menu with Mediterranean accents like the pork souvlaki and shrimp calypso. Go for Sunday brunch, for dinner or for a

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ueno! Chef Luigi Ornaghi has finally arrived from Torino, Italy, to provide Three Glasses’ (202 1/2 N. First) delectable menu of small plates like a charcuterie and cheese plate or rabbit and pancetta rolls with warm mushroom ragu. Entrees range from melt-in-your-mouth homemade pasta to seafood and meat, like the braised pork shank with huckleberry sauce. Desserts like crème brûlée and chocolate and amaretti flan will tempt you to stay and enjoy live music. Check out the new Web site at www.threeglasses.net for wine list info and weekly menu changes. In the spring, look for an expanded upstairs dining area (265-0230).

fire-side rendezvous in their expanded lounge area (265-2000). Next time you’re headed up Highway 200, stop by Trestle Creek Inn (42296 Highway 200), which reopened in June. With plans to stay open year-round, Trestle Creek Inn serves up great cool-weather comfort foods like their broasted chicken and Saturday’s smoked prime rib. Open Thursday through Monday, 11a.m. to 9 p.m. (264-5758). Rejuvenate your groove at The Craggy Range Bar & Grill (120 E. Lake St.), formerly the Power House Bar & Grill. With a new menu and extensive remodeling, this Glacier Restaurant from Whitefish, Mont., reenergized the décor with rustic chic style and a plethora of plasma televisions for area sports fans (265-3551). –C.S.

www.sandpointonline.com

Next to the Historic Panida Theatre 300 N. 1st Ave. • 208-263-6957

~ Eichardt’s Serves up the Best of Northwest Microbrews, Food and Local Live Music ~ Full Lunch and Dinner Menu 16 Micros on Tap • Oak Cask Red Wines Upstairs Game Room Open Daily From 11:30 am

•ESPRESSO •OVENFRESH PASTRIES •SALADS •SANDWICHES •BOXLUNCHES

•MILKSHAKES •NON-DAIRY SHAKES •SMOOTHIES •ITALIAN SODAS •TICKET OUTLET •LIGHTCATERING

212 Cedar St. • Sandpoint • 263-4005

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Bangkok Cuisine

Blue Moon Café

Café Bodega

Café Trinity

Connie’s Café

Di Luna’s

Blue Moon Café 124 S. 2nd Ave.The Blue Moon Café offers a great summer and winter dining atmosphere; a deck, large windows and cozy comfortable seating. Our menus and specials combine the best of your favorites and also something new and different including many vegetarian choices. All our ingredients and cooking methods present you with the freshest of meals. Homemade soups are our specialty and show off our multicultural backgrounds and interests. We welcome you and your family for get-togethers and meetings. We’re open seven days a week for breakfast and lunch. Also available for evening parties upon request. 265-9953.

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Café Bodega Bangkok Cuisine Thai Restaurant

www.sandpointonline.com

202 N. 2nd. Ave., across from US Bank. Come enjoy authentic Thai food in a welcoming atmosphere. All of our dishes are cooked to order using the freshest ingredients with no added MSG. We also have a wide variety of vegetarian dishes. We offer a selection of wine and beer as well as Thai tea and coffee. All of our traditional desserts are made in our kitchen. Takeout orders are also available. We are open for lunch Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and dinner Monday through Saturday from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Closed on Sundays. 265-4149.

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5th and Cedar at Foster's Crossing Antique & Gift Market. Revitalize yourself at Cafe Bodega, Sandpoint’s Bohemian eatery (with wireless Internet access) featuring an assortment of international sandwiches, homemade soups, all organic espresso bar, whole leaf tea, beer and Italian artisan gelato. Open Wednesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and on Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 263-5911

Café Trinity 116 N. First Ave., next to Starbucks in the Old Lantern District. Enjoy the flavors of our Southerninspired food such as gumbo, étouffée or chef Gabriel’s signature Spunky Crawfish Chowder. We also feature fresh seafood and Tim’s Special Cut Meats. Whether you are having dinner on our wonderful deck overlooking Sand Creek or sitting at our


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Downtown Crossing

Eichardt’s

Enoteca La Stanza

Locate alphabetically in listings

Hey Cupcake! Monarch Mountain Coffee Pine Street Bakery Sandy's Sugar Shack

Bistro-style cafes or delis

Blue Moon Café Café Bodega FC Weskil’s Hope Market Café Lucy's Deli & Dogs Coffee House Mr. Sub Wily Widgeon Café

Eclectic or fine dining

Di Luna’s Café Downtown Crossing Sand Creek Grill Connie’s Restaurant The Landing Three Glasses Restaurant & Wine Bar

Pub-style

Eichardt’s Pub, Grill & Coffeehouse MickDuff’s Brewing Co. Slates Primetime Grill & Sports Bar

Regional/ethnic specialties

Café Trinity Bangkok Cuisine Hydra Steakhouse Ivano’s Ristoranté Oishii Sushi MaMaSan’s Amerasian Grill Second Avenue Pizza

Wine Bars & Cocktail Lounges

Enoteca La Stanza Stage Right Cellars Sunset Saloon Three Glasses Restaurant & Wine Bar

dining bar and exhibition kitchen, you will enjoy a taste of the South in beautiful North Idaho. Serving lunch and dinner. Beer and wine available. 255-7558

Connie’s Café 323 Cedar St. Homestyle meals served since 1952. Featuring extensive breakfast, lunch and dinner menus, Connie's has been a Sandpoint icon for generations. Under new ownership, Connie's has returned to home cooking with large, affordable portions and delicious homemade desserts. Also be sure to check out Connie's Lounge. Serving a late night appetizer menu, featuring 50-cent pool games, live entertainment and Monday night football parties,

Di Luna’s 207 Cedar St. We’re an American bistro café offering hand-cut steaks, homemade soups and vegetarian cuisine. Everyone in your family will find their favorites here. Open for breakfast and lunch, Wednesday- Sunday, serving breakfast all day. We also specialize in theme catering menus that can make any occasion large or small a success. Our catering staff will work with you to take the hassle out of your special event, so you can enjoy the experience along with your guests. We love good music, so twice a month we have dinner concerts and bring in the best acoustic musicians from around the country. 263-0846.

Hope Market Café

Eichardt’s 212 Cedar St. Don’t miss this comfortable pub and grill. Located downtown in a charming, historic building. This relaxing pub mixes casual dining with seriously good food. With more than a dozen beers on tap, good wines, including oak cask local red wines, and regional touring live music, there’s something for everyone. Upstairs you’ll find a game room with a pool table, darts and shuffleboard. Eichardt’s offers smokeless dining seven days a week. Find out for yourself why Eichardt’s is continually picked as the locals’ favorite hangout. Open daily at 11:30 a.m. 263-4005.

Enoteca La Stanza at Ivano’s Ristorante

DRINKS

Bakeries, coffee & desserts

Connie's lounge is the fun place to be. Warm up by the fire after skiing and have a glass of wine, a pint of local microbrew or a cocktail from our fullservice bar. Return to Connie's. 255-2227.

Hey Cupcake!

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Restaurant index by type of cuisine

FC Weskil’s

Martini/Wine Bar. Enoteca (full bar) La Stanza (the room). Sandpoint’s only specialty martini and wine bar, located in Ivano’s Ristorante, serving exotic martinis such as the Fallen Angel, Mayan Temple, Flirtini and the Pear Sage Margarita. Classic wines and a bar menu with all entrees under $9 are also served. Specialty pizzas, sal-

Downtown Crossing Bar & Grill

206 N. First Ave. Welcome to Downtown Crossing, a unique restaurant and lounge in the heart of downtown Sandpoint. Enjoy our fresh, made-from-scratch recipes mixing regional dishes and seasonal favorites with a twist of diverse ethnic influence. We offer an extensive martini and specialty cocktail menu and a fine selection of beer and wine. Feel at home in our relaxed atmosphere while being entertained nightly by the best conglomeration of local talent. Piano bar, live bands and performers, local artwork, and streetside patio seating! Serving lunch and dinner, open late for cocktails and entertainment. 265-5080. www.sandpointonline.com

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DRINKS

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Hydra Steakhouse

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Ivano’s Ristoranté

ads, paninis and traditional pasta selections served in a comfortable, soft, warm atmosphere all with Ivano’s integrity. Join us for a relaxing evening in “Enoteca La Stanza” WednesdaySaturday starting at 4 p.m. or visit Ivano’s dining room for a full dining experience. 263-0211.

FC Weskil’s 300 N. First Ave. Named after FC Weskil, the man whose vision became the Panida Theater, and located adjacent to the theater lobby in the heart of downtown Sandpoint is Sandpoint’s newest coffee bistro. The aroma from our oven will entice you with fresh baked goods to complement your morning coffee. For lunch or a light dinner, enjoy a daily variety of soups, salads and sandwiches. There are ready-to-go selections if time is tight or the beautiful outdoors is calling your name. Light catering and box lunches also available. Ticket location for the Panida and local events. 263-6957.

Hey Cupcake! 204 N. 1st Ave. Hey, Cupcake! is Sandpoint’s gourmet sweetery. Original cupcake recipes are baked fresh daily to satiate your single serving, nofuss dessert craving (not to mention your cuteness fix). We serve more than 20 flavors of Dreyer’s ice cream! Shakes, malts, sundaes, splits, muffins, cookies, cinnamon rolls, candy, and “Hey, Cupcake!” apparel are also available. Check out our fall and winter clothing line! Hey, Cupcake! is convenient to downtown shopping or walks to and from City Beach. Winter hours: Wednesday-Sunday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 265-6767.

Hope Market Café

www.sandpointonline.com

620 Wellington Place, Hope. Simply put, the Hope Market Café is all about flavor. Artisan cheeses, fine wines, ales, a gourmet market and epicure-

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Lucy’s Deli & Dogs

MaMaSan’s Amerasian

an café with exceptionally prepared dishes for lunch and dinner – all located in an old mercantile in beautiful Hope. A true destination along a truly scenic byway. The café offers gourmet sandwiches, soups and pizzas throughout the day, with a hazardous dessert selection – all made in-house. In the evening, they push the envelope with their nightly dinner selections; elegant and exotic foods prepared fresh each day, complemented by North Idaho’s most impressive wine list. Cozy up to the woodstove on the weekends and savor their brunch specials or enjoy an artisan cheese plate with a glass of wine as you watch a spectacular sunset over the lake. A limited selection of fine spirits are available for sipping. On the old Highway 200 Business Loop in historic Hope. 264-0506.

Hydra Steakhouse 115 Lake St. The Hydra is Sandpoint’s most popular dining establishment, with unique and casual surroundings. The restaurant is open daily. A full dinner menu, featuring Midwest aged beef, king crab, lobster, fresh seafood and pasta. All entrees come with our famous 60-item salad bar. Lunch 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and dinner 3 p.m. to close. Open 363 days a year, closed Thanksgiving and Christmas. Experience The Hydra Steakhouse. You’re sure to be delighted. Just ask someone from Sandpoint! 263-7123.

Ivano’s Ristoranté & Caffé First and Pine. Serving the community for more than 23 years, Ivano’s Italian dining accompanied by classic wines and gracious atmosphere add to the enjoyment of one of Sandpoint’s favorite restaurants. Pasta, fresh seafood, buffalo and beef, veal, chicken and vegetarian entrees round out the fare. Dinner served seven nights a week starting at 4:30. Lunch served Monday-Friday at

www.monarchmountaincoffee.com 208 N. 4th Avenue • Sandpoint, ID 208.265.9382 • 800.599.6702 Open Daily SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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MickDuff’s Brewing Co.

Monarch Coffee

10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. An excellent bakery featuring organic coffee, fresh pastries and a deli style lunch offering, Monday-Friday. After lunch we transform the deli into Sandpoint’s finest “Martini/Wine Bar” Wednesday-Saturday beginning at 4 p.m, Enoteca La Stanza. (For further information see the Enoteca listing) Off-site catering available for weddings, family get-togethers and just plain large gatherings. 263-0211.

Lucy’s Deli & Dogs Highway 200 in Clark Fork. The Scotchman Coffee House has been a landmark here for the last year, and Lucy’s Deli and Specialty Foods has made this one of the Northwest’s greatest delis. We serve the original Vienna all-beef hot dog. The owner, Spencer Clark, with his family, has a great estate wine, that we will soon be serving and selling. Louise Sims, manager, creates great foods, serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. Enjoy dining inside or take out. Also offered is a sack lunch for those on the run or off for a day of hiking on Scotchman’s Peak. Lucy’s Deli serves homemade carrot cake, biscuits and gravy, smoked salmon quiche, spinach lasagna, and a variety of sandwiches. Enjoy our warm atmosphere. Open seven days a week, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. 266-1100.

MaMaSan’s Amerasian Grill On the Cedar Street Bridge. This eatery boasts some of Sandpoint’s finest Asian and American fare. Nadja Lane’s authentic Thai peanut sauce has been passed down through many generations of her family and cannot be matched for its quality and unique taste. Enjoy it either on your Asian or American dish. Treat yourself to MaMaSan’s phad phai, Panang curry, or one of their signature Sushi dishes. MaMaSan’s also offers many American dishes to suit the whole family. Eat in,


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Find them online at

www.SandpointDiningGuide.com

E AT S

Mr. Sub

Oishii Sushi

312 N. First Ave. Come and enjoy our fine handcrafted ales in a family dining atmosphere. We offer a variety of top-of-the-line beers ranging from fruity blondes to our seasonal porter. We also brew a unique-style root beer for those young in age or at heart. Our menu is packed full of flavor with traditional and updated pub fare. You will find toasted sandwiches, hearty soups, gourmet hamburgers and much more at our cozy brewpub located in downtown Sandpoint. 255-4351.

Monarch Mountain Coffee 208 N. Fourth Ave. Monarch Mountain Coffee has been roasting coffee in Sandpoint since 1993. This friendly coffeehouse and outdoor café is the hub for relaxing, meeting with friends, people watching or getting the latest scoop on happenings in town. Featuring a variety of drinks sure to satisfy your thirst. Fresh roasted coffee, espresso drinks and teas are complemented by an assortment of smoothies, chai and yerba mate. Also serving breakfast burritos, locally crafted baked goods, bagels and desserts. All coffee is roasted on-site in small batches and is available for purchase in our coffeehouse or by mail order. Take a taste of North Idaho home with you! Monarch Mountain Coffee is open daily. Located next to Packages Plus. Call for directions at 265-9382 or (800) 599-6702. Loitering strongly encouraged.

Mr. Sub 602 N. Fifth St. Mr. Sub – where there is always a daily special. We are a family-owned-and-oper-

ated business providing a tradition of great service and quality foods for more than 20 years. Our delicious subs are made with fresh ingredients, our bread is baked at a local bakery and our salami is specially made by Wood’s Meats. Come in and enjoy our local favorites like the turkey bacon sub, potato salad or our great garden fresh salads. Having a party? With 24-hour notice, our 3-foot and 6foot party subs are sure to please. We will also deliver your fresh subs until 2:30 p.m. on weekdays in the Sandpoint area. Come in and see us for great service and excellent food! Credit and debit cards accepted. 263-3491.

Oishii Sushi 116 N. First St. Oishii is definatly Sandpoint’s hottest fusion sushi and saketini bar. Energy and excitement pulse through the room with walls dressed in original art by local artist Matt Donahue. The incredible custom lighting creates a surreal effect that makes the design sleek and chic without being too formal; it’s an intimate, notoriously stylish atmosphere. You can dress up but don’t necessarily have to. The food is light and healthy, but it is also elegant and reassuringly priced. As for the service, Oishii is the kind of place where everyone knows who you are, or at least treats you like they do. It’s very central, making it the perfect place to start or end your evening. 263-1406.

Pine Street Bakery 710 Pine St. Welcome to Pine Street Bakery, specializing in European pastries, breads and cakes. Also a complete line of coffees, espresso drinks and teas from Tazzina of Santa Cruz. All bakery products are made on the premises using fresh butter and cream, farm eggs and fine chocolate. Custom order birthday, specialty and wedding cakes; fine French pastries; and a complete line

Sandy’s Sugar Shack

Second Avenue Pizza

of tarts, cookies and bars. The bakers create more than 10 varieties of breads every day, including whole grain organics and sourdoughs. Come in and let the products speak for themselves. Open Tuesdat-Friday, 7 a.m. until 5:30 p.m., Saturdays 8 a.m. until 1 p.m. Located right next to The Paint Bucket. Plenty of parking and outdoor seating. Ask for Liz or Deirdre for custom orders and/or questions. 263-9012.

Sand Creek Grill 105 S. First Ave. This restored 1906 Fidelity Trust Bank Building situated on Sand Creek provides a lovely backdrop for casual but luxurious dining. Guests are warmed by fireplaces, burnished woods and exposed brick walls indoors in the winter, and are mesmerized by the view from the flower- and sun-filled gardens and patios during the Sandpoint summer. The innovative menu features Inland Northwest cuisine with a distinct global influence and emphasis on fresh, local organic ingredients. Beautiful presentation, gracious professional service and the highest-quality ingredients are all hallmarks of this establishment. Enjoy sharing sushi, creative salads and tapas-style appetizers in Dulce while exploring an extensive wine list and relaxing while listening to talented local musicians. Open daily from 4:30 p.m. Reservations recommended. 255-5736.

DRINKS

MickDuff’s Brewing Company

Sand Creek Grill

&

take out or have your meal delivered. Want to take home some of Nadja’s secrets? You can purchase many items from her market. 263-0103.

Pine Street Bakery

Sandy’s Sugar Shack On the Cedar Street Bridge. Sandy's Sugar Shack specializes in homemade fudge, hard-dipped Ice cream, old fashioned malts, sundaes and banana splits. We have the ’50s decor with fun for all ages. We have a great place for birthday parties. We also make ice cream cakes and pies. Come visit us at the Cedar Street Bridge. Open seven days a week. Check for seasonal hours. 263-6710. www.sandpointonline.com

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Slates

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Stage Right Cellars

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Second Avenue Pizza 215 S. Second Ave. Try the piled-high specialty pizzas at Second Avenue Pizza. They’re loaded with fresh ingredients and the dough is homemade. The Juke Box Special weighs 7 pounds – now that’s not your average pizza! We also specialize in excellent calzones, specialty salads and sandwiches, or try the garlic bread appetizer, an excellent hand-tossed pizza covered with cheese and garlic, served with marinara sauce. We also offer take and bake pizzas for those in a hurry after a long day or those who like an easy fix for dinner. Beer and wine also served. Rice crusts and soy cheese are now available for those who have specific dietary requirements. For an out-of-this-world pizza experience come to Second Avenue Pizza! Open Monday-Friday. 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Saturday-Sunday 3 p.m. to 10 p.m. Free deliveries available! 263-9321.

Slates Prime Time Grill & Sports Bar Slates Restaurant and Sports Lounge is located in beautiful Ponderay, Idaho and is only five minutes from downtown Sandpoint. Slates serves lunch and dinner seven days a week and mouth-watering Black Angus prime rib on Friday and Saturday nights. We serve some of the best burgers, salads and steaks in the area. We also have a full bar with happy hour everyday at 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Three pool tables, two big screens and 11 other TVs located throughout the restaurant. Slates opens for lunch at 11 a.m. every day of the week. Our kitchen is open late nights on Friday and Saturday and closes at 9 p.m. the remainder of the week. The bar is open until there is no one to serve or 1 a.m., whichever comes first! 263-1381.

Stage Right Cellars www.sandpointonline.com

302 N. 1st. Ave., “Stage Right” of the Panida

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Sunset Saloon

The Landing

Theater. Looking for a particular bottle of wine or a special cigar? Stage Right Cellars carries a variety of fine wines and cigars, along with specialty beers. Pick up a bottle to go, or stay and enjoy a glass of wine or beer in our comfy lounge. Our walls are filled with local art for your viewing pleasure, and we offer free live music on the weekends. Don’t miss our monthly Comedy Night, tasting events, art openings and much more. Open seven days a week! www.stageright cellars.com 265-8116.

Sunset Saloon Located in the historic Hotel Hope as a joint venture with the popular Wily Widgeon Cafe. Offering a full bar and dinner menu year-round with one of the best views of any establishment on the lake. Offerings include something for everyone – meat loaf, alder plank salmon, filet mignon and nightly specials. Come by for the view, food or nightly drink specials and discover why Hope is one of North Idaho's favorite destinations. Call ahead for hours of operation. 264-6004.

The Landing Where the river meets Lake Pend Orielle at Highway 95 south of the Long Bridge on the water. Clearly one of the finest restaurants, with water with boat dockage and mountain views. Serving dinner, lunch and Sunday brunch. Closed Monday and Tuesday. Offering beef, lamb, pork, seafood, fowl and pasta along with our chef’s daily specials. Our food is made fresh daily on premises, including all of our breads, wonderful desserts, salad dressings and soups using the finest and freshest ingredients. We hand-cut all of our meat, grind our own hamburger and make our own sausage. Enjoy our full-service cocktail lounge featuring specialty drinks and an extensive wine list with comfortable seating in front of a large fireplace or our

Three Glasses

Wily Widgeon Café

dining room with a large fireplace and a 340-gallon saltwater aquarium. During warm weather we have two large outdoor patios for dining and cocktails. The landing offers great food and excellent service at competitive prices. 265-2000.

Three Glasses Restaurant & Wine Bar 202 ½ N. First Ave. On the corner of Bridge Street and First Avenue, appropriately located on the subterranean level of First Avenue (downstairs). Classically French-trained chef Luigi Ornaghi, of Torino, Italy, prepares elegant American seasonal fare with deep roots in Northern Italian and French cuisine. Whenever possible we feature locally sourced ingredients. Think of us whether you’re looking for a night on the town or simply a glass of wine. We offer a 300-plus international wine list with handpicked favorites from the Northwest, select imports and microbrews in a relaxed but sophisticated setting. Come for the food and wine, and stay for the live music nightly, showcasing a baby grand piano, big comfy mobster booths and a hardwood dance floor. Open Tuesday- Sunday 4 p.m. to 11 p.m. www.threeglass es.com 265-0230.

Wily Widgeon Café Located in the historic Hotel Hope, the Wily Widgeon Cafe has established itself as one of the best year-round breakfast and lunch destinations in the area. The incredible food and views pair perfectly to create the perfect dining experience, with offerings such as lobster benedict, huevos rancheros, and steak and eggs for breakfast, and lobster melt, knife and fork philly, and dijon parmesan chicken for lunch. Either are served all day Wednesday through Sunday until 2 p.m., with daily specials, soups, desserts and drink specials. 264-5800.


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Service Listings

ACCOMMODATIONS

See the LODGING DIRECTORY on page 135 ANTIQUES

Foster’s Crossing Antique & Gift Market

5th and Cedar, 263-5911 – An early 1900s railroad freight house converted to three floors of eclectic shopping. Unusual gifts, furniture, antiques and art. New and used books. See ad, page 48. ARTS ORGANIZATIONS

Flat Hat Productions

Founded by Rob Kincaid in 2005 in an effort to bring high-quality theatre, musicals and music recitals to Sandpoint at affordable prices. FlatHatProductions.com

Pend Oreille Arts Council

120 E. Lake Street, Ste. 215, 2636139 – Presents the finest quality experiences in the arts for the people of northern Idaho. We support the performing arts, visual arts, art fairs and art education. ArtinSandpoint.org ART & PHOTO GALLERIES

ArtWorks Gallery

214 N. 1st, 263-2642 – Fine arts and crafts by regional artists, including original paintings, sculpture, jewelry, pottery, glass, tile, photography, prints. See ad, page 98. SandpointArtworks.com

Hallans Gallery

323 N. 1st, 263-4704 – Since 1906. Celebrating the century in photos by Ross Hall and Dick Himes. See ad, page 98. RossHallCollection.com

Redtail Gallery

Skeleton Key Art Glass

255-2429 – A working stained glass art studio, where you can get all of your supplies and tools, take classes, attend workshops, or have something unique and amazing custom-made for your home or

ASSISTED LIVING

The Bridge Assisted Living

1123 N. Division, 208-263-1524 – A total continuum of care on the campus of Life Care Center of Sandpoint. See ad, page 56. AUTO / MOTORSPORTS

Alpine Motors Company

Hwy. 95 North, 263-2118, 1-800430-5050 – Your Cadillac, Buick, Pontiac, GMC truck dealer. New and used sales and leasing. Full service parts and body shop. AlpineMotors.net

Anderson’s Autobody

263-6443 – Serving Sandpoint since 1989. We specialize in complete frame, body and paint repairs. Car rentals on-site, free pick up and delivery. See ad, page 96.

Ponderay Yamaha

263-1124 – Family-owned business, started in 1994. Our goal is to serve the needs of our customers to the fullest. The largest showroom in the Idaho Panhandle, large selection of motorcycles and four-wheelers. See ad, page 143.

Six Star Automotive

255-2955 – Dealing in sales, repair and service for foreign and domestic vehicles. We specialize in Asian imports. We are also authorized dealers of THULE carrack systems. See ad, page 49. BANKS / FINANCIAL

AmericanWest Bank

Come visit our new financial center at Fifth & Poplar, 255-1700 – Forty-three full-service financial centers throughout Central and Eastern Washington and Northern Idaho. We are proud to play an active role in each one and honored to call ourselves your community bank. See ad, page 100. awbank.net

Edward Jones

263-0515, 800-441-3477, Dave Reseka or Rob Kincaid, 2557405, 877-777-5677 – Since 1871. Stocks, CDs, mutual funds, bonds, IRAs, government securities, tax-free bonds and much more. See ad, page 36. edward jones.com

First Horizon Home Loans

265-8981 – The Lutz Team, Sandpoint – Specializing in resort lending and one-time-close con-

struction loans. Offering more than 450 different loan options to meet your mortgage needs. See ad, page 108. DougLutz.com

Horizon Credit Union

800-852-5316 – Serving Eastern and Central Washington and North Idaho for 60 years. With a wide range of services and products to choose from, your one-stop, fullservice financial institution. See ad, page 19. hzcu.org

Jensen, Brian C., CPA

263-5154 – Specializing in tax preparation, payroll and accounting services. Financial and tax planning. See ad, page 93.

Panhandle State Bank

231 N. 3rd, 263-0505 – Branches in Bonners Ferry, Ponderay and Priest River. Also bank in Post Falls, Rathdrum and Coeur d’Alene. Locally owned and managed. See ad, page 97. PanhandleBank.com

US Bank

201 Main St., 263-6891 – Other banks promise great service, US Bank guarantees it! usbank.com BOATS / DOCKS

Alpine Shop

213 Church, 263-5157 and at Schweitzer, 255-1660 – Boat sales and service for all your lake boating needs. Water skis, water gear and Old Town canoes and kayaks. Outdoor apparel and equipment. See ad, page 69.

Eagle Marine Supply

469058 Hwy 95 S., Sagle, 2631314 – Boat lifts, floating and rollin docks, dock kits, dock ramps, dock accessories, dock hardware, water toys and tram systems. See ad, page 110. EagleMarine Supply.com.

Northwest Docks & Water Works

P.O. Box 1502, Sandpoint, 2634684 – New dock construction, dock rebuilds, mooring buoys, shoreline protection, amphibious pile driving, crane service. See ad, page 116.

Sandpoint Marine & Motorsports

195 N. Triangle Dr., across from Slates, 263-1535 – Your Campion and Bluewater boat dealer offering complete parts and service departments for all your watercraft. See ad, page 138.

BOOKS

Keokee Books

405 Church St., 263-3573 – Publishing fine nonfiction and guide books. Also offering publishing services to authors and groups that wish to self-publish. See ad, page 160. KeokeeBooks.com BREWERY

Laughing Dog Brewing

263-9222 – A craft microbrewery that offers tours, taproom for tasting and a gift shop to browse through. Located off Hwy. 200 on Emerald Industrial Park Road. See ad, page 65. LaughingDog Brewing.com. BUILDING / HOME

Ace Septic Tank Service

Sandpoint, 263-5219 – “Where a Flush Beats a Full House.” Portable toilet rental, construction/all occasion, permanent or temporary. Septic tank pumping, residential and commercial.

AirSeal Insulation, Inc.

Sandpoint, 263-4421 – Specializing in Spray Foam Insulation. This latest technology is healthy, comfortable, quiet, and green. For use on existing homes and new construction. See ad, page 131. sealection500.com

Ted Bowers Construction

263-5447 – Specializing in remodels. Creative designs for custom finish work and cabinetry. Registered and insured. See ad, page 113. TedBowers.com

Burnett, Jim CCM, PMP

Priest River, 255-6636 – Certified construction manager specializing in alternative energy. Call or email for consultation. See ad, page 113. jburnett@gotsky.com

Clearwater Landscapes

1701 Cemetery Rd., Priest River, 265-5881 – Provides an interactive design process that enables you to plan and visualize your landscape before any work begins. IdahoLandscapes.com, Landscape Market.com

Crown Builders

691-7607 – Providing complete construction services from design inception through completion for 33 years. Building relationships, not just beautiful homes! See ad pages 35 & 119. CrownBuildersIdaho.com

WINTER 2008

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

www.sandpointonline.com

Sixth & Oak St., 946-8066 – Local sculptor Mark Kubiak displays art for a chosen local artist for six weeks at a time in his gallery but also has several of his own pieces available in the studio. The back portion of Redtail Gallery is rented to Arts Alliance, which offers art classes to people of all ages. See ad, page 98.

business. See ad, page 98.

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Service Listings

ADVERTISER INDEX A Child’s Dream Come True

48

AirSeal Insulation

131

Fogg Electric, Inc

Albertson / Barlow Insurance

93

Foster’s Crossing

Alpine Shop

69

Fred's Appliance

113

Pend d’Oreille Winery

48

Petal Talk

122

48

Ponderay Yamaha

143

123

Priest Lake Realty

53

102

Fritz's Fry Pan

122

Redtail Gallery

AmericanWest Bank

100

G II 2 / Glahe & Associates

127

River Journal, The

159

98

Anderson Auto

96

Green Meadow Kennels

56

Sandpoint Building Supply

118

Archer Vacation Condos

65

Hallans Gallery

98

Sandpoint Furniture

121

ArtWorks Gallery

98

Harris Dean Insurance

106

Sandpoint Interiors

113

Beardmore Building

35

Heritage Shores Realty

132

Sandpoint Marine &

Belwoods Furniture

16

Horizon Credit Union

19

Motor Sports

138

Bitterroot Group

10

Idaho Club, The

39

SandpointOnline.com

161

Blue Lizard, The

17

Iron Horse Ranch

11

Sandpoint Realty

30

Sandpoint Satellite

33

110

Bonner General Hospital

36

Bonner Physical Therapy

105

Jim Burnett, CCM, PMP Just Clever

113 98, 106

K106.7 Radio Powder Parties

64

Sandpoint Signs & Graphics

32

Sandpoint Super Drug

105

Brian Jensen, CPA

93

Keokee Books

160

Sandpoint Vacation Getaways

Bridge Assisted Living, The

56

Kootenai River Inn

143

Sandpoint Vacation Rentals

Cedar Street Bridge

9

Century 21

23

Century 21 - Shawn Taylor & Alex Wohliab

124 37

Coldwater Creek

164

Coldwell Banker Michael White

3

Coldwell Banker Patrick Werry

130

Coldwell Banker Resort Realty CO-OP Country Store, The

2 110

29

Sandpoint Waterfront Vacations 69

Lake Country Real Estate

43

Sandpoint West Athletic Club 142

LaQuinta Inn Laughing Dog Brewing

142 65

Litehouse Foods/Bleu Cheese

Schweitzer Land & Timber Co.

126

Schweitzer Mountain Resort Seasons at Sandpoint

163

24 - 25

Factory

65

Selkirk Glass & Cabinets

72

Local Pages, The

158

Six Star Automotive

49

Lodge at Sandpoint, The

134

Skeleton Key Art Glass

98

Longevity Wellness Center

105

Sleep’s Cabins

20

Mark Hall Realty MeadowBrook Home & Gift

94

Solstice Center For

44

The Healing Arts

139

Spa at Seasons, The

21

Starhawk Realty

49

Crossing at Willow Bay, The 70 - 71

Meriwether Inn

Crown Builders

Misty Mountain Furniture

21

113

Monarch Marble & Granite

111

93

Monarch Mountain Lodge

68

35, 119

49 134

KPND Radio Ski Parties

Lakeshore Mountain Properties 112

Cisco’s

105

Dan Fogarty Custom Builder

263-5546 – A fully insured, local builder with the experience and history you can rely on. In the building trade since 1975 and doing business in Sandpoint since 1981. See ad, page 113. DanBuilt.com

DSS Custom Homes

263-2853 – We are a familyowned business serving Sandpoint and northern Idaho since 1974. We build with honesty, pride, integrity and responsibility. See ad, page 38. DSSCustomHomes.com.

Fogg Electric

597-1121 – Quality electrical construction, 125 years in the electrical business. Commercial, industrial and residential. Licensed/ bonded/insured. Serving all of North Idaho. Free estimates. See ad, page 113.

Fred’s Appliance

All major brands, including complete Viking dream kitchens. Coeur d’Alene or Spokane, 208-7654202, 509-328-3824 or 509893-3581. See ad, page 123. FredsAppliances.com

GII2

265-0247 – Large format specialists. B&W and color. Copying, printing and scanning of blueprints, maps, arts, etc. Survey supplies, marking paint, flagging. Instrument sales, rental and service. See ad, page 127.

Glahe & Associates

Dr. Paul Koch

105

Mountain Communications

122

Ted Bowers Construction

113

265-4474 – Professional Land Surveyors. Our goal is to deliver the highest quality product at the appropriate technical level in a timely manner and at a fair price. See ad, page 127. GlaheInc.com

Dreams in Beauty

105

Mountain Spa & Stove

101

Terry Williams

113

Monarch Marble & Granite

Dan Fogarty Custom Builder Dave Neely Agency Divine Health and Fitness Dover Bay www.sandpointonline.com

48

Alternative Health Care

Bonner County Daily Bee

156

Flying Fish Company

105 46, 106

DSS Custom Homes

38

Eagle Marine Supply

110

Edward Jones

36

Evergreen Realty

6

Evergreen Realty Charesse Moore

116

Evergreen Realty - Schweitzer Exit Realty Eye Care For You

83

45, 133 105

Monks Hydro-Geoscience &

Su Gee' Skin Care Sullivan Homes

26

Sunshine Goldmine

20

Golder Associates

111

Taylor Insurance

Mountain Spirit Fused Glass My Body Shop

98 105

Northwest Docks &

50

Timber Frames by Collin Beggs

113

Tomlinson Sandpoint

Waterworks

116

Northwest Executive

128

Northwest Handmade

117

Northwest Group In-Land

132

Vacationville

Outdoor Experience

139

Waterfront Property

93

Management

Pacific Far West Insurance

105

Sotheby's

4 - 5, 57 - 61

Tomlinson Sandpoint Sotheby's / Shelley Healy

128 138 136

Family Health Center

32

Panhandle State Bank

Finan McDonald

22

Pend Oreille Mechanical

111

Western Pleasure Guest Ranch 65

Pend Oreille Shores Resort

139

Winter Ridge

First Horizon Home Loans

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

108

Winter 2008

97

Western Luxury Homes

66 105

263-5777 – Specializing in custom fabrication of solid-surface, natural stone. Custom kitchen countertops, vanities, showers, tub decks, fireplace surrounds, desks, decorative inlays and more. See ad, page 111.

Monks Hydro-Geoscience & Golder Associates

263-1991 or 676-9933 – Providing Bonner County with groundwater development, geotechnical engineering, wetland delineation and environmental services. See ad, page 111. MonksHydroGeoscience.com


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Service Listings

Mountain Spirit Fused Glass

385 Stoney Brooke Lane, Clark Fork, 266-1519 – We offer a wide range of products to enhance any home or office. Windows, traditional, fused, or in combination. Glass for sidelights, doors, counter tops, table-tops, and cabinetry. If you need glass, we will work with you to make sure you get exactly what you need. See ad, page 98. MountainSpiritFusedGlass.com

Panhandle Art Glass

514 Pine St., 263-1721 – Est. 1982. We are a full-service studio specializing in stained, etched, beveled and fused glass: residential, commercial and liturgical. Artistic design and fabrication for projects of any size tailored to the needs of our clients, Call for portfolio and references.

Panhandle Pump

500 Vermeer Dr., Ponderay, 2637867 – Serving the Idaho Panhandle with quality service and merchandise for over 25 years. The area’s leader in water purification and filtration plus complete water and sewer systems. Residential and commercial. Open Mon-Fri 7am-6 pm. Sat 7am-noon. PanhandlePump.com.

Pend Oreille Mechanical

1207 Dover Hwy., 263-6163 – Service 24/7. Plumbing, cooling, heating, sheet metal, hydronic, refrigeration. See ad, page 111. POMechanical.com

Sandpoint Building Supply

Sandpoint Satellite & Sound

265-5928 – Announcing the introduction of Sandpoint Home Systems. We specialize in central and remote controlled lighting, security, heating/cooling, audio/ video distribution and home theater systems. See ad, page 33. SandpointHomeSystems.com

Selkirk Glass & Cabinets

Located in the Ponderay Design Center, Ste. G, behind Sandpoint Furniture, 263-7373 – Specializing in the custom design of Omega and

Studio of Sustainable Design

100 Jana Lane, 263-3815 – Bruce Millard, Architect. Personal, environmentally sensitive and healthy design, incorporating natural, recycled and durable materials including straw bale. Full services. bemarchitect.com

Sullivan Homes Sandpoint

877-263-1522 – Specializing in rustic cabins and custom homes. Come see the homes and cabins we are building at The Idaho Club, The Crossing at Willow Bay, and Festive Lane at Bottle Bay. See ad, page 26. SullivanHomesSandpoint.com

Terry Williams Construction

265-2936, 290-5423 – Specializing in custom home construction, remodels and additions. Certified ARXX Insulated Concrete Form installer. See ad, page 113.

The Paint Bucket

714 Pine St., 263-5032 – Sandpoint’s complete paint and wallpaper store. Paint and sundries, window covering, wall covering, custom framing.

Timber Frames by Collin Beggs

Sandpoint, 290-8120 – Handcrafted traditional timber frame homes. Wooden, drawbored joinery. Hand-rived pegs. Hewn, hand-planed and roughsawn surfaces. See ad, page 113. E-mail: collin.beggs@verizon.net

Western Luxury Homes LLC

290-3490 – We have a passion for turning our clients’ dreams into reality. We create homes that fit your lifestyle and express your quest for perfection. Call for a free consultation. See ad, page 66. CLOTHING

Coldwater Creek

800-262-0040 or 263-2265 – Located on First Avenue in Sandpoint. Discover one of the most unique collections of women’s apparel and accessories. Perfect style for today’s busy woman. See ad, back cover. TheCreek.com

Finan McDonald Clothing Co.

301 N. 1st Ave., 263-3622 – Unique selection of men’s and women’s outdoor and natural fiber clothing; woolens, fleece, cottons

and silks. See ad, page 22.

A Child’s Dream Come True

255-1664 – We keep in stock a wide selection of natural crafts, toys and more. Wood toys, soft dolls, art supplies, baby gifts and games are just a few of the fun things we have. See ad, page 48. AChildsDream.com FARM / GARDEN

The CO-OP Country Store

125 Tibbetts Lane, Ponderay, 263-6820 – Farm, Home, Hardware. The CO-OP has just about everything for the farm and home. See ad, page 110. CoopCountryStore.com

334 N. 1st Avenue, 255-7105 – Beyond Native Tradition. We offer a large selection of authentic Indian jewelry, pottery, drums, artifacts, art, rugs, hand-carved fetish and much more, all high quality and affordable prices. We are located on the Cedar Street Bridge. See ad, page 17.

Cisco’s

212 N. 4th, Coeur d’Alene, 208769-7575 – Specializing in investment quality historic American Indian art, collectibles, Americana, fine original paintings and more. huntersofthepast.com See ad, page 37.

Fritz’s Frypan

FURNITURE

Belwoods Furniture

301 Cedar St., 263-3189 – Featuring furniture, floorcoverings, appliances and home entertainment systems and TVs. Family owned for over 31 years. See ad, page 16. BelwoodsFurniture.com

Edmundson Fine Woodworking

1965 Samuels Rd., 265-8730, toll-free 866-877-1882 – Custom, handcrafted furniture and cabinets built with attention to detail. Carefully selected hardwoods, hand-cut dovetail drawers, curved surfaces and inlay are just a few details. EFineWoodworking.com

Misty Mountain Furniture

265-4190 – A unique variety of custom handcrafted furniture, cabinets, railings, accessories and the fine artwork of over 70 regional artisans. See ad, page 21. Misty MountainFurniture.com

Northwest Handmade

308 N. 1st Ave., 255-1962, 877-880-1962 – Featuring a variety of regional artists. Custom log furniture, wood carving, metal art, one-of-a-kind gifts. See ad, page 117. NorthwestHandmade.com

Sandpoint Furniture Carpet One

GIFTS/FLOWERS/JEWELRY

Blue Lizard

CRAFTS & TOYS

401 Bonner Mall Way, Ponderay, 263-5138 – A full-service home furnishing store for over 60 years. Unique furniture, flooring and window covering packages. Luminesce Lighting Design offers full service lighting design. See ad, page 121. SandpointFurniture.com

On the corner of First and Cedar St. in Sandpoint, 255-1863 – Featuring a wide array of fine cookware from some of the top manufacturers, such as Le Creuset, J.A. Henckel, Cuisinart and more. See ad, page 122. FritzsFrypan.com

Just Clever

334 N. 1st Ave., 255-5556 – A blend of carefully selected gifts, home décor, and handcrafted iron garden art as well as a wide selection of humorous and thoughtful signs. We ship anywhere. See ads, pages 98 and 106. JustCleverOnline.com

MeadowBrook Home & Gift

205 Cedar St., 255-2824 – We offer a timeless selection of unique and affordable gifts, home decor and furnishings. See ad, page 44. MeadowBrookHomeAndGift.com

Petal Talk

120 Cedar St., 265-7900 – Fullservice floral and gift shop! Fresh flowers, bundled or custom designed. Indoor plants and European plant baskets. Special event and wedding services. Delivery available. See ad, page 122. SandpointFlowers.com

Scandinavian Affar

319 N. 1st Ave., 263-7722 – The Scandinavian countries are represented in this specialty shop including their kitchen items, table tops, candles, electric candleholders, books, cards, rugs, pewter Vikings, mugs, Danish irons, tomtes, fjord design tableware, as well as many non-ethnic gift items.

WINTER 2008

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

www.sandpointonline.com

263-5119 – We operate with honesty, integrity and our sales staff is dedicated and knowledgeable. We carry everything from lumber, siding, doors and cabinets all the way to the tools that help you get the job done. See ad, page 118. SandpointBuildingSupply.com

Dynasty Cabinets, custom windows and doors. See ad page 72.

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Sharon’s Hallmark

306 N. 1st Ave., 263-2811 – Special Gifts for Special People including Vera Bradley bags; Big Sky Carvers; Yankee, Tyler and BeanPod candles; souvenirs and balloon bouquets. We have a full selection of Hallmark cards, books, gift wrap and stationery.

Sunshine Goldmine

263-6713 – Come discover the unique and distinctive at Sunshine Goldmine. We are proud to have served Sandpoint for over 28 years. Sandpoint’s number one stop for handmade jewelry and gold. sunshinegoldmine.com See ad, page 20.

Keokee Creative Group

405 Church St., 263-3573 – Complete graphics, design and editorial for any project. If you like Sandpoint Magazine, you’ll like what we can do for you. keokee.com

Alternative Health Care

263-7889, 866-464-2344 – North Idaho’s most trusted provider of quality and affordable in-home care services for the elderly and disabled. Skilled nursing services, respite care, hospice care and housecleaning. See ad, page 102.

Bonner General Hospital

www.sandpointonline.com

My Body Shop

Sandpoint, 610-3690 – Reshape, Recreate, Rejuvenate your body both physically and mentally with Natalie Litzell, certified fitness trainer and wellness consultant. You’ve got the power to make the change! See ad, page 105. NatalieLitzell.com 219 Cedar St., Ste. A, 2658440 – Rolfing aligns the body’s structure by releasing old injuries, chronic stress and embedded tension to create an experience of vitality. 27 years experience. align.org

Sandpoint Super Drug

HEALTH CARE

520 N. 3rd Ave., 208-263-1441 – Combines state-of-the-art medical technology with the very best in patient care. Our wide range of specialties and services make Bonner General Hospital your care close to home. See ad, page 36. BonnerGen.org

Bonner Physical Therapy

263-5731 – Providing cuttingedge technology and manual techniques to obtain the optimum result for pain control and recovery from an orthopedic condition or resolving symptoms from diabetic neuropathy. See ad, page 105.

Divine Health & Fitness

208-946-7027 – We combine personal training with traditional exercise-based physical therapy and nutrition and lifestyle coaching. Nia, Yoga, fitness classes in private studio. See ad, page 105. DivineHF.com

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

Located in the Pinegrove Medical Center at 606 N. Third Ave., Ste. 101, 263-1435 – Our family practitioners specialize in caring for every member of the family through all the stages of your life. See ad page 32. FHCSandpoint.com

Rolfing

GRAPHIC ARTISTS

158

Family Health Center

263-1408 – Family-owned pharmacy serving Sandpoint for over 32 years. Four knowledgeable pharmacists on staff along with an extensive array of over-the-counter and home health care products. See ad, page 105

Su Gee’ Skin Care

516 Oak St., 263-6205 – We invite you to experience the best skin care Sandpoint has to offer! Choose from the extensive menu of exquisite facial and body treatments provided in a serene and relaxing environment. Where beautiful skin can be obtained by anyone. See ad, page 105. sugeeskincare@yahoo.com INSURANCE

Albertson Barlow Insurance Services

265-6406 – Specializing in life, disability, individual, group health, and now home and auto too. For over 15 years we’ve been assisting the Sandpoint community. See ad, page 93.

Farmers Insurance – Dave Neely Agency

263-3741 – Farmers Insurance Agency serving Sandpoint and the rest of North Idaho since 1997. We specialize in personal lines insurance at competitive rates. See

Winter 2008

ad, page 93.

Harris Dean Insurance

1205 Hwy 2, 265-9690 – The resource for all your insurance needs. The largest independent insurance agency in North Idaho, specializing in business, personal, life and health. See ad, page 106. HarrisDean.com

North Idaho Insurance

102 Superior St., 263-2194, fax 263-8084 – A full-service, independent insurance agency serving the North Idaho area since 1978. Insurance for business or personal risks: property, liability, workers comp, bonding, home, auto, life and health. NorthIdahoInsurance.com

Pacific Far West Insurance

263-1426 – Serving Sandpoint and North Idaho for 24 years. Quotes on auto, home, business, life and group insurance. See ad, page 93. isu-haddock.com

Taylor Insurance Co., Inc.

1009 W. Superior St., 263-4000 or 208-773-6441 in Post Falls – Insurance and financial services for all your personal and business needs. See ad, page 50. Taylor AgencySandpoint.com INTERIOR DESIGN

Sandpoint Interiors

502 Cedar St., 263-8274 – Specializing in residential and commercial design, custom draperies and window treatments. Visit our showroom, or call for inhome consultation. See ad page 113. SandpointInteriors.com INTERNET SERVICES

SandpointOnline.com

263-3573 – Our town’s community Web site. Complete online services include Web site design, hosting and search engine optimization.

KENNELS

Green Meadow Kennels

263-2544 – Highly trained staff with a healthy environment for pets. Specializing in pet daycare, dog boarding, obedience training and conformation classes. See ad, page 56. GreenMeadowKennels.net. MARINAS

Holiday Shores/East Hope Marina

264-5515 – Full-service marina

located 18 miles east of Sandpoint on Hwy 200 East in Hope, Idaho. See ad, page 136.

Sandpoint Marina

Located next to the Old Power House, 120 E. Lake St., 263-3083 – Accessible to downtown Sandpoint. See ad, page 136. SandpointWaterfront.com MARKETING

Keokee Creative Group

405 Church St., 263-3573 – We help your ideas take shape. Keokee can set your company apart by developing effective advertising, public relations and marketing campaigns. Talent. Experience. Professionalism. keokee.com MASSAGE / SPA

Dreams in Beauty Day Spa, Peggy Richards

263-7270, 877-422-6240 – Offering message: The Rolf Method, Deep Tissue, Sports, Trager, Swedish, Reflexology, Pregnancy, Infants and Children. Facials, herbal wraps and mud wraps. See ad, page 105. DreamsInBeauty.com

Longevity Wellness Center

946-1288 – Oriental bodywork and therapeutic massage. Nationally certified AMTA member. See ad page 105.

Solstice Center for the Healing Arts

263-2862 – Featuring therapeutic massage, oriental bodywork, movement therapy and retail store. Located at Schweitzer Mountain. See ad, page 105.

The Spa at Seasons

424 Sandpoint Ave., third floor, 888-263-5616 – Offering holistic, healing therapies and luxury skin care treatments. Plush spa accessories, the ultimate skin care products and aromatherapy gifts. See ad, page 21. SeasonsAtSandpoint.com MEDIA

Bonner County Daily Bee

310 Church St., 263-9534 – Bonner County’s No. 1 daily newspaper. See ad, page 110. bonner countydailybee.com

KPND FM - KSPT AM KIBR FM - KBFI AM KICR FM

327 Marion, 263-2179 – Blue Sky


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Service Listings

Broadcasting. Adult album alternative, news, talk, and real country. See ad, page 29. 106.7 The Point – North Idaho’s all-new rock station. See ad, page 64.

Mountain Communications

263-8226 – We are your local Verizon wireless repair and service center. Nobody has better coverage in our area than Verizon wireless. See ad, page 122.

The Local Pages

888-249-6920 –The phone directory with the most. See ad, page 158. LocalPagesInc.com

The River Journal

255-6957 – A twice-monthly publication of the news and events of our area. Get in touch with Sandpoint by reading our community paper. See ad, page 159. RiverJournal.com MOVING

Handyman Services, Inc.

Stop by and see our new location at 1606 Baldy Mountain Rd., 265-5506 – For all your moving or handyman needs. Packing supplies available for sale. Heated and record storage. Residential and commercial. FedEx & UPS Freight shipping and receiving. Bonded and insured. SandpointMovers.com OPTOMETRY / OPTICAL

Eye Care For You

710 W. Superior, Ste. A, 2639000 – Dr. Julie Gagnon and Dr. Kenneth Cameron are dedicated to providing the best eye care for our customers. We also offer a full-service optical store. See ad, page 105.

Paul E. Koch, O.D.

Located inside Wal-Mart, Hwy. 95 N, 255-5513. – Full service optometry office. Call for an appointment, or just walk in. Same day fitting for most contact lens prescriptions. Treatment of minor eye infections. See ad, page 105.

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

Northwest Executive & Environmental Services

255-2266 – Property management for a discerning clientele, with high security and utmost privacy. Licensed, insured and bonded professionals.Concierge services, cleanup and restoration. See ad, page 128. nwees.com

Northwest Group In-Land

290-8599 – Professional land management group offering complete consulting and real estate services for developers, buyers and sellers of real estate. Development plans, environmental consulting and field work, management plans for forest land tax exemptions. See ad, page 132. NorthwestLandMan.com

Sandpoint Property Management

314 N. 3rd Ave., 263-9233 – Since 1993, providing exceptional real estate management. Whether it’s showing property, screening tenants, collecting rent and more. Representing the Beardmore Building in Priest River. See ad, page 35. SandpointRentals.com PUBLISHING / PRINTING

Keokee Co. Publishing, Inc.

405 Church St., 263-3573 – We

publish Sandpoint Magazine, plus fine books about our region. Offering complete design, editorial and publishing services for books and all other publications. KeokeePublishing.com REAL ESTATE

Century 21 on the Lake

316 N. 2nd Ave., 255-2244 – Nationally known, locally trusted. Sandpoint’s premiere real estate firm. Any of our 22 professional agents can help you. See ad, page 23. C21Sandpoint.com, C21Schweitzer.com Shawn Taylor, Alex Wohllaib For your all-access pass to Schweitzer Mountain properties, come see us in the Lazier building, located in the heart of the village. Shawn, 290-2149; Alex , 6101388. See ad, page 124. C21Schweitzer.com

Coldwell Banker Resort Realty

Sandpoint 263-6802, Schweitzer 263-9640 – If you’re looking for real estate in the Sandpoint area or at Schweitzer Ski Resort, we can help fill your needs. See ad, inside front cover. CBSandpoint.com Michael White 290-8599 – B.S. in forestry and ecosystem management. See ad page 3. NorthIdahoLandMan.com Patrick Werry 255-9434, 290-2016 – Providing an exceptional real estate experience. I look forward to the opportunity to earn your trust. See ad, page 130.

Evergreen Realty

321 N. 1st, 263-6370, 800-829-

6370 – For all your real estate needs in Idaho, Washington and Montana. Waterfront, Schweitzer and commercial properties. Search virtual tours or MLS listings. See ads, pages 6 and 83. Evergreen-Realty.com or SchweitzerMountain.com.

Evergreen Realty, Charesse Moore

Charesse Moore, Sales Associate, 255-6060, 888-228-6060 – Hard-working professional. Sandpoint’s top producing agent 2004 to 2006. See ad, page 116. Evergreen-Realty.com

Exit Realty Sandpoint

255-4550, 888-331-EXIT – “Your Safe Passage to all your real estate needs.” Find your dream home! Call today for a free market analysis. See ads, pages 45 and 133. ExitRealtySandpoint.com

Heritage Shores Realty, Inc.

310 E. 4th St. #2 in Clark Fork, 266-1800 or 15 Sagle Rd. in Sagle, 265-1958 – We are a fullservice experienced Real Estate Agency serving your needs in northern Idaho and northwestern Montana. See ad, page 132. HeritageShoresRealty.com

Lake Country Real Estate

226 N. 1st Ave., 263-5454 – Making Clients For Life. Search MLS online, see virtual tours and more. See ad, page 43. LakeCountryRealEstate.com

Lakeshore Mountain Properties

255-1446, 264-6505 – We can service anyone from either of our locations. We specialize in Schweitzer and waterfront proper-

A newspaper worth wading through

The River Journal P.O. Box 151 Clark Fork, Idaho 83811 For a Complimentary Issue email trish@riverjournal.com or call 208.255.6957 Subscribe $30 for 24 issues

The phone directory with the most

White pages • Yellow pages • Information pages • Fold-out maps • Reverse directory • Directory on a disk • Digital Business Cards Local businesses, make sure you‘re represented!

WINTER 2008

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

www.sandpointonline.com

In Sandpoint it’s the first choice

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ties. See ad, page 112. Lakeshore MountainProperties.com

Mark Hall Real Estate

409 Church St., 263-0507 – Friendly, professional, no pressure service for all your real estate needs. See ad, page 94. MarkHallRealty.com

Priest Lake Realty

443-6052 – Located in Coolin, Idaho on Priest Lake. Your source for real estate services covering Priest Lake and North Priest River. See ad, page 53. Discover PriestLake.com

Sandpoint Realty

263-2135 – Sandpoint's oldest, most established real estate firm. We are dedicated, full-time professionals who are available seven days a week to assist in finding you the right property. See ad, page 30. SandpointRealty.com

Schweitzer Land & Timber Co.

Starhawk Realty

204 E. Superior St., Ste. 1, 2630363 – Open since 2003, our office is continually one of the top producers and handles residential, income property, acreage, water-

www.sandpointonline.com

Tomlinson Sandpoint Sotheby’s Int’l Realty

200 Main St., 263-5101, 800282-6880 – No. 1 in sales and service, year after year! We’re the market leader for a reason. Offering top-notch service for residential, land, commercial land, waterfront properties. See ads, pages 4-5, or search all area listings at TomlinsonSandpoint SothebysRealty.com. Also see our agents’ ads: • Cindy Bond, page 61 • Susan & Brandon Moon, page 59 • Sue Brooks, page 60 • Shelley Healy, page 128 • Stan Hatch, pages 57 and 60 • Kyler Wolf, page 60 • Cheri Hiatt, page 58 • Mickie Caswell, page 58 REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENTS

888-255-7301 – Privately owned, the company is committed to the long-term culture, environment and thoughtful growth of this very unique alpine village. See ad, page 126. SchweitzerLand.com

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front and new construction. See ad, page 49. StarhawkRealty.com

Beardmore, The

263-9233 – Newly renovated in downtown Priest River at 119 Main Street, the Beardmore Building offers retail and office Suites for lease. On the National Registrar of Historic Places, the Beardmore has been remodeled with environmentally sustainable, or “green policy” in the construction techniques, products and energy generation. See ad, page

NEW SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

Winter 2008

35. BeardmoreBlock.com

Bitterroot Group

South Fork Big Sky, MT, 888-7750006 – Providing architects, interior design, builders and timberwrights. The featured builder at the Ironhorse Ranch private community in Sandpoint, Idaho. See ad, page 10. BitterrootGroup.com

Cedar Street Bridge Public Market

Downtown Sandpoint at First and Cedar. Reopened this summer featuring shops, restaurants, entertainers, special events, and just a splash of nightlife. See ad, page 9. CedarStreetBridge.com

Crossing at Willow Bay, The

Sandpoint’s newest premier waterfront community featuring 82 luxury homesites on 180 wooded acres located on the Pend Oreille River. Contact Kim Hansen, 2635656. See ad, pages 70-71. CrossingWillowBay.com

Dover Bay

265-1597 – New waterfront community. Homesites, condominiums and cabins. Custom built homes. On the shores of beautiful Lake Pend Oreille, 3.5 miles west of Sandpoint. See ads, pages 46,106. DoverBayIdaho.com

Idaho Club, The

800-323-7020 – A private, upscale waterfront community featuring Idaho’s first Jack Nicklaus

Signature golf course. Amenities include lakefront recreation, spa, marina, kid’s club. See ad, page 39. TheIdahoClub.com

Iron Horse Ranch

A 380-acre private gated community of 24 unique homesites ranging from 5 to 12 acres. Over 200 acres dedicated to open space. Call Paula Kamp, 290-5768. See ad, page 11. IronHorseAtSandpoint.com

Seasons at Sandpoint

313 N. 2nd Ave., 255-4420 – Luxury waterfront condominiums and townhomes. Experience the best of both worlds – lakefront in the heart of downtown. SeasonsAtSandpoint.com See ad, pages 24-25. RECREATION / TO DO

From the Heart Ranch – Alpacas

1635 Rapid Lightning Rd., 2652788 – Tour our ranch to see what life is like with alpacas! Shop our ranch store for the wonderful hats, scarves, sweaters, rugs, throws, and yarn made from alpaca fiber. Open year-round, closed on Tuesdays and Wednesdays.

Kootenai River Inn Casino & Spa

Hwy 95, Bonners Ferry, 800-3465668 – Stay, play and relax. Three casino rooms, 65 deluxe guest rooms, riverfront view,


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Springs Restaurant and new luxury spa. See ad, page 143. KootenaiRiverInn.com

Sandpoint West Athletic Club

1905 Pine St., 263-6633 – Fullservice club with indoor pool, aerobics, racquetball and more. Daily rates, flexible/affordable memberships. See ad, page 142. SandpointWest.com

Wolf People

On Hwy. 95 in Cocolalla, 263-1100 – Wolf People is a wolf education facility where you can see live wolves and learn all about them. WolfPeople.com RESORTS

Pend Oreille Shores Resort

47390 Hwy. 200, Hope, 2645828. Fully furnished condos on Lake Pend Oreille. Full-service athletic club with indoor pool, racquetball. Boat moorage. See ad, page 139. POSresort.com

Schweitzer Mountain Resort

11 miles from Sandpoint, 800831-8810, 263-9555 – 2,900 skiable acres, shopping, dining and lodging, tubing, snowmobile rides and Nordic trails. See, ad, inside back cover. Schweitzer.com

SIGNAGE

Sandpoint Signs & Graphics

255-4805 – A business without

signs is a sign of no business! Providing complete packages for manufacturing, installation and maintenance. See ad, page 32. SandpointSigns.com SPA & STOVE

Mountain Spa & Stove

1225 Michigan, 263-0582 – Featuring spas and saunas, stoves and fireplaces, furnaces and boilers for your home, garage, shop or barn. See ad, page 101. MountainStove.com SPORTING EQUIPMENT

Outdoor Experience

263-6028 – Quality equipment and clothing for outdoor enthusiasts. Kayak and bike rentals and sales. Cool outdoor clothes. See ad, page 139. OutdoorExperience.us SPECIALTY FOODS

Flying Fish Company

255-5837 – The finest selection of fresh and frozen seafood in North Idaho. Open Wednesdays and Fridays year-round. Everything guaranteed. See ad, page 48. FlyingFishCo.com

Litehouse Bleu Cheese Factory

125 S. 2nd, 263-2030 – Fresh cheese curds and bleu cheese, domestic and imported cheeses, Northwest food items, including everything huckleberry. See ad, page 65.

LitehouseFoods.com

The Smoke House

Hwy. 95 at south end of Long Bridge, 263-6312 – Smoked fish, meat, poultry, “world-famous jerky.” Fine wines, imported beers and local products in our delicatessen.

Winter Ridge Natural Foods Market

265-8135 – Organic produce, natural and organic meats, organic coffee and juice bar. Deli, bulk foods, supplements, homeopathic medicines and literature. See ad, page 105. WinterRidgeFoods.com VACATION RENTALS

Lakeshore Mountain Management

1574 – Come spoil yourself at the Seasons at Sandpoint Resort. Private and upscale, located on Lake Pend Oreille with fully furnished luxury condos steps away from downtown. Private marina and beachfront, many amenities, concierge services, deluxe spa, and free shuttle to Schweitzer Ski Mountain. See ad, page 69. Sand pointWaterfrontVacations.com

Sleep’s Cabins

Lakeshore Drive, 255-2122 – Six historic log and bungalow cabins on beautiful Lake Pend Oreille. Sleeps 4-12. See ad, page 20. Sleeps Cabins.com

Vacationville

264-5300, 888-708-3300 – From the shores of Lake Pend Oreille to Schweitzer Mountain, perfect vacation rentals for everyone. Variety of accommodations for all seasons. See ad, page 112. NorthIdahoRentals.com

Sandpoint Vacation Rentals

263-7570 or 866-263-7570 – Offering a variety of fully furnished accommodations in the Sandpoint area, up at Schweitzer Resort, and on beautiful Lake Pend Oreille. See ad, page 134. Sandpoint VacationRentals.com

Sandpoint Waterfront Vacations

402 Sandpoint Ave., 208-597-

109B N. 1st Ave., 255-7074, 877-255-7074 – Sandpoint’s oldest and largest vacation rental company. Specializing in vacation rentals on “the lake, the mountain and the city in between.” Open Mon-Sat, 9-5; Sun 11-3. See ad, page 138. Vacationville.com WINE

Pend d’Oreille Winery

220 Cedar St., 265-8545 – Tastings, tours and retail sales of our award-winning wines and others from world-class vineyards of the Northwest. Expanded gift and wine shop. Open daily. See ad, page 48. E-mail: steve@powine.com or go to powine.com

Log on to Sandpoint’s remarkable community web site. Events • Visitor Guide • Movies Lodging & Dining • Recreation Job Center • Free classified ads Weather & travel info • News Sandpoint Q&A Forums • More

Get the

TownCrier FREE e-mail newsletter of Sandpoint happenings register online www.sandpointonline.com

www.sandpointonline.com WINTER 2008

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

www.sandpointonline.com

... thereʼs a lot goinʼ on!

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Last Page By Sandy Compton

Orion appears in the sky above Sandpoint.

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inter: short days wedged between long nights and lashed together by weather; darkness at the window before the workday’s done; a time for the cave, for fire, for waiting. And yet the world keeps spinning; migrating ’round the golden furnace to the other side of the system, where we lean away from the heat for a different view. It’s a whole new universe out there, and on nights when clouds have frozen and fallen from the sky, it makes for some breathtaking discoveries. So, put your woolies on and that sweater Aunt Louise knitted for you 20 years ago. Pull your hat down over your ears. Let’s go out and look at the stars. A luminescent sky map is terrific company, but determine how to use it before you go out. Then, you can leave your mittens on and the flashlight in your pocket. Next, a clear view of the southern sky is desirable. The skies parade by in clockwise fashion, rotating on the center bearing that is Polaris, aka The North Star. The North Star is always – um – north of us, so the action is in the south. Stars and planets are not all we see. What appears to be a star might be a galaxy – far, far away. For this primer, though, let’s stick to closer objects.

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

Naming conventions are multiple. Constellations are primarily known by Latin names. Individual stars are often known by their original Arabic names but also by their order of apparent size (not magnitude) within a constellation. Aldebaran (Alpha Tauri, magnitude .86) was originally al dababarãn, “follower of the Pleiades.” The Pleiades is that seven-star cluster we now associate with automobiles – in Japan, they call them Subaru. Kappa Draconis (magnitude 3.87) has no name besides its lowly order of size within Draco. Magnitude is measured on a complicated scale. Generally – but not always – the lower the number, the brighter the star. Stars we see from our outpost are in our galaxy, The Milky Way. The brightest is Sirius – Alpha Canis Majoris, magnitude minus 1.46. It’s 8.6 light years away, around 48 trillion miles, give or take a trillion. Yet, it’s our closest neighbor. Next closest is Arcturus (Alpha Bootes, magnitude minus 04), 33 light years away and brilliant silver. Orion, the Hunter, with his famous belt, may be the most wellknown constellation in the winter sky, save our Big Dipper. He appears nightly between October and March, rising earlier each evening as the

WINTER 2008

months pass to stalk across the sky. His left shoulder – Alpha Orionis (.80) – is Betelgeuse, a French derivation of bit-al-jauzã, “shoulder of the Giant.” His right foot – Beta Orionis (.12) – is Rigel, derived from rijl, “foot.” The three bright stars that bind the Hunter’s waist are, from left to right, Alnitak, Alnilam and Mintaka. On Jan. 1, 2008, Orion will rise above the Cabinets at about 5:45 p.m., a little south of due east, to travel in an arc across the southern sky. When he clears the horizon, his distinctive belt will be pointing about 8 degrees right of vertical. Find his belt and you can find the rest of him. Find Orion, and you have your “skymark.” Preceding him will be Taurus with Aldebaran near the juncture of the bull’s horns. Chasing after him will be his dogs, Canis Major, containing Sirius, and Minor, containing Procyon (magnitude .36). Above him and to his left will be Gemini, with the twins Castor and Pollux (1.55 and 1.99, respectively). As a bonus, above his upraised left arm will be Mars, our planetary neighbor. Starting from Orion, then, the sky’s the limit. Follow the Hunter out of the cave, and he will lead you to the rest of the winter sky.

PHOTO BY RYAN MCGINTY

Winter stargazing


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