Sandpoint Magazine Summer 2006

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2006

M A G A Z I N E

S U M M E R

SANDPOINT Get Out There 10 great

adventures

Patrick McManus

turns mysterious

INSIDE

SANDPOINT VISITOR GUIDE

+

Painters, Lake Photo Essay, Quest Aircraft, Birding, Extreme Makeover, Golf, Open Mics, Rock Climbing, Calendars, Dining and Lodging


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COLDWELL

BANKER,

A

NAME

YOU

CAN

TRUST

Earning your confidence for 100 years

Downtown Sandpoint circa 1906

Coldwell Banker is the oldest real estate company in the nation, and we are the longest-running brokerage in Sandpoint. We have been welcoming people to Sandpoint from the

Colbert Coldwell (1883-1967)

Benjamin Banker (1885-1965)

same building for 33 years. Now we also offer offices on The Coldwell Banker success story has its beginnings in

Schweitzer and in Bonners Ferry.

the San Francisco earthquake of 1906. The devastation

Just like our founders, we believe in honesty, hard work and putting the customer first, supported by cutting-edge marketing and communications technology.

and loss of records created a need to provide people with professional real estate services they could trust. Colbert Coldwell developed rules that led to honest and ethical standards. These rules were to become the industry standard and created a successful business

Coldwell Banker Resort Realty ... A place where you are welcome, a name you can trust.

model for the next 100 years.

www.cbsandpoint.com We’re available to serve you 7 days a week! SANDPOINT PHONE: 208-263-6802 TOLL-FREE: 800-544-1855

SCHWEITZER PHONE: 208-263-9460 TOLL-FREE: 866-673-2352

R E S O R T R E A LT Y BONNERS FERRY PHONE 208-267-8575 TOLL-FREE: 866-375-8575


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Who, What and Why in Greater Sandpoint

SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E VOLUME 16, NO. 2

FEATURES Get out ther e

INSIDE: SANDPOINT

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VISITOR GUIDE

Cover story: Discover 10 outdoor adventures within an hour of Sandpoint, from paddling to flying

Retur ning to Shangri-la

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One climber writes a brief memoir on adventure climbing in northern Idaho, on a summer spent researching a Keokee guide book to be published in 2007

Patrick McManus is back

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The Sandpoint-born humorist introduces his first novel, The Blight Way

Ar tists on a dif fer ent canvas

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Locals Gail Lyster, Janene Grende and Betty Jean Billups paints on ceramic tile, silk and wood

Images of Lake Pend Or eille

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Photo essay with a stunning selection of the big lake’s many scenic faces

The Kodiak: On a wing and a prayer

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Meet the turbo prop airplane built here and the people behind the scenes at Quest Aircraft

Downtown anchors

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Coldwater Creek renovates the historic W.A. Bernd building and moves out of the Cedar Street Bridge, which gets a facelift over the summer and reopens as a public market in the fall

Business in their blood

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Part III of series on Sandpoint’s business families: Porters, Belwoods, Trubys and Van Dellens

Family gets Extr eme Makeover home

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For a week last fall, ABC’s hit show turned the town upside down, building the Heberts a home

Hidden Lakes goes under the blade

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As the golf course closes for a Jack Nicklaus redesign, golfers explore other area links

Bir ding in nor ther n Idaho

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The sport of many feathers offers up a lot of opportunity for birders in our region

Open mics galor e

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The chance to express oneself abounds at local venues

Called by the salmon: Last Page

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Artist Eileen Klatt paints collection of extinct fish portraits, a project dubbed A Litany of Salmon

editor’s note

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Who, What and Why in Greater Sandpoint

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Calendar

Events calendar with Hot Picks and Festival at Sandpoint’s stellar lineup

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Inter view Ed Lucero, world-record kayaker

Real Estate

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Featuring specialty building techniques, landscape architecture, new housing projects, real estate transaction sampler and Marketwatch

Dining Guide

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Special section with dining reviews on restaurants in the Sandpoint area

Lodging Ser vices

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On the cover: A fellow sailor pauses by a Pintail sailboat on Lake Pend Oreille, as photographer Chris Guibert eyes him from a vantage point high up on the Green Monarch Mountains. This page: Olympian Nate Holland wakeboards on Lake Pend Oreille, in this photo by Doug Marshall; see story, page 13.

Sandpoint Magazine is published twice yearly, in May and November, by Keokee Co. Publishing, Inc., P.O. Box 722, Sandpoint, ID 83864. E-mail: inbox@keokee.com Web: www.keokee.com Phone: (208) 263-3573 Publisher Chris Bessler Editor Billie Jean Plaster Advertising Director Scott Johnson Art Director Laura White Designer Jackie Hethorn Contributors Jenna Bowers, Brent Clark, Kevin Davis, Stephen Drinkard, Susan Drinkard, Trish Gannon, Elissa Glassman, Chris Guibert, Lisa Gerber, Keith Kinnaird, Thaddeus Laird, Marianne Love, Sherry Ramsey, Sheryl Van der Leun and Laurel Wagers The entire contents of Sandpoint Magazine are copyright ©2006 by Keokee Co. Publishing, Inc. No part may be reproduced in any fashion. Subscriptions: $9 per year, payable in advance. Send all address changes to the address above. Visit our Web magazine published at www.sandpointonline.com. Printed in USA

Summer 2006

|

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

www.sandpointonline.com

We have a saying here at Keokee Co. Publishing: “This is the best issue of Sandpoint Magazine yet, that is, until the next one.” That seems to be the trend, as we gaze upon the past 32 issues spanning 16 years. The first magazine we published, the Winter 1991 issue, was only 32 pages and had full color on about half of those. By last summer, it had grown to 84 pages – all full color – then to 100 pages in the Winter 2006 issue. And now, at 124 pages, Sandpoint Magazine has broken its record again. The sheer size of this issue dawned on me in April when I received my new issue of Outside magazine. I excitedly brought it into the office and dropped it on the designer’s desk, giving it the “plop test,” as I call it. “Laura, look! This is the same size as our magazine,” I said. It made us feel like the “big guys.” Thanks to Sandpoint’s robust economy, the magazine has grown. We would like to thank everyone who has supported Sandpoint Magazine over the years. We couldn’t do it without you. I know that sounds corny, but it’s true. Some readers have said that they read the magazine from cover to cover, unlike others they get. We hope that trend continues, too. Finally, as the cover story encourages, “get out there” on adventures this summer. –B.J.P.

D E PA R T M E N T S Almanac

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Ten acres on Upper Gold Creek. County maintained road with power and phone to property. Nicely forested, great views. $99,000

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Some things just don’t fit

Mini ranch on 7 acres with complete horse setup, shop, big garden & great landscaping. 2car garage, 4 Bd/3 Ba home with deck & great views. Forest & pasture, on paved rd. $278,000

135-acre working guest ranch & hay farm bordering a wildlife refuge and the Clark Fork River, on a paved road. It includes a spacious main house, six log cabins, a large barn, a tack barn, large shop, large machine shed and complete horse setup. Beautiful forest, pasture, ponds and views. This is a rare opportunity.

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208.290.8599

www.NorthIdahoLandMan.com Resort Realty


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Almanac Who, What and Why in Greater Sandpoint

Besides on Christmas Eve and Easter, First

Presbyterian Church in Sandpoint seldom has a standing-room-only crowd, but one event this spring brought the building to that status. Flat Hat Productions’ event Feb. 12 attracted a crowd of 200 to enjoy Amy Craven’s recital of love songs in honor of Valentine’s Day. Sandpoint native son Rob Kincaid, who happens also to be Ms. Craven’s significant other, formed Flat Hat in 2005 out of a “personal desire to bring serious and classical music and theater to Sandpoint.” It seems that “serious” is in the eye of the beholder. In March, Flat Hat produced a hilarious and sold-out, two-weekend run of Nunsense, directed by Shauna Lyman and presented in the Fellowship Hall of First Lutheran Church. On a more serious note, though, Flat Hat’s inaugural event in December brought soprano Marilyn Barnes of Santa Fe, N.M., to Sandpoint. The group’s final 2005-06 season event in April was a concert featuring the University of Idaho Jazz Choir and Percussion Ensemble. “My goal is high-quality entertainment at affordable prices,” Kincaid said, “something no one else was doing. And, it’s been a really good first-season experience. The community has embraced us very warmly.” Flat Hat Productions, which thrives on small venues, formed a coalition with Sandpoint’s larger venue specialist, the Festival at Sandpoint. Flat Hat will give 25 percent of net profits to the Festival’s Music Education

Program, and the Festival will assist in marketing Flat Hat events. Looking forward, Flat Hat has started cementing its lineup for the next season, beginning in October and running through March. This fall, Flat Hat will bring University of Tennessee recitalist and mezzo soprano Lorraine DiSimone to Sandpoint. Also in Kincaid’s lineup is Robert Champagne, who does one-man theatrical productions of comic and dramatic scenes from theater. Kincaid himself will conduct a local choir and organist in a recital of English choral anthems. On the not-so-serious side, Kincaid and collaborator Scott Johnson are considering putting on the comic play, Greater Tuna. Serious or not, Kincaid’s flair for the dramatic, his love for music – which he taught for a number of years – and his ability to talk talented friends and acquaintances into performing for Flat Hat Productions should keep Sandpoint in “high-quality entertainment at affordable prices” for a number of seasons to come.

PHOTO BY SCOTT JOHNSON

Flat Hat Productions brings fine performances

The cast and director for the Flat Hat production Nunsense pose playfully. Standing from left, Amy Craven, Jody Corlis, Bonnie Miller, Shelley Johnson and Kelley Price hold up their director, Shauna Lyman.

–Sandy Compton

D I S C O V E R B U G S A N D F I S H AT A Q U AT I C E D U C AT I O N C E N T E R “Macro- what?” Yes, macroinvertebrates, those water bugs found

cation, plant identification, and educational material to help save endangered species, including the bull trout. That species has declined due to land-management activities, hybridization with brook trout and illegal harvesting, according to Taylor. “The people that come will have to understand the project is under construction,” Taylor said, “but even more exciting for me is the way we are getting it done. The community is coming together with lots of energy to help us.” Call Taylor at (208) 769-1414 to learn how to support the project with tax-deductible donations or volunteer work. Taylor recently announced that veneer-coated, flat stones with etched names on them are being sold as a fund-raiser. Learn more at fishandgame.idaho.gov/cms/wildlife/wdc

www.sandpointonline.com

scurrying around rocks in streams, are one of the many subjects detailed at the WaterLife Discovery Center, a work-in-progress on the Pend Oreille River on Lakeshore Drive in Sagle. Kids will hopefully get to see some fish cruise by one of the underwater viewing windows this year. Mark Taylor, the regional landowner/sportsman coordinator at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, has high hopes as more support comes forward from the community, corporate sponsors and local schools. “My goal is to have water in the pond, fish in the water and the underwater viewing windows up this summer,” he said. People are already flocking to the interpretive site to experience nature’s many wonders on the trail that features overlook bridges, interpretive signs and benches installed by a local Eagle Scouts. Future plans include a living stream filled with various trout species, a streamside trail with interpretive information, fish identifi-

–Brent Clark

SUMMER 2006

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Almanac Who, What and Why in Greater Sandpoint

D O N N A , T H E D E S P E R AT E HOUSEWIVES CHAMP

explodes onto

www.sandpointonline.com

PHOTO COURTESY DIAMOND STRUCK RECORDS

Look out! Bomshel is exploding onto the country music scene. Look closely! Behind the big hair and the sparkly glitz, there’s a familiar face. One member of this dynamite singing duo grew up in Sandpoint. She’s Kristy Osmunson, 1999 Sandpoint High School grad, former ASB president and the daughter of SHS nursing instructor Kathy Holm and Dr. Willard Osmunson, a former Sandpoint dentist. “Kristy O.” from Idaho and Buffy Lawson from Kentucky recently released their first single It Was an Absolutely Finger Lickin’ Grits ’n Chicken Country Love Song. Two weeks after its release, Curb Records reported “the group’s debut single had reached No. 4 in country radio’s ‘Most Added’ list.” A 13-song CD should be released by early summer. The collection includes Bomshel Stomp, voted sixth among Club Connection’s country-dancing favorites for 2005. “This duet gives you a combination like nothing you’ve ever seen before,” said Bomshel manager/producer Chuck Howard of Nashville. “Two different personalities form this one incredible personality. It’s the look, the sound, the way they interact with people. People love them.” In Osmunson’s case, her singing and fiddling music career started at age 4 when she joined Fiddler’s Hatchery, then in Sandpoint. Osmunson’s early music teachers aren’t surprised at her success. She has studied music at Idaho State University, University of Idaho and, most recently, Nashville’s Belmont University. “Kristy was a bright-eyed seventh grader when she came to me at SMS,” said Jon Brownell, SHS choir instructor. “After hearing her sing, I told her parents that she needed to have voice lessons. I felt she had something speKristy Osmunson, left, and Buffy Lawson cial. Turns out I was right. She has business savvy as well as talent, and, yes – that’s right – the look.” Local musician Tammy Belzer-Gunter gave Osmunson voice lessons for several years. “I loved her excitement and enthusiasm,” Belzer-Gunter said. “Her success will inspire other young people who would like to pursue a career in music.” As for Osmunson, she has set some lofty goals but hopes her success will eventually allow her to move back home. “I spent my whole life trying to get out of Sandpoint,” she said. “Now I’ll spend the rest of my life trying to get back.” –Marianne Love

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SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

SUMMER 2006

COURTESY PHOTO

Sandpoint singer country music scene

Diane Sawyer and Donna Deshon, right, on Good Morning America Last September, Donna Deshon, a long-

time Sandpoint resident, became ABC’s Desperate Housewives champ in a contest held on Good Morning America. The network was looking for the hit show’s No. 1 fan, and as luck would have it, they found her in northern Idaho. To apply for the contest, Deshon had to tape her own 2-minute version of scenes from the show, finished just two days before the contest deadline. She recruited her family, found wigs and wild clothes, taped the segment, and sent if off with high hopes. Just a week later on a Friday morning at 5 a.m., she was roused from her bed by Good Morning America on Sept. 15. A TV crew had secretly set up in the dark for a live broadcast in front of her Sandpoint home to announce that Deshon was a finalist in the contest. “I had a little warning,” she said, laughing. “I heard something at 3 a.m. and peeked out the window. The camera crews were setting up in my front yard!” One week later, Deshon flew to New York to compete against two other finalists. She earned the most points, winning the Desperate Housewives trivia contest held Sept. 22. Her prize? A trip to Universal Studios in Hollywood, Calif., for a walk down Wisteria Lane in November 2005. “I won a trip down Wisteria Lane. … It’s an entire neighborhood, but most of the houses are facades, and the trees, flowers and gardens are all silk. Terri Hatcher and Felicity Huffman were great. Felicity invited me into her trailer and showed me around. It was fun, but it felt surreal. It happened so fast, I couldn’t believe I was there.” –Sherry Ramsey


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Almanac Who, What and Why in Greater Sandpoint

Sandpoint is known for visual art – for Artwalk, the Arts and Crafts Fair, murals and outdoor sculpture. But in what one place can you enjoy the whimsy of an Amy Tessier lion, the joyful colors of the late Doris Adams and Bob Lindemann, the nostalgia evoked by the photos of Ross Hall and Duane “Cap” Davis, the comforting warmth of a quilted wall hanging, and the energy of Kaleidoscope art students? Hints: It’s off the usual art-tour route, and it’s not a dedicated gallery or museum. And while artistic quality is important, the works are specifically chosen because they raise people’s spirits. You could say that the chance to enjoy a light-hearted Bonnie Shields mule drawing in the hallway may be just what the doctor ordered. That last clue, the healing quality, is the key. Bonner General Hospital boasts a substantial permanent collection of paintings, prints, photography and textile art, thanks to Art for the Soul. Ginny Jensen, the former Pend Oreille Arts Council executive director who has chaired the eight-member committee since her retirement from POAC in 2000, says their aim is to bring upbeat, uplifting art into the hospital setting. And it’s a success – they’ve placed nearly 300 pieces in the past six years, to the consistent delight of patients, staff and visitors. A group of Western scenes or landscapes hangs in one waiting room, and florals or fish are found down a hallway. The groupings are

PHOTO BY BILLIE JEAN PLASTER

Decking the halls Just what the doctor ordered

changed and move around, as do individual pieces, keeping the displays fresh for employees and visitors. Art extends throughout the public areas, in some offices and to the Brown House. The idea came from longtime summer resident Marianne Finley, who is the mother of local artist Maria Larson. Finley had developed a similar program in California. An artist donates one piece, and at a later date the committee purchases a second work. In addition, some art is donated outright, and people commission works for the hospital. Principal funding comes from the Art Transplant Sale, held each April. A colorful brochure about the program is available at the hospital. Call Nikki Luttmann, Bonner General’s community relations specialist, for more information at (208) 265-1123.

Ginny Jensen stands by the painting Majestic Lion with Rabbit by Amy Tessier, part of the Art for the Soul collection at Bonner General Hospital.

–Laurel Wagers

K R A M E R R E L E A S E S G R E E N B AY PA C K E R S TA P E S curious discovery in his garage last year, cassette tapes he had made during his 1967 season playing football for the Green Bay Packers under legendary Coach Vince Lombardi. Jerry Kramer, author of Instant Replay, had taped a number of locker room conversations and speeches as research material for his best-selling book. He released those tapes in a two-CD set called Jerry Kramer’s Inside the Locker Room: The Lost Tapes of His 1967 Championship Season.

In a companion booklet, he wrote: “ … You will hear the Coach speak directly to the team before our biggest game ever – the game that gave us our third world championship – Super Bowl II. The locker room was a very private place – you will hear tears, laughter, prayers and curses. That is the way it really was. I hope you feel after hearing these CDs that you were right there with us.” The CD set sells for $30 on jerrykramer.com, where an announcement to republish

Instant Replay this fall may also be found. Kramer plans a book premiere in Green Bay on Sept. 9, before the Packers-Bears game. Kramer, who graduated from Sandpoint High in 1954, played Bulldog football as a right guard and kicker under Coach Cotton Barlow. He played at the University of Idaho on scholarship before being chosen in 1958 in the fourth-round draft by the Green Bay Packers. Kramer, 70, lives in Boise, Idaho. A feature interview with him was published in the Summer 1998 issue of Sandpoint Magazine.

www.sandpointonline.com

One former Sandpoint resident made a

–Billie Jean Plaster

SUMMER 2006

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Almanac Who, What and Why in Greater Sandpoint

The Leonard Paul Store turns 100 this year, and its new owners, Pat and Teri Akins, are ecstatic about owning the business – even if it is haunted. The previous owners didn’t disclose this information, but workers at the store have told the Akinses that they think the ghost is an old-timer that was buried behind the store. “We think it is John Peterson,” said Pat. Peterson was a frequent visitor to the store and even built a cardboard mural of animals that is still on the east wall of the current building, to offset a debt owed to the owner of the store, Leonard Paul. Pat said Peterson died in the winter, so, as the story goes, his body was stored in the basement until they could bury him in the spring of 1941. The

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most recent ghostly visit was in January 2006, when painters reported to the Akinses that the ladder moved five feet Original building down the wall while they were there work- above, circa 1913, and store in 2005 ing. Other workers at right have reported lights going on and off, cooler doors being left open and seeing strange shadows. Leonard Edward Paul opened the store at the early age of 19 in 1906 on the shores of Priest Lake. The original building was only 20-by-30 feet. In 1926, a new building was built, and the upstairs housed a dance hall that was a popular place for kicking up your

This ornate, colorful cardboard mural made by John Peterson can be seen in the Leonard Paul Store. Employees and the new owners think the ghost of Peterson may be making occasional visits to the store.

years COURTESY PHOTOS

Leonard Paul Store celebrates

heels for many years. The store was the first U.S. Post Office in the area, and it was also a trading post for Indians to trade hides for goods. The store has changed hands a few times after Paul retired, but the Akinses “are here to stay,” said Pat. They say they are happy to provide a multitude of supplies, Priest Lake clothing, gifts and local artwork to Priest Lake visitors. To celebrate the 100-year anniversary, the Akinses are planning on having live music, store specials and a barbecue on July 15-16. Phone (208) 443-2463 for more details.

cnic, swim, pi , ke hi , ke bi , Dine, golf ter ski, camp wa , be tu , sh fi , boat “The lake” without the city Beautiful, spacious. Bring the family and enjoy! It’s all here. Experience the adventure.

www.priestlake.org

1-800-774-3785 10

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

SUMMER 2006

©Tom Holman Collection, used with permission

www.sandpointonline.com

–Brent Clark

A Full-Service Floral Shop Specializing in Progressive Design

265-7900 major credit cards accepted Call toll free 1-888-391-3033 120 Cedar Street Sandpoint E-mail: petaltalk@sandpoint.net

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Almanac Sea Jet, ahoy Navy’s test ship on a mission The fact that the U.S. Navy has a research base on Lake Pend Oreille is readily apparent to anybody who spots Sea Jet – a 133-foot model representing a destroyer-

size surface ship – on the lake. Sea Jet was christened on Aug. 24, 2005, in a ceremony featuring Rear Admiral Jay Cohen in Bayview at the Naval Surface Warfare

Center Acoustic Research Detachment. Later last year, on Oct. 24, the Advanced Electric Ship Demonstrator was put in the water and “went to sea” on Nov. 28. The first phase of testing ran from then until March 20, 2006, according to Steve Schreppler, the project officer at the Office of Naval Research. The quarter-scale ship that cost $16 million is undergoing a reconfiguration and returns to the water Aug. 22 through Nov. 6. A third phase will likely occur in January 2007. “AESD will operate from the NSWC Acoustic Research Detachment base, so the people of Bayview should be able to see it going to and returning from its operational area,” Schreppler said. “During the periods of testing, the ship will leave the base in the morning hours and return in the late afternoon. The operational area is anticipated to be bounded by Garfield Bay to the north and Lakeview to the south.” So, boaters and swimmers who see the mighty Sea Jet shouldn’t be alarmed. Simply put, just stay out of her way. She’s on a mission – from the U.S. government.

www.sandpointonline.com

U.S. NAVY PHOTOGRAPH BY JOHN F. WILLIAMS

–Billie Jean Plaster

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The Advanced Electric Ship Demonstrator (AESD), the Sea Jet, is shown inside the Navy facility in Bayview before getting launched on the lake.

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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Almanac Sandpoint’s elite athletes Conrad and Holland first two homegrown Olympians Winter X Games at Aspen, Colo., on Jan. 28. Then he was one of 16 chosen to represent the United States on the snowboard team. At the Torino Olympics on Feb. 16, he won the first round but crashed in the quarterfinals, finishing 14th overall. “It shows that someone from a little town can have big dreams and go out and fulfill them,” Rebecca said. She and husband Don and several more family and friends traveled to Italy to watch Nate compete. Their youngest son, Patrick, also competes in snowboarding on the World Cup circuit and hopes to compete at the 2010 Olympics alongside Nate. But hold on. The third Olympian from Sandpoint could very well be Jake Rosholt, a wrestler who is training for 2008 in Beijing. He won his third NCAA championship in 2006 as a senior at Oklahoma State University. Now that begs the question: Did he drink the same water as Conrad and the Holland boys?

feel it. wear it. live it. funky, hip & affordable clothing for women 324 n. first downtown sandpoint

208.263.1116 –Billie Jean Plaster

www.sandpointonline.com

Roxane Conrad, 1992 sport pistol Olympian

PHOTO BY REBECCA HOLLAND

As of 2006, Sandpoint has spawned two Olympians, and strangely enough, both of them were raised in the Selle Valley, the pastoral area north of town. The first was Roxane Conrad, who competed at the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona, Spain, in pistol shooting. The second was Nate Holland, who raced in the inaugural snowboardcross event in the 2006 Winter Olympics at Torino, Italy. Holland’s mother, Rebecca, joked about the Selle connection and said, “It’s in the water.” Conrad was born in Sandpoint in 1964 and raised on a ranch on Forest Siding Road, graduating from Sandpoint High in 1982. Her parents, Charles and Lanelda, were Marines, and she followed in their footsteps, joining the U.S. Marine Corps straight out of high school. She got into competition through the Corps and has competed around the world, culminating with a spot on the U.S. Olympic team. She finished 24th in the sport pistol event in the 1992 contest, out of about 60 competitors. When asked if being an Olympian had changed her life, she said, “Not really.” Now more than a dozen years later, she is looking forward to retiring from the Corps in 2009 and returning to Sandpoint to take over the ranch where her mother still resides. Roxane is Chief Warrant Officer-4 at Parris Island, S.C., in the Recruit Depot. The Military National Finals Rodeo Queen in 1985, Conrad also raises and trains horses and currently competes in dressage and hunter-jumper. She lives on St. Helena Island in Beaufort, Va. Holland was born in Sandpoint in 1978 and grew up in a log home on ColburnCulver Road in the shadow of Schweitzer Mountain, where he started snowboarding at age 10. He started competing in snowboarding a couple of years later, winning his first race. Now based at Squaw Valley, Calif., Holland finished third in the world in the 200405 and fourth in the 2005-06 World Cup seasons. Highlights of last season included placing first at the SBX World Cup in Saas-Fee, Switzerland, in October and taking gold in the

Nate Holland is all smiles with family members at ’06 Olympics. SUMMER 2006

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Almanac Who, What and Why in Greater Sandpoint

Ranch puts on horse camp for big kids

PHOTO BY MARIANNE LOVE

After completing the Western Pleasure Guest Ranch Adult Horsemanship Camp last September, Wisconsin’s Megan Carstens and Sandpoint’s Susan Daffron shared one regret – the five-day equestrian experience had to end. “By Thursday, I, along with a couple of other hardy campers, was begging to go on one last trail ride in the rain,” Daffron wrote in her Vickie Fuller, on Highspeed, watches riders along with Brad Yunek at the 2005 Adult Horsemanship Camp at Western Pleasure.

online journal. Carstens, 29, of Madison, Wis., joined her mother, Rebecca Carstens from Pennsylvania, at Western Pleasure for the horse camp. Megan, who had only had two prior horse experiences in her lifetime, says she gained confidence on horseback through the camp.

“We got lots of one-on-one attention. … The highlight was when I was able to canter in control without being scared stiff the last day,” Megan said. “I was most pleased that I learned how to better steer a horse and stay in control.” Instructor Vickie Fuller adjusts her instruction to the level of individual riders. Western Pleasure Guest Ranch owners Roley and Janice Schoonover, who also participate, initiated the program in 2004. “Some people are fine with coming and getting a horse already saddled,” Janice said, “but others have a desire to learn and want more information.” Campers spend five days and nights at the ranch on Upper Gold Creek Road. They spend daylight hours on horseback, riding the trails or sometimes even helping round up some cattle. This year, Sept. 24-28 is set aside for up to 12. Phone (208) 263-9066. –Marianne Love

www.sandpointonline.com

AP PHOTO/JAE C. HONG

Buechner rides the Broncs

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Rowdy Buechner competes in bareback riding during the ninth go-around of National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas on Saturday, Dec. 10, 2005.

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

If he’s had a good day on the job, Sandpoint native Rowdy Buechner (pronounced Buckner) sometimes makes several million dollars per hour. That’s how it is when a person works 8 seconds at a time, sometimes earning as much as $30,000. Of course, if those 8 seconds don’t go well, Buechner gets nothing. Buechner lives up to his name as a cowboy, climbing aboard bucking broncs, bareback style. On most days when rodeo fans across the United States and Canada yell, “Ride ’em, Rowdy,” he does. With a career that started at age 4 as a mutton buster – riding sheep – he’s also ridden his share of bulls and horses. Buechner, 26, finished 7th in the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA) bareback standings last year. His year-end winnings, after being sidelined for several weeks with a hip injury, amounted to $125,681 along with a whole lot of fancy belt buckles, jackets and other prizes. More than half of his 2005 paychecks came while competing at his first National SUMMER 2006

Finals Rodeo (NFR) in Las Vegas in December. During one night at the 10-day rodeo, Buechner earned 90 points, the highest bareback score for the entire NFR, by riding renowned bronco Painted Smile for 8 seconds. For rodeo riders, scores depend on talent and style – for both horse and rider. The better the horse bucks, the more bucks their successful riders can earn. Besides his NFR successes, Buechner took first or tied for first in 13 rodeos last year, including the prestigious Cheyenne Frontier Days Rodeo. In February 2006, a hip injury in San Antonio once again sidelined him for several weeks. By March, Buechner was on the road again in his new Dodge truck, chasing down rodeo action across the country. As last year’s top money winner for the Columbia River Circuit, he earned the right to compete at Pocatello’s Dodge Circuit Finals in March, taking second place and $9,000. Rowdy’s dad, Hop Buechner of Kootenai, says long-range plans for the close-knit Buechner clan include buying land in Moses Lake – the hometown of Rowdy’s recent bride, Audrey. They want to build an arena and start acquiring bucking stock of their own. “It’s a dream of ours,” Hop said. “We’ve been working together since he was born. That’s just the way we are. I’ve been proud of him ever since the day he was born.” –Marianne Love


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PHOTO BY JAY MOCK

Almanac

Sandpoint is one of the towns along the International Selkirk Loop, as seen in this photo taken from the Mickinnick Trail.

The loop gets ‘All American Road’ designation The International Selkirk Loop, the only international scenic byway in North America, was designated earlier this year by the U.S. Department of Transportation as an “All American Road.” The 280-mile-long scenic loop winds around the Selkirk Mountains through Idaho, Washington, and British Columbia, Canada, following lakes and rivers for much of its distance. Sandpoint is one of several gateway communities on the loop. This top honor is given to roads that offer a journey that is a destination unto itself. The designation also requires that the road has more than one unique feature; the

International Selkirk Loop boasts many. It travels through two states and two countries, and includes North America’s longest ferry ride at Kootenay Lake in British Columbia. The abundance of outdoor recreation along the way typically keeps visitors busy for three to 10 days. Finally, a strong membership base in the gateway communities supports the loop, another factor that contributed to its being honored. Since the Selkirk Loop is now one of 27 “All American Roads” in the United States, many benefits to this region are expected. Funding earmarked for these roads will bring enhancement projects along the high-

way, such as historical and interpretive rest stops. The Selkirk Loop will also be included in National Scenic Byways maps and brochures, in Mobil Travel Guides, and in National Geographic Travel Guides available all over the country. The exposure is sure to raise the profile of this scenic drive. The Selkirk Loop was developed in 1999. Visitors interested in driving the loop can visit selkirkloop.org or obtain a travel guide at the Greater Sandpoint Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center on the north end of town on Highway 95. –Lisa Gerber

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Almanac Who, What and Why in Greater Sandpoint

PHOTO BY B. CLARK/NORTHWESTPHOTOANDVIDEO.COM

Scottish kilts, wailing bag pipes and the beat of drums The “Thump! Thump!” sound

usually tells the audience or parade watchers the Albeni Falls Pipes and Drums Band members have arrived. The sound of a bagpipe just can’t be reproduced in words, so this local band and attraction is one that needs to be seen and heard for yourself. The band was formed by two employees at the Albeni Falls Dam in 2000, and then four retired police officers joined up. Over the next six years, its membership grew to 26. In 2005, the band showed its colors at the Albeni Falls 50th anniversary, but this year they headed north to Canada to compete with 20 bands during the Spring Fling, on May 5, in Penticton, British Columbia. “We are the first U.S. band to ever be invited,” said Don

Mansfield, a piper in the band. “They are very serious up there (about competitive bagpipe playing and drumming).” The band will make appearances during the Fourth of July Parade in Sandpoint, other local parades and at their annual concert on Aug. 26, at 7 p.m., at the Sandpoint High School auditorium. “We are getting more and more popular,” said Mansfield. Several 15-year-old students from Sandpoint High have joined, but the piper having seniority is Dellas Eaton, a 72-year-old man from Coeur d’Alene, who makes the trip every Saturday to practice with the band in a local Sandpoint church. Anyone thinking of joining the band has to consider that they will put in some long hours blowing and squeezing that bagpipe. “It takes about seven years for a piper to become reasonably efficient,” said Mansfield, but noted that with dedicated practice, a band member can be playing with the Albeni Falls Pipes and Drums Band at performances within a year. –Brent Clark

301 N. First Ave. Downtown Sandpoint www.sandpointonline.com

208.263.3622

16

The Plaza Shops Downtown CDA 208.765.4349

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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Reliable as the Moon rise Sandpoint is the greatest place to live! We welcome you to come and enjoy the many pleasures of Bonner County, where there is something for everyone. In 1910, the Moon family came to Sandpoint for all the same reasons you come here today – pristine setting, hunting, fishing, recreation, and quality of life. Give Susan or Brandon a call and let them help you find your piece of paradise and start your own history in Bonner County.

See these listings online at www.SusanMoon.com Custom 4-bedroom 3-bath home at Canoe Cove just minutes to schools, health club and downtown. 9’ ceilings, gourmet kitchen with polished concrete countertops, red fir flooring, stainless appliances. Family room, gas-fired hydronic heat, 2 fireplaces, covered deck with hot tub overlooking the water. Parking area and walkways have hydronic snow melt system. The details are endless! $699,000 #2053749 Call Brandon @ 208-610-4685 Gorgeous Lake Pend Oreille frontage with majestic mountain views. Half-acre parcel with 153’ of beautifully landscaped waterfront that looks south to Bottle Bay. Four-bedroom 3-bath older home with guest quarters. There’s a dock with 2 boat lifts, 30’x60’ shop/garage and carport to store all the toys. Serene setting to relax and enjoy all the pleasures of Sandpoint. $1,600,000 #2060997 Call Susan @ 208-290-5037

Proud sponsors of the ACBS Wooden Boat Festival. JULY 8-9


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Who, What and Why in Greater Sandpoint

Long Bridge No. 3 turns Sandpoint contractor Skip Pucci plans to honor the 50th anniversary of Sandpoint’s third Long Bridge this summer. After all, he has held a personal interest in the span since before it opened. On Friday, June 22, 1956, Pucci and some friends took off on their bikes toward Superior Street and set out across Lake Pend Oreille, bound for Gold Hill. They climbed halfway up the mountain and found a perch where they could watch the first cars roll across Sandpoint’s new bridge. Meanwhile, community dignitaries and bridge contractors met for lunch at Ponderay’s Fairview Club. Later, at 2:30 p.m. on the sunny summer day, Miss Sandpoint Carol Barlow, with princesses Joanne Pennington (Kelly) and Shirley Hendrickson (Parker), snipped the ribbon. Sandpoint Chamber of Commerce President James Brady then led a caravan across the new structure that had cost nearly $2 million. Long Bridge No. 3 departed dramati-

50

cally from its two predecessors. Designed by Al J. Sachse, an engineer with the Idaho State Highway Department, the project used 6,445 feet of hydraulically dredged fill on its northern end. Riprap material came via dump trucks from a quarry west of Great Northern Road. “I’d take them (drivers) water and lemonade, and they’d give me a ride,” Pucci said. The foundation for the 5,879-footlong bridge included 1,132 composite timber-concrete pilings. Pre-cast 80,000pound concrete spans, transported by barge from City Beach, were lifted by a crane from pontoons. Pucci’s father, Geino, worked on the forms and panels for the spans and

Miss Sandpoint Carol Barlow addresses the crowd during the dedication of the third Long Bridge on June 22, 1956.

helped with the bridge guardrails. The bridge served motorized traffic for 25 years. The fourth bridge, the one presently used for motor traffic, opened on Sept. 23, 1981, at a cost of $11.4 million. Pucci’s interest in bridge No. 3 continues to this day; he has maintained the cement planters since the 1980s. He plans to spruce them up for the anniversary. –Marianne Love

INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL lights up the town

www.sandpointonline.com

Bonner County filmmakers Fred and Trevor Greenfield, a father-son team, are bringing a true international film festival to Sandpoint’s historic Panida Theater: the Idaho Panhandle International Film Festival (IPIFF) Aug. 24-26. The inaugural festival features short and feature-length films submitted from independent filmmakers worldwide, with special incentives to encourage submissions from the Pacific Northwest. Nearly 30 hours of great cinema and entertainment are expected in approximately 15 programs, culminating with an awards presentation on Aug. 26, according to the founders. IPIFF requires that submissions focus on high-quality storytelling through narrative and documentary form. Its creators hope the festival may possibly discover the world’s next Steven Spielberg or Ron Howard – renowned Hollywood directors. While all films will be unrated, PG-13 will be the target audience standard. The Greenfields say that any story, theme, budget or form of acquisition is encouraged, so long as the end result is good storytelling that will leave the audience saying, “Wow.” “We want this to be a three-day event that brings the community together to celebrate quality independent cinema and support the Panida Theater,” said Fred. Local sponsors include Laughing Dog Brewing, which will pour a selection of its locally made ales at the event. The Greenfields expect most sponsors to offer special promotions available only to festival pass holders. A “Best of Festival,” slated Aug. 27, screens five hours of the award-winning entries from the three-day festival. A portion of the proceeds benefits the Panida. Look up ipiff.com or call the Panida at (208) 263-9191 for more details. Fred Greenfield

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THE BONNER COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY COLLECTION

Almanac


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Calendar

Calendar

June

July Every Saturday and Wednesday: Farmers Market. See June. 1 Sandpoint Fly-In. Regional pilots fly into Sandpoint Airport for aircraft display open to public, from 7 a.m.-noon. 255-6201 1 Summer Sounds. Edwards Park Acoustic Trio performs. See June 3. 2 Sunday Concerts on the Lawn.

Hot Picks Plein Air Paint-Out It’s a shootout with paint brushes, as more than 20 artists paint outside for two days June 14-16, capturing scenes of natural beauty. Artists will work at the Hope Market Café on Thursday, then on Sandpoint lakefront on Friday. Artists show paintings at a reception Friday on the Cedar Street Bridge. timberstand.com or 263-7748. Sandpoint Wooden Boat Festival Take a stroll along Sand Creek July 79 to see more than 50 beautifully restored wooden boats moored along the boardwalk. There’s a parade up the creek, plus a host of happenings, such as model boat demos, sandcastle contest, beer garden and more. woodboatfestival.com or 255-1876

POAC sponsors this free live concert series featuring classical music on the lawn in front of the Edgewater Resort at City Beach, 2 p.m. each Sunday in July. Celtic Nots perform. 263-6139 4 Fourth of July. Sandpoint Lions Club sponsors parades downtown in the morning, stage performances and a raffle at City Beach in the afternoon, then a terrific fireworks show at dusk. 263-0887 7-8 The Laramie Project. Live play from Looking Glass Theater Co., portrays life in Laramie, Wyo., in the year after the murder of a young gay man. At Panida’s Little Theater, 7:30 p.m. 263-9191

See complete calendars at

SandpointOnline.com Artists’ Studio Tour This free, self-guided driving tour is staged the weekends of July 21-23 and July 28-30, and invites the public into the home studios of artists in more than 20 locations. Get a map at arttourdrive.org or 265-4380 Idaho Panhandle International Film Festival First-ever film festival comes to the Panida Theater Aug. 24-26 with some 30 hours of original shorts, features and documentaries, submitted by up-and-coming filmmakers from around the globe. ipiff.com or 263-9191 Schweitzer Fall Fest This 14th annual outdoor music festival on Schweitzer Mountain on Sept. 2-3 features concerts, chairlift rides, hiking and biking, kids’ activities, a beer garden and more. schweitzer.com or 263-9555

SUMMER 2006

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

www.sandpointonline.com

Every Saturday and Wednesday: Farmers Market. Open-air market of fresh produce, garden starts, handcrafts, flowers, food and music at Farmin Park. Saturdays 9 a.m.-1 p.m. and Wednesdays 3-5:30 p.m. 263-8764 2-3 Grease. Sandpoint High students stage this ’50s classic, with a live band, in the SHS auditorium, 7:30 p.m. 263-3034 3 Summer Sounds. 2 for 2 performs in this free, summer-long concert series of local and regional musicians. Noon-2 p.m. every Saturday through Sept. 2 at Park Place stage, corner of First and Cedar. 263-6139 8 Spring Fling Concert. Sandpoint High choir’s annual concert, 6 p.m. at Panida Theater. 263-9191 10 Summer Sounds. Peter Lucht performs. See June 3. 11 Studio One Dancers. Annual performance by local dance studio, 7 p.m. at Panida Theater. 263-9191 14-16 Plein Air Paint Out. See Hot Picks. 16 Danceworks 2006. Annual performance from Danceworks students, 7 p.m. at Panida Theater. 263-9191 16-17 Young Writers of the Lost Horse. Fifth annual young adult writing and book arts conference for children grades 5-12. 255-4410 16-July 18 ArtWalk I. The first of two revolving art exhibits opens June 16 with art receptions at 20 gallery locations downtown, including the Old Power House, home to the event’s sponsor, POAC. Self-guided art tours for the first exhibit continue through July 18. 263-6139 17 Summer Sounds. Monarch Mountain Band performs. See June 3. 17-18 Pend d’Oreille Winery Birthday Party. Annual celebration at Pend d’Oreille Winery with wine tasting, music and food. 265-8545 17-18 Spiritfest. Two-day Christian family weekend at Silverwood Theme Park with regional bands performing each evening from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. 683-3400 24 Schweitzer Summer Celebration. Schweitzer summer season kicks off with free scenic chairlift rides, mountain biking,

hiking, live music, climbing wall, kids’ games, barbecue, wine tasting and more, noon to 5 p.m. 263-9555 24 Diva Night at the Panida. Sandpoint has its divas, and they’ll be live on stage in this annual event, 7:30 p.m. at the Panida Theater. 263-9191 24 Summer Sounds. Bruce Bishop performs. See June 3.

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Calendar

www.sandpointonline.com

8 Summer Sounds. Kathy Colton & the Reluctants perform. See June 3. 8-9 Sandpoint Wooden Boat Festival. See Hot Picks. 9 Sunday Concerts on the Lawn. Carl Rey & the Blues Gators perform. See July 2. 14-15 The Laramie Project. See July 7-8. At Panida’s Little Theater, 7:30 p.m. 263-9191 15 Summer Sounds. Backstreet Dixie performs. See June 3. 16 Sunday Concerts on the Lawn. Moko Jumbie performs. See July 2. 21-Sept. 1 ArtWalk II. The second of two revolving art exhibits opens with art receptions at the 20 or so gallery locations downtown. Self-guided art tours for the second exhibit continue through Sept. 1. 263-6139 21-23 Artists’ Studios Tour. See Hot Picks. 22 Schweitzer Bluegrass Festival. Schweitzer Mountain Resort hosts this annual festival on the mountain with numerous bluegrass groups performing, plus chairlift rides and a barbecue. 263-9555 22 Summer Sounds. Muskrat Ramblers perform. See June 3. 22 Excelerator. Fourth annual import, sports compact and truck/SUV car show at Silverwood Theme Park, with live DJs, DB Stereo Drags and other contests. 683-3400 23 Sunday Concerts on the Lawn. Generations performs. See July 2. 28-30 Artists’ Studios Tour. See Hot Picks. 29 Crazy Days. Tons of deals in giant sidewalk sale by downtown merchants. Good advice: get there early. 255-1876

minute

walk hours free much fun

29 Summer Sounds. Special two-fer Crazy Days edition, with Off the Grid performing 10 a.m.-noon, followed by Carl Rey & the Blues Gators noon-2 p.m. See June 3. 30 Sunday Concerts on the Lawn. Swing Street Big Band with the Swing Shift Singers perform. See July 2.

August

Every Saturday and Wednesday: Farmers Market. See June. 3 Sitar Concert. Trio from India play classical music of the Benares region, 7 p.m. at the Gardenia Center, 400 Church St. 265-4450 3-13 Festival at Sandpoint. Internationally renowned concert series on the lawn at Memorial Field alongside beautiful Lake Pend Oreille. See Festival calendar, page 25. 265-4554 5 Long Bridge Swim. Hundreds of swimmers hit the water for a 2-mile swim across Lake Pend Oreille, 12th annual event now the biggest open-water swim in the Northwest. 265-5412 5 Summer Sounds. Silver Winds Flute Quartet performs. See June 3. 12 Summer Sounds. Easy Pickin’s performs. See June 3. 12-13 Arts & Crafts Fair. POAC’s 33rd annual juried art exhibit at City Beach, with 100 booths of all-original, handmade artwork, kids’ activities, nearly a dozen revolving music acts, artists’ demonstrations and more. 263-6139 18-19 Bonner County Rodeo. Annual rodeo all weekend, precedes county fair, at the Bonner County Fairgrounds. 263-8414 19 Summer Sounds. Charley Packard &

Come play with us! Experience the heart of downtown Sandpoint with over 100 shops & 30 restaurants. Plenty of free on & off street parking! 108 Main Street 208 255-1876 downtownsandpoint.com

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Jesse Harris perform. See June 3. 23-26 Bonner County Fair. Traditional country event with lots of livestock, 4-H auction and contests, crafts, produce, flower exhibits and more, at the Bonner County Fairgrounds. 263-8414 24-26 Idaho Panhandle International Film Festival. See Hot Picks. 25-26 Ponderay Days. Third annual community celebration with food, fun and festivities, carnival, games and car show. 255-2414 26 Summer Sounds. Robin Marks Trio performs. See June 3.

September

Every Saturday and Wednesday: Farmers Market. See June. 2 Summer Sounds. Finger-style guitarist George Bruner performs in the final act of the season. See June 3. 2-3 Schweitzer Fall Fest. See Hot Picks. 2-3 Coaster Classic. Fifth annual Labor Day Weekend classic car show at Silverwood Theme Park, with a ’50-’60s dance on Saturday. 683-3400 9-10 Harvest Party. Pend d’Oreille Winery’s 11th annual festival with grape stomping competition, cork spitting contest, grape bobbing, food sampling, wine tasting, winery tours and live music. 265-8545 21-24 Idaho Draft Horse and Mule International. The Northwest’s largest draft horse and mule expo at the Bonner County Fairgrounds with several shows. The annual sale will be held Sept. 25. 263-8414 22-23 The Miracle Worker. Live drama, 7 p.m. at Panida Theater. 263-9191


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Calendar

Festival at Sandpoint It’s the seminal summer event in Sandpoint: The Festival at Sandpoint, bringing two weeks

29 Big Band Broadcast. A nostalgic reprise of the live radio shows of yesteryear on the Panida Theater stage, this event kicks off the 2006-07 Performance Series of monthly music, dance and theater presented by POAC. 8 p.m. 263-6139 30 Tribute to Vaudeville. Variety show reprises old-fashioned vaudeville, presented by Jean Peck productions. 7:30 p.m. at Panida Theater. 263-9191

October 6-7 All Bonner County Bazaar. CAL’s annual arts and crafts festival and sale at the Sandpoint Community Hall. 265-8284 7 Thank You, Bob Hope. Live show by Brick Wall Comedy Theater, 8 p.m. at the Panida Theater. 263-9191 7 Oktoberfest. Traditional Oktoberfest celebration sponsored by Downtown Sandpoint. 255-1876 13 Gran Folklorico de Mexico. Colorful pageant of Mexican folk music and dance by acclaimed international traveling company, live at Panida, 8 p.m. Second in POAC Performance Series. 263-6139 14 Harvestfest. The Sandpoint Farmers Market closes out the season with entertainment, food, booths, arts and crafts, and displays at Farmin Park, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 265-0780 29 Gar Lange in Concert. Singersongwriter mixes roots rock, new country, rhythm and blues. 8 p.m. at the Panida Theater. 263-9191

See complete calendars at

SandpointOnline.com

Assisted Living 1123 North Division Street, Sandpoint, ID 83864

(208) 263-1524 Residents at The Bridge live in lovely surroundings while receiving all the personal assistance they need to keep their independence. We offer private studio and one bedroom plans.

annual staging of The Festival with yet again a stellar lineup of eclectic and renowned musical acts in genres from classical to country to pop. All shows are at Memorial Field and begin at 7:30 p.m. unless otherwise noted. For tickets and information, call (208) 2654554 or toll-free 1-888-265-4554, or click to festivalatsandpoint.com.

Thursday, Aug. 3: The season opens with a tribute to the music that makes Hollywood sing, as the Spokane Symphony Orchestra conducted by Maestro Gary Sheldon presents Hooray for Hollywood. This pops concert will feature favorites from West Side Story to Harry Potter and composers from Bernstein and Williams to Strauss and Rachmaninoff.

Friday, Aug. 4: Tanya Tucker, one of the finest song stylists of any genre, lights up the main stage. A musical prodigy who won Country Music Association and Grammy nominations before she was 15 years old, she was named CMA’s Female Vocalist of the Year in 1991. Her reality show Tuckerville is a current hit on TV. Saturday, Aug. 5: It’s Super Surfin’ Saturday with Los Straitjackets, starring guitar legend Dick Dale. Los Straitjackets serves up original, energetic, surf-guitar twang complete with Mexican wrestling masks. Self-taught guitar legend Dick Dale has knocked down numerous distinctions, among them the title of “King of the Surf Guitar” by fellow surfers in the ’50s and ’60s, and Guitarist of the Year by Guitar Magazine in 1981. Sunday, Aug. 6 at 4:30 p.m. it’s a Family Concert, starring the Spokane Youth Orchestra conducted by Verne Windham and Gary Sheldon as they musically explore a theme of rivers. Fun kids’ activities precede the concert, including the always-popular Instrument Petting Zoo. Thursday, Aug. 10: Nickel Creek with special guests The Wailin’ Jennys. With mandolinist Chris Thile, guitarist Sean Watkins and violinist Sara Watkins, Nickel Creek serves up progressive

bluegrass music. The Wailin’ Jennys is a Canadian roots trio of Ruth Moody, Nicky Mehta and Annabelle Chvostek, who make luscious and sweet music that never fails to cast melodic magic. Bonus: Complimentary microbrew tasting at 6 p.m.

Friday, Aug. 11: Actually, that’s spelled Phat Phriday, a doubleheader of the best in progressive alternative rock. First comes Jackie Greene, a folk, blues and country musician with a sound that’s reminiscent of his musical heroes Bob Dylan and Tom Waits. Next it’s David Gray, one of Britain’s leading artists, with finely crafted lyrics and music both inspirational and haunting. His 1998 album White Ladder brought him a Grammy nomination for Best New Artist and GQ award for Best Solo Artist.

Saturday, Aug. 12: It’s an incredible lineup for Super Soul Sister Saturday. First, it’s Ruthie Foster, an up-and-coming voice with a gospel influence. Then the multitalented Susan Tedeschi burnishes her formidable reputation as a deeply expressive singer, prodigiously talented guitarist and distinctive songwriter. Finally it’s true legend and three-time Grammy winner Etta James. Her incredible five-decade career has rightfully brought her multiple awards as a R&B pioneer, along with her own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Sunday, Aug. 13: It’s the Grand Finale with the Spokane Symphony Orchestra performing a timely Happy Birthday Mozart concert in celebration of the 250th birthday of the master classical composer. Come early for the complimentary wine tasting at 4:30 p.m. Stay for fireworks show.

See complete calendars at

www.sandpointonline.com

Helping to Manage Life

of astonishing music on the lakeshore under the stars. Running Aug. 3-13, this is the 24th

SandpointOnline.com SUMMER 2006

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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HO M E S IT E S

• C ON D OM I N IUM S

terfront Com a W w mu e N n ity A THE PLACE Magnificent lake and mountain setting • 285 acres; nearly one-third protected • Over 4,000 feet of public beach • 9 acres of parks, 7 miles of trails

CUSTOM HOMESITES From $195,900 to $2.27 million Interior and waterfront .35 to 1.5 acres

THE COMMUNITY Stunning waterfront in amazing North Idaho • Central village with town center • Proposed, full-service, 274-slip marina • Homes in 9 distinct neighborhoods

CABINS IN THE WOODS Variety of floor plans and styles 2-, 3- and 4-bedroom homes

THE OPPORTUNITY Visionary planned waterfront development • Limited to 500 housing units • Variety of price ranges • Condos, homes, homesites

BAYSIDE SOUTH CONDOMINIUMS From mid $369,000 to $455,000 2- and 3-bedroom homes Along Walson Wetland Park

DoverBayIdaho.com | 208.265.1597 Financing available from Panhandle State Bank 208.263.0505 | www.panhandlebank.com

MARINA TOWN CONDOMINIUMS From $650,000 to $1.25 million 1-, 2-, and 3-bedroom homes On the lakefront


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I N

T HE WOOD S

C US TOM

BUIL T

HOMES

On the lake next to Sandpoint SANDPOINT “A Norman Rockwellmeets-Ansel Adams classic” –USA Today “Top 10 outdoor towns” –Outside Magazine “Best small town in the West” –Sunset Magazine

SCHWEITZER “No. 1 Ski Resort in the Inland Northwest” –Pacific Northwest Inlander “A little-known gem of the Northwest” –MSN.com

NORTHERN IDAHO • 43-mile-long Lake Pend Oreille • 2.5 million acres of public lands in 3 mountain ranges • Four seasons with warm sunny summers, snowy winters

Welcome to Dover Bay. This complete, new residential waterfront resort community on the shores of beautiful Lake Pend Oreille is just 3.5 miles west of downtown Sandpoint, Idaho, and a short drive to Schweitzer Mountain Resort. The plan for this visionary community respects the inherent natural beauty of the land by reserving plenty of open space. Dover Bay’s unparalleled location contains almost 2 miles of lakefront plus inlets, streams, ponds and islands. Trails wind through cattail inlets and meadows from the lake to the top of Dover Point, where panoramic views await. Take advantage of real estate and home buying opportunities in a variety of price ranges, from condominiums to custom waterfront homes, in this magnificent, pristine lake-and-mountain setting on Idaho‘s largest lake. Contact us today.


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Interview

Stor y and photos by

Ed Lucero, world-record kayaker

S

Chris Guibert

andpoint local Ed Lucero, age 39, was last seen in town on video. He was part of the Banff Mountain Film Festival’s Radical Reels that showed in March at the Panida Theater. He was featured in a clip showing his world-record kayak drop of 105.6 feet over Canada’s Alexandra Falls on July 31, 2003. When his face lit up the big screen, someone yelled “Yeah, local boy!” and the crowd went nuts. This drop might be Lucero’s most famous stunt. In a January 2004 Outside magazine interview, Lucero said this about the waterfall plunge: “It felt like I was on a conveyor belt that had just speeded up. Then I go over and I’ve got my head tucked fully down, ready for impact. That was probably the calmest moment of my life. I didn’t hear the waterfall anymore. It sounds nuts, but it’s relaxing. I was in my own little world for what seemed like a long time. Then WHAM-O! BOOM! I hit the water and there was an incredible tone in my head, like BUUUUUUhhhyoooooing. Eeeeee.”

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PHOTO BY JED SELBY

Interview

ut he would never mention this feat to you if you ran into him at the local coffee shop. He is far too humble. He would rather tell you about the bicycle technology he is currently developing for Worldbike in Kenya, Africa, and talk about sustainability. Worldbike has become Lucero’s latest passion, giving him a chance to utilize his diverse background. He joined the Navy when he was 17 and spent four years traveling throughout the Pacific. He went on to design Southwestern jewelry in New Mexico and eventually went to work in the kayak industry. He did everything from instructing swift water rescue clinics to designing gear to working on an IMAX Film production, Caves, coordinating river safety. In 2005, prior to working with Worldbike, Lucero was working at the Bonner Community Food Center, making handmade bikes at Alpine Designs and tossing pizza at the Old Ice House Pizzeria in Hope. Lucero’s journeys have taken him around the world, from South America to Africa. Lucero, who is single, has guided trips in Ecuador, Guatemala, Costa Rica and across North America. He has been featured in many extreme videos (“kayak porn,” he calls them), filmed for Real TV and appeared on the Outdoor Life Network. One of his biggest accomplishments in the kayaking world was designing his signature armored life vest for Stolquist. It was the first vest with reinforced spinal protection. It was stitched with Kevlar, could be used as a rescue platform for stabilizing victims, and also incorporated a climbing harness so the wearer could be repelled into a canyon. The vest was the first thing Lucero designed that was multipurpose. He now takes a “multi-tool approach” to everything he designs, believing things should have more than one use.

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You grew up in northern New Mexico. What influences did the culture in the area have on you?

As a child, I spent most of my time outside away from the TV, exploring the ancient Pueblo land along the Rio Grande

Above right: Ed Lucero begins his record-breaking dive over Alexandra Falls in Northwest Territories, Canada on July 31, 2003.

near Los Alamos. This developed a respect and admiration for native Pueblo and Hispanic cultures. As a curious child I experienced passive solar architecture while playing warmly within abandoned, south-facing cliff dwellings. Watching mom roll out tortillas and then eating them with red or green chili inspired my young taste buds to seek fine flavor.

I was a “weekend warrior” dreaming of whitewater most of the week. ... Soon I was asking myself demanding questions like, “Why go back to work in the city when I love the river?” When did you start kayaking, and how does one build up to do the largest waterfall drop ever?

I started kayaking with an inner tube on the Rio Grande in northern New Mexico. Kayaking is a part of my lifestyle, which started while viewing a National Geographic article with kayaking pictures. The article inspired me to join a rafting organization in Los Alamos, called the Explorer’s Club, when I was in junior high. While rafting I saw my first kayak in the river. I desired the freedom of my own maneuverable boat, so I built a diamond-shaped boat in wood shop and headed down into the canyon for my first “canoe” float. The plywood boat sealed with black roofing tar soon disintegrated, and my desires for a better craft grew. After graduating from high school, my passion for watercraft placed me in the U.S. Navy. Soon after the Navy, I bought my first kayak in 1989 when I was 22. Kayaking soon took over my life. I was a “weekend warrior” dreaming of whitewater most SUMMER 2006

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Interview

Ed Lucero, above, pauses for a photo while working in Africa for the Worldbike program. Above right, an African rides the “Big Boda,” a modified bike that the non-profit program is helping to develop. (Courtesy photos)

of the week. My job was designing Southwestern-style jewelry for a large manufacturer in Albuquerque, N.M. Miniature jewelry kayaks and bicycles started erupting out of my desk as my thoughts drifted outside to kayaking. Kayaking challenged me both physically and mentally. Soon I was asking myself demanding questions like, “Why go back to work in the city when I love the river?” I asked myself if I was afraid to change my life, and realized I was. I quit my job and moved closer to the river and life grew sweeter. This started me on a path of questioning my own fear and attempting to overcome it. Rapids and waterfalls were triggering an inside challenge to overcome fear. Kayaking lines others believed impossible soon became my “possible.” Successfully running difficult rapids gave me confidence both in and out of the water. Big drops started growing as I pushed myself forward over fears. When I saw my line off Alexandria Falls, I felt the fear and felt the challenge. I asked myself, “If I believe I can run this, what am I afraid of?” Paddling progressively difficult stretches of whitewater felt like climbing a ladder – challenging myself with a jump after each rung. Eventually, one day I’m looking off the top, and jumping off seemed very natural. Where are some of the best local places to kayak?

Idaho is an epic place to kayak, and North Idaho in particular is extremely epic. My favorite spot close to Sandpoint is Grouse Creek Falls. Lion Creek, Lightning Creek and the Pack River are also incredible runs very nearby. Farther north are the Moyie and Yaak rivers. Kootenai Falls is about 66 minutes away and one of my favorite spots to kayak in the world. The Kootenai run starts with a 20-foot waterfall and then a monster-fast surf wave. The kayaking here is worldclass and totally amazing. Is kayaking work or play for you now?

Kayaking is my soul playing, so mostly I work to kayak. Sometimes work is play, but seldom is play work.

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In 2000 you were a sponsored “extreme” kayaker. You painted your truck with logos and dialed it in for an extensive tour through North America. The next year you switched gears to a bicycle and strapped on your kayak and camping gear and rode your bike from Sandpoint to New Mexico. Why did you switch to a bike?

Switching the “Soultour” to a bicycle reduced my cost and expanded my adventure. The truck and trailer always seemed to suck up my hard-earned funds. I spent more time under the hood and at the gas station than in my kayak. Getting on with my bicycle put me directly on my ride. My maintenance cost for the whole summer tour was $30 to repair a worn wheel. You refer to that trip as the “Soulboating Tour.” What is “soulboating?”

Soulboating is a soul-searching process that involves growing. Soulboating is an introspective way of thinking, which sometimes leads to falling. For the last year you’ve been working with a non-profit organization called Worldbike. What do they do?

Worldbike develops affordable utility bicycles for human-powered transportation. We design, fabricate and teach people to build utility bicycles. Our modified bicycle (the “Big Boda”) helps people transport basic things such as water, food and other people. We have found that by extending the length of a bicycle and strengthening its wheels, we also extended its hauling and earning capabilities. In Sub-Sahara Africa, bicycles are the main source of transportation. These types of modifications can directly change how millions of people and goods are moved from place to place on a daily basis. How did you get involved, and what assets did you bring to help with the Worldbike mission?

I used an Xtracycle on my 2001 bicycle-kayak Soultour. An Xtracycle is a SUB (sport utility bicycle) that is designed to carry 150 pounds of gear and can even carry a kayak. Xtracycle is the profit partner of Worldbike and a previous sponsor of mine. Ross Evans, founder of Xtracycle, knew me as a pro kayaker, welder and designer. He recommended I look into the Worldbike Africa project. I realized while working with the Bonner Community Food Center that I felt a


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I asked myself, “If I believe I can run this, what am I afraid of?” ... Eventually, one day I’m looking off the top, and jumping off seemed very natural. strong desire to help people. When asked to help create affordable transportation in Africa, I was easily hooked.

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Check out this project with Lake Country Real Estate at Sand Creek. Contact Owen Mullen, 208-755-0446 or Teague Mullen, 208-255-6650. 208-263-6820 office • www.LakeCountryRealEstate.com SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

A desire to change our world for the positive has always been at the core of my soul. There is a little boy in me who wants to save the world and make mom proud. Splashing down fear off waterfalls or helping a family on the road with their flat tire keeps me feeling fit. I make mistakes, then learn and make more, learning more. It has all become a challenge. I have learned waterfalls and rivers mirror my life. I see my line and feel the challenge. Sometimes I fall, but the river – just like life – always flows forward. In the last year there has been a lot of talk about Africa. Bono (lead singer of U2) has met with President Bush to discuss lifting Africa’s debt, reform trade policies and help with the HIV/AIDS epidemic. There are hundreds of NGOs (non-government organizations) there now spending billions of dollars. What is Worldbike doing differently to help Africa?

Hidden Valley is well worth a drive north of town, to the end of Hidden Valley Road. See the beauty and potential of this property for yourself!

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In the last three years you have gone from riding your kayak off of a 100foot waterfall to helping design and build human-powered transportation for people in Africa. How do these two, seeming drastically different things connect?

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Worldbike creates load-carrying bicycles for the developing world. Humanpowered transportation is a powerful tool to help end poverty. By setting up manufacturing and sales of utility bicycles, Worldbike initiates enterprise and inspires technical innovation. We start shops and add training, enabling the spark of creation. We want to empower the locals to build the bikes on their own. We don’t just give out free bikes; we show how to build and sell them for a profit. What makes us different from most NGOs is that we are a really small organization which helps minimize any bureaucracy. This enables us to work fast and efficiently. In the last year we


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spent less developing bicycle technology in Africa than most NGOs spend on one automobile. In the United States, people use bikes for transportation and recreation. Here we see everything from BMX bikes to mountain bikes. How are bicycles different in Africa?

Most people in Africa use a 1920s-era bicycle design known as the “Black Mamba.” It’s a heavy, single-speed bike with deadly brakes. People labor extremely hard with old technology. Bicycles in the United States have evolved rapidly, while bike technology in Africa has stagnated. What are the conditions like in Uganda and Kenya?

In East Africa people are incredibly poor, earning less than $1 a day. Only a few have the luxury of an automobile. Millions of people choose bicycles and walking as their main mode of travel. Public transportation is available but still very expensive for a majority of Africa’s population. What is the next step for Worldbike?

We’re going to bring newer mountain bike technology into East Africa. We are currently designing utility bikes made from used mountain bikes. Bringing used mountain bikes from America will help keep Worldbikes affordable. In the future we plan to ship a sea container full of modified mountain bikes, tools and parts to the port city of Mombasa in Kenya. Inland we’ll use our existing Worldbike footprint in Kisumu to continue building modern, load-hauling bicycles. From there we learn and branch out to other countries. How can people learn more about Worldbike or make a donation?

We have a great Web site located at worldbike.org where there is a page for making donations. Pictures of the project can be found at flickr.com/photos/ soulboating. What can people do locally to make a difference?

Ride a bike, appreciate how fortunate we are, and make way for positive changes. SUMMER 2006

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ADVENTURES

10 ADVENTURES WITHIN

ne of the wonderful things about Sandpoint is that we can go from zero to adventure quickly – whether by motorboat, foot, horseback, kayak, mountain bike, sailboat, airplane or by other means. In this story, we introduce readers to 10 great outdoor adventures, all within reach of town in an hour or less. Some of the most inveterate thrill seekers and fun hogs around share where they have been, how they got there and what they saw in the great outdoors – with just enough details so that you, too, can do the same.

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ADVENTURES

AN HOUR* OF SANDPOINT *OR A LITTLE LONGER, IF YOU DAWDLE

The question we might ask ourselves is why we risk life and limb, or maybe just a bruised knee, to seek these outdoor experiences. It might be that we are seeking a connection with nature and some much-needed solace. Perhaps, others are searching for a better understanding of the Almighty and His grand creation. We may love to feel the power that went into designing the mountains, the lakes and the rivers. There is no better way to share in the awe and wonder of our natural surroundings than by getting out there, in the backcountry and on the water. That’s why we sometimes go to extremes. Or, just maybe, we are simply addicted to the smell of the woods, the sound of the water and that unmatchable high we get from adrenaline pulsing in our veins.

Left: A hiker pauses to soak in the view from a trail in the Selkirk Mountains at Schweitzer Mountain Resort. (Photo by Woods Wheatcroft) Above: Ozzy Summerday is about to drop into the falls at Grouse Creek, in the Cabinet Mountains northeast of Sandpoint. (Photo by Doug Marshall/El Photo Grande)

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ADVENTURES PADDLING

PHOTO BY WOODS WHEATCROFT

Kayak the Clark Fork Delta Minutes from Sandpoint: 59

Location: northeast end of Lake Pend Oreille at the mouth of the Clark Fork River

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lip on your spray skirt. Shimmy into your kayak. Slide into the water, and see ya later. When you embark on a paddling trip from the Johnson Creek boat launch, you enter a unique environment of winding channels, marshy backwaters, forested islands and abundant wildlife. The best way to explore the Clark Fork Delta – a riverine ecosystem – is in a kayak. This ecosystem formed over thousands of years as water flowing from the mighty Clark Fork River slackened and met with the waters of Lake Pend Oreille. On a lake as expansive and open as Pend Oreille, the Clark Fork Delta offers a more intimate experience than you might expect. Overhanging trees, looming cliff walls and circuitous meanders make you feel absorbed by the landscape – as a guest and not an intruder. The silence of your craft makes it easy to glide on the water unnoticed by wildlife. Deer will often mistake you for a floating log. Canada geese are more wary but will go about

apparently undisturbed, if you keep your distance. You may arouse the attention of a moose enough to get a glance. Elk have been known to frequent some of the larger islands. It’s tough to sneak up on the beavers, but they’re good for a jolt as they smack the water with their tails to announce their presence. The bird life in the delta is extraordinary. Ospreys are a common sight flying to and fro calling in their high-pitched screeches and shuttling fish from the water to the nest. Get too close to their nest, and you may find yourself backpaddling. Heron rookeries are a unique experience that will definitely catch your attention. Many mating pairs will build their nests high in the canopy of a cottonwood grove. The raucous calling of the rookery makes a sound of a prehistoric nature. Bald eagles are often seen harassing a raft of coots or being harassed by a murder of crows. The diversity of waterfowl, too vast to enumerate, creates a vibrant hum to the delta, as they erupt with a splash from the water and whir by, propelled like rockets. If you don’t lose yourself in observing the

wakeboard or water-ski From the big lake down the Pend Oreille Riv er to Willow Bay Minutes from Sandpoint: 0 Location: in Sandpoint on Lake Pend Oreille heading west down the Pend Oreille River 36

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teeming wildlife, you will in the serenity of the languid waters. There are miles of interconnected waterways that lead on and on, and it is easy to get lost, so bring a map. With a little exploration and “bush-yaking,” you can get to some isolated places that exude an untrammeled feeling. Leave them that way for those who follow and those who live there. If you are feeling a little claustrophobic, a paddle out to the big lake is not far. Take in a deep breath as you look out over the expanse of water and realize that you could just keep going, if you wanted to. –KEVIN DAVIS

How to reach the put-in To get to the Johnson Creek boat launch, go west on Highway 200 to Clark Fork. Once in town, turn right after the Conoco gas station. Cross the Clark Fork River and turn right on Forest Service Road 278. Drive about 2.5 miles and look for the turnoff to the boat launch on the right, just before the cattle guard.

hanks to the sheer size and depth of Lake Pend Oreille, there are numerous ideal locations for great wakeboarding. Depending on wind direction, weather and, of course, our mood, wakeboarders and water-skiers are faced with that overwhelming choice every time they go out. For a quick “pull” after a day at work, you can stay close to the marina, be it in Sandpoint or Hope, with small coves and bays nearby. If the water is rippling, escape to one of numerous coves and find protected water. Make the adventure complete by taking time to jump from rope swings out by the Monarch Mountains or at Bottle Bay. On those glorious days when no other responsibilities are calling, locals such as Matt Gillis heed the call of that sparkling lake for a full day of wakeboarding down the Pend Oreille River. Gillis, a college student, says his ideal day on the water begins near Sandpoint, as he and his friends head down the river along the southern shore. The smooth, glassy water and minimal boat traffic provide for optimal conditions. They’ll go as far as 15 miles, maybe even 20 miles, downriver, pulling a wakeboarder. The shallow water allows ’boarders to see down to the bottom, and that makes for especially cool wakeboarding as they skim across the water, crossing the wake to and fro. Along the way, they admire the beautiful riverfront, the foothills of the


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ADVENTURES SAILING

PHOTO BY WOODS WHEATCROFT

Sail Lake Pend Oreille Minutes from Sandpoint: 45 Location: Garfield Bay across the central reach of the lake to the Monarch Mountains

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ailing Lake Pend Oreille near City Beach is great for an afternoon, but sailing to the Green Monarch Mountains can be a fantastic way to experience the heart of the lake and a distant mountain range to which few travel. The lake is deep, cold and sometimes unpredictable, but the rewards are bountiful – a powerful and steep, mountain-lined coast with peaceful coves and serene stone beaches. One day last spring, we set off and pointed east toward the Monarchs from Garfield Bay with our small, no-frills 14-foot Pintail. While we knew we could make it there and back in a day, we aimed to stay overnight at one of many peaceful, backcountry campsites. We hoisted the mast, loaded the gear and embarked from

the public boat launch. We brought along tents, sleeping bags, firewood, food and libations. As the saying goes, “Let the good times roll!” We left our car and loved ones behind and started the crossing at 1 p.m. The lake was calm, almost too calm. It took 20 minutes to sail out of the bay with a final push from the Pintail’s small motor to get us into the open water. But no luck; the calm continued. When there is no wind on a sailing adventure, there is only one thing to do – relax. We sprawled out on the small deck and benches and let the gentle breeze push us across the lake as we soaked up the sun’s warming rays. Hours later, we reached the steep, abrupt face of the Monarchs, rising more than 2,500 feet above the lake. The Monarchs hold some of the least developed shoreline around the whole lake – miles and miles of it. Indian Point was one of the closest and significant points, so we aimed our boat there. It took five hours to cross the 4.5 miles. Once you get close to the shoreline, spotting beaches that make good overnight destinations is easy. Most have an established fire pit and level areas for tents and bags. We set up camp, cooked, partied and took in a mind-bending sunset to wrap up the evening. The next morning provided us with brisk winds. It took only an hour to cover the same distance back to Garfield Bay. Our hearts were racing as we sped back across the lake in a fraction of the time it took to get there. –CHRIS GUIBERT

How to reach the put-in Travel south on Highway 95 to Sagle Road. Turn left and go to Garfield Bay Road. Turn right and go to the bay’s public boat launch.

PHOTO BY DOUG MARSHALL /EL PHOTO GRANDE

Selkirk Mountains and the wildlife. They take a break here and there, turn off the boat, listen to some music and jump into the water to cool down. Gillis says it’s a rare day when they don’t see four or five bald eagles circling around and divebombing for their lunch. Farther down, as they pass marshy inlets, they may even be lucky enough to see a moose wading around, quenching his thirst in the hot sun. They know it’s time to stop when they reach Willow Bay Resort and Campground. This out-of-the-way restaurant serves outstanding burgers on an outdoor deck – big enough to satisfy the appetites of Gillis and friends and prep them for the 15-mile return trip home. If you want to make your adventure an overnighter, try the moorage at Willow Bay Marina or Riley Creek. In town, boaters can stay the night at Sandpoint Marina. –LISA GERBER

How to reach the put-in Turn right off First Avenue onto Bridge Street and follow it to the boat launch at City Beach. Or follow Highway 2 west to Boyer Avenue. Turn left and take Boyer to Memorial Field/Lakeview Park, where there is a public boat launch.

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ADVENTURES

Hope Marine Services

UNDERWATER

Your only full-service marina on Lake Pend Oreille with a

PHOTO BY JILL FOELSCH

Complete Upholstery Shop 47392 Highway 200 Hope, Idaho 83836

208-264-5105 www.hopemarine.com email: hope1@nidaho.net Dealerships:

Scuba dive Lake Pend Oreille Minutes from Sandpoint: 30 Location: Talache Landing on the western shore of central Lake Pend Oreille

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nsuspectingly, I walked into AA Diving early one March morning, planning to simply ask owners Joe and Jill Foelsch a few questions about their business and get enough information to write an article. A few hours later, after trying on everything from wet suit booties to a mask, I left with plans set to dive in Lake Pend Oreille. Joe had convinced me that we could go diving in the lake this time of year; in fact, he dives year-round. Always up for adventure, and knowing I needed research material for this story, I had taken him up on his offer to go diving. We set a date to meet up later in March and take the plunge. After much preparation, including a safety briefing, waiver signing and gear loading, we were off. Destination: Talache Landing, southeast of town. Joe picked this place for several reasons, including good visibility and the possibility of a wall dive. That type of dive, being an advanced one, would only be attempted if Joe deemed me capable enough. Safety would be strictly adhered to from

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beginning to end. I got the feeling that we wouldn’t be taking any unnecessary risks. Now, I have been diving many times before but always in tropical, warm waters where you throw on a light (2- to 3- millimeter) wetsuit and you’re ready to go. Not the case when diving in Lake Pend Oreille. After what seemed like hours – real time was about 30 minutes – I had my pounds of gear upon me and felt fairly sure that I could brave the 42-degree waters. From the moment I put my head under water, the lake was transformed. Having spent more than 26 years – my whole life – living near Lake Pend Oreille, I was under the impression that I knew this body of water pretty well. But I had never seen it like this. After swimming along at a reasonable 20- to 30-foot depth for a few minutes, we came to the edge of an abyss. Looking over the face of the wall, I was stunned by the cool blue light, the jagged rock formations and the eerie barrenness. Joe signaled to me, Do you want to go back or go farther? “Farther,” was my enthusiastic response. Before I knew it we were at 80 feet, and I was entranced. The depths seemed infinite; the visibility was surprisingly good; and there was nothing alive in sight. The whole effect was beautifully haunting. I had been transported. Eventually, we had to surface, as I needed to warm up and get back to life in the real world. But I had been convinced. Diving in Lake Pend Oreille was an experience unlike any other, and I couldn’t wait to do it again. –JENNA BOWERS RESOURCE: AA Diving, 123 S. 3rd Ave., Suite 5, Sandpoint. Phone (208) 263-3332 or look up AA-Diving.com for rentals, tours and certification.

How to reach the put-in Drive south on Highway 95 and turn left on Sagle Road. Travel east and turn right on Talache Road and follow it to Talache Landing on Lake Pend Oreille.


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ADVENTURES PHOTO BY B. CLARK/NORTHWESTPHOTOANDVIDEO.COM

Pend Oreil e k La C r u i s e s le

ON THE RIVER

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River float The Priest Minutes from Sandpoint: 45 to 58 Location: On the Priest River between Pend Oreille River and Priest Lake

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hile there are other rivers in Idaho that are notorious for their white-water adventures, the Priest River is often overlooked for both its white water and its scenic beauty. Since 1999, I have been exploring its rapids and following in the path of the “river pigs,” hearty lumbermen that took on the dangerous task of moving logs downriver – a method used until 1949. My first float started by kayak just below Outlet Dam on Priest Lake, when I paddled into the Class III white-water rapids at Binarch Creek and floated down to the Dickensheet Campground. This section is for kayakers with a solid Eskimo roll or expert canoeists who don’t mind siphoning water out during late spring high flows. The run is fairly short, taking about an hour to complete, so most advanced boaters just run another shuttle for two or three runs on this section during a day. Below the state-operated campground, the river takes on a meandering characteristic – where more than 14 major oxbows can be found. This three-hour float takes in Class II Chipmunk Rapids, cedar-lined banks and wildlife-watching opportunities. Summertime flows can be slow, so get on the river early if you want to take time to explore the surrounding countryside before taking out at White Tail Butte Landing. Some floaters continue downstream to the Big Creek access point – a spot that is hard to find and accessible only by four-wheel

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The author pushes forward at McAbee Falls. drive. Others go on to McAbee Falls. McAbee Falls is the next major take-out/putin for the Class III Eight-Mile Rapids and is accessed by taking Peninsula Road north from Highway 57. There are a few surf waves that develop just downstream of the bridge on West Side Road to warm up the paddling arms before going into the canyon. Four more oxbows are found in this section before dropping into the boulder-strewn Eight-Mile Rapids – where the river pigs battled log jams and the water’s speed accelerates into the canyon. The takeout for this section is at Saddlers Creek. Paddling the rest of the way out requires working those arms through some long stretches of slack water. Saddlers Creek access point has a staircase to allow launching of kayaks and tubes, but rafters will have to be creative with a larger raft. This is a common launch point for inner tubers during July on this section, as they float from the Saddlers Creek put-in to the Priest River Campground at the river’s mouth. With more than 44 miles of shoreline between Priest Lake and the Pend Oreille River, the Priest offers something for everyone – white-water excitement in late spring or a more docile float on the river to delight your scenic senses. Get paddling! –BRENT CLARK

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RESOURCES: Sandpoint Ranger District, (208) 2635111, fs.fed.us/ipnf/sandpoint; Priest Lake Ranger District, (208) 443-2512, fs.fed.us/ipnf/priestlake; All About Adventures guided kayak tours, phone 866-GO-IDAHO, allaboutadventures.com/kayak

How to reach the put-ins To reach McAbee Falls-to-Eight-Mile Rapids section, from the city of Priest River, turn north onto Highway 57 and travel 3.5 miles to Peninsula Road. Take a right and follow the paved road 4.6 miles to the bridge and put-in. For Binarch Rapids put-in, go north on Highway 57 from the town of Priest River for 23.3 miles to a parking turnout on Highway 57 just south of the Outlet Dam on Priest Lake. The Dickensheet Campground put-in/take-out can be reached by following Dickensheet Road east of Highway 57; the turnoff is just past the Priest Lake Visitor Center.

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TWO LOCATIONS

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ADVENTURES BY HORSEBACK

Ride a horse on a full moon

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Minutes from Sandpoint: 18 Location: Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 2 miles below the village PHOTO BY MICHAEL WHITE

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at Schweitzer

y the light, by the light, by the light of the silvery moon … ” It’s hard for me not to sing on nights like this. I don’t know all the words, and I suspect certain tone deafness, so I try to keep it to myself. But the quiet night with just a clip-clop rhythm and the bright light of the moon occasionally poking through the trees, as if it were a light beam following me, just seems to beg for a song. There’s not much steering to do, as the horse under me can see the trail much better than I can see the silhouette of the horse in front me. That’s part of the thrill of trail riding on the night of a full moon – trusting in your senses, trusting in the 1,000-pound animal. Listening to the red-tailed hawk’s alarming cry. Letting go of the habitual dependency on sight. With an imagination like mine, sight only serves as a trick. Each bush waving in the night air becomes a lumbering bear; the tall grass, a slinking mountain lion. We are not hundreds of miles into the Frank Church Wilderness; we are just above the city lights of Sandpoint, watching one of the best full moon shows around. When we reach Picnic Point on Schweitzer, we pull out the cushions, spread out fruit and cheese, and wait for Luna to make her appearance. When it happens, it seems so fast – not like “bam” but like “ahwwwoooo.” Across the lake, the profile of the Cabinet Mountains sets the stage. The star of the show peaks through the curtains, sees her audience and then rises – her chest full, her magnitude magnificent. The crowd goes nuts. One night we cheered so loudly that she ducked through the clouds on her

The views are better from above Trail Rides twice daily, Tuesday-Sunday, 9 a.m. & 1 p.m.

Small groups, great rides. Ask about Full Moon Rides: July 11, Aug. 9, Sept. 7 Call for group rates and reservations.

2 miles before Schweitzer Village

263.TROT or 800.831.8810 (8768)

or reserve with the Activity Center at Schweitzer, (208) 255.3081

www.MountainHorseAdventures.com

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way up and came out again, even brighter than before, so we cheered louder. Then there was the full moon ride in which she didn’t appear at all. I thought my fellow riders would be so disappointed, but, instead, we saw the most extraordinary display of lightning. It rode the blackened clouds in a charge across the sky and never did a drop of rain fall upon us. –LAURA WHITE RESOURCES: At Schweitzer, Mountain Horse Adventures hosts full moon rides (see ad, this page, for dates) and 3-hour trail rides six days a week. Phone (208) 263-TROT (8768) or look up mountain horseadventures.com, or call the Schweitzer Mountain Activity Center for reservations or trail information at (208) 255-3081.

Directions to the trailhead: Drive up Schweitzer Mountain Road 7 miles to the horse barn on the right and park there. Or continue to Schweitzer Village; park in the lot below the village. Trails are marked for horses.


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Bike Priest Lake’s shore Minutes from Sandpoint: 59 Location: Priest Lake near Nordman on the northwest end of the lake t is early, and the summer’s morning sunlight shines through my bedroom window, nudging me awake. Usually, I’d just roll over and ignore it, but I have a full day of mountain biking the trails along Priest Lake ahead of me. It’s time to get rolling. Priest Lake arguably offers the best intermediate riding in the area with its smooth and wide trails that roll through moderately hilly terrain in majestic, old-growth cedar forests. The trail hugs the shoreline of beautiful Priest Lake with the Selkirk Mountains in the background. The views, the trail, the beaches and a backpack full of good food all add up to one perfect day. There are a few options to this ride. The Lakeshore Trail starts near Nordman and follows Priest Lake for 7 miles one way. The Navigation Trail starts where the Lakeshore Trail leaves off, at the Beaver Creek Campground, and continues about 9 miles farther out. The Upper Priest River Trail continues from there for an additional 20 miles and is more advanced. Riders can put together any combination of these trails depending on mileage desired. If two vehicles are available, there is the possibility of shuttling by leaving a vehicle at two different trailheads. My family and I opted to start at the Lakeshore Trailhead and meander through the forest, stopping at a lakeside campground for a picnic and a swim. The trail will please a variety of riders but is especially ideal for families with children who have good athletic ability and some riding skills

PHOTO BY CHRIS GUIBERT

I

because it is not technically difficult. The occasional steep pitch may have them pushing their bikes in short sections. Many easy bridge crossings will keep them well-entertained, and the frequent beach stops provide a great swim and picnic break. Once we arrived at the Beaver Creek Campground, we continued farther along the Thorofare between Priest and Upper Priest lakes. After getting a peek of the northern, remote Upper Priest Lake, we turned around and headed back. –LISA GERBER

Directions to the trailhead:

SANDPOINT WEST ATHLETIC CLUB

Directions to the trailhead: Turn right out of Priest River on Highway 57 north to Priest Lake. In Coolin, bear left and follow signs to Nordman. Turn right in Nordman and follow signs to Reeder Bay. After the Reeder Bay Campground, follow the road another 3 miles to the parking lot for the trailhead No. 294, Lakeshore Trail, on the right.

Summer

Adventure Camp A fun and affordable weekly experience for your 10-12 year-old www.sandpointwest.com 1905 PINE STREET • 208-263-6633 SUMMER 2006

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ADVENTURES ON THE WATER

Fish Alpine lakes Minutes from Sandpoint: 59

O

utdoor adventure seekers: Dust off those internal frame backpacks, dig through several boxes to find those misplaced water filters and examine a Forest Service map for this adventure destination. If you like to fly fish, watch wildlife and camp near a high mountain lake, point your compass to Two Mouth Lakes, where you can also explore “Myrtle’s Turtle.” There are many high-mountain trails within a 30-mile radius of Sandpoint, but after exploring several of them, I’ve found a personal favorite nestled in the Selkirk Mountains near Bonners Ferry. Located at just above 5,280 feet, this alpine cirque containing Two Mouth Lakes is the trip to put on your summer to-do list. This trail offers a heart-pounding workout along with the scenic views, so hikers should be in shape. The U.S. Forest Service rates this trail as difficult; its elevation gain is 1,800 feet. The hike is approximately 5.5 miles long and has a 15-percent grade on the trail to the lakes, so bring along your healthy lungs and toned legs. After a short but bumpy drive from Bonners Ferry, you will be in awe even before unloading your pack from the vehicle, especially if you have never explored the scenic beauty of the Myrtle Creek watershed. In its headwaters, an unnamed granite knob stands out – known to locals as Myrtle’s Turtle, due to its obvious,

Aaron Burgess proceeds with stealth and light-footed steps, sneaking up on wary fish feeding in the shallows around Two Mouth Lakes.

PHOTO BY B. CLARK/NORTHWESTPHOTOANDVIDEO.COM

Location: Two Mouth Lakes in the Selkirk Mountains west of Bonners Ferry

Hike From Lunch Peak to points in the Cabinets Minutes from Sandpoint: 59

T

he moose in Lake Darling, whence Lightning Creek is born, had its head underwater, so I didn’t know its gender until it surfaced, trailing waterweeds. For minutes, then, I watched her dip again and again into the lake. There was something odd about the perspective, though. The lake was smaller than I recalled. Then she finally sensed me, and everything snapped into place. The hair on my neck rose as her small, bright eyes looked me over. The lake hadn’t shrunk. She was the biggest moose I’ve ever seen, and I was glad she was far away. I followed Forest Service Trail No. 52 past the lake and toward Trail 67, and then I found her tracks and her calf’s, which made me nervous. A cow

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moose with a baby is more dangerous than a bull in rut. As I climbed toward the Lightning Creek/Pack River divide, I kept watch. I didn’t see the moose again, and that was probably fine by her, too. I did have a good and proper hike along the spectacular ridge that holds Trail 67. Bear grass, lupine, Indian paintbrush and white phlox bloom here, beside a well-defined track wending through hemlock and subalpine fir forest and across talus slopes made of broken mountains. To the east stretch Lightning Creek and the Scotchman Peaks; to the west lie Lake Pend Oreille, the Purcell Trench and the Selkirk Mountains. I chose that day to climb a steep 1,500 feet from the lake to the ridge before turning south

SUMMER 2006

PHOTO BY KEVIN DAVIS

Location: Lunch Peak atop the Cabinet Mountains east of Sandpoint

toward Lunch Peak. I returned to my beginning point via Trail 161, which follows Gordon Creek back to Lightning Creek. But, I could have just as easily (OK, more easily) driven to Lunch Peak and hiked Trail 67 without having to work so hard.


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ADVENTURES

www.sandpointfurniture. com

arched shape. The summit is worth a side trip if you have enough energy left. Pack along a collapsible, spin-casting rod and reel, or venture up the trail with your fly-fishing gear, to take a chance at catching a few of the elusive westslope cutthroat trout cruising the shallows or deep. I’ve caught a few of these trout planted by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, but, as in many subalpine lakes, the trout don’t get large due to the short feeding season. My friend was quite successful with a hopper pattern with a dropper nymph in the lower lake. This is one of the Selkirk Mountains’ hidden gems, so what are you waiting for? Finish packing, don’t forget your map and compass, and get outside! –BRENT CLARK RESOURCES: Bonners Ferry Ranger District, Highway 95 south in Bonners Ferry, (208) 267-5561. fs.fed.us/ipnf/bonnersferry

Directions to the trailhead: Drive north on Highway 95 to Bonners Ferry. Turn left on Riverside Road and follow it to the West Side Road No. 417; go right (north) to the Kootenai National Wildlife Refuge. Turn left on Myrtle Creek Road No. 633 and follow it about 12 miles to a wide spot in the road where an old access road takes off on the right. The Two Mouth Lakes trailhead and signs are found here.

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60 YEARS. THE ADDITION OF LUMINESCE HAS ENABLED US TO OFFER FULL SERVICE LIGHTING DESIGN. Not that Trail 67 is easy. It is relatively accessible, though, and offers lots of options for length and level of exertion. For beginning hikers of ages 10 and above, it’s a great day hike of whatever length might be appropriate to the group. One moderate out-and-back trek is to Pend Oreille Peak, four miles one-way. There is no water available on the ridge, so hikers should carry plenty. For experienced back-packers, Trail 67 connects with other trails to many places in the Cabinets, even as far as the Kootenai River, 25 miles from Lunch Peak. Remember, though, those miles are as the raven flies, not as the moose – or the trails – meander. –SANDY COMPTON RESOURCES: Sandpoint Ranger District, Highway 2 in the Federal Building in Sandpoint, (208) 263-5111. fs.fed.us/ipnf/sandpoint. To reserve the Lunch Peak Lookout, contact ReserveUSA at 877-444-6777 or look up reserveusa.com.

Directions to the trailhead:

30,000 square feet of name brands like: Broyhill, Simmons Beauty Rest, Lane Motion Furniture, Tempur-Pedic, Liz Claiborne Flooring, Biltmore Estates hand-scraped wood, Relax It’s Lee’s Carpeting and Hunter Douglas window fashions. We have extensive lines of natural stones, slates and hardwoods. We offer FREE estimates and professional installation. Interior Design consultation available. LOCATED ACROSS FROM THE BONNER MALL PONDERAY, IDAHO

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Drive east on Highway 200 for 12 miles and turn left on Trestle Creek Road No. 275. Follow it northeast roughly 12 miles to Road 1091; turn left and follow it 4 miles to Lunch Peak. High clearance or four-wheel drive vehicles are recommended. Trail 67 begins just below Lunch Peak Lookout.

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ADVENTURES IN THE AIR

Fly the skies PHOTOS BY CHRIS GUIBERT

Minutes from Sandpoint: 0 Location: Departing from Sandpoint Airport and flying over the Selkirk Crest, to the Clark Fork Delta

I

’m on my first flight with Sandpoint Aviation, and I’m being offered a chance to pilot the plane. Others would say “No thanks,” but I couldn’t resist. Before I knew it, I was steering the plane down the Pack River Valley. “Small adjustments,” said Skim, my modest instructor and pilot, as he coached me. It was exhilarating to know I was controlling the plane. I wasn’t worried about crashing, as there are two steering wheels, and Slim could have quickly taken over, if need be. I felt like leaning out the window and screaming, “I’m flying! I’M FLYING!” Sandpoint Aviation has been operating at the Sandpoint Airport for nearly 10 years. People have chartered flights to scout wildlife, check out real estate and even scatter ashes. The pilots are flexible and honor most requests if the weather is OK, using a 1976 Cessna 172 that holds three people plus the pilot. This model is great for both the scenic flights and lessons. For those who get sucked into the romance of being a pilot – as I almost did – the requirement is 40 to 50 hours at $115 an hour to obtain a pilot’s license (includes usage of the plane and Skim as instructor). That can be considered a small invest-

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ment for a hobby that may last a lifetime. Skim, a.k.a. Steve Wilson, has been flying for more than 11 years and has six years of instructing under his belt. He is cool and calm, unlike the driver’s education teachers of my youth. But not everyone wants a license. Some just want to take in Sandpoint’s beautiful scenery by air. Our flight started by circling around Bald Mountain and working our way north along the Selkirk Crest. We cruised by Schweitzer Mountain Resort and continued north to Chimney Rock to check out this spire of rock. Awesome! Then Slim then let me take the wheel as we cruised above Pack River toward the lake. When we got lakeside, I let Skim take over so I could start shooting photos again. “Just open the window and

SUMMER 2006

start shooting,” Skim said. I was in heaven. Skim granted my every wish. “Can you do another pass around the delta?” I asked. “No problem.” “Can you tilt the wing up for a better angle?” “Sure.” Flying in a small plane is a completely different experience than an airline jet. Windows are all around, so the views are sweet. The passengers are much more in touch with their surroundings. You feel the wind currents and small updrafts. So grab the family or your sweetheart and fly that plane. You won’t regret it! –CHRIS GUIBERT RESOURCE: Sandpoint Aviation, (208) 263-9102, scenic flights, lessons, rentals and airport services.

Directions to the airport: Directions to the airport: Drive north on Boyer Avenue and turn left at Airport Way.


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This is our world... welcome

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What makes us

KING OF FUN? Perhaps it’s just because we have the most toys. Full service marinas, one in downtown Sandpoint, one in East Hope, and one to come in Dover Bay. We rent what you need on the lake, from wakeboard boats, speed boats, pontoon party boats, to kayaks, canoes and water accessories. We also know how to take care of your toys,with a fullservice marine, Polaris snowmobile and ATV dealership located behind Wal-Mart, featuring sales and factorycertified mechanics.

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WATERFRONT PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 263-3083 • www.sandp ointwaterfront.com


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he first thing rock climbers need to

Tknow about rock climbing in north-

Returning to Shangri-la: A brief memoir on adventure climbing in northern Idaho

Story and photos by Thaddeus Laird

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ern Idaho is that this is not the Sierra Nevadas, nor the Cascades nor the Sawtooths. This is one of those unique places on Earth where black bears, overgrown trails and old-growth cedar trees far outnumber climbers. It’s a place where solitude is a reality – not a fringe benefit – and where the locals often come equipped with heavy artillery. I was pondering all this while standing chest-deep in a patch of huckleberries high in the Selkirk Mountains above Priest Lake. We were searching for a climbers’ trail that leads up toward an illusive mountain called The Lion’s Head. My climbing buddy, Jason, was marching behind me through the willy-whacks, swatting off the occasional bee. We were loaded down with all the usual accoutrements of a climbing expedition into the Selkirks: backpacks bulging with ropes and hardware, polypropylene torn and ragged from years of bushwhacking, sneakers wet from a stream crossing gone bad, and, of course, a white shock of dog-hair in tow named Kootenai. After sorting through the huckleberries, we noticed that the brush thinned and that we were deposited into a rocky basin below the impressive 800-foot rock face of The Lion’s Head. We parked Kootenai near an old Douglas fir tree, stashed some gear and began boulder-hopping toward the bulkhead of ominous rock in front of us. Our goal was to explore a previously unclimbed route on the mountain’s southeast face: a striking mountain feature I had walked past on many occasions, always admiring it for its apparent disregard for life expectancy and certainty of outcomes. We hiked around to the mountain’s west side and gained the toe of the southwest ridge. Then we followed grassy ledges around to the base of the southeast face where we stood silently reviewing the mountain above us. I traced a possible climbing route in the


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air with my shaking finger, and Jason suddenly looked as if he was going to faint. I tossed on my harness, handed Jason a bag of smelling salts and began tiptoeing up the first hundred feet of beautiful, lichen-covered rock. Unbeknownst to me at the time, this was shaping up to be one of the best climbs of the summer. It’s no coincidence that it was also shaping up to be one of the best summers of my life. One year earlier, I had made an interesting life decision to uproot from a perfectly sound life here in Sandpoint and move to Berkeley, Calif., to follow a girl, get a “real” job and see the world through a different pair of eyes. Needless to say, I had promptly quit the job, and I convinced the girl to move back to Idaho with me and spend the entire summer researching a guidebook on climbing in northern Idaho and western Montana. At the top of my pitch, I slotted a few pieces of gear into a crack, pulled the rope tight to Jason and yelled down that I was safe. As Jason paddled up the lower slabs toward my belay, the distant valleys unfolded beneath him like AstroTurf in the early morning sun. Once at my ledge, Jason grabbed the gear and began battling up the next section of unknown cliff above. His determination and resilience on the rock was as impressive as the face we were attempting to climb. At the top of his pitch, we traversed right and gained the base of the classic East Ridge Direct route, which we quickly followed to the top. At the summit, I extracted the ancient summit register that lives inside a massive rock cairn up there and thumbed through all the piles of old climbing notes stuffed within. I produced one little slip of paper in particular – that just so happens to be my favorite little slip of paper on Earth – and handed it to Jason. Scribbled on the piece of paper was a faded name and an obscure date: 1938. This tiny piece of brown paper bag was left behind by a man from Bonners Ferry

PHOTO BY BILL KISH

Far left: The west face of The Lion’s Head shines in the midsummer sun. Left: The author climbs the second pitch of It Ain’t Hay (5.9) on Chimney Rock.

This tiny piece of brown paper bag was left behind by a man from Bonners Ferry who had apparently been the first person to climb The Lion’s Head back in a time when my grandfather was a teenaged boy. who had apparently been the first person to climb The Lion’s Head back in a time when my grandfather was a teenaged boy. I have a habit of producing this piece of paper when I am with someone who has never stood on the summit of The Lion’s Head before. It’s a party trick of sorts, and it has the keen ability to put various little things into perspective. Jason was impressed, as planned, and we sat there looking out over the subtle majesties of the Selkirk Range, trying to imagine what a climber’s life would have been like back in the 1930s. With a single, sweeping glance of the high peaks around us, my eyeballs were quickly snagged by a striking blade of granite rock in the far distance. This iconic spike of stone, called Chimney Rock, is by far the best climbing venue in northern Idaho. In fact, this tremendous fist of rock was my motivation to write a rock climbing guidebook in the first place. Looking over at Chimney Rock was like looking into a crowd and spotting an old friend I had not seen in many years. All at once, countless

memories of sitting up on that high perch came flooding into my mind. I thought back to the girl I had altered my life for and chased to Berkeley – how the two of us had sat on that summit, legs intertwined, telling jokes and promising the world to each other. And then there was the time I soloed the classic West Face Standard Route and sat up there contemplating the incalculable speck one’s life plays in the bigger picture of living. Then again, there was the time I had dragged a group of my closest friends to the summit – all inexperienced climbers who had made it their goal to sit on that rocky crown someday. As I gazed over at Chimney Rock and all the other peaks beyond, I suddenly realized that these were not merely chunks of rock. For me, these mountains were geologic mileposts. No matter where life took me, no matter what I became, I would be coming back to these peaks countless times over the course of the rest of my life. One day, I might even return with a wife and a few kids and a massive mortgage in tow. Or maybe just a new climbing buddy whom I would happily startle by producing a certain slip of paper on the summit of The Lion’s Head. I looked over to Jason, who was waving down to a tiny white speck of dog hair sitting in the boulder field far below. No matter what happened, no matter what the eventual outcome of life would be, I would always feel the same way about this place as I did right then. These valleys and rocks and trees and good people, this was not merely some place I had spent a few formative years becoming a rock climber. This is where I had spent the most defining years of my life. Returning here was like reconnecting with my own little rock-climbing Shangri-la. And in some form or another, it was a place I would always be. Itinerant climber Thad Laird recently finished writing a climbing guide for the Selkirks and Cabinet mountains, due out from Keokee Books later this year.

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THE SHORT LIST: TWO NOTABLE CLIMBS IN THE SELKIRKS

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CHIMNEY ROCK

THE LION’S HEAD

From Sandpoint, drive north on Highway 95 for 13 miles and turn left (west) onto Road No. 231, Upper Pack River Road. Go about 16 miles to West Branch Road No. 2653, turn left and go one-half mile to the Chimney Rock Trail No. 256 trailhead. Hike Trail No. 256 for approximately six miles to the base of Chimney Rock’s East Face. The Canary Legs to Cooper-Hiser (5.10b) begins in the obvious lie-back crack in the center of the face, which makes up the right side of a detached flake. At the top of the flake, enter a gully and climb it to a bolted belay. Move left onto beautiful flakes and cracks that are followed to a massive ledge. Tunnel behind the obvious chimney and gain the South Nose of Chimney Rock, which is climbed to the top. Rappel off the northwest tip of the formation.

From the town of Coolin located off Highway 57 near Priest Lake, drive the East Shore Road for approximately 26.5 miles. Turn right onto Forest Service Road No. 44. Follow this road until it crosses Abandoned Creek. Turn right and park at the hairpin turn. Follow the climbers’ trail up to the base of The Lion’s Head and then traverse around to the southeast face. Southeast Face to East Ridge Linkup (III 5.8) begins on the right (east) side of the southeast face, where there is an obvious slab covered in lime-green lichen. Climb this slab up into obvious doublecracks, which are climbed to a belay point below a dihedral/corner. Climb the corner until you are forced out right via face climbing to a notch on the East Ridge. Follow the crest of the East Ridge, passing through rock bulges (a few pitons will be encountered here) to the top. Rappel down the southwest face.

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Patrick McManus returns Humorist introduces first novel, The Blight Way

who was born and raised in Sandpoint, has written 15 funny, essay-style books, many of which are based on his own childhood outdoor adventures on the banks of Sand Creek and in the mountains around Sandpoint in the ’30s and ’40s. His first novel, published in February by Simon-Schuster, is entitled The Blight Way. It is the first in a series of Sheriff Bo Tully mysteries set in the Hoodoo Mountains, which he says he uses as a name because he likes it, not because it refers to any mountains in Idaho. “I created two ranges of mountains, the Snowies being the other one. I’ve found it fairly easy to create mountain ranges, and they give me a certain sense of accomplishment,” he said. McManus is known primarily as a humorist, and in this tale much of the humor is in the bantering between the characters, especially between the approaching-middle-age sheriff, Bo Tully, and his crusty, 75-year-old former sheriff father, “Pap.” A body is found on the property of some folks no one would want as neighbors near the tiny town of Famine, and then even more bodies are found, but just how many can’t be revealed here. “Because this was my first mystery, I didn’t know how many dead people I should have. It would have been easy enough to have 12 dead people, or 20, but I didn’t want to go overboard on this first effort,” he says. The sheriff gives his father a homicide investigation for his 75th birthday, and it’s a bit of a bonding experience for the two men, even though Pap refuses to stop smoking his freshly rolled cigs while sleuthing together in his son’s Ford Explorer. The tale continues between notso-Heart-Smart meals at Dave’s House of Fry

with theorizing about badguy motives. The sheriff is admittedly far better at unraveling those motives than he is at trying to figure out women and his relationships with them. Tully doesn’t get into trouble in this book for his blatant disregard for law enforcement protocol that might get in the way of solving crimes in Blight County, Idaho. That could be why the book is entitled The Blight Way. It will be interesting to see if Tully can continue to pull off his own brand of justice in the next seven or eight Bo Tully mysteries McManus intends to write. The book isn’t always laugh-out-loud material as is his monthly humor piece for Outdoor Life; McManus found writing this mystery thoroughly enjoyable, primarily for this reason. “Writing humor is not fun, largely because the reader expects it to be funny. In writing the novel, I tried to combine humor with mystery. In this case, the humor is kind of a bonus, instead of being the only purpose for the work, which is the mystery itself,” he said. There are no curse words in the book, just characters saying unnamed profanities with a certain number of letters. Tully may forget such courtesies as Miranda rights and such, but deputies may not curse on the job! “The fact that there are no profanities in the book is in part a send-up of some of the mysteries now being written and all the profanities they use. The other part is that my audience has long been a family audience, and I didn’t want to leave them behind when I wrote this book,” he said. The 288-page, hardcover edition of The Blight Way is available at Vanderford’s and The Corner Book Store for $24. It is also available for checkout at the East Bonner County Library. Look up mcmanusbooks.com for more details. SUMMER 2006

By Susan Drinkard

PHOTO BY BILLIE JEAN PLASTER

Humorist Patrick McManus,

Patrick McManus

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Artists on a different canvas Locals paint on ceramic tile, silk and wood

Creating art is a challenge in and of itself, but for some artists, that is just the beginning. Gail Lyster, Janene Grende, and Betty Jean Billups have found different means of expression, by altering their mediums and painting on unique surfaces. The results are truly original works of art, complete with stories of struggles and obstacles. And they wouldn’t have it any other way. By Jenna Bowers

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Gail Lyster Janene Grende F or Gail Lyster, the best part about painting tile is the constant surprise. Every time she puts a piece into her 1,800-degree kiln she wonders what will come out of it. There is always something new and exciting when working with tile, which seems to be the perfect medium for the younghearted and free-spirited artist. It all begins with the tile itself. There are several different options: bisque, porcelain, terra cotta and glazed tiles, the latter being the most challenging with which to work. She is often presented with glazed tiles by clients who want their unique piece of art on tile to match what is in their home. Luckily for them, she is always up for a challenge. And she almost always gets one. After choosing the tile, she sketches the design onto it with markers. From

continued on page 53

Betty Jean Billups

T

hough she has been an artist for more than 30 years, Janene Grende only discovered painting on silk eight years ago. “It’s the most fun I’ve ever had painting! Silk is such a gorgeous fiber,” she said. Though there are only 20 colors available in silk dyes, they are indeed gorgeous and vibrant, one of her favorite things about the medium. “It’s so rewarding. It makes people happy, makes them smile.” Grende’s artwork reflects her lifestyle and surroundings. Horses are prominent figures, and she often paints her own. The best known is Red Sky, a 28-year-old beauty, whose portrait became a specialty Montana state license plate. The plate depicts a horse in front of a sunset, and was recently continued on page 55

F

or Betty Billups, painting on birch door skins is as practical as it is desirable. The ultralight material can be cut up into any size and packed almost anywhere. That is of the utmost importance, because she specializes in “plein air” painting, which is all about movement. Plein air is a style of landscape painting that was created by a French impressionist. It is a way to capture the light and the land before, or even

PHOTO BY BOBBIE JOHNSON

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continued on page 56 Facing page: Sand Creek by Betty Billups Below, left to right: Daisy Landscape on tile by Gail Lyster, Morning Moose on silk by Janene Grende and Guardians of the Green by Billups

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A r t f u l ly S a n d p o i n t a ke L e h t y b o i d Stu

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Janene Grende

Lyster continued from page 51

there she traces the contours of her drawing with liquid wax, which resists the glaze for a controlled edge. Then she applies the glaze, often layering upon layers to get her desired color, though she is well aware that it probably won’t look how she hopes it will on the first try. When asked if she fires the tiles only one time, she laughs, “In a dream.” More often it takes three to six tries of glazing, firing, re-glazing and re-firing to get it just right. She won’t stop the process until she gets the true color she wants. Lyster, who has owned Fine Art Tile in Sandpoint since 1990, can be commissioned to make one-of-a-kind pieces for bathrooms, kitchens, signage, gifts or whatever else people can think of. She works with her daughter Kate, and together they create original and unique pieces.

“One of the coolest parts about tile is that it holds pure brilliant color, and it will last forever,” Gail said. They recently relocated their studio. Look up finearttilestudio.com or call (208) 2630826 for an appointment.

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nominated for a national design award. Proceeds from sales of both the license plate and prints of the original art go to The Montana Horse Sanctuary. She also paints wildlife, such as moose, foxes, bears and birds. Cowgirls are another of her favorite subjects. For Grende, painting on silk has become an incredible release, because it is “so fluid and unpredictable.” She refers to it as “Doris Day painting – que sera, sera.” She can spend hours conceptualizing a piece, sketching it, tracing it onto the silk, applying gutta (a wax-like substance used as a resistance to create a border) only to lose it entirely. “It’s not very forgiving,” she says of the process, and it can “go south very quickly.” The colors can start to run together and “make mud,” rendering a piece irredeemable. She has remade several paintings more than once, but for her it is just a part of the creation. She still manages to make between 60 and 80 pieces a year, and

though she loves each one, she can’t possibly find room for all of them in her home. Grende’s art can be viewed and purchased online at janenegrende.com, or call to visit her studio in Kootenai at (208) 263-6210.

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as, it changes. She hikes into beautiful places, sets up and contends with wind, bugs, tides, rain, sun and snow – all to encapsulate a fleeting moment. To assist this style, Billups designed her own “pochade” that is, essentially, a box. In her pochade she can carry her materials as well as her wet canvases, and it also functions as an easel. She couldn’t find one that was durable enough to handle travel and backpacking, so she made one that was. It is sturdy and easy to repair, because she believes in a philosophy of making something once, well, to reduce the use of materials and the waste that comes from poorly made products.

Carson Canyon

Billups began plein air painting with pioneer and friend Denise Burns in 1985. She loves it because she feels that she can truly depict an ever-changing landscape “in the moment.” She even wrote a book, Artist’s Projects You Can Paint: 10 experiments with impressionism en plein air. This 96-page, all-color instructional book sells for $20. She started using birch door skins in addition to museum board because of the smooth surface and easy mobility. It is so light that she can fit dozens of pieces into her pochade and hit the trail. Billups’ art, book and durable pochade can all be viewed and purchased at bettybillups.com or by calling (208) 263-1117.

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Photo Essay

www.sandpointonline.com

Images of Lake Pend Oreille

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She has countless nooks and coves, this big body of water shaped like an ear lobe. Her hues change with the weather, as if she were one big aquatic mood ring. With 111 miles of shoreline, Lake Pend Oreille holds seemingly endless vantage points, from which photographers can create images that capture her many personalities. Over the years, she has been photographed thousands, perhaps millions, of times. In this photo essay are some of the best scenic shots of the lake captured recently. Take time to view these images on paper. But, better yet, take time to stop and enjoy the view on your next hike, drive or paddle around the lake. Pend Oreille has many faces, and no film or megapixel could ever do her justice. The human eye – unfettered by a camera’s lens – is simply the best way to view her portrait. Clockwise from top: The views from Mineral Point seem never-ending, looking east to the Green Monarchs and Cabinet Mountains. (Photo by Chris Bessler) Friends paddle on the lake as the wispy, white clouds above warn of a weather change. (Photo by Woods Wheatcroft) The sheer steepness of the Green Monarch Mountains is captured in this shot taken from the Johnson Point Vista. (Photo by Kevin Davis) A couple who plans to build a retirement home on this homesite will have a fantastic view in their golden years. This shot looks east from Sagle over the lake and beyond the islands near the Hope Peninsula. (Photo by Mike and Lori Palmer)

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Photo Essay

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Photo Captions

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Top: Taken at the Bitter End Marina, this photo shows the harbor in Bayview one misty morning in October. The mist eventually burned off to reveal a glorious fall day. (Photo by Jan Reuter) Above: Doug Marshall captured Frazier King as he trims out the spinnaker on his sailboat just off Oden Bay.

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Above: Chris Guibert caught Ed Lucero snoozing while the wind was slack, while sailing from Garfield Bay toward the Green Monarchs. As the wind was absent, there was nothing to do but relax and enjoy the blue-sky day. While it took five hours to reach Indian Point that spring day, the wind picked up for the return trip the next day, helping the sailors reach the bay in only 45 minutes.


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Photo Essay

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Clockwise from above: Tanner Williams, doing a cannonball, and Choco enjoy an evening swim in Oden Bay. (Photo by Doug Marshall/El Photo Grande). Richard Heinzen, who lives in Bayview, took this shot of Idlewilde Bay’s rocky shore. Another image by Heinzen shows the old pier near the boat launch at Blackwell Point. The photographer thinks that the southern end of the lake, where Farragut State Park is found, is where Lake Pend Oreille is at her prettiest. The splash made by Tanner, above, at Oden Bay shines in the sun’s waning rays, in this follow-up image by Doug Marshall.

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The Kodiak: on a wing and a prayer Airplane built in Sandpoint awaits FAA approval By Stephen Drinkard

Ever since October 2004, there has been a new wing and an old prayer flying above Sandpoint. The wing belongs to the Kodiak, a new 10-seat, turbo prop airplane awaiting final FAA certification sometime in 2006, being manufactured by Quest Aircraft adjacent to the airport in Sandpoint. The prayer comes from the hearts of the employees of the company, in hopes this plane will help feed and bring medical relief to hun-

www.sandpointonline.com

dreds of thousands of people around the world.

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF QUEST AIRCRAFT

Quest Aircraft, begun in 2001, currently has 63 employees and in two years, when the plane is in full production, is projected to employ 140. Working out of a 27,000-squarefoot building, the Kodiak team has taken five years to design, build and test the prototypes. The company just finished last October building its 57,000-square-foot production facility. Quest intends ultimately to build 52 airplanes a year in that building, each plane selling for about $1.3 million. This company joins a number of other successful, homegrown manufacturing companies in Sandpoint: Unicep, Thorne Research, Litehouse Foods and Smart Plugs to name a few. Quest and these other companies are helping create the bridge Sandpoint needed from a disappearing timberbased economy to one based on a diversity of enterprises.

The Kodiak is not just another airplane; it is a remarkable fusion Clockwise, from left: The Kodiak flies over of old and new Sandpoint in this 2005 air-to-air photo. Kelly technologies. On Mahon and Chris Klynstra, an assembly manager, the one hand, the rest after landing on a remote airstrip, known as Kodiak is fabricated McGee, about 35 miles east of Sandpoint. with easy-to-repair Missionary pilot Dave Voetmann brings supplies aluminum and rivto southern Mali, West Africa, in 1995. ets. Its engine is a Voetmann, left, stands beside Tom Hamilton, the 750-horsepower aviation designer for the Kodiak, with the prototurbo prop that type in the background. flies not on avgas – at $15 per gallon in some countries around the world – but on Jet-A fuel (or even on diesel in a pinch) that, at only $2.50 a gallon, is a ubiquitous and cost-effective fuel, even in the poorest of countries. Its tough landing gear and high ground clearance enable the plane to land on the most uneven of surfaces. And, it has the flexibility to be easily transformed from cargo hauler to scheduled airliner to backwater floatplane to executive dress-up. On the other hand, the new wing design is the result of the most sophisticated engineering available today. The new wing allows the plane a dramatically lower stall speed, enabling the pilot to fly in complete control while taking off and landing in the most difficult and shortest of situations. It lands in fewer than 700 feet with a payload of 3,450 pounds and it takes off rapidly, climbing at 1,700 feet per minute. And, its avionics – the electronic systems of the plane – are state of the art. Perhaps the most “gee-whiz” benefit of its avionics is the ability it gives pilots to guide the plane in heavy storms and complete darkness with a screen that shows a realistic, real-time image of the surrounding terrain. The Kodiak is the brainchild of entrepreneur and aviation designer Tom Hamilton, chief technical officer of Quest. Hamilton has over 25 years in the aviation business, working with Boeing on special projects as well as designing his own planes, two different kit planes, one of which was among the fastest and the other one of the easiest to build. He moved to Priest River, 20 miles west of Sandpoint, a few years ago and SUMMER 2006

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started Aerocet, a company that builds composite floats for airplanes. But, according to Hamilton, the heart of the plane – and indeed, the Quest mission – belongs to his long-time friend and pilot colleague Dave Voetmann. Hamilton has a picture of Voetmann carrying in his arms a young, emaciated African child. Voetmann, after graduating from Prairie Bible College, took his family to Africa and for 25 years flew humanitarian missions, bringing medical supplies and food to refugees. In one mission, he and another pilot flew in medical and food supplies 14 hours a day for weeks on end in Mali, a landlocked country in West Africa. In a year, they helped to save about 100,000 lives. “Our country recently lost 3,000 people in the 9/11 tragedy. We were shocked by the loss of life,” said Hamilton, “but we have a hard time conceptualizing, let alone having compassion for, the loss of tens of thousands of lives that happens continuously in third-world countries. Until you have seen in person small children scavenging for food scraps in a dump, their feet burning from fires, compassion is difficult.” Hamilton and his family have also done humanitarian mission work, including helping build houses in Mexico with Bruce Johnson, Sandpoint resident and Alaskan bush pilot, who helped get Quest established in Sandpoint. But Hamilton came to believe the best way he could help was to design a better plane for humanitarian work, particularly since the missionary fleet of planes is aging and some are no longer being built. It took Hamilton several years of design work and a meticulous survey of needs from such groups as Missionary Aviation Fellowship and AirServ International, groups that fly in medical relief to disasters around the world, such as the earthquake in Pakistan this year and the tsunami that struck several countries in 2004. By 1998 heart and mind came together in design of the Kodiak, and


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in 2001 Quest Aircraft broke ground in Sandpoint. The funding of the development of the Kodiak has come entirely from foundations friendly to the mission of the company: to “design and manufacture an aircraft specifically suited to the needs of humanitarian and missionary organizations, which provides access to otherwise isolated peoples in the most geographically challenging regions of the world.” To that end, Quest’s goal is to donate one plane for every10 manufactured to missionary agencies like AirServ, one of the first groups to fly relief supplies into Baghdad. In order for Quest to sustain its mission, there also has to be commercial sales. So they have targeted sales to government, charter and passenger airlines, and personal and special users. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has already ordered five planes for spotting birds, and charter company Salmon Air will use the plane to fly small UPS routes. Hunting and fishing guides are purchasing the plane for their businesses; small airlines in poorer countries will use it for scheduled service; and business executives will purchase the plane for easy access between company locations, as they can land the Kodiak on a road. Hamilton believes wealthy individuals will also buy the plane, just because “it’s the biggest SUV they can get.” In short, Hamilton hopes the buyers will be many and varied for what he says is the essence of the Kodiak: “A large airplane that has excellent performance in a short field.” Of the 60 preorders for the Kodiak as of March, 40 are commercial sales. The future looks bright for Quest. As for Hamilton, while he will continue to oversee Aerocet, as well as many other projects, the development of the Kodiak remains his passion. “With all that I have and want to do, I didn’t need another project like the Kodiak,” he said, “but God thumped me on the heart and here we are.” You might say, on the wing of a Kodiak and a prayer of compassion. questaircraft.com SUMMER 2006

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New Coldwater Creek flagship store:

Historic W.A. Bernd building

Gets a stylish renovation B y S h e r y l Va n d e r L e u n

The new kid on the block is actually a 99-year-old beauty. t various times, the historic W.A. Bernd building, at 311 N. First Ave., housed a general store, hotel, pool hall and even a brothel. Now, following an extensive nine-month renovation, it reopens May 27 as the new “jewel in the crown” for Coldwater Creek. The catalog and retail merchant that is headquartered here had leased the entire Cedar Street Bridge, an anchor in the downtown retail sector, since 1995. Moving to its own building means that this anchor will be across the street, just a half a block south of the bridge. The Cedar Street Bridge, meantime, will undergo its own renovation and reopen later in 2006. This landmark is another major anchor downtown, especially since 1983 when it opened as a marketplace over water (see story, page 69). The First Avenue storefront features the company’s signature collections of apparel, jewelry, accessories, gifts and home accents in an environment that Rob Herrera, manager of store design and architecture for Coldwater Creek, describes as inspired by the “Grand Lodge” tradition, which ties into the company’s Northwestern roots. “The monumental scale, the proportions, the finishes, the use of raw, natural materials – it’s like shopping in a great, comfortable living room,” Herrera said. Coldwater Creek operates nearly 200 retail stores across the country, with plans to open 65 more in 2006. At almost 10,000 square feet, the

A

Sandpoint showplace is double the size of most of the company’s retail locations. Founded in Sandpoint 22 years ago, Coldwater Creek has long been respectful of its roots in the community. In conceiving its new location, the company has been steadfast in its commitment to preserve the building’s historic and architectural integrity and to ensure that the building remains a landmark for future generations. “Sandpoint is a town that’s rich in history, and we’re proud to be part of that history,” said Herrera. “We couldn’t turn our backs on the building’s heritage, and, in fact, we embraced it. Because it’s the right thing to do.” During the demolition phase, the original brick surfaces were painstakingly removed and stored offsite, to be reused later throughout the interior. The facade is true to the original, with operable awnings and transoms with decorative glass, a throwback to another era. According to Elena Petrocco,

Coldwater Creek’s vice president of visual merchandising, the design philosophy for the Sandpoint store is a reinterpretation of the company’s current retail model but also adds features and design elements that completely set it apart. “Even the displays are unique to the new location, with skeletal ‘floating’ walls and merchandising systems specially designed to highlight the building’s historical aspects,” she said, “while at the same time providing a dramatic backdrop to our Coldwater Creek products.” Referencing windows in the back of the store, with a “view” of the alley, Petrocco said: “We could have reclaimed the space (for merchandise), but that would have been a sin … we wanted to leave it as it was. There’s a connectivity to the original architecture and the space within.” Natural finishes abound: exposed brick, raw wood and metals with patina. “Everything, as much as possi-

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ble, is indigenous to the area and produced by local craftspeople and artisans,” said Herrera. “We utilized reclaimed ‘dead’ wood throughout. All of the flooring is Douglas fir – the majority of it milled locally. The original wood joists were re-inserted into the ceiling to pay homage to the authenticity of the original architecture.” The comfortable, inviting ambiance is further underscored by the soothing sounds of the water fountain. And upstairs, a wood-burning fireplace complements the wine bar and invites visitors to sit back and stay awhile, its chimney piercing the extended skylight. Light fixtures dangling in front of the original, street-facing windows beckon to the passersby outside. And what about the wine bar? Yes, the new venue continues a tradition unique to the Sandpoint retail location: It features a wine and espresso bar. Just the thing to take the edge off after a hard day of shopping. A separate street entrance with a metal and wood staircase – or the elevator – takes

people upstairs, where a massive barn door of reclaimed wood sets off a convivial anteroom and frames the entrance to the wine bar. Deep leather chairs are arranged to create conversational areas, while colorful stools add playful accents around the bar. Managers say the company plans to continue its popular wine tastings on Friday nights, usually to the accompaniment of local musical talent. “We hope that our guests will feel comfortable reading the newspaper or bringing their laptops, just relaxing and enjoying the space, and that they’ll want to come back again and again,” said Petrocco. Visitors and locals alike may simply want to see the city’s newest historic landmark, and maybe shop, sip or sit awhile. Coldwater Creek is open Monday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m., and on Sunday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Look up thecreek.com or call (208) 263-2265.

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Cedar Street Bridge undergoing facelift To reopen as public market in fall 2006 Although the Cedar Street Bridge, at 334 N. First Ave., will be closed for the better part of the summer, Sandpoint residents and visitors can look forward to the downtown landmark’s next incarnation when it reopens in October as the Cedar Street Public Market. It won’t be the first time the property has changed hands and taken on a completely new identity. Constructed in 1906 and used for vehicular traffic over Sand Creek until 1971, the original wooden bridge had been condemned by the City of Sandpoint and was in danger of being torn down altogether when world traveler and visionary Scott Glickenhaus stepped in. The “new” Cedar Street Bridge was designed by award-winning passive solar architect Jonathan Stoumen and opened to the public in 1983. Heralded as the only marketplace on a bridge in the United States, it was conceived by Glickenhaus as Idaho’s answer to Italy’s famed Ponte Vecchio, the 800-year-old marketplace on a bridge in Florence. The stunning twolevel promenade spans 400 feet across Sand Creek, supported by 161 pressure-treated wood pilings. Coldwater Creek opened its first retail storefront on the bridge in 1988 and expanded in 1990, 1992 and 1995. The property’s sole occupant for the last decade, Coldwater Creek relocated in May to its new, 10,000-square-foot flagship store in the historic W.A. Bernd building. In February 2005, the Cedar Creek Bridge was purchased by Jeff Bond and John Gillham, partners in Clear Visions, a Sandpoint development and commercial investment firm. Bond is also broker-owner of Tomlinson Black Sandpoint. Their plans for the bridge include a vibrant mix of vendors, from fresh flowers to fruits and vegetables to coffee and unique gifts, similar to the popular Pike Place Market in Seattle. And perhaps not so very different from what Glickenhaus originally envisioned for his neo-Ponte Vecchio. Negotiations are currently under way with a restaurant partner and vendors for a deli and bakery, among others. It’s all good news for downtown, says Jen Forsyth, executive director of the Downtown Sandpoint Business Association. “As downtown continues

to attract new retail businesses, having the historic bridge as an option is fantastic,” she said. “It is a huge benefit for downtown to be able to keep the anchor of Coldwater Creek but then also have the bridge that will attract new businesses to downtown or keep existing ones with the benefits of diversity.” Bond says he is looking forward to bringing the bridge back to its public market status. He and his partner are working with Bernardo Wills Architects from Spokane on plans to add an atrium to the front that is the full size of the entrance, with an elevator (the ramp on the east end will be removed). Tentative plans also include adding a kitchen upstairs and a coffee vendor in front, perhaps combined with a bookstore. Everything will be repainted, too, he added. “We want a lot of animation, a lot of activity, and the vendors will create that,” Bond said. “We’re looking to make it a real public space. We would like to offer it out to non-profit groups for fund-raising activities.” Bond, who says he has a long history with the building, was the original paint contractor back in 1983. While Coldwater Creek is leaving the bridge in May, Timber Stand Gallery will be open June 14-16 for the Plein Air Paint Out and will be reopening with the bridge in the fall (see Calendar, page 23). Timber Stand is in a temporary location in the interim (location not announced by press time, look up timberstand.com or call 263-7748 for details). “We plan to be open in October, just in time for the busy holiday season,” said Gillham, of the bridge. “It’s definitely a go, and we think all of Sandpoint will be really excited about it. We certainly are.” –Sheryl Van der Leun and Billie Jean Plaster

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Family Business

They’ve got business in their blood THE BONNER COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY COLLECTION

The generations of Sandpoint businesses: Part III

Scott Porter, left, and John Porter are pharmacists at Sandpoint Super Drug and the father-son team that runs the longtime familyowned business. Above right: This photo, circa 1960s, taken of First Avenue during an Independence Day parade shows the original location of Sandpoint Drug, in the upper right. John Porter bought the business from Allen Rolfson in 1974.

By Marianne Love

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his, the third installment in a series, brings us to the 1970s, an era that saw the Porters, Belwoods, Trubys and Van Dellens become business owners in Sandpoint. Their family-owned businesses continue to thrive, as they have stuck it out through thick and thin for three decades. These and other businesses benefit from friendly service, courteous workers, lower business-operation costs and quality of life, conditions that have driven Bonner County’s most recent business growth, says Mark Williams, Bonner County Economic Development Corporation (BCEDC) executive director. While Bonner County’s manufacturing jobs have doubled in the past five years, the economic picture hasn’t always been so rosy. Williams tips his hat to seasoned local businesses that have prospered through the decades. “Customer service … differentiates successful businesses, and Bonner County businesses excel at customer service,” he said. “I believe it reflects the quality of life we have and the respectful way that people treat each other in our community.” Like Williams, Sandpoint Magazine honors longtime business owners with this third segment of profiles, once again revealing that customer satisfaction remains foremost in local business owners’ strategy. Porters (1974): Whenever Marla Bergstrom hired a new Sandpoint Super Drug employee, she told them, “You’ll never work with a nicer bunch of people, and you’ll never have a nicer boss.”

SUMMER 2006

Bergstrom has worked for John Porter since he purchased Sandpoint Drug, Inc. at 313 N. First from Allen Rolfson in 1974. After a few years off, she returned when Porter opened the Sandpoint Super Drug on Fifth Avenue in 1981. She retired in May 2005 but came back part-time because of Porter and his staff. “That’s what I missed most when I quit,” she said. “John’s a great guy. The customers loved him, and they still do.” Porter has earned community-wide respect as a business owner and community leader ever since he, his wife, Sue, and their young family moved to Sandpoint from Spokane, where he worked as a pharmaceutical salesman. “I enjoyed the experience of selling pharmaceuticals,” he said, “but in 1974, it all changed. Allen Rolfson … called me to see if I wanted to purchase his store.” With earnestmoney support from Don and Sharon Rench, Porter sought a loan. “So off to Idaho First National Bank I went,” he said. “We had no money. Howard Faux, the bank president who didn’t know me from Adam, gave me the loan I needed.” Porter was on his way. With no room for expansion and downtown parking at a premium, he later opened Super Drug on Fifth. “We had room for about 75 cars,” he said. “Then came the mall. We decided to move the small Sandpoint Drug from First Avenue out there (in 1985), calling it Bonner Mall Drug & Hardware.” After six years of relatively slow business and added competition, including KMart, Porter closed the mall store and moved merchandise to the Super Drug.


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Family Business “Overall, we’ve shown good growth over the last few years,” Porter said. “The business climate has changed. We’ve had to find our niche and be better managers of our businesses. We have 23 employees, with 10 of those having over 12 years – the longest being 31 years. We’re very proud of each of them and try to promote a family-type atmosphere.” Porter is also proud to have his 35-year-old son, Scott, working with him as a full-time pharmacist since 1999. “Our family feels blessed to be part of the Sandpoint community,” Porter said. “It’s been good to us, and we hope we’ve been good to it.”

Belwoods (1975): When Ernie Belwood plays Olympic-style games with his grandchildren, Julia and Kobe, everybody wins – including Ernie. That attitude toward fun models how Ernie ran his business for 30 years. His daughter, Lori Stites, hopes to continue the trend. Founded in 1933 by Charley Pennington and first known as Furniture Exchange, the store at 301 Cedar St. has seen three owners during its 73 years. In 1965, Pennington sold it to Alvie Jeffres. During Jeffres’ tenure, Belwood was finishing high school in Priest River, working his first job for the railroad in Tacoma, getting married to Sandpoint’s Diane Payne and serving in the Vietnam War. After military service, he returned to lineman duties for the Northern Pacific Railroad before moving back to Sandpoint. In 1975, eight months after being hired as a delivery-truck driver for Furniture Exchange, Belwood, at 27, was offered a chance to buy the store. With help from his father-in-law, Ross Payne, he bought the business, changing its name to Belwood’s Furniture. After 30 years of serving customers, Ernie retired in 2005, turning the store over to his daughter, who is now 35. “I’m very proud that Lori took it over,” Belwood said. “She likes people the way I did and loves to help them. She’s also taken it on as a challenge of helping her dad.” If genes aid in facing the challenge, Lori, a University of Oregon graduate, is well-equipped. During the 1940s, her grandfather N.M. “Chet” Belwood co-owned Belwood-Merwin’s Hardware on North First with Lee Merwin. Merwin later bought out the partnership. Her other grandfather, Ross Payne, owned Ross Rexall Drug Store at First and Cedar from the early 1950s until 1973. Payne later established Nu-Way Wash-o-Mat with his daughter, Diane Belwood – Lori’s mom. Shortly after

that, they opened the Fifth Avenue Carwash, now operated by Lori’s husband, Andre. “I’ve had a lot of people to show me how and what to do to run a business,” Stites said. The daughter, who hung around Dad’s store as a kid, has witnessed and learned from major changes occurring in the Sandpoint business community. “In those days, everybody shopped at home. You stayed home with the people that supported your community,” she said. “ ... You must take care of that customer who walks through the door, so they will tell their friends and come back again and again.”

Trubys (1975): Bill and Carol Truby have loved doing business in Sandpoint for 31 years. Truby’s Health Mart has provided them sustenance and a family atmosphere where Carol’s mother, Irene, and two daughters, Valerie and Rosalie, have helped out for years. “We can’t think of anywhere else we’d like to go,” Carol said. “There are so many nice things you can do around here. You feel like you’re on vacation a lot of the time.” After moving to Sandpoint from Oregon in December 1974, the couple opened Truby’s in Gunning’s Alley three months later – but not before customers had already picked through the merchandise. “We were still getting ready, and people were … buying right out of the box,” she said. “We had items on a limited scale – dairy, cheese, grains and teas. We would buy grains and package them next door.” In the early days, certified raw milk came from a Bonners Ferry dairy. A plumber working in the Tri-Cities would bring their tofu supply. The Trubys listened

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Top: Lori Stites with her dad, Ernie Belwood Above: Alvie Jeffres hands the store’s keys to Ernie and Diane Belwood in 1975. (Courtesy Bonner County Daily Bee) Below left: Rosie Alexander poses with parents, Carol and Bill Truby. Below: Carol Truby and daughters Rosie, then 13, and Valerie, 11, stand beneath the store’s original sign in 1980.

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Family Business to customers’ suggestions and also provided education about health foods. “It was new to a lot of people,” Carol said. In 1976, Truby’s moved to its present location at Second and Main. The store now includes a small but busy vegetarian cafe. Ruthi Pick helped establish the cafe in the late ’70s after Bill stopped her on the street, asking if she would be interested in working behind a lunch counter. “I worked there for five years,” Pick said. “It just took off.” She still enjoys going to Truby’s for a sandwich.

Van Dellens (1978): Clarence Van Dellen and Dave DeWeerd grew up together in their Dutch community of Pella, Iowa, and then went their separate ways. Both reconnected when DeWeerd opened a camera store and studio in Libby, Mont. Clarence was building underwater photo equipment at the Bay Area’s Oceanic Products when he received a call from DeWeerd, raving about a wonderful town he had found

Far right: Clarence Van Dellen behind the original counter in 1978 Right: Clarence and Linda Van Dellen behind today’s counter at the Image Maker

in northern Idaho. “I came up in the fall, walked to City Beach, and said ‘Hmm, this looks like the place to be,’ ” Van Dellen said. On March 20, 1978, the two opened Image Maker Photo/Camera Store. DeWeerd ran the studio while Clarence sold camera equipment. Their partnership ended tragically in 1981 when DeWeerd died in a waterskiing accident. “Ruthie and Jeff Eich bought the studio and operated from this location for two or three years,” Van Dellen said. The Eichs later opened Windward Studio at their Sagle home. Since then, Van Dellen has increased his inventory. He has also offered one-hour film processing since 1988. His challenge has been keeping up with huge changes in

technology and retail in general. “Our kiosk (digital printing center) has allowed us to offer top-quality, instant digital prints from camera cards or photo CDs up to 8 by 10s,” he said. Image Maker’s staff includes technicians, longtime manager Mike Hammersberg and Van Dellen’s wife, Linda, a retired elementary teacher. Like other independent store owners, they have dealt with the influx of national chain stores by focusing on providing high-quality service and expertise. “Knowledgeable customer service has become a rare commodity,” he said. “I had spent more years in front of a counter than behind, so I believe in treating customers as I would like to be treated.”

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Family gets

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Extreme Makeover home

For a week last fall, ABC’s hit show turned the town upside down and volunteers poured out their hearts

By Elissa Glassman hat happened after ABC’s hit show Extreme Makeover: Home Edition (EMHE) knocked on the door of the Hebert family in Sandpoint last November was nothing short of a miracle. Thousands of spectators watched in awe as 300 local contractors and hundreds of volunteers used their skills day and night in bone-chilling temperatures to build a 3,000-plus-square-foot home in 96 hours. The generosity simply poured out of this small community with incredible donations including manpower, building materials and food by national enterprises, regional companies and local restaurants. When Eric Hebert’s sister, Francine, died of a heart attack in 2004 – leaving her 8-year-old twins Keely and Kyler orphaned – he left his bachelor lifestyle in Montana to become an instant dad for his niece and nephew in Sandpoint. All Eric could afford to buy was a 25-year old berm underground home, described as a dark daylight basement with a roof and only one entrance. Meantime, EMHE’s producers were looking for a family like Eric’s, in which children were being raised by someone other than their biological parents. Eric’s old friend, Tim Cipari, an employee for the ABC affiliate in Missoula, Mont., got an e-mail from the show’s casting director asking about families who fit that profile. Cipari immediately replied to the email and received a response instantly. Cipari then helped Eric make an audition video to apply for the show. After ABC watched the video, they called Todd Sullivan, president of Sullivan Homes in Spokane, Wash., to see if he would be interested in building an “extreme” home in Sandpoint. “When I got the initial phone call to help out, my world changed. It’s a huge challenge to build a house in seven days and requires hundreds of partners and volunteers to come

PHOTO BY BILLIE JEAN PLASTER

W

favorite part of his room, besides the remote control track encircling his bed, is the remote control light. Also upstairs is “The World Room” decorated by Romero Britto, a worldfamous artist from Miami. “This is the best room in the house,” Eric said. The children also love the play castle in the back yard, designed by Ed Sanders and built by Cochran’s crew. Nearby is a memorial for Francine – an engraved rock placed near a willow tree. Keely pointed it out as the family paused to reflect for a moment. The twins were soon tugging on Eric again, affectionately calling him “Uncle.” From top: Extreme Makeover’s Ty Pennington shouts “Move that bus!”; Michael Moloney greets the crowd; and Ed Sanders and Paige Hemmis check on progress.

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PHOTOS BY K.C. POTTER

together in a very short period of time. When I heard the story of this family, I couldn’t say no,” said Sullivan. Locals helped orchestrate the massive project. Skip Pucci, owner of Pucci Construction, made numerous calls to line up subcontractors. “I put myself in the family’s shoes and knew what they were going through,” said Pucci. “Coming from a family who lived with eight brothers and sisters in not-the-best living conditions, I could relate.” Eric’s boss, David Cochran, general manager/partner of Lakeshore Properties, and Pucci worked together with Producer Andy Lipson on the details of the project. Ty Pennington – megaphone in hand – led the EMHE team to the home on Nov. 12, 2005. The Heberts were then whisked off on a week-long vacation to the Bahamas. Soon, volunteers were working around the clock, and thousands of spectators flocked to the site via shuttles donated by Schweitzer. The family returned on Nov. 19 to the “reveal.” The show aired Jan. 22. Four months later, Eric let Sandpoint Magazine tour the house. He said there “isn’t one thing I would change. It’s perfect.” The twins, now 9, love their upstairs bedrooms. Kyler says the

PHOTO BY ELISSA GLASSMAN

Happy to be home are Kyler, Eric and Keely Hebert, shown atop the play castle behind their new house.

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Golf

G oing under the blade:

Hidden Lakes closes to get a Jack Nicklaus redesign and a new name Opportunity ripe to explore other area courses B y K ei th Kinnair d

If you haven’t hit the course at Hidden Lakes Golf Resort yet, your time is running out.

PHOTO BY JOANN DOAST

The northern Panhandle’s premier golf course is set to close in late May or early J une, so work can begin on the comprehensive facelift that will transform Hidden L akes into the Northwest’s premier golf resort. There’s even a new name to go with the new face – The Idaho Club. “We thought with a new golf course, we wanted this to have a new beginning. We want to take it to the next level,” said Chuck R eeves of Bonner Pend Oreille Investments, which is in the process of purchasing the

resort from D ick V illelli. Construction equipment will replace duffers as the sale closes. D evelopers have received approval from Bonner County to add up to 3 27 new dwellings. The new units, along with the 17 1 units the county has already approved, could bring the total number of dwellings to 4 9 8 , but R eeves said the density is being scaled back to avoid muting the natural surroundings. “We keep looking at it, trying to make it better every day, if we can,” R eeves said of the evolving layout. The club’s centerpiece will be the J ack Nicklaus Signature links course. The G olden Bear’s name can be found on a number of courses in the country, although only a few are signature courses which have Nicklaus’ direct involvement in how it’s designed and laid out. The Idaho

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CAP DAVIS PHOTO COURTESY THE GREATER SANDPOINT CHAMBE ROF COMMERCE

Golf

Club will be one of those courses. Reeves said the plan is to have nine holes ready for play by 2007 and the remaining nine holes completed by 2008. “It’s really a two-year process,” said Reeves. Hidden Lakes earned its name from founder Jim Berry, because the water hazards aren’t always visible from the tees or on approach to the greens. The new name, Reeves said, signifies a new era for the development. It also pays homage to Lake Pend Oreille, which will eventually figure more prominently at the club. Developers are also purchasing the lakefront Idaho Country Resort with plans to link it to the club. Back at the Hidden Lakes site, Reeves envisions something of a town center around the existing clubhouse. A spa, fitness center, pool and condos will help round out the core. Retail opportunities could include a sandwich shop and a flyfishing shop. There will also be a concerted focus on amenities and activity-oriented programs geared toward families and children, something Reeves said is sadly absent from many golf communities. Kids could take in sailing, boating or fishing lessons while mom and dad hit the links. “Your imagination is sort of the only thing that limits what you can do,” said Reeves. Though the name of the course is changing, the prevalence of water will still be a key feature. Hidden Lakes is

already flush with water obstacles, thanks to a tangle of creeks and a constellation of ponds and lakes that dot the resort. Villelli said there could be more water hazards after the dust settles from the redesign. “The water will still be a huge element, but it will come into play in different, more refined ways where – with a good golf shot – you’re not going to get in trouble,” he said. The course could stretch to 7,300 yards, although Villelli anticipates the forward tees will be a bit more forgiving. Villelli describes the new layout as a rewinding of the current flow. No. 9 will become the starting hole, but

PHOTO BY LAURA WHITE

Left: Hole No. 9 at Hidden Lakes will be Hole No. 1 at The Idaho Club. Above: The sun is setting on Hidden Lakes Golf Resort, as the course undergoes a redesign by Nicklaus Design in 2006. Below: StoneRidge has 19 holes and 6,684 yards in an idyllic setting in western Bonner County.

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Golf

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SUMMER 2006

the existing green will be the tee. Nos. 8 and 7 will also be played in reverse. “Then there’s the new hole,” Villelli said, referring to the vicinity of No. 12, a par 3 that currently features the glassy pond on the right and the waterfalls on the left. “That’s changing dramatically. You’re actually going to play over that entire pond and shoot up toward where the tee box is on 13. Then you go under the tunnel and play seven holes on the other side (of Highway 200).” Several of the entirely new holes on the other side of the highway work in an earthy element that doesn’t come into play on the existing 18 holes – granite. Villelli said there is an idea to route the holes through a reclaimed rock quarry, adding another facet to the resort. The traditional links format means there will be no front nine and no back nine, although Villelli said there will be a halfway house with refreshments and restrooms. The resort’s driving range will also be redone into what Villelli calls a “learning center.” Along with the standard firing line, and practice chipping and putting areas, Villelli expects there will be a videotaping setup where people can scrutinize the nuances and mechanics of their swing. “You can watch yourself swing, learn from it, progress and get better, as opposed to just standing there hitting ball after ball,” he said. From what Villelli knows about Nicklaus, he operates on the fine wine theory: It will open only when it’s ready and when it’s world-class. “The intention is to create the finest golf course in the Pacific Northwest and the finest destination golf resort. It just takes a little bit longer to do it the best,” Villelli said.

Time to explore other courses There is a bright side to Hidden Lakes’ hibernation. Golfers now have a perfect excuse to hit up the five other golf courses in Bonner and Boundary


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www.sandpointonline.com

counties. Each of the courses has their unique challenges and personality. For those looking for a true 18 with panoramic vistas, they can fix their gaze toward StoneRidge, A Golf and Recreational Community, or the Priest Lake Golf Club – both in western Bonner County. StoneRidge, located off Highway 41 in Blanchard, underwent its own renovation in 2001 and reopened for play in 2002. The realigned course offers sweeping views of the Blanchard and Hoodoo valleys. Aaron Lynn, StoneRidge’s director of golf, expects to see an uptick in visitors because of construction at Hidden Lakes, but adds that the golf resort community is already seeing a spike in play anyway. “We’ve increased our play by between 10 and 20 percent every year since we’ve remodeled,” he said. “I honestly don’t think there’s a better value in the Pacific Northwest.” Lynn said players will now have to do less guesswork on club selection. Distance yardage is being put on sprinkler heads, and now that range finders are permissible in competition, flag sticks have been fitted with reflectors, so golfers will know how much distance is between their golf ball and the cup. Lynn said range finders can be rented at the pro shop if you don’t have one of your own. Although StoneRidge is about 45 minutes southwest of Sandpoint, it’s well worth the drive. Set in a prairie hemmed by tree-studded hills, there is no shortage of challenging but fun golf holes. StoneRidge is composed mostly of par 4 holes. There are five par 5s and as many par 3s. The resort also has a 19th hole called “The Gambler,” which invites golfers to test their end-of-theround luck and nerve. The Priest Lake Golf Club, located north of Priest River on Highway 57, expanded to a true 18 in 2002. The new front nine winds around wetlands and through rock outcroppings, resulting in a par 72 course. SUMMER 2006

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Golf

PHOTO BY BILLIE JEAN PLASTER

The longest fairway at the Elks Golf Course is on No. 6, flanked by railroad tracks on the right and a parking lot on the left.

No. 2 is the course’s toughest hole, thanks to a trifecta of hazards – a pond and sand trap guarding the front of the green and a jail of trees to the back. Much like Hidden Lakes, moose and deer can be seen ambling down fairways amid the 6,500-yard layout. The Mirror Lake Golf Course on the southern side of Bonners Ferry on U.S. Highway 95 is, at its core, a nine-

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hole affair, but has staggered tee boxes to create an 18-hole track. The bluegrass fairways are lined with trees, but there is still plenty of room to drop your shots. Water hazards in the form of springs come into play on four of the holes and the bent-grass greens are typically large, undulating and swift. Situated in the Kootenai River Valley, Mirror Lake boasts views of

SUMMER 2006

serene pasture land, the Selkirk Mountains and attendant foothills. For those looking for something a little more laid back, the Sandpoint Elks Golf Course in Ponderay and the Ranch Club in Priest River are good options. Both have nine greens and 18 tee boxes to create a front-and-back feel. Compared to the other courses in the tip of the Panhandle, they are smaller. But that doesn’t mean they’re lacking in challenge. Consider the Elks’ No. 6, which has a meaty fairway but is flanked by railroad tracks on the right and a parking lot on the left. This 392yard par 4 rewards those who can shoot straight. Hook it and hope the ball doesn’t tag a vehicle or the golf cart sheds. A slice off the tee can land a ball on the tracks, where it typically leaps out of one’s possession for good. The Ranch Club’s No. 6 also requires straight shooting. Dense woods line the fairway and there is a high-tension power line that’s very


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Golf

much in play. Although U.S. Golf Association rules demand replaying the ball if it clangs off the tower or power line, the local rule gives people the choice of replaying. The Elks’ course is located next to Lake Pend Oreille on Highway 200, although foliage obscures the view in the summer. However, there are great views of the Selkirks. The Ranch Club’s scenery is dominated by the Pend Oreille River Valley.

Becoming a different type of attraction Even though there is limited golf at Hidden Lakes this season, Villelli said the resort is still attracting potential visitors interested in seeing how a Nicklaus Design course takes shape. “We actually had a bunch of people make reservations, and they just want to come out and see what it’s like to maybe watch the No. 1 course in the Northwest come together,”

said Villelli. Villelli acknowledges the redesign has inspired some grumbling from course regulars, but he remembers when people were down on him when he had the course redesigned a few years back. Back then, critics argued the course couldn’t be perfected, but Villelli said that some of those same people later admitted he had managed to do just that. “That’s what we’re trying to do. If everybody’ll be patient, they’re going to be rewarded tenfold,” he said. Villelli says he is proud of what he accomplished at Hidden Lakes and is glad to see people coming on board who are committed to conscientious development. “I think I’m going to get to play the last round. Even though I don’t golf, I think I’ll sneak out after everybody’s gone and hit one more just to say, ‘I was the last guy,’ ” he said.

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Birding

Birding in northern Idaho:

By Marianne Love

www.sandpointonline.com

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ast summer it began – a birding fixation. My classmate Terry Gray led a birding tour during our 40th class reunion. We saw just a few birds along the Mickinnick Trail that day, but Gray’s introductory tidbits ignited a fascination that exceeded my lifelong, backyard birdwatching passions. Like millions of retiring baby boomers enjoying more leisure time, I’m more devoted than ever to feeding and watching the creatures that fly in and out of our area every year. “Sandpoint is a great place to go birding,” Gray said. “Wherever there is water, you will find birds.” Gray’s birding activities started early in life. Since high school, he’s owned Roger Tory Peterson’s Field Guide to Western Birds. He set up a feeding operation in his backyard. As a member of the Palouse Audubon Society, he’s taken dozens of field trips. He also talks about birding to groups and happily guides novices on birding tours. “In the Inland Northwest, a person can observe 220 species that either live in this area or migrate through twice a year,” he said. “On most field trips, a person can observe approximately 40 to 100 species in one day.” The pastime offers much more. Identifying a species by sight or sound offers an intriguing challenge. There’s the opportunity of meeting mutual SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

Above: A northern pygmy-owl perches on an old stump. Below: A great blue heron rests on floating logs on Lake Coeur d’Alene.

bird lovers from around the country. Some folks simply enjoy sitting in the shade on a summer afternoon watching chattering robins or black birds splash around in the birdbath.

Birders of many feathers Bird-watching offers unlimited dimensions, and birders come in as many packages as their feathered friends. Maxwell Zimmerman is 14 years old. His lifetime birding records already

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include the 75 to 100 greater flamingos – pink ones – that took flight against the backdrop of a rising sun during his visit to France. “They came almost within 100 feet of me,” Zimmerman said. “It was awesome.” That sighting rivals his City Beach experience with Sandpoint’s Earl Chapin while studying different species of gulls. “Something caught my eye – flying through the air about 150 feet off

PHOTOS BY B. CLARK/NORTHWESTPHOTOANDVIDEO.COM

A sport of many feathers


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Birding

COURTESY PHOTO

From left: The population of Merriam’s turkeys is growing in northern Idaho. In this photo, the male is strutting his stuff to impress the female. Bev Chapin offers feathers to a swallow in the spring. Common goldeneyes take off from a pond near Priest River.

the ground,” he said. “I asked Earl what it was. He looked and blurted out in amazement that they were longtailed jaegers, (far from their Arctic habitat). Even Earl was amazed.” Sandpoint certified arborist Rich Del Carlo has noted characteristics for about 500 species during his 35 years of birding. “To become a proficient birder,” he said, “notice not only feather color but also, for example, flight characteristics or where they perch. Do they flick tail or wings or do they bob when they walk?” Del Carlo loves birding in “wild, wonderful places,” while my 84-year-old mother, Virginia Tibbs, observes the creatures visiting feeders around her house in the Selle Valley north of Sandpoint. One day, I invited her on a birding road trip. She sounded skeptical. “When did you start birding?” she asked. “When I got assigned this story,”

I said. “Why birding?” “Cuz it’s my story. Ya gotta bird book?” I asked. “Yeah, here on the table. I always have it handy for identifying the birds in the feeders.” “Then you’re a birder,” I reassured her. “Oh, OK, when are we going? You want me to bring my book?” Mother has enjoyed backyard birding most of her life, as have Boots and Becky Reynolds of Trestle Creek. At their kitchen table, binoculars hold equal rank to plates and forks. Boots claims “real men” keep their birding habits in the closet, but Becky says Boots is the “real birder” in the family, spending his mornings filling their numerous homemade feeders with black-oil sunflower seeds or wild bird mix. They have recorded nearly 50 species feeding on handouts. “We observe them every morning

‘Birdbits’

The ways and means of birding here

• South of Sandpoint: Round Lake State Park, 11 miles south of town on Dufort Road just west of Highway 95, (208) 263-3489; and Farragut State Park, 4 miles east of Athol. (208) 683-2425. Annual state parks fee required. idahoparks.org • East of Sandpoint: Several areas off Highway 200, including Oden Bay, Sunnyside, Pack River

Delta, Denton Slough and Clark Fork Delta. • North of Sandpoint: McArthur Reservoir, 20 miles north of Sandpoint near Naples, (208) 267-5157; Kootenai National Wildlife Refuge, 2,774 acres with a variety of birding facilities, 5 miles northwest of Bonners Ferry, (208) 2673888 or kootenai.fws.gov; Nature Conservancy at Ball Creek Ranch, 2,600 acres along Westside Road, 12 miles northwest of Bonners Ferry, (208) 267-9629 or (208) 676-8176; Boundary Creek Wildlife Management Area, accessible from Westside Road or Boundary Creek Dike Road, near Canadian border, (208) 769-1414. • West of Sandpoint: Highway 2 along the Pend Oreille River at Dover Bay or Riley Creek Recreation Area near Laclede; Priest Lake State Park in Coolin, (208) 443-2200, idahoparks.org.

Chapin family birders Sandpoint’s Earl Chapin, at 74, could be called the Pied Piper of local birders. His life list includes 723 birds. He once spent 21 miserably wet days at Mt. Atu in Alaska’s Aleutian Islands, recording 29 species never seen anywhere but in Asia. Chapin has lured most of his family into birding. His wife, Bev, collects feathers, saving them until the swallows return each spring. She holds feathers in her hands as the birds pluck them, one at a time, to carry off for nest con-

• Fish and Game Mitigation Areas: Pend Oreille Combined Lands Wildlife Management Area includes 12 habitat segments, totaling 1,292 acres and scattered across the Pend Oreille sub-basin. Parcels vary from 17 acres to 310 acres. Map and additional information are available at idfg.idaho.gov. Visitors should check with each facility for fees, maps, restrictions and hunting regulations. GENERAL TIPS FOR BIRDING Bring a field guide and binoculars. Know what to expect in your area; review area bird checklists. Find the birds: learn songs, learn about species habitat. Join a birding group. Go on a birding trip. Read about birds. Bring birds to you with flowers, sunflower seeds, bluebird houses or feeders. Record sightings. Have fun. Ask questions. Be kind to birds. (birding.com)

www.sandpointonline.com

WHERE TO GO With its abundance of water, northern Idaho offers a virtual birding paradise. Riparian areas, wetlands and mixed forests in the valleys provide excellent viewing potential, as do public recreational areas along the waterways, including Sandpoint City Beach, state parks, camping and picnic grounds, and boat launching areas.

while having breakfast,” Becky said. “Then Boots gets to watch them while I’m at work. He reports anything new that happens during the day.”

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Birding

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struction. Carol Chapin Cressey, their daughter, remembers accompanying her dad to Sunnyside to observe ducks. “The first one I was able to identify was the bufflehead – still my favorite,” she said. Kenny Chapin’s interest began when his dad gave him a bird book for his birthday in 1990. “That wasn’t a great present in my mind,” he said. After accompanying his dad, Kenny’s opinion changed. “I just loved seeing those birds. They were so beautiful. Usually, they’d been just a black item flying through the sky to me.” Chapin family members have helped locally with the annual nationwide Christmas Bird Count. From dawn until dusk, good weather or bad, counters record bird numbers around Sandpoint and submit findings to the Audubon Society.

A birding tour In March I attended a Native Plant Society meeting, which was capped off with a birding tour with Earl to Denton Slough east of Hope. On this cold, wet and dreary day, Earl pulled out his $1,000 spotting scope, covering it with plastic. Zeroing in on assorted coots and ducks, he invited the 17 birders to take turns looking at individual species, including an American wigeon, hooded mergansers and a common merganser. A few early birders peeked through the scope but soon climbed into their cars, leaving the rest of us behind in the rain. That was my first clue that truly dedicated birders don’t care about weather conditions – at least until the scope fogs up and rain starts dripping down the lens. I surmised that our rainy-day group included a few of the birder species known as “common wusses.” I spotted them later, seated in a warm perch, feeding on free hot dogs at the Holiday Shores Anniversary Celebration. Indeed, birders represent all shapes, ages and persuasions. Whatever the species, wherever they choose to perch, they have got a paradise for watching wonderful, winged creatures here in northern Idaho. For more specifics and anecdotes from local birders, visit mariannelove.com.


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Open Mic

Open mics galore The chance to express oneself abounds at local venues

Stor y By Trish Gannon

A

ndy Warhol can talk all he wants about those “15 minutes of fame” – at least he could if he were still alive – but all people really want is the chance to get up behind a mic, in front of an audience and maybe the chance to do it on a semi-regular basis. And for those folks, Sandpoint is a good place to be. Those who think they can give Garth Brooks or Sheryl Crow a run for their money often stop in at the Long Bridge Bar and Grill, at the south end of Sandpoint’s Long Bridge, on Friday and Saturday nights, and take the “karaoke challenge.” This venue features an eclectic mix of performers and an equally eclectic selection of music. It all starts at 9 p.m., but those singing need to watch out for the “fish bowls” – a specialty house drink. They’ll tend to tempt performers to tackle songs they might be better off leaving alone. For those who still have karaoke fever in their blood and don’t mind some travel, head south to the Garwood Saloon, located right off Highway 95 in Garwood, approximately 32 miles south of Sandpoint, for country ballads on karaoke night, Fridays and Sundays. Or, go 26 miles east of Sandpoint to Clark Fork’s Cabinet Mountain Bar & Grill, just off Highway 200, where the selection is wide, but the competition is fierce in traditional karaoke. A hint: The old-timers bring their own CDs. It takes place every other weekend. For those whose musical skills run to

instruments other than voice, check out the Monday Night Blues Jam at Eichardt’s Pub, 212 Cedar St. in Sandpoint, held, not surprisingly, every Monday night. A tradition for more than a decade, the Blues Jam invites instrumentalists of all kinds to join in with host Truck Mills for a bluesy, bluegrassy, rockin’, family-friendly night of jamming. “This is Eichardt’s, so it all starts when it starts,” said owner Jeff Nizzoli, but generally it all starts happening between 8 p.m. and 9 p.m. There’s more to art than just music, and

One of the Shook Twins, Laurie, does the beat box at Downtown Crossing’s Open Mic Night.

Photos by Chris Guibert

www.sandpointonline.com

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there are a lot of venues for those talented with the spoken word. They bring stories, poetry and prose to Café Bodega in Foster’s Crossing Antique Mall, at Fifth and Cedar in Sandpoint, on the second Tuesday of each month at 6:30 p.m. for Five Minutes of Fame. Popular with the younger crowd is “spinning disks.” Those who want to try their hand at being a deejay, go to Synergy, 209 First Ave., in Sandpoint every Thursday night for Open DeeJay Night. Synergy’s owners suggest bringing music along – anything from vinyl to CDs to MP3s – but leave those 8-tracks at home. This is the place where tomorrow’s professionals can show the world – or a little portion of it – how good they are at spinning the tunes, starting at 8 p.m. It’s not necessary for performers to specialize, however. The Open Mic Night at Sandpoint’s Downtown Crossing, also on First Avenue, each Wednesday at 8 p.m., tickles the creative fancy of entertainers from a wide variety of venues. Instrumentalists, songwriters, poets,

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dancers – you name it. The mic is open and waiting for artists to take it over. At Downtown Crossing, the mic is available to all ages, as long as the kitchen is open, or until about 10 p.m. There’s no karaoke, though. Those who plan to sing need to bring along their own instrumentation or do it a cappella. If Downtown Crossing is too crowded, or if Wednesday night just doesn’t work, head north into Bonners Ferry and visit Mugsy’s Bar & Grill downtown. This famous sports bar features an open mic on the second Tuesday of every month. Here entertainers can sing, bring an instrument or play an instrument that’s available at the bar. It all starts at 7 p.m., which gives plenty of time for one of the renowned Mugsy’s hamburgers. Neil Diamond once said that “performing was the easiest part” of what he did. Those who take the leap and go on stage for karaoke or open mic are welcome to test that theory out at any of the several venues in northern Idaho. Go ahead – take the mic. You’ll be glad you did.

Open mic venues Cabinet Mountain Bar & Grill, 213 E. 4th (Highway 200) in Clark Fork, (208) 266-1229 Café Bodega at Foster’s Crossing Antiques, 5th and Cedar, (208) 263-5911 Downtown Crossing, 206 N. First, (208) 265-5080 Eichardt’s Pub & Grill, 212 Cedar St., (208) 263-4005 Garwood Saloon, 17804 N. Highway 95 in Hayden Lake, (208) 772-7878 Long Bridge Grill, Highway 95 in Sagle, (208) 265-7929 Synergy, 209 N. First, (208) 255-4412


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They shelter our soul and warm our spirit

HOMES

From timber frame to straw bale, specialty construction techniques are producing homes that stand the test of time.

PHOTO BY TRISH GANNON

By Trish Gannon

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Real Estate

From a double-wide trailer to a castle complete with portcullis and moat, homes of all shapes, sizes and types are going up in this countryside characterized by a hot real estate market and open land.

The age-old method of timber frame As an early spring sun slants through the open doors of the barn, Collin Beggs makes himself comfortable atop a huge piece of red oak and

PHOTO COURTESY OF COLLIN BEGGS

Avid buyers who can’t find the home of their dreams already constructed and waiting for them to move into are increasingly buying up bare land and building what they want. That trend is fueling a construction industry that, as little as a dozen years ago, was seasonal with “stagnant” the only way to describe the winter months. Although conventional housing is the norm, some people want something a little bit out of the ordinary. For them, “stick-built” just doesn’t match their vision of a home for the ages. And for those people, there are contractors who can provide exactly what they want. Following, we highlight three area builders who provide that “something-out-of-the-ordinary” that a growing number of homeowners are looking forward. Read on to learn how the oldest building form that exists – timber framing – is growing new homes throughout the area that may well still be standing when the date ticks over to 3007. Visit with a builder who takes modern materials – Styrofoam and concrete – and puts together a “Lego-style house” that can withstand gale-force winds. And finally, visit with an artisan featured many times in these pages who, as part of his philosophy of housing being an integral part of a person’s soul, is helping owner/builders create incredibly durable and comfortable homes out of little more than compacted straw bales and plaster. Enter the world of specialty builders.

begins to hand drill a hole. His movements are precise, methodical and comfortable. He is a man at home with wood, and at home with building techniques that pre-date him by hundreds of years. SUMMER 2006

The internal structure of a timber frame home awaits sheathing – the walls and roof. The frame will be visible inside the house when done.

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Real Estate

Above: A hand-hewn beam takes shape for use in timber frame construction. Above right: Collin Beggs takes a break in his shop to hash out building plans.

“Timber frame construction is the oldest continuing vernacular in construction,” he said. “Any country with good forests used timber framing. It dates back to the 11th century in some areas.” At its heart, timber frame construction is a celebration of wood and how it is joined together. It is posts and beams and complex joinery, and the combination results in a self-supporting structure, eliminating the need for support from walls. True timber frame construction – as opposed to the broader category of post-and-beam

A timber frame home “is just really beautiful. These houses are more human. I think when someone chooses to build a timber frame, it’s a quality-oflife comment . It’s a house for the longer term, a place your greatgrandchildren could live in.” construction – joins solid wood timbers joined by traditional wooden joinery. The joints are mortise and tenon, dovetails, and wooden pegs. The mortise is simply a hole cut in the wood, while the tenon is a tongue designed to fit the hole precisely. This method

of construction is the strongest and most durable way to build with wood, according to Beggs. “Timber frame construction has a proven history,” Beggs said. “There are timber frame homes built in the 1200s that are still in use. If we cut a tree,

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Lake Country REAL ESTATE

• HOME • AGENTS • INFO LINKS • RELOCATION • CONTACT US • VIRTUAL TOURS • SLIDE SHOW • PROPERTY SEARCH

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Real Estate

800-726-9546 208-263-9546 105 Pine St., Ste. 103 Sandcreek Plaza Building Sandpoint, ID 83864

1243 Glengary Road One-of-a-kind prime lakefront home, with 152.7 feet fronting Glengary Bay. Custom 3-bed, 3-bath home features native rock entryway, two fireplaces, oak flooring, wet bar, executive master bath, gourmet kitchen w/ceramic tile floors. Waterfall & pond entryway, wrap-around deck w/views overlooking the Cabinet Mtns. and Hope Island. Pebble beach and boat slips, terraced landscaping all on 1.25-acre estate. Way too much to list. Priced at $1,950,000.

Pack River Road Properties Four 20-acre parcels to choose from. Easy access off paved county road frontage. Mostly level to benched, treed acreage with great views of the Selkirk Mountains. Near USFS entrances, lots of wildlife. utilities available. Creek frontage on two parcels. Short distance off HWY 95. Prices start at $229,000.

Kirby Creek Breathtaking panoramic views from this 2-story log home w/basement. Overlooking Lake Pend Oreille and the Green Monarchs. Home is 2-bed, 1 and 3/4 bath, wood floors, open-beam ceiling, bonus rooms, 40x54-foot shop w/living quarters, set up for horses w/corrals and stable. Lots of wildlife!!! All this and lake access for just $880,000!! Call us for all your real estate needs – Matthew Linscott, Mark Linscott, or Lana Kay Hanson. 800-726-9546 If it’s difficult, we do it immediately. If it’s impossible, it takes a little longer.

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6.1 View Acres Located off Kirby Creek Rd., 6.1 timbered acres feature breathtaking views from the Selkirk Range to Lake Pend Oreille. Private and secluded, with lots of wildlife. Short distance to public boat launch and beach at Trestle Creek. Priced at $199,900.

and put it into a frame, the potential is that the home will be used for hundreds of years.” A timber frame home “is just really beautiful. These houses are more human,” Beggs said. “I think when someone chooses to build a timber frame, it’s a quality-of-life comment. It’s a house for the longer term, a place your great-grandchildren could live in.” The timber frame home gives occupants a sense of security, he added. “People subconsciously feel safer when they can see what’s holding the roof up.” Beggs spent seven years learning his craft, and he likens the techniques he uses to those of fine furniture builders. He said his work “combines nature, handwork and the craft tradition.” He started in construction by building with full-scribe logs in Alaska, before heading to the East Coast to learn timber framing from the experts there. He worked and trained with three different companies, learning along the way about how to do high-end construction and historical restoration. “I wanted to come back West,” he said. He opened his business just north of Sandpoint in January 2005. He is now working on his fourth project and his fifth design locally. The wood he works with is enormous, some pieces weighing up to 1,600 pounds. “I measure a lot,” he said. “I have to be very precise. There are some pieces of wood I may work on for days, and it has to be right. If one of us cuts a joint just a half-inch off, we can’t use that piece of wood. Quality (work) is just a necessity.” Timber framing, he says, can be employed in any style of construction – from a New England saltbox to a Japanese-inspired pagoda. One of the oldest buildings in the Far East, by the way, is the Kondo, or Golden Hall, and was built in the early 7th century as a private temple for Crown Prince Shotoku. It’s a timber frame structure. “Timber framing results in an incredibly durable building,” said Beggs.


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Real Estate

Super-insulated walls using straw bales Architect Bruce Millard, who owns the Studio of Sustainable Design, utilizes a number of specialty building techniques in the homes he designs for clients. One such technique he is wellknown for is the use of straw bales as a construction material. “There’s no such thing as a straw bale house,” he said. “It’s a type of wall system. Straw bales are just another building material that has some incredible properties that other building materials can’t touch. The combination of compacted straw bales encased in plaster material creates an incredibly good, insulated thermalmass, structural wall system.” Straw-bale construction attracts both unskilled and professional builders, according to Millard. It is an easy way for unskilled builders to learn to build their own homes, and for communities to offer projects and workshops. Straw-bale construction is a historical method that professional builders are just starting to re-learn. Instead of competing, builders have been collaborating on projects and sharing success and failure. “We have found that people who try straw-bale construction tend to absorb and agree with the concept, and see it as a departure from the idea that industry is somehow more sophisticated than nature. The community that builds with straw bales will help build a sustainable future,” Millard wrote on bemarchitect.com, his Web site. “Most people (who build this way) end up being involved in the construction themselves. They believe in it.” He added: “Participants in a threeday workshop learned to stack, compress and double-coat the walls with cement stucco. They learned that airbag compression produces strong, well-insulated walls.” Millard said utilizing a unique

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One-of-a-kind opportunity to own a waterfront estate with 300 feet of pebble beach frontage on Lake Pend Oreille. Large custom home, 4 totally restored guest cabins, and a 5th that could easily be converted. New bath house services cabins. 200 ft dock large enough for 20 boats. www.windermere.com/tid111244 • $1,900,000

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Millard said utilizing a unique technique like this is “part of the philosophical core, that housing spaces should be a part of yourself.” technique like this is “part of the philosophical core, that housing spaces should be a part of yourself.” In fact, Millard runs his business out of a 500-square-foot building created with straw bale walls. While Millard, as an architect, is an

advocate for constructing with straw bales, he says there aren’t any local builders who specialize in the technique. “There’s not really anyone specializing in building this way,” he said. “When I first got into it, I explored how it was done and taught others how to do it. I don’t really have the time for that now.” But he added that

Bottom left: Architect Bruce Millard and his friends built this 500-square-foot, one-story structure with a loft as a guest house. The house’s walls were framed with load-bearing, two-string straw bales. Left and above: These photos of the guest house in progress show how the straw bales were compressed and shaped to frame the walls.

PHOTOS BY CATHERINE WANEK

he is always willing to work with clients to find someone with the knowledge and skills to build this way – or to help them learn how to do it themselves. “This is a great system. It helps to teach people how to look at life ecologically.”

A bomb-proof method: ARXX concrete form Terry Williams, who owns Terry Williams Construction in Sandpoint, builds with a material that is not quite as historic as timber frame but has a reputation for being durable as well: insulated concrete forms. Williams is the only local builder utilizing the ARXX insulating concrete form (ICF), considered to be the No. 1 insulated concrete form in the

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one click service

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Real Estate PHOTOS BY TRISH GANNON

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N :

Timber Frames by Collin Beggs, (208) 265-4982, or via email at collin.beggs@verizon.net. Terry Williams Construction, (208) 265-2936 or (208) 290-5423. Bruce Millard at Studio of Sustainable Design, 100 Jana Lane in Sandpoint, (208) 263-3815 or look up bemarchitect.com.

The ARXX insulated concrete form, top, and a finished home built using that type of form is shown above.

business. “This is just an incredibly energy-efficient home you end up with,” Williams said. “You don’t see the difference when you build like this – but you feel the difference.” ARXX ICF is a double layer of polystyrene reinforced with steel that is filled with concrete, creating a wall free of cavities and gaps. “It’s like stacking giant Legos,” Williams said, laughing. “With supervision and some training, just about anyone can build a house like this.” Williams said the benefits of building out of concrete include more than just the superior insulation. “These homes are gale-force-wind rated,” he said. “They’re rated to a seismic level four. The block won’t support mold growth, and concrete won’t burn. You can build one of these houses 400 feet from the railroad, and you won’t be able to hear the trains. You can run into one of these walls with a truck, and it won’t move. This is a product of the future. It saves trees, saves energy and allows for faster construction. Plus, there’s no harmful products in the block.” There are no limitations to building styles when using the ARXX blocks. Williams said they work with any plan, any type of home. “You can even build round walls if you want to. We can put any type of surface material

over the block, so your house will look exactly the way you want it to look. But you’re going to feel more comfortable and feel safer when you walk inside,” he said.

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Lakeshore Mountain Properties (208) 263-7313 SUMMER 2006

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Building Services BOWERS CONSTRUCTION fine woodworking tel. 208.263. 5546 Sandpoint, Idaho

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SUMMER 2006

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The evolution of landscape architecture Whether they’ve moved here from the lands of bright lights and asphalt or were born and raised in this land of unparalleled beauty, homeowners are increasingly looking to improve their properties by landscaping, many in a way that reflects the natural serenity around them. “There are some people who recognize this area is beautiful and wild and natural, and they want to have their surroundings mirror that,” said Barb Pressler, a Sandpoint landscape designer who owns and operates Gardens by Barbara. “Landscaping has come a long way from the days of smooth, green lawns and juniper bushes.” A look at the Web site for Clearwater Landscapes, clearwaterlandscapes.com, owned and operated by Dan Eskelson, reflects this area of interest for homeowners, with informational sections on ponds and other water features; hardscapes (retaining walls, pavers, buildings and the increasingly popular use of natural boulders to create visual interest in a landscape); and lighting that not only creates a safe path to your front door, but highlights elements in your landscaping plan. “Plan,” of course, is a key word in landscaping. “I use a phrase – plan twice and plant once,” Eskelson said. “I still get horror stories

from people who have invested money in landscaping only to have it not work out in the end.” One of the biggest mistakes made in landscaping property is “not understanding the site you have,” Eskelson added. “A plan should be very site specific and take into account the soil conditions, the topography of the site, and the type of plants that will grow well there.” Pressler concurred. “Sometimes the situation can become ridiculous,” she said, “especially when people plan their landscapes on their own,

by Trish Gannon

PHOTO BY BARBARA PRESSLER

Designs that mimic natural surroundings gain in appeal – and add to a home’s value

Landscape designed by Barbara Pressler combines rocks and stained concrete to mimic the natural surroundings at this lakefront home.

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SUMMER 2006

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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Above: Landscaping can easily become food for wildlife, such as this moose checking out a garden in the Selle Valley. (Photo by Linda Rice) Above right: A stone fountain at Idaho Stone made of natural rock imitates a flowing stream. (Photo by Trish Gannon)

and aren’t even aware of some of the issues they should be considering.” A big issue, she says, is what’s called the “urban/wildland interface” – the increasing practice of homebuilding in formerly wild areas. “People need to understand that landscaping can easily become animal fodder. Some people have spent a lot of money on a place only to have it turn into food for deer,” said Pressler. There are solutions to those types of problems, from understanding what plants are less attractive to wildlife, to lighting plans designed to deter animals, or even, simply, planting a lot and being prepared to re-plant as necessary. “The trick is for people to understand their property and plan accordingly,” Pressler said. At Clearwater Landscapes, Eskelson offers an online landscape design service for clients out of the area, but he says: “The more one-on-one,

the better. We consider one of the basic goals of landscape design to be the creation of unity and cohesiveness.” A good design involves the ability to visualize, he added. “You have to know what the mature size of a plant is going to be, and you have to be able to picture how it’s all going to look both now, and years down the road.” A good landscape design “is not cheap” Pressler said, but Eskelson states that “cost is a matter of perception.” He points to a study done by Cornell University that shows “landscaping of high quality, designed and installed, can improve total property value anywhere from 17 to 40 percent.” With numbers like that, landscaping is not just an investment in a quality living experience, but a financial investment in the long-term value of a piece of property. Pressler encourages owners to consider other issues when designing a landscape plan as well. She’s a proponent of xeriscaping – landscaping designed to use little water – because “too many people don’t water appropriately and their beautiful landscaping just dies on the vine.” She also promotes the use of rock and concrete in hardscape materials in this area of summer fire season. “It just doesn’t make sense

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Sandpoint’s Top Producing Agent*

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“I understand that buying or selling a home can be one of the most significant financial decisions my clients might make. It is my goal to make that experience a positive one. I am a full-time agent with a high energy level and a commitment to professionalism.” Quality Custom Home on 5 Acres with Water Views & Creek *Based on Selkirk MLS Data for 2004, 2005 & YTD 2006

Desirable private location close to town. Property features include: 3 master suites, a rock fireplace, gourmet kitchen with granite counter tops, hydronic floor heat, surround sound, wrap-around deck for entertaining, and mature trees. This is an incredible showplace!

Website: www.evergreen-realty.com 321 N. First Avenue, Sandpoint, ID 83864 E-mail: charesse@evergreen-realty.com Cell: 208.255.6060 Toll Free 888.228.6060 Fax: 263.3959 SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

SUMMER 2006


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to move out into the woods, and then put a big wooden deck next to your house that creates a ladder for fire to destroy your property.” That type of thinking has helped Idaho Stone, located on Kootenai Cut-Off Road in Ponderay, to triple in size since Bill and Cathy Friedman purchased the business just over three years ago. “People are surprised to learn just how affordable it is to use natural stone,” said Bill, and the business is surrounded by hundreds of examples, from natural slate to boulders weighing up to three tons. “The use of stone is very popular because there’s so many options,” he said. Many purchasers are looking to duplicate what they see in nature. “The more balanced the system is, the less problems they seem to have with it.” In addition to stone, “water features are a big part of our business. It’s becoming more

and more popular each year.” From a simple trickle of water running down a granite face to a full-scale, elaborate pond, people are looking more and more to add water to their landscaping plans. “The use of water is soothing to the soul,” Pressler said, “and adds to a landscape plan on a number of different levels.” This can range from bird habitat to a secondary water source in the event of fire. At Pressler’s own home, copious use of water features has created a paradise for frogs, and their evening chorus fills the air. “We sort of went through a phase of asphalting and concreting everything we saw,” Bill said, “because it was easy. Now we’re starting to see that change, moving toward taking care of our planet and doing something along the line of a more natural product. Ultimately, it’s so much more appealing.”

Above left: These beforeand-after shots show a garden in progress by Barbara Pressler. First, a collection of burned stumps and rocks are placed as elements. Then almost all native plants are added to conserve on water. Stone walkways complete the natural-looking landscape. Above: Dan Eskelson built a hill to create dimension in this landscape design. (Courtesy photos)

Sandpoint’s Top Producing Agent*

*Based on Selkirk MLS data for 2004, 2005 & YTD 2006

Waterfront Home on Over an Acre

Separate guest home and majestic lake & Schweitzer views. A protected bay with boat dock, mature trees, landscaped yard with fire pit, 3 BR, 3 BA, master suite, beautiful wood & log accents, hydronic heat, large decks, and an attached 2-car garage. 425sf, 1 BR, 1 BA guest home with lake views included. An incredible showplace!

Website: www.evergreen-realty.com

321 N. First Avenue, Sandpoint, ID 83864 E-mail: charesse@evergreen-realty.com Cell: 208.255.6060 Toll Free 888.228.6060 Fax: 263.3959 SUMMER 2006

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

www.sandpointonline.com

“My strong work ethics, high energy level and dedication to helping buyers and sellers with their real estate needs are what have made my business a success. I enjoy what I do and look forward to helping clients attain their dream.”

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Communities in the making Planned developments meet area’s growing housing demand

T

By Brent Clark

$ 57 5,000 range. These private retreats of 6 acres to 12 acres each, located south of town, all have breathtaking views of Sandpoint, the surrounding Selkirk and Cabinet mountains, and the expanse of L ake Pend Oreille. The views get even better at dusk when the lights flicker from the valley as the moon rises over the eastern mountains. “The points we are trying to emphasize are the privacy, closeness to town, the seclusion with acreage and the views,” said V oit. There are only 10 homesites within the 100-plus-acre gated community. The Crossing at Willow Bay is another waterfront community planned on 18 0 acres on the Pend Oreille R iver fronting D ufort R oad. This residential community emphasizes recreation and will have a sports center with basketball, tennis and volleyball courts, 2.7 5 miles of trails, and 4 4 0 feet of community waterfront for those looking to see a great blue heron or a gaggle of geese feeding in the shallows. A nother amenity at the resort will be the SUMMER 2006

The demand for property in this area, which offers quality of life, a slower pace, abundant recreation and views such as this, are fueling the housing market in Bonner and Boundary counties. www.sandpointonline.com

more inventory in the burgeoning housing market, construction this summer will be the busiest Sandpoint has ever seen for new planned community developments. A fter a few years in which Sandpoint has gotten “found” by national media, with stories in publications from USA Today to Outside and Sunset magazines, the market has raced to meet the demand created by the exposure. “R eal estate developers are producing diverse housing options for varied buyer demographics,” said A lison Murphy, realtor associate for the Windermere R eal Estate/ R esort L ifestyles Inc., Sandpoint office. “We have new waterfront and Schweitzer Mountain developments meeting the needs of true resort buyers,” she said. “We have townhouses, cluster residences and multi-family housing under construction. There are also unique golf resort and equestrian-friendly properties. Our market offers something for just about everyone.” A ll the interest and activity depleted the inventory of real estate on the market, which in turn has driven up property values and listing prices. The market has responded with a spate of new developments – all built with amenities to take advantage of the area’s natural beauty and recreational opportunities. The Crossing at Willow Bay, The R idge at Sandpoint, Iron Horse R anch, The Idaho Club, Hidden V alley, Elmira Townsite and The Meadows at Fall Creek are among the new communities in various stages of development. A lready on the market are two large waterfront developments, Seasons at Sandpoint and D over Bay. Steve Carlson, associate broker for Coldwell Banker and representative for Iron Horse Ranch, said he believes the real estate market will be more competitive once all of the private community developments come on the market. Iron Horse R anch, in Samuels near Walsh L ake, was still in the final permitting process as of early May, but the planned community’s low density and preservation of open space has won it accolades among planners. The 3 8 0-acre property will be limited to just 24 homesites,

ranging from 5 to 12 acres. “We have 200 acres dedicated just to green space,” said Carlson. The generous green space will provide biking and hiking trails, an equestrian center, and beach and dock on Walsh L ake, where residents will be able to take a canoe out for an evening paddle to search out the neighborhood moose. D eveloper and owner of The Ridge at Sandpoint, R ichard V oit, is also excited about offering high-end view parcels in the $ 3 50,000-

PHOTO BY CHRIS GU IBERT

o meet a pent-up demand for

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Wrap yourself around this

Or let the view wrap around you. The Ridge at Sandpoint is a special neighborhood, that is less than 6 easy miles from downtown Sandpoint, just off of Lakeshore Drive. Feel far removed from the world in your retreat. Selling a small handful of 6 TO 12 ACRE TIMBERED LOTS on a ridge with views from here to tomorrow. Look across LAKE PEND OREILLE, over the town of Sandpoint and the surrounding Mountains. There’s a lot of boasting in Sandpoint these days, waterfront, close to town, private. THIS IS OUR BOAST, COME SEE IT FOR YOURSELF.


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Wrap yourself around this

Or let the view wrap around you. The Ridge at Sandpoint is a special neighborhood, that is less than 6 easy miles from downtown Sandpoint, just off of Lakeshore Drive. Feel far removed from the world in your retreat. Selling a small handful of 6 TO 12 ACRE TIMBERED LOTS on a ridge with views from here to tomorrow. Look across LAKE PEND OREILLE, over the town of Sandpoint and the surrounding Mountains. There’s a lot of boasting in Sandpoint these days, waterfront, close to town, private. THIS IS OUR BOAST, COME SEE IT FOR YOURSELF.


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Visit our website, or call for more information

THE RIDGE AT S A N D P O I N T Keeping life simple.

Mountain Ridge Drive, Sandpoint, Idaho 83864 Tel. (208) 946-1300 TheRidgeAtSandpoint.com


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Visit our website, or call for more information

THE RIDGE AT S A N D P O I N T Keeping life simple.

Mountain Ridge Drive, Sandpoint, Idaho 83864 Tel. (208) 946-1300 TheRidgeAtSandpoint.com


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add up to 327 homes, in addition to the 171 homes the county had already approved. The total could be 498 dwellings, but Chuck Reeves of Bonner Pend Oreille Investments has said the density is being scaled back to help maintain its natural surroundings. Among the recreation accoutrements are plans for a fitness center with a pool and spa. After the course renovation is complete, Reeves said he believes it may become a destination for golfers across the globe. Meanwhile, just a few miles north of Sandpoint, David Ronniger, a longtime organic seed potato grower, is making a 144-acre chunk of land into seven 20-plus acre parcels for his Hidden Valley development. It’s his aim to create estate ranches in the sought-after Selle Valley. The parcels offer meadows, stunning views of Schweitzer and the Cabinet Mountain range, granite rock outcroppings, big trees, privacy and easy access within minutes to town. Teague and Owen Mullen, agents for Lake Country Real Estate, are excited about the new venture. “It has the most spectacular 20-acre parcels on the Bonner County market,” said Owen. Just a bit farther north, Kent

www.sandpointonline.com

Willow Bay Marina, providing a boat launch, plus waterfront dining by Café Trinity where diners can enjoy sunsets over the river. Also planned is a Beach Club facility for meetings, workouts, and maybe even wedding and receptions. The Beach Club will have an onsite caretaker who will maintain the club and other recreational amenities. The Crossing development won final approval last summer, and reservations for lots start on June 15. There will be eight waterfront lots, 13 view lots, six cabin sites and 55 wooded tracts from 1 acre to 3.5 acres. Jim Sullivan and Jerry Hansen are partners in the project. Sullivan said much of the infrastructure construction is under way and their objective is to have paving, landscaping and lights up by late-July. Three model homes are planned. Just northeast of Sandpoint, Hidden Lakes Golf Resort, soon to be renamed The Idaho Club, is getting new owners who plan a major expansion of the golf course and community. Nicklaus Design, headed by the legendary golfer Jack Nicklaus, is redesigning the golf course, already famed for its many water hazards amid the lush Pack River delta. Developers got approval from Bonner County to

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Compton is offering a much different flavor of Idaho in Elmira. Compton’s goal is to offer affordable housing with 3-bedroom homes starting at $145,000. He calls his community, appropriately, Elmira Townsite, as it is the original townsite platted in 1909, in the days that the old Union Pacific Railroad lines were built through the valley. “My intent is to provide wellconstructed, practical homes to people who are otherwise priced out of Bonner County,” said Compton. “I’m hoping to attract a mix of young families and retirees who can peacefully live together in a nice neighborhood.” Also to the north is The Meadows at Fall Creek, a 300-acre gated community where 26 acres will be held in open space amid the 5- to 7-acre homesites. The development, marketed by the Merry Brown-Hayes Group at Windermere Real Estate Resort Lifestyles, Inc., will have hiking, biking and bridle trails along Fall Creek with ponds and waterfalls. At Naples, about 20 miles north of Sandpoint via Highway 95, the lot pricing starts at $179,000. A private log community center is planned. Two projects have a significant head start in the boom in planned communities. First, Seasons at


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Sandpoint is almost ready to begin offering finished units in its private community built on the last stretch of undeveloped lakeshore property within Sandpoint city limits. The Seasons offers strolling-distance proximity to Sandpoint’s downtown with its coffee shops, superb restaurants, shops and entertainment. At its prime location just north of City Beach, it also has outstanding lake access with private sandy beach and marina, plus a clubhouse, spa, and year-round pool. “We are finishing up the first two phases of the first two buildings,” said

and nature preserves, miles of bike and walking trails, a new community beach, a marina and central village and more. Tara Lock, sales associate for Dover Bay Real Estate, said Dover Bay has been enjoying strong interest. The home offerings include waterfront and interior homesites for custom homes, “Cabins in the Woods” in a number of floor plans, and a variety of condominiums. And Dover Bay is taking advantage of its head start. “We have some custom home construction already under way,” said Lock.

Jeff Bond, broker for the Tomlinson Black Sandpoint office. The property offers primarily condos but is also selling townhouses and penthouses priced from $700,000 to $1 million. Meanwhile, a second distinctive large waterfront community is well under way, Dover Bay, with a wide range of offerings to homebuyers. The 285-acre property, 3.5 miles west of downtown Sandpoint, has 2 miles of lakefront plus inlets, streams, ponds and islands. The planners take full advantage of the site’s outstanding natural amenities with a number of parks

A SAMPLER OF RECENT SANDPOINT AREA REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS LOCATION

TYPE

BEST

LISTED

SELLING

DAYS ON

of Property

Features

Price

Price

Market

AGENT/

Firm

Sandpoint

Residence in town

South neighborhood

$529,000

$513,000

16

D. McLaughlin/Century 21

Sandpoint

Airport development

New construction

$402,785

$402,785

1

Sandpoint

Townhome

Location

$170,000

$170,000

7

M. Gagnon/Century 21

Blanchard

Vacant land

10+ acres, price

$65,000

$63,000

146

Sandpoint

Residential

Acreage, lake views

$966,000

$993,452

12

Sagle

Residential

Waterfront

$769,000

$769,000

8

Sagle

Vacant land

River views, acreage

$925,000

$925,000

54

P. Closson/Maiden Rock

Sandpoint

Vacant land

Water view, land

$330,000

$305,000

65

K. Wolf/Tomlinson Black

S. Taylor/Century 21 S. Carlson/Coldwell Banker N. McCanlies/Coldwell Banker M. Stewart/Lake Country

Naples

Acreage

293 acres, waterfall

$1,500,000

$1,400,000

90

J. Rands/Tomlinson Black

Sagle

Residential

Lakefront, new home

$899,000

$830,000

55

M. Brown-Hayes/Windermere RL

Acreage

Adjoins golf course

$435,000

$435,000

1

Moyie Springs

Sandpoint

Residential

Affordable with acreage

$69,900

$69,9000

31

B. Gile/Windermere RL R. Lockwood/Coldwell Banker

Sandpoint

Residential

Views, water access

$966,000

$993,452

12

S. Mitchell & N. Leatherman/Lake Country

www.sandpointonline.com

SUMMER 2006

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

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MARKETWATCH: PROPERTIES SELLING AT RECORD PRICES IN FEWER DAYS

www.sandpointonline.com

“When I talk to investors and developers, they Those properties continue to close at a think this area is going to continue to grow a higher average selling price – $292, 213 for the lot,” said Bill Malone, a title officer at Sandpoint first quarter of the year, compared to $202,994 Title Insurance. “And it makes sense – this is such for the same period in 2005. And for a little hisa nice area to move to.” torical perspective on those numbers, in 2000, A lake, a ski mountain, some of the best the year the real estate market began to take off restaurants in the Inland Northwest and beauty in this area, it was reported in Sandpoint that is unparalleled: It is all fuel for growth, and Magazine that “… 2000 has started with a bang as Bonner County moves into the second quarter … ” with an average sales price on residential of 2006, the real estate market is reflecting that property of $160,088. potential. “It seems like there is even more high-end “What we see at our end of the process is people buying,” Parrish said. He speculates that a that the volume is picking up,” high percentage of the buying Malone said. After what he Y E A R - T O - Y E A R C O M P A R I S O N market is still found in investors characterized as a “more normal and people buying second FOR SINGLE-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL AND CONDO first quarter,” the market is homes. HOUSING “heating back up for spring.” “The job market is what “It’s feeling like last year 2005: holds it back from being a maragain,” said Charlie Parrish, ket where buyers live here fullClosed listings: 1,195 owner/broker of Evergreen Average sale price: $254,570 time,” he said, but he pointed Average days on market: 72 Realty and a veteran of the local out that there has been some market with more than two 2004: growth with people who are decades of experience. “able to do their business by Closed listings: 1,241 In the first quarter of this Average sale price: $203,340 telecommuting.” year, 175 properties were closed Back in 2000, sellers could Average days on market: 103 through the Selkirk Association expect to take a while to sell 2003: of Realtors multiple listing sertheir property – the average Closed listings: 987 vice. That is down slightly from Average sale price: $162,391 was 195 days on the market. last year’s total of 185 closings, Average days on market: 178 That has dropped to just 88 though still up significantly days on the market for this first Source: Selkirk Association of Realtors MLS from the 158 closings in 2004. quarter of 2006, a significant

... there’ s a lot goin’ on!

Log on to Sandpoint’s remarkable community web site. Events • Visitor Guide • Movies Lodging & Dining • Recreation Job Center • Free classified ads Weather & travel info • News Sandpoint Q&A Forums • More

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drop from just five years ago, and down three weeks from last year’s numbers. Commercial property is another area that continues to see change, with the average days on the market dropping to 103 in the first quarter of 2006, compared to 185 last year. Inventories, however, are still low, with just 28 active listings. Still, that growth has led Parrish to add a commercial division to Evergreen. Phil Albany, who was the original broker at Evergreen from 1986 to 1989, recently returned to head it up. “We’re very busy now,” he said. “That’s exciting.” The potential for growth in the area shows up strongly in the market for vacant land. With 583 properties listed, the first quarter of 2006 featured 126 closings. That number is not as impressive as the first quarter of 2005’s 240 closings; but the real story is in price and days on market. Last year, the average sales price on vacant land in the first quarter was $95,548 after an average of 178 days on the market. Just a year later, the average sales price has jumped to $151,565, after only 91 days on the market on average, almost half that of last year. “I think, in the year to come, we’re going to stay steady in a growing market. The quality stuff is selling, and I think we’ll continue to grow in the second home market,” Parrish said.

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

SUMMER 2006

–Trish Gannon

Get the

Crier TownC FREE e-mail newsletter of Sandpoint happenings register online www.sandpointonline.com


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First House…

First Business…

First Vacation Home…

First Investment Property…

For all your Firsts… And Seconds!

Sandpoint & Schweitzer

www.Evergreen-Realty.com www.SchweitzerMountain.com www.CommercialSandpoint.com

321 N. First Avenue, Sandpoint, ID 83864 800-829-6370 • 208-263-6370


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Dining

What’s to EAT? dining in sandpoint, idaho Beyond Hope Resort Located 16 miles east of Sandpoint on Hwy. 200’s scenic bi-way. Inside enjoy fireside dining and a rustic lounge. Indulge in cocktails and appetizers on the expansive lawn. Dine deckside with panoramic lake views and spectacular sunsets. First-rate cuisine, fine wine, and friendly service are Beyond Hope Resort’s signature. Lunch 11:30, dinner 4:30. Reservations recommended. 264-5251.

Beyond Hope Resort

of gourmet food items before heading home. Open Monday - Saturday 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Sunday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 263-5911.

Café Trinity

Café Trinity

Lakeside Deck Dining Great food, great views Boat Access Lunch, Dinner & Full Bar

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208 264-5251 www.beyondhoperesort.com

Café Bodega 5th & Cedar at Foster’s Crossing Antique & Gift Market. Revitalize yourself at Café Bodega, Sandpoint’s newest cosmopolitan eatery (with wireless Internet access), featuring an assortment of international sandwiches, homemade soups, organic coffee, teas, beer, wine and Italian artisan gelato. You may also pick up an assortment

Southern Inspired Food

Exhibition Kitchen Near Public Parking Private Parties Live Music

Public Moorage Waterside Dining Cooking Classes

116 N. First Ave. • 255-7558 110

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

SUMMER 2006

116 N. First Ave., next to Starbucks in the Old Lantern District. Enjoy the flavors of our Southern inspired food such as gumbo, étouffée, or Chef Gabriel’s signature Spunky Crawfish Chowder. We also feature fresh seafood and Tim’s Special Cut Meats. Whether you are having dinner on our wonderful deck overlooking Sand Creek or sitting at our dining bar and exhibition kitchen, you will enjoy a taste of the South in beautiful North Idaho. Serving lunch and dinner. Beer and wine available. 255-7558.

Chimney Rock Grill In the Selkirk Lodge at Schweitzer. Enjoy breathtaking views while dining on the mountain.

IN THE HEART OF SANDPOINT

Live Entertainment, Piano Bar, Open Mic, Unique Cocktails, Great Food 206 N. First Ave. Sandpoint

265.5080


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Dining

Chimney Rock Grill

Northwest specialties include hand-cut steaks, fresh fish and daily specials plus a wide selection of wines and microbrews. A relaxing bar features happy hour. Open daily starting in November. Call 255-3071.

Chophouse 209 N. First Ave. Conveniently located on First Ave. in the beautifully restored Pastime Building, Chophouse offers an outstanding dining experience unrivaled in Sandpoint. A classic though modern atmosphere welcomes young and old alike. With a wide-ranging menu and specials prepared daily, Chophouse caters to all categories of taste. Known for their steak, Chophouse serves exclusively prime cut beef. In addition to their award-winning beef, a daily seafood delivery maintains a fresh and distinguishing selection. Also, their knowledgeable staff will gladly assist you in deciding from an extensive and elaborate wine list, ensuring that your choice will complement your entrée perfectly. When pursuing a distinct dining experience, your first choice is Chophouse. Kids menu available. 265-1535.

Downtown Crossing

Eichardt’s

Downtown Crossing 206 N. First Ave. Welcome to Downtown Crossing, a unique restaurant and lounge in the heart of downtown Sandpoint. Enjoy fresh, made-fromscratch recipes mixing regional dishes and seasonal favorites with a twist of diverse ethnic influence. There’s an extensive martini and specialty cocktail menu, and a fine selection of wine and beer. Feel at home in the cozy lounge furniture, while being entertained nightly by the best conglomeration of local talent: bar-side piano, live bands, local artwork and now-famous open mic night. Patio seating available. 265-5080.

Duke’s Cowboy Grill

are always welcome. Takeout available for your rib or monster burrito cravings. Serving lunch and dinner. Extensive beer and wine-by-theglass selection. 263-0600.

Eichardt’s 212 Cedar St. Don’t miss this comfortable pub and grill. Located downtown in a charming, historic building. This relaxing pub mixes casual dining with seriously good food. With over a dozen beers on tap, good wines, a full coffee bar and live music, there’s something for everyone. Upstairs you’ll find a game room with pool table, darts and shuffleboard. Eichardt’s offers smokeless dining seven days a week. Find out for yourself why Eichardt’s is continually picked as the locals’ favorite hangout. Open daily at 11:30 a.m. 263-4005. Floating Restaurant

Chophouse

Duke’s Cowboy Grill 30340 Hwy. 200, next to the Elk’s Golf Course in Ponderay. 1/2 mile from the Hwy. 95/Hwy. 200 junction. Duke’s features authentic woodfired barbecue (ribs, pulled pork, brisket, among others), handmade buffalo chili and Tex-Mex specialties. There is an old ’55 Chevy truckbed that features complimentary chips and salsa, old Westerns play on the TV and kids

P O N D E R AY 263-0600

Full Lunch and Dinner Menu 16 Micros on Tap • Upstairs Game Room Open 7 Days From 11:30 am

212 Cedar St. • Sandpoint • 263-4005

Highway 200, East Hope at Hope Marine Services. Twenty minutes from Sandpoint, in beautiful Hope, Idaho. The lake’s only floating restaurant and lounge offers spectacular views from two decks or a cozy dining

Willow Bay Marina 520 Willow Bay Road Priest River

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30340 Highway 200

~ Eichardt’s Serves up the Best of Northwest Microbrews, Food and Local Live Music ~

Floating Restaurant

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room. Regional fare, fresh seafood and local products fill the menu along with handmade breads, desserts, soups and sauces. A full bar and outstanding wine list complement your experience. Children’s menu too! Open Easter through October serving lunch, dinner and Sunday Brunch. Accessible by boat or car. 264-5311.

fill your picnic basket or boat cooler before you head out. The cafe features impressive gourmet deli sandwiches, salads and a variety of handcrafted truffles, tortes, cakes and cookies. Relax and enjoy a truly spectacular lake view, a bottle of wine and an imported cheese platter shared with friends, and watch the sunset over the lake. Open for breakfast, lunch and European-style pizzas Tue-Sun. Eclectic bistro dinner specials Thu-Sun. Live music Fri., Sat. and Sun. Outdoor seating. 264-0506.

Ivano’s Ristorante

MickDuff’s also brew a unique-style root beer for those young in age or at heart. Our menu is packed full of flavor with traditional and updated pub fare. You will find toasted sandwiches, hearty soups, gourmet hamburgers, individual pizzas and much more at our cozy brewpub located in downtown Sandpoint. 255-4351.

Monarch Mountain Coffee Hope Market Cafe 620 Wellington Place, Hope. Who would expect to find such an extensive array of artisan cheeses, gourmet foods, wines and ales in such a fun and beautiful little cafe in Hope? The Hope Market Cafe on the old Highway 200 Business loop is the perfect place to stop and

Ivano’s Ristorante Located on the corner of First and Pine, Ivano’s has been serving the community for over 20 years. Italian dining accompanied by classic wines and gracious atmosphere add to the enjoyment of one of Sandpoint’s favorite restaurants. Patio seating available during the summer months. Pasta, fresh seafood, buffalo and beef, veal, chicken and vegetarian entrées round out the fare. Dinner served 7 nights a week starting at 4:30. Lunch served Mon-Fri at 11. An excellent bakery featuring organic coffee, fresh pastries and a deli style lunch offering, MonFri. Off-site catering available for weddings, family get-togethers and just plain large gatherings. Call 263-0211 for reservations.

208 N. Fourth Ave. Monarch Mountain Coffee is Sandpoint’s hometown coffee roaster. This friendly coffeehouse and outdoor café is the hub for relaxing, meeting with friends, people watching or getting the latest scoop on happenings in town. Featuring a variety of drinks sure to satisfy your thirst. Fresh roasted coffee, espresso drinks and teas are complemented by an assortment of smoothies, chai and yerba maté. Also serving breakfast burritos, locally crafted baked goods, bagels and desserts. All coffee is roasted on-site in small batches and is available for purchase in our coffeehouse or

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MickDuff’s Brewing Company

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312 N. First Ave. Come and enjoy our fine, handcrafted ales in a family dining atmosphere. We offer a variety of top-of-the-line beers ranging from fruity blondes to our seasonal porter. We

Wine & Beer Bar Game Room Artisan Breads

Catering Delivery Seasonal Hours Outdoor seating

PIZZA, CALZONES & SANDWICHES

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by mail order. Take a taste of North Idaho home with you! Monarch Mountain Coffee is open daily. Located just next to the Post Office. Call for directions at 265-9382 or (800) 599-6702. Loitering strongly encouraged.

Old Ice House Pizzeria & Bakery Best wicked-good pizza west of the Hudson. When you’ve got a serious need for some real East Coast-style pizza, and you’re all out of frequent flyer miles, there’s always Hope – Idaho, that is. The uber-funky Ice House Pizzeria on 140 W. Main St. in tiny Hope (pop. 80) has freshly baked focaccia bread, calzones and pizza’s served whole or by the slice. You can also get sweet baked treats – plus hats, scarves, beads and all manner of accessories. But the pizza is the thing: thick, molten cheese; fragrant, lightly spiced tomato sauce; yeasty crust that’s not too thick, not too thin. This stuff is authentic enough to bring on a Boston accent. 264-5555. Pine Street Bakery

Pine Street Bakery 710 Pine St. Welcome to Pine Street Bakery. Specializing in European pastries, breads and cakes. Also a complete line of coffees, espresso drinks and teas from Tazzina of Santa Cruz. All bakery products are made on the premises using fresh butter and cream, farm eggs, and fine chocolates. Custom order birthday, specialty and wedding cakes, fine French pastries and a complete line of tarts, cookies and bars. The bakers create more than 10 varieties of artisan breads every day, including whole grain organics and sourdoughs. Come in and let the products speak for themselves. Open Tue-Fri, 7 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. Saturdays 8 a.m. until 1 p.m. Located right next to The Paint Bucket. Plenty of parking and outdoor seating. Call 263-9012 and ask for Liz or Deirdre for custom orders and/or questions.

Roastery • Coffee House

Power House Grill & Sports Bar

www.monarchmountaincoffee.com

Power House Grill & Sports Bar 120 East Lake St. Featuring modern American cuisine, the Power House Grill & Sports Bar is a oneof-a-kind restaurant and entertainment center in the historic “Old Power House” building. Located at the Sandpoint Marina. Enjoy waterfront dining with panoramic views of Schweitzer and the city. Affordable, casual family dining featuring smokin’ good Idaho-style steaks, ribs, smoked prime rib on weekends, seafood, pastas and Sandpoint’s Best Burgers. Outside dining is available. Full-service catering with a private banquet room is featured. Call for live

208.263.9012

Steaks, Ribs, Burgers, Pastas, Seafood Smoked Prime Rib Fri. & Sat. Live Music & Entertainment 4 Hi-Definition Plasma TVs Sandpoint Original

• Accessed easily by boat or car • Join us April through October for lunch, dinner and Sunday brunch

at Hope Marine Services Hwy 200 E. Hope, Idaho

www.sandpointonline.com

• Relax with a full bar & outstanding wine list on the cocktail deck

GRILL & PLASMA SPORTS BAR

710 Pine Street • Sandpoint

• Enjoy spectacular views and that special 'lake experience' from the floating decks or dining room • Feast on regional fare featuring fresh seafood, aged beef and local, fresh ingredients

“Tastes as good as it looks!” Deirdre Hill Liz Evans

IN HOPE

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entertainment schedules. Open 11 a.m. seven days a week. Walk, bicycle, drive or boat the entire family to an experience unparalleled! 265-2449.

Second Avenue Pizza

Synergy 209 N. First Ave. Since its launch last July, Synergy has quickly established itself as Sandpoint’s best dance and live act venue. As Sandpoint’s premier nightclub, Synergy prides itself in both the quality and quantity of entertainment. With performances every weekend, Synergy offers an entertainment schedule that, until recently, was unavailable in Sandpoint. By attracting tourists and locals alike, each night offers an opportunity to drink, dance and socialize in a unique atmosphere. Featuring regional and national bands and DJs, Synergy’s entertainment is as diverse as its clientele. In addition to live entertainment, resident djs spin dance music classics from the past, present and future. Wednesday, Salsa Night, is quickly becoming Sandpoint’s hottest dance night. If that’s not enough, Synergy offers a full menu and nightly drink specials. 255-4412.

Trinity at Willow Bay

Second Avenue Pizza 215 S. Second Ave. Try the piled-high specialty pizzas at Second Avenue Pizza. They’re loaded with fresh ingredients. The Juke Box Special weighs 7 pounds – not your average pizza! Excellent calzones, salads and sandwiches, or try the garlic bread appetizer, an excellent hand-tossed pizza covered with cheese and garlic, served with pizza sauce. Free deliveries. 263-9321. Synergy

Trinity at Willow Bay

www.sandpointonline.com

Willow Bay Marina, 520 Willow Bay Road, Priest River. Come experience casual waterfront dining on our deck with spectacular sunsets and panoramic views. Featuring a full service bar, outdoor seating and docks for boaters. Serving lunch and dinner. Seasonal operation. Gas and boat launch. Catering available for weddings, family reunions, etc. Call for hours of operation. 265-8854.

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No. of Units Spa or Sauna Pool on site Restaurant Bar or Lounge Kitchens Meeting Rooms

L O D G I NG

www.sandpointonline.com

America’s Best Value Inn (208) 263-1222 or (800) 543-8193 Archer Vacation Condos (877) 982-2954 / archers@direcway.com Best Western Edgewater Resort (208) 263-3194 or (800) 635-2534 Church Street House B&B (208) 255-7094 Clark Fork Field Campus Resort (208) 266-1452 Clark Fork Lodge (208) 266-1716 Coit House B&B (208) 265-4035 or (866) 265-COIT Grandview Resort (208) 443-2433 K-2 Inn at Sandpoint (208) 263-3441 Kootenai River Inn (208) 267-8511 or (888) URLUCKY La Quinta Inn (208) 263-9581 or (800) 282-0660 Lodge at Clark Fork (208) 610-3885 Motel 6 (208) 263-5383 or (800) 4-MOTEL-6 Pend Oreille Shores Resort (208) 264-5828 Sandpoint Quality Inn (208) 263-2111 or (866) 519-7683 Sandpoint Vacation Rentals (208) 263-7570 or (866) 263-7570 Selkirk Lodge (208) 265-0257 or (800) 831-8810 S l e e p ’ s C abins (208) 255-2122 or (866) 302-2122 Stoneridge: A Golf & Rec. Community (208) 437-2451 Vacationville (208) 255-7074 or (877) 255-7074 Waterhouse B&B (208) 265-9112 or (888) 329-1767 Western Pleasure Guest Ranch (208) 263-9066 White Pine Lodge (208) 265-0257 or (800) 831-8810

COMMENTS x At-home atmosphere, wireless internet, cable TV, gift shop. Free Continental

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breakfast with homemade sourdough waffles. See ad, page 81. americasbvi.com Beautiful 3-bedroom, 2-bath waterfront condos on Lake Pend Oreille in Hope. Discount ski and golf tickets available. 10kVacationRentals.com/Sandpoint/index.htm Downtown Sandpoint on the Lake. Indoor pool, sauna fitness room, hot tub. All rooms with lake view. Beach House Bar & Grill. 22-site RV park. sandpointhotels.com Beautifully restored arts & crafts classic, period furnishings, queen-sized beds, private baths, scrumptious breakfasts. Walk to shops, restaurants, beach. churchstreethouse.com Located on Scenic Byway Highway 200. Beautiful views, wildlife and bird watching, biking and more. geocities.com/clarkforklodge 30-acre resort perfect for groups, clubs, weddings, family reunions & corporate meetings. Sleeps 65 in 6 different houses. clarkforkfieldcampus.com Beautiful 1907 Victorian. Family apartment units available. Gourmet breakfast. One block to downtown, minutes to City Beach. coithouse.com Lodging available all year. Restaurant and lounge open daily Memorial Day through Labor Day; open weekends remainder of year. www.grandview-priest-lake.com Quiet downtown location close to restaurants and shopping. Lovely rooms from $49. Clean. Weekly rates. Jacuzzi. k2inn.com New deluxe rooms with private river view balconies, 3 casinos (1 non-smoking), 400 gaming machines, rec center and spa. See ad, page 21. kootenairiverinn.com Downtown location, high-speed Internet. Free breakfast, themed-spa suites. Silverwood, ski & golf pkgs. Kids stay free. See ad, page 38. hotels-west.com Superbly furnished throughout, featuring a fully equipped kitchen, 4 lovely bedrooms designed to accommodate up to 10 guests. clarkforklodge.com Free wireless, new motel with Jacuzzi suites, two 24-hour hot tubs, guest laundry, free HBO and ESPN. Pets welcome. Kids stay free. See ad, page 84. motel6.com Fully furnished condos and on-site athletic club on Lake Pend Oreille. Stay and play packages. See ad, page 116. posresort.com Indoor pool and hot tub. Close to downtown Sandpoint. 5th Avenue Restaurant and Mitzy’s Lounge on property. Kids stay and eat free. sandpointhotels.com Beautiful furnished resort properties available for nightly, weekly, monthly stays on the lake, at the ski resort or in town. See ad, pg. 115. sandpointvacations.com Mountain accommodations, stay and play packages. Spectacular mountain and lake views. Outdoor heated pool and hot tubs. See ad, page 123. schweitzer.com On beautiful Lakeshore Drive. Sleep’s Cabins consists of 6 log bungalows decorated with original furnishings and collectibles. See ad, page 24. sleepscabins.com Beautiful newly refurbished condos includes use of rec center. Nightly rentals. Golf pkgs. Golf course & restaurant next door. See ad, page 78. stoneridgeresort.com Luxury lakeside homes, cozy mountain cabins and lovely condominiums at the heart of Sandpoint. See ad, page 69. vacationville.com Deluxe spa suites with private hot tub on deck, jetted tub for 2 in bath. Gas fireplace, AC, kitchenette, free wireless Internet. sandpoint.org/waterhouse Private cabins sleep 2-8. Lodge rooms with private baths, rec room, horseback riding and meals available. See ad, page 13. westernpleasureranch.com New accommodations, stay and play packages. Spectacular mountain and lake views. Outdoor hot tubs, access to heated pool. See ad, page 123. schweitzer.com

GET IT at home. Only $9 per year

(208) 264-5828 47390 Hwy 200 • Hope, ID 83836 www.posresort.com

Subscribe today. www.sandpointonline.com

800-880-3573 208-263-3573

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Service Listings

Ser vices Accommodations

See the LODGING DIRECTORY on page 116

Antiques Foster’s Crossing Antique & Gift Market 5th and Cedar, 263-5911 – An early 1900s railroad freight house converted to three floors of eclectic shopping. Influences from across the globe touch the unusual gifts, furniture, antiques and art found on the first and second floor. The cellar is filled with antique finds of every pedigree, as is the south end of the building. Browse the old railroad car for your favorite new and used books or visit the second floor wool and yarn shop for all your knitting needs. Open Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Sunday 11 a.m.4 p.m. See ad, page 53.

Arts Organizations Idaho Panhandle International Film Festival (IPIFF) A true international film festival is coming to Sandpoint at the fantastic 550-seat historic Panida Theater. Nearly 30 hours of feature and short length dramas, comedies, action and documentaries will be shown from around the globe, August 24-26. See ad, page 85. ipiff.com

Pend Oreille Arts Council 120 E. Lake Street, Ste. 215, 2636139 – POAC exists to facilitate and present the finest quality experiences in the arts for the people of northern Idaho throughout the year. We focus on and support the performing arts, visual arts, art fairs and art education. The POAC office and gallery is located in The Old Power House building. ArtinSandpoint.org

Art & Photo Galleries 263-2642 – Explore a variety of open artists’ studios by taking this free, countryside, self-guided driving tour in North Idaho. A wonderful opportunity, a unique experience. Guide maps available in various rack locations. See ads, page 52. arttourdrive.org

Art Works Gallery 214 N. 1st, 263-2642 – Fine arts and crafts for home and office by regional artists, including original paintings, sculpture, jewelry, pottery, glass, tile, calligraphy, photography, stone, wood, metal, gourd art, prints, cards, wearable art. Hours 10 to 6 daily. See ad, page 52. sandpointartworks.com

The Hallans Gallery 323 N. 1st, 263-4704 – Since 1906. Celebrating the century in photos by Ross Hall and Dick Himes. See ad, page 53. rosshallcollection.com

Janene Grende Artist 263-6210 – Wildlife, scenic or equestrian paintings in gouache on paper or hardboard or silk dye on silk. Commissions welcome. See ad, page 53. janenegrende.com

Janusz Studio by the Lake 264-5153 – Experience the Artist Dream at this working art studio. A treasure of fine “Romantic Expressionist” watercolors, sculpture garden and grounds tour with magnificent views of Lake Pend Oreille. See ad, page 52.

Panhandle Art Glass 514 Pine St., 263-1721 – Experience the finest in handmade glass, distinctive lighting and fine arts and crafts by regional artists. Supplies for craftpersons, showroom and gallery.

Ship Wreck Art Studio 683-1606 – Derk Klein and Mary Alderete. Two artists specializing in 18th & 19th Century folk art furniture and quality architectural metal art. View art at the Art Works Gallery at 214 1st Ave. See ad, page 52.

Assisted Living The Bridge Assisted Living 1123 N. Division, 208-263-1524 – A total continuum of care on the campus of Life Care Center of Sandpoint. See ad, page 25.

Automotive Alpine Motors Company, Hwy. 95 North, 263-2118, 1-800430-5050 – Your Cadillac, Buick, Pontiac, GMC truck dealer. New and used sales and leasing. Full line of service and parts departments, and body shop. Service department open Saturday until noon. alpinemotors.net

Banks / Financial Edward Jones Two offices in Sandpoint to serve you – 521 N. 4th Ave., 263-0515, 800-441-3477, ask for Dave or Tom. And 303 Pine, 255-7405 or 877777-5677, ask for Rob Kincaid – Serving individual investors since 1871. Stocks, CDs, mutual funds, bonds, IRAs, government securities, tax-free bonds and much more. See ad, page 68. edwardjones.com

Fine Art Tile 263-0826 – Custom designs are

Panhandle State Bank

231 N. 3rd, 263-0505 – Branches in Bonners Ferry, Ponderay and Priest River. Also bank in Post Falls, Rathdrum and Coeur d’Alene. Locally owned and managed. See ad, page 66. panhandlebank.com

Boats / Docks Alpine Shop 213 Church, 263-5157 and at Schweitzer, 255-1660 – Boat sales and service for all your lake boating needs. Water skis, water gear and Old Town canoes and kayaks. Outdoor apparel and equipment located downtown. See ad, page 39.

Eagle Marine Supply 469058 Highway 95 S., Sagle, 263-1314 – Eagle Marine carries a variety of products including boat lifts, floating and roll-in docks, dock kits, dock ramps, dock accessories, dock hardware, water toys and tram systems. See ad, page 80. eaglemarinesupply.com

Northwest Docks & Water Works P.O. Box 1502, Sandpoint, 2634684 – New dock construction, dock rebuilds, mooring buoys, shoreline protection, amphibious pile driving, crane service. See ad, page 13.

Sandpoint Marina Shop & Motor Sports Located across from Slates Restaurant, 95 N. Triangle Dr., 2631535 – Repair and parts center, watercraft and recreational vehicle sales. See ad, page 45.

Books Keokee Books Keokee Co. Publishing, Inc., 405 Church St., 263-3573 – Publishing fine nonfiction and guide books for northern Idaho and the Inland Northwest. Also offering publishing services to authors and groups that wish to self-publish. See ad, page 119. keokeebooks.com

Brewery Laughing Dog Brewing 263-9222 – Laughing Dog Brewing is a craft micro brewery that offers tours, tap room for tasting and a gift shop to browse through. We are located off Hwy. 200 on Emerald Industrial Park Road. Please visit our website at LaughingDogBrewing.com . See ad, page 114.

Building / Home Ace Septic Tank Service Sandpoint, 263-5219 – “Where a Flush Beats a Full House.” Portable toilet rental, construction/all occasion, permanent or temporary. Septic tank pumping, residential and commercial.

Alpine Lumber

1400 N. Division, 263-8224 – Alpine offers a full line of building materials and the largest selection of specialty lumbers in the Inland Empire. Our Custom Design Showroom offers cabinets and more. Installation services available. See ad, page 64. alpinelumber.net

BT Timberworks 800-763-4639, 406-763-4639 – One-of-a-kind design/build. Fine timber frames, timber trusses, fine timber products and sawmill. See ad, page 98. bttimberworks.com

Caribou Creek Log Homes 267-3373, 800-619-1156 – We hand-craft the finest custom log homes and lodges, along with log roofing systems, spiral staircases, trusses, posts and more. See ad, page 48. cariboucreeklog homes.com

Clearwater Landscapes 1701 Cemetery Rd., Priest River, 265-5881 – Provides an interactive design process that enables you to plan and visualize your landscape before any work begins. You are an essential part of the design. See ad, page 98. idaholandscapes.com

Dan Fogarty Custom Builder 263-5546 – A fully insured local builder with the experience and history you can rely on. In the building trade since 1975 and doing business in Sandpoint since 1981. See ad, page 98. danbuilt.com

GII2 265-0247 – Large format specialists. B&W and color. Copying, printing and scanning of blueprints, maps, arts, etc. Survey supplies, marking paint, flagging. Instrument sales, rental and service. See ad, page 68.

Glahe & Associates 265-4474 – Professional Land Surveyors. Our goal is to deliver the highest quality product at the appropriate technical level in a timely manner and at a fair price. See ad, page 68. glaheinc.com

Kitchen Tune-up 263-5700, 877-913-5700 – For cabinet reconditioning, refacing or custom design, call Brian Potter for a free, in-home consultation. See ad, page 98. kitchen tuneup.com

Monks HydroGeoscience Sandpoint, 263-1991 – A hydrogeological and environmental consulting company providing science-based, well-site location services, well-production testing, water-quality testing and waterwell video inspection and trou-

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Artists’ Studios Tour

hand-painted by Gail Lyster on tile for installations in homes and businesses. See ad, page 52. Visit our Web site at FineArtTileStudio.com.

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Service Listings bleshooting services. See ad, page 64. monkshydrogeo science.com

Panhandle Pump 500 Vermeer Drive, Ponderay, 263-7867 – Serving the Idaho Panhandle with quality service and merchandise for over 20 years. The area’s leader in water purification and filtration plus complete water and sewer systems. Open Monday through Friday 7 a.m.-6 p.m., Saturday 7 a.m.-noon. panhandlepump.com

Pend Oreille Mechanical 1207 Dover Hwy., 263-6163 – Service 24/7. Plumbing, cooling, heating, sheet metal, hydronic, refrigeration. See ad, page 40. pomechanical.com

Studio of Sustainable Design 100 Jana Lane, 263-3815 – Bruce Millard, Architect. Personal, environmentally sensitive and healthy design, incorporating natural, recycled and durable materials including straw bale. Full services, or hourly consulting. bemarchitect.com

The Paint Bucket 714 Pine St., 263-5032 – Sandpoint’s complete paint and wallpaper store. Paint and sundries, window covering, wall covering, custom framing.

Timber Frames by Collin Beggs Sandpoint, 290-8120 – Handcrafted Traditional Timber Frame Homes. Wooden, draw-bored joinery. Hand-rived pegs. Hewn, hand-planed and rough-sawn surfaces. See ad, page 98. Email: collin.beggs@verizon.net

Vermont Timber Frames 40 Golden Pond Dr., Heron, Montana, 866-677-8860 – Timber framing is a centuries-old building system that utilizes mortise and tenon joinery. The result of this craft is a sturdy, spacious, organic home or building as aesthetically pleasing as it is functional. See ad, page 65. vtf.com

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Downtown Sandpoint Business Association 108 Main St., 255-1876 – In downtown Sandpoint! The heart of Sandpoint’s present, past and future merge to bring you an eclectic blend of businesses from dining experiences, lodging, services, professional choices and unique shopping. See ad, page 24. downtownsandpoint.com

Chambers of Commerce Priest Lake 888-774-3785 – Idaho’s Crown Jewel, Priest Lake naturally provides adventures: distinctive lakeside resorts, restaurants, golfing, marina rentals, day use and overnight campgrounds, fishing, biking, hiking, creating family memories. See ad, page 10. priestlake.org SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

Greater Sandpoint 800-800-8106 – Information on visiting or relocating to beautiful north Idaho. Sandpoint is an ideal year-round family and/or adventure vacation destination. Sensational in all seasons, you will want to visit soon, and visit often. sandpointchamber.com

Clothing Bella Jezza, a Boutique 324 N. 1st Ave., 263-1116 – Unique, affordable, funky, fun and fashionable. Clothing, accessories and jewelry. Check out our distinctive hats! See ad, page 13.

Coldwater Creek 800-262-0040 or 263-2265 – Located on First Avenue in Sandpoint. Discover one of the most unique collections of women’s apparel and accessories. Perfect style for today’s busy woman. See ad, back cover. thecreek.com

Finan McDonald Clothing Co. 301 N. 1st Ave., 263-3622 – Unique selection of men’s and women’s outdoor and natural fiber clothing; woolens, fleece, cottons and silks. See ad, page 16.

Computers Foxglove Solutions 265-2414 – We provide affordable custom E-commerce solutions, website design, SEO and Web applications. Our Enterprise Solutions can easily handle the growth of your company. foxglovesolutions.com

Sandpoint Computers 212 N. 1st Ave., #G103, 265-1608 – Offering advanced network services to businesses. Experienced in Linux, Novell, Macintosh and Windows. Internet and Intranet solutions. See ad, page 40. sandpointcomputers.com

Crafts & Toys A Child’s Dream Come True 1223 Michigan St., 255-1664 – Natural toys, dolls, baby gifts, art supplies, co-operative games, Ostheimer wood figures, play silks, and dress-ups. Supplies and kits for toymaking, children’s handwork, felting, knitting, and the fiberarts including 100% wool felt and undyed silk. Just east of Division in the Michigan Street Center. achildsdream.com

Education Sandpoint Waldorf School 2006 Sandpoint West Drive, 2652683 – The Sandpoint Waldorf School, now in its 14th year, offers a comprehensive academic program that fosters the healthy development of the child's intellect, imagination and social life. Preschool through 8th grade. sandpoint.org/waldorf

SUMMER 2006

Equine Services King Spur Stables & Children’s Equestrian Center 683-7315 – Full-care boarding, training, riding clubs, adult and youth drill teams, playdays too! Lessons private and group. English, Western, Jumping and Dressage. Relaxed atmosphere that specializes in the beginner. Bringing in top-notch instructors in all disciplines for clinics. Contact Sara or Doug. kingspur.net

Farm / Home The CO-OP Country Store 125 Tibbetts Lane, Ponderay, 2636820 – Farm, Home, Hardware. The CO-OP has just about everything for the farm and home. See ad, page 40. coopcountry store.com

Forest Management Worman & Associates 208-762-0434 – Offers private forest landowners with a wide range of forest management services including selective logging, fire risk reduction, restoration, clean-up and management plans. See ad, page 55. worman forestry.com

Furniture Edmundson Fine Woodworking 1965 Samuels Rd., 265-8730, tollfree 866-877-1882 – Custom, hand-crafted furniture and cabinets built with attention to detail. Carefully selected hardwoods, hand-cut dovetail drawers, curved surfaces and inlay are just a few details that contribute to pieces that invite your touch. Call for a brochure or visit us online. efinewoodworking.com

Northwest Handmade 308 N. 1st Ave., 255-1962, 877880-1962 – Featuring a variety of regional artists. Custom log furniture, wood carving, metal art, one-of-a-kind gifts. Located downtown. See ad, page 72. northwesthandmade.com

Sandpoint Furniture Carpet One 401 Bonner Mall Way, Ponderay, 263-5138 – A full-service home furnishing store for over 60 years. Offering unique furniture, flooring and window covering packages. The addition of Luminesce Lighting Design offers full service lighting design. Free estimates. See ad, page 43. sandpointfurniture.com

Gifts / Flowers Idaho Stone Kootenai Cutoff Road, 265-5178 – Featuring unique stones from around the world including bulk, pond kits and cement products. Gift store with crystals, cathedrals and stone jewelry. All landscape needs! See ad, page 22. idaho-stone.com

MeadowBrook Home & Gift 205 Cedar St., 255-2824 – One of Sandpoint’s newest downtown additions. We offer a timeless selection of unique and affordable gifts, home decor and furnishings. Open 7 days a week. See ad, page 57.

Petal Talk 120 Cedar St., 265-7900 – Full-service floral and gift shop! Fresh flowers, bundled or custom designed. Indoor plants, green and blooming as well as European plant baskets. Whimsical garden gifts. Special event and wedding services. Sensitive and caring funeral tributes. Delivery available in town, out of town and all around. See ad, page 10. sandpointflowers.com

Sharon’s Hallmark 306 N. 1st Ave., 263-2811 – Special Gifts for Special People including Vera Bradley bags; Big Sky Carvers; Yankee, Tyler and BeanPod Candles; souvenirs and balloon bouquets. We have a full selection of Hallmark cards, books, gift wrap and stationery.

Graphic Artists Keokee Creative Group 405 Church St. , 263-3573 – Come see our new digs! Complete graphics, design and editorial for any project. If you like Sandpoint Magazine, you’ll like what we can do for you. keokee.com

Health Care Aligning Waters 219 Cedar St., Ste. A, 265-8440 – Rolfing aligns the body’s structure by releasing old injuries, chronic stress and embedded tension to create an experience of vitality. See ad, page 74. align.org

Ammara Medical 30410 Hwy. 200, Ste. 102, Ponderay, 263-1345 – Ammara Medical is a complete family, women’s health and internal medicine practice with a full medical staff that can treat most everything. See ad, page 54. myammara.com

Total Physical Therapy 123 S. 3rd Ave., Ste. 8, 265-0534 – Total Physical Therapy offers quality care for a variety of musculoskeletal conditions, ranging from injuries to post-surgical rehabilitation. All treatments are administered by a licensed physical therapist. See ad, page 74.

Insurance Harris Dean Insurance 706 W. Superior St., Ste. A, 2659690, fax 255-4946 – The resource for all your insurance needs. The largest independent insurance agency in North Idaho, specializing in business, personal, life and health. See ad, page 74. harrisdean.com

North Idaho Insurance 102 Superior St., 263-2194, fax 263-8084 – A full-service, independent insurance agency serving the


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Service Listings North Idaho area since 1978. Insurance for Business or Personal risks: property, liability, workers comp, bonding, home, auto, life and health. NorthIdaho Insurance.com

Pacific Far West Insurance 120 E. Lake St., Ste. 311 (in The Old Power House building), 263-1426 – Serving Sandpoint and North Idaho for 24 years. Quotes on auto, home, business, life and group insurance. As independent agents, we do the shopping for you! haddockins.com

Taylor Agency 1009 W. Superior St., 263-4000 or 208-773-6441 in Post Falls – Insurance and financial services for your personal and business needs. See ad, page 64.

Interior Design Sandpoint Interiors 502 Cedar St., 263-8274 – Specializing in kitchen and bath design, space planning, custom window treatments and finishing touches. Visit the showroom or call for in-home consultation. See ad, page 98. sandpoint interiors.com

Internet Services SandpointOnline.com 405 Church St., 263-3573 – Get online with SandpointOnline.com, our town’s community Web site. Get a residential or business Internet connection; complete online services include Web site design, hosting, search engine optimization.

Marinas Holiday Shores/E. Hope Marine 264-5515 – Full-service marina located 18 miles east of Sandpoint on Highway 200 East in Hope, Idaho. See ad, page 45.

Hope Marine Services 47392 Hwy. 200, Hope, 264-5105 – Your full-service, year-round

stop. Boat sales, full-service shop, accessories, boat charters and dining at The Floating Restaurant. See ad, page 38. Email us at hope1@nidaho.net. hopemarine.com

Sandpoint Marina Located next to the Old Power House, 120 E. Lake St., 263-3083 – Accessible to downtown Sandpoint. See ad, page 45. sandpointwaterfront.com

Waterford Marinas P.O. Box 339, 683-2213 – Come to Bayview on Lake Pend Oreille and visit our three great marinas; Boileau’s Resort and Marina, Vista Bay Marina and Bayview Marina. We have restaurants, condo rentals and much more. See ad, page 81. bayviewmarinas.com

Marketing Keokee Creative Group 405 Church St., 263-3573 – Come see our new digs! We help your ideas take shape. Keokee can set your company apart by developing effective advertising, public relations and marketing campaigns. Talent. Experience. Professionalism. keokee.com

Massage / Spa Dreams in Beauty Day Spa 263-7270 – Massage, bodywork, facials and day spa treatments. Weekend appointments and outcall also available. dreamsinbeauty.com

Heaven the Spa 424 Sandpoint Ave., 888-2635616 – Located inside the lobby at Seasons at Sandpoint, luxury condominiums on Lake Pend Oreille north of City Beach. For health, wellness and weight-loss supplements, see heaven.royal bodycare.com. Our mission is to care for you with the most effective and nurturing spa treatments available. See ad, page 41. heaventhespa.com

Lake to Mountain Massage 611 N. Ella, 610-3591 – Suzanne Guibert, bachelor’s degree in exer-

cise science and nationally certified massage therapist. Bodyworker since 1997 specializing in sports and accident related injuries. Some insurance accepted. Therapeutic massage in a relaxing, healing environment. Flexible hours and outcalls also available. See ad, page 74.

Media Artisan Northwest Magazine 360-825-8499 – We help promote the arts scene in the Northwest and provide a high-profile venue for artists and galleries through our quarterly magazine. See ad, page 52. artisannw.com

KPND FM - KSPT AM KIBR FM - KBFI AM KICR FM 327 Marion, 263-2179 – Blue Sky Broadcasting. Adult album alternative, news, talk, and real country. See ad, page 33. 106.7 The Point – North Idaho’s all new rock station, coming soon to a radio near you! See ad, page 84.

The Local Pages 888-249-6920 –The phone directory with the most. See ad, page 90. localpagesinc.com

The River Journal 255-6957 – A twice-monthly publication of the news and events of our area. Get in touch with Sandpoint by reading our community paper. See ad, page 84. riverjournal.com

Moving Handyman Services, Inc. Corner of Division and Ontario, 265-5506 – For all your moving or handyman needs. A complete line of packing supplies available for sale. Serving North Idaho, Washington and Montana. Residential and commercial. Your hometown movers since 1997, bonded and insured. sandpointmovers.com

Optometry / Optical Paul E. Koch, O.D. Located inside Wal-Mart, Hwy. 95 N, 255-5513. Full service optometry office. Call for an appointment, or just walk in. Same day fitting for most contact lens prescriptions. Treatment of minor eye infections. See ad, page 74.

Pre-School Joanna’s Pre-School 263-9823 – Winner of NAIEYCS’ 2005 award of excellence. An alternative-style pre-school located in the Selle Valley just minutes from downtown Kootanai. Featuring Art, Music, Yoga, Dancing and more. Also traditional teachings in a beautiful setting for a wellrounded experience for your child. See ad, page 74.

Publishing / Printing Keokee Co. Publishing, Inc. 405 Church St., 263-3573 – Drop by and see our new digs! We publish Sandpoint Magazine , plus fine books about our region. Offering complete design, editorial and publishing services for books and all other publications. keokeepublishing.com

Real Estate Boileau’s Resort Condominiums Bayview, Idaho, 683-2213 – Centrally located in the heart of downtown Bayview at the water’s edge, these waterfront condos have been beautifully upgraded and remodeled. From $149,900. Call Kathi Ellis or Ron Olson. See ad, page 81. bayviewmarinas.com

Century 21 on the Lake 316 N. 2nd Ave., 255-2244 – Nationally known, locally trusted. Century21Sandpoint.com. See ad page 102. sandpointhomes.com Dan McLaughlin & Debbie Ferguson The Premier Real Estate Team with more than 30 years experience! Come visit our new

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Service Listings office and check out our recently renovated Web site, sandpoint homes.com. Call Dan at 265-1572, Debbie at 263-5459. See ads, page 31. Molly McLaughlin, Reid Treadaway and Nancy Dooley It’s as easy as 1-2-3. Three real estate agents, one team. 2552244. See ad, page 44. Kim Hansen & P.J. Nunley Waterfront Specialist, 255-2244. SandpointAgent.com See ads, pages 86, 99, 106, 107 and 120. Brenda Fletcher 255-8197 – For sales and service with your property! Search both Sandpoint and Coeur d’Alene areas: brendafletcher.com . See ad, page 94. Donna Short 304-1080 – Lifelong resident and native of North Idaho, going back five generations. I’m excited to represent my knowledge and history of North Idaho by selling real estate in my hometown. When you’re looking for more than just a strong work ethic, call me. c21sandpoint.com . See ad, page 90. Shawn Taylor, Alex Wohllaib For your all-access pass to Schweitzer Mountain properties, come see Shawn or Alex in the Lazier building, located in the heart of the village. We are the Schweitzer experts! Shawn Taylor, 290-2149: Alex Wohllaib, 6101388. See ad, page 73.

C.M. Brewster & Co. Real Estate

Coldwell Banker Resort Realty Sandpoint 263-6802, Schweitzer 263-9640 – If you’re looking for real estate in the Sandpoint area or at Schweitzer Ski Resort, we can help fill your needs. See ad, inside front cover. cbsandpoint.com Rebecca Lockwood 304-9224 – Your California connection. 28 years in real estate, San Diego, Napa and Sandpoint. See ad, page 97. rlockwood@coldwellbanker.com Michael White 290-8599 – B.S. in forestry and ecosystem management. See ad page 6. NorthIdahoLandMan.com

Evergreen Realty 321 N. 1st, 263-6370, 800-8296370 – For all your real estate needs in Idaho, Washington and Montana. Specializing in waterfront, Schweitzer Mountain and commercial properties. Search our virtual tours or all the MLS listings at evergreen-realty.com or schweitzermountain.com . See ads, pages 4, 56 and 109.

Evergreen Realty, Charesse Moore Charesse Moore at Evergreen Realty, Sales Associate, 255-6060, 888-228-6060 – Hard-working professional. Sandpoint’s top producing agent in 2004 and 2005. See ads, pages 69, 100 and 101. evergreen-realty.com , Charesse@evergreen-realty.com

Lake Country Real Estate 226 N. 1st Ave., 263-5454 – Making Clients For Life. Search entire MLS online, see virtual tours and more. See ad, page 91. lakecountryrealestate.com

www.sandpointonline.com

211 Cedar, 263-3167, 800-3389849 – C.M. Brewster & Co. Real Estate is a long-established team of Realtors working together to help you. If you are buying or selling in North Idaho, you need our wealth of knowledge and experience in your corner. Our community roots and home-town friendliness set us apart from the rest.

Come by to see us in Sandpoint, and visit our Web site at cmbrewster.com.

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Lakeshore Mountain Properties 255-1446, 264-6505 – Let our friendly crew provide you with the fast, efficient service you deserve! Ski slope to waterfront, luxury cabins to condos, we make your dreams a reality. See ad, page 97. schweitzerproperties.com

Lana Kay Realty 105 Pine St., Ste. 103, 263-9546 – Serving your North Idaho and Western Montana real estate needs since 1963! See ad, page 92. lanakayrealty.com

Maiden Rock Real Estate 318 N. Sixth Ave., 255-1544 – Proud to offer the hometown care and assistance in all of your real estate needs that you should expect with a family owned business. See ad, page 97. maidenrock.com

RE/MAX Mountain West 212 N. First Ave., 265-6700 – RE/MAX Mountain West is a regional real estate company, with a focus on resort areas. We are proud to announce the opening of our newest resort location in Sandpoint, Idaho. Come see why nobody sells more real estate than RE/MAX. See ad, page 96. mountainwest.info

SandpointOnline.com 405 Church St., 263-3573 – Get real estate information and find links to all local Realtors and agencies in the Real Estate Guide of SandpointOnline.com , our town’s community Web site. Links to Featured Properties, FSBO listings, buying and building services, too. See ad, page 108.

Sandpoint Management

Property

314 N. 3rd Ave., 263-9233 – Since 1993, Sandpoint Property Management has provided exceptional real estate management to a diverse range of clien-

tele. Whether it’s showing property, screening tenants, collecting rent and more, we can take care of it all. See ad, page 64. sandpointrentals.com

Tamarack Realty 101 N. 1st Ave., 263-9703 – Matching people and property since 1992. Exceptional service is our focus. See ad, page 94. tamarackrealty.com

Tomlinson Black Sandpoint Real Estate 200 Main St., 263-5101, 800282-6880 – No. 1 in sales and service, year after year! We’re the market leader for a reason. Offering top-notch service for residential, land, commercial land, waterfront properties. See ads, pages 17-20, or search all area listings at tbsandpoint.com . Also see our agents’ ads : • Jeff & Cindy Bond, page 17 • Susan & Brandon Moon, page 20

Windermere/Idaho First Realty 1009 Hwy. 2, Ste. E, 263-8400 – Brett Gile, your high-end real estate specialist. Focusing on waterfront and vacation properties. See my listings at brett.mywindermere.com . See ad, page 93.

Windermere Real Estate/ Resort Lifestyles, Inc. 470889 Hwy. 95 S in Sagle, 2557800, and in the White Pine Lodge at Schweitzer, 255-2211 – 20 Agents – 2 Offices – One Goal ... helping each client find their perfect place in North Idaho from Coeur d’Alene to the Canadian border – and everywhere in between. See ad, page 95. destinationsandpoint.com Carrie LaGrace 290-1956 – Bringing over 15 years of experience in sales and marketing to every client! Work and play the Idaho way. See ad, page 79. carrielagrace@windermere.com


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Service Listings Real Estate Development Dover Bay 265-1597 – Dover Bay, a new waterfront community. Homesites, condominiums and cabins. Custom built homes. On the shores of beautiful Lake Pend Oreille, ideally located only 3.5 miles west of Sandpoint. See ad, pages 26 and 27. doverbayidaho.com

Hidden Valley Seven, 20-acre view parcels presented by Lake Country Real Estate. This property is located just 3 miles north of Sandpoint and offers meadows, views of Schweitzer, the Cabinet Mountain range and much more. Call Owen Mullen, 755-0446 or Teague Mullen, 2556650. See ad, page 32.

The Idaho Club Lake & Golf Retreat 800-323-7020 – A private, upscale waterfront community featuring Idaho’s first Jack Nicklaus Signature golf course. Other amenities include lakefront recreation, spa, marina, kid’s club, and much more. See ad, page 87. theidahoclubcom

Iron Horse Ranch 406-995-7806 – Iron Horse Ranch at Sandpoint, a 380-acre private gated community of 24 unique homesites ranging from 5 to 12 acres. Over 200 acres dedicated to open space. See ad, page 3. ironhorseatsandpoint.com

Seasons at Sandpoint 313 N. 2nd Ave., 255-4420 – Sandpoint’s newest address. Luxury waterfront condominiums and townhomes available this summer. Experience the best of both worlds – lakefront in the heart of downtown. Visit our Preview Center for more information. See ad, page 21. SeasonsAtSandpoint.com

The Crossing at Willow Bay

The Ridge at Sandpoint This special gated neighborhood is limited to only 10 view homesites on 6- to 12-acre parcels located less than 6 easy miles from downtown Sandpoint. Learn more about The Ridge at Sandpoint today by calling 208-946-1300 or check out our Web site at theridgeatsandpoint.com. See ad, pages 104-105.

Village at Riverstone South from I-90 on Northwest Blvd., 877-775-2005 – 1, 2 and 3bedroom luxury condominium homes located on the river in

Recreation Kootenai River Inn Casino & Spa Hwy. 95, Bonners Ferry, reservations 800-346-5668 – Stay, play and relax at the all newly remodeled facility. Three casino rooms, 65 deluxe guest rooms, riverfront view, Springs Restaurant and new luxury spa. See ad, page 15. kootenairiverinn.com

Lake Pend Oreille Cruises 255-5253 – Experience the breathtaking scenery of Lake Pend Oreille. Enjoy a public cruise departing from City Beach in Sandpoint; or charter a private cruise for any occasion. See ad, page 39. lakependoreillecruises.com

Mountain Horse Adventures Two miles from Schweitzer Village – Three-hour guided horseback trail rides on Schweitzer through shaded trails, along ridges covered in wildflowers to Picnic Point. Outrageous views. Reservations 263-8768, or make reservations at the Mountain Activity Center in Schweitzer Village, 800-831-8810. See ad, page 40. mountainhorse adventures.com

Sandpoint West Athletic Club 1905 Pine St., 263-6633 – Full-service club with indoor pool, aerobics, racquetball and more. Daily rates, flexible/affordable memberships. See ad, page 41. sandpointwest.com

Silverwood Theme Park The Northwest’s largest theme park features three roller coasters, four monster water slides and more than 60 other rides and attractions. Shows, entertainment. Open May 1 to Oct. 10. See ad, page 12. silverwoodthemepark.com

The International Selkirk Loop Bonners Ferry, 267-0822, 888823-2626 – Encircles the breathtaking Selkirk Mountains in northeast Washington, north Idaho and southeast British Columbia. “North America’s first and only International Scenic Byway.” Awarded America’s top honor of All-American Road under America’s Byways Program. See ad, page 15. selkirkloop.org

Resorts Pend Oreille Shores Resort 47390 Hwy. 200, Hope, 2645828. Fully furnished condos on Lake Pend Oreille. Full-service athletic club with indoor pool, racquetball. Boat moorage. See ad, page 116. posresort.com

Schweitzer Just 11 miles from Sandpoint, 800-831-8810, 263-9555 – Lodging packages, dining, hiking, biking, horseback riding, chairlift rides. See ad, inside back cover. schweitzer.com

Stoneridge Resort (208) 437-2451 – A timeshare located in North Idaho, 45 minutes from Sandpoint. Each condominium boasts a spectacular panorama that enhances Stoneridge's relaxed atmosphere. A fullyequipped recreation center, with an Olympic-size swimming pool, tennis courts, and an adjacent golf course complete the picture for those who want to combine healthful exercise with their relaxation. See ad, page 78. stoneridgeresort.com

Waterford Marinas P.O. Box 339, 683-2213 – Come to Bayview on Lake Pend Oreille and visit three great marinas; Boileau’s Resort and Marina, Vista Bay Marina, and Bayview Marina. We have restaurants, condo rentals and much more. See ad, page 81. bayviewmarinas.com

Spa & Stove Mountain Spa & Stove 1225 Michigan, 263-0582 – Featuring spas and saunas, stoves and fireplaces, furnaces and boilers for your home, garage, shop or barn. See ad, page 57. mountainstove.com

Specialty Foods Litehouse Bleu Cheese Factory 125 S. 2nd at Lake, 263-2030 – Fresh cheese curds, homemade bleu cheese, domestic and imported cheeses, local and Northwest food items. See ad, page 79. litehousefoods.com

The Smoke House Hw. 95 at south end of Long Bridge, 263-6312 – Smoked fish, meat, poultry, “world-famous jerky.” Fine wines, imported beers and local products in our delicatessen.

Sporting Equipment Alpine Shop 213 Church, 263-5157 and at Schweitzer, 255-1660 – Boat sales and service for all your lake boating needs. Water skis, water gear and Old Town canoes and kayaks. Outdoor apparel and equipment located downtown. See ad, page 39.

outdoor clothes. Visit us in downtown Sandpoint. See ad, page 41. outdoorexperience.us

Vacation Rentals Lakeshore Mountain Management 264-5300, 888-709-5300 – A full range of accommodations to suit every vacation need. Let our knowledgeable staff find you the perfect rental from the shores of Lake Pend Oreille to slopeside at Schweitzer Mountain. Now accepting new properties. Look up northidaho rentals.com

SandpointOnline.com 405 Church St., 263-3573 – See listings for multiple vacation rentals at the Lodging Guide of Sandpoint Online, our town’s community website. Links to hotels, B&Bs and local resorts, too.

Sandpoint Vacation Rentals 263-7570 or 866-263-7570 – Locally owned and operated. SVR offers a variety of fully furnished accommodations located in the Sandpoint area, up at Schweitzer Resort, and on beautiful Lake Pend Oreille. See ad, page 117. sandpointvacationrentals.com

Sleep’s Cabins Lakeshore Drive, 255-2122 – Six historic log and bungalow cabins on beautiful Lake Pend Oreille. Sleeps 4-12. See ad, page 24. sleepscabins.com

Vacationville 109B N. 1st Ave., 255-7074, 877255-7074 – Sandpoint’s oldest and largest vacation rental company. Specializing in vacation rentals on “the lake, the mountain and the city in between.” Open Mon.Sat., 9-5; Sun. 11-3. See ad, page 65. vacationville.com

Wine Pend d’Oreille Winery 220 Cedar St., 265-8545 – Tastings, tours and retail sales of our awardwinning wines and from worldclass vineyards of the Northwest. Open 7 days. Expanded gift and wine shop in new location. See ad, page 84. powine.com or email: steve@powine.com

Athlete’s Choice 102 Cedar, 263-8158 – We carry the newest lines of athletic shoes, sports-specific shoes, casual shoes, athletic apparel and athletic equipment. See ad, page 39.info@athleteschoice.net

Outdoor Experience 314 N. 1st Ave., 263-6028 – Quality equipment and clothing for outdoor enthusiasts. Kayak and bike rentals and sales. Cool

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SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

www.sandpointonline.com

Sandpoint’s newest premier waterfront community featuring 82 luxury homesites on 180 wooded acres located on the Pend Oreille River. Adjacent is the Willow Bay Marina and Trinity at Willow Bay, a full-service marina with waterfront dining and entertainment. For more information, contact Kim Hansen at Century 21 On The Lake, 263-0639. See insert.

Coeur d’Alene. A perfect balance between civilization and nature, community spirit and intimate privacy, the Village at Riverstone. See ad, page 11. riverstonecda.com

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Called by the salmon Artist paints collection of extinct fish portraits

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Once the Inland Northwest’s rivers roiled with salmon on their way to home streams, returning from their three- or four-year lives in the ocean. Millions of coho, chinook, steelhead, sockeye, chum and cutthroat started their inland journey as silver streaks and changed shape and color along the way, attending only to one imperative instinct: to mate, spawn and end their lives in the streams where they were hatched. They sought the Pend Oreille, the Spokane, the Walla Walla, the Powder and Payette and Boise and Bruneau, the Wenatchee, the Yakima and dozens of others. Sixty-one Inland Northwest salmon populations are now listed as extinct by the National Marine Fisheries Service, those millions that once churned up the rivers each year reduced to a few thousand at best, and in some rivers barely countable. Watercolorist Eileen Klatt paints not the silent streams but the essence of the fish, their gaudy spawning-season greens, golds, reds, purples, even blacks captured on paper in the paintings that form A Litany of Salmon. Klatt says she did not so much choose to paint fish, particularly salmon, as accept their call. Ever since she painted a fish instead of fruit for a class assignment requiring an

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through their living counterparts, and over a period of two years she traveled as a pilgrim to the rivers and streams where the salmon still return. She obtained sample fish, traced their contours, photographed details of jaw and fin and tail, collected water from their streams and left small offerings. Then, back in her Hope studio, she called on the salmon spirits for inspiration and painted their portraits pair by pair, mixing the water from their rivers into her watercolor, mixing scientific observation with spiritual insight. The result is this series first shown in 2005 at North Idaho College and at Oden Community Hall. The visual component consists of 51 life-size paintings of salmon couples – the male and female of each population in their spawning colors, each couple representing both their existing race and an extinct population. Some, richly detailed, wear spots and scales and deep hues. Others are splashed in a dramatic wash of green, gold, red and purple. One couple, outlined with only touches of contour, seem ethereal, a pair of spirit fish glimpsed rather than seen. To stand among these portraits is to begin to feel the salmon presence so important to the artist, a presence that has been vital to Northwest culture for centuries. The series is more

Clockwise from top left: Artwork of extinct salmon by Eileen Klatt includes pairs of Nemah chum, Bonneville coho, Lyons Ferry fall chinook, Little White Salmon coho, Clearwater spring chinook and Wenatchee sockeye.

“organic” subject, Klatt has been on the path toward the series that she calls her life work. She obtained a master’s degree of fine arts from Washington State University, has taught for North Idaho College and has painted Northwest fish for some 15 years. Her paintings are collected internationally, and Three Brown Trout and Rainbow/Rainbow are widely available as prints. Salmon started swimming into her dreams more than a decade ago. Eventually she yielded her painting – and her devotion – to learning and telling their story. What might have been only a painting project became a spiritual quest. She followed salmon-run statistics from river checkpoints. She dedicated herself to documenting the vanished fish SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

SUMMER 2006

than an exhibit of dramatic and beautiful paintings. Klatt has documented her research and her pilgrimage, keeping meticulous records of her travels, of the fish and of the paintings, along with personal notes, quotations and sketches. Eager to tell the salmon story and show these paintings throughout their “home range,” she speaks passionately about the salmon, about the hardships and dangers they face and about their place in the Northwest ecology. “They want to come back,” she said, speaking of the salmon’s unrelenting drive to return to their home streams. It would be fitting if this pilgrim painter’s litany of salmon helps to hasten the return of shimmering, turbulent streams of flashing fins to Northwest rivers.


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Schweitzer offers every kind of fun under the sun, from exploring endless terrain to simply lying by the pool. It’s up to you how much or little you want to do. Either way, you’ll enjoy breathtaking scenery and fresh mountain air. So, get off the couch and onto a chairlift. Escape to Schweitzer and stay awhile.

GREAT ESCAPE FAMILY VACATION

••

FROM JUST $369 PER FAMILY AND INCLUDES: 3 nights of lodging One-day Silverwood Pass for four (includes kids 7 & under)* One-day FUN PASS (1 Bungee Jump Trampoline, 2 rock climbs & unlimited chairlift rides)

SUMMER EVENTS

JUNE 24 Summer Opening Day JUNE 24 Schweitzer Summer Celebration JULY 1-4 Rockin’ Fourth of July Weekend July 22 Bluegrass Festival AUG 3-13 Festival at Sandpoint Concert Series FestivalatSandpoint.com SEPT 2-3 Fall Fest

800.831.8810 | schweitzer.com *Silverwood day pass available for an upgrade on children ages 8 & up. Additional children and adults may purchase discounted day passes separately. Package valid Wednesdays through Sundays, June 24 - Sept 4, 2006. Tax or fees not included.


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unique clothes, looks, style The moment you step through our door, you’ll sense that you’ve discovered a very special place. A unique collection of colors, fabrics and textures for every occasion; versatility for busy lifestyles; and exciting ways to make them work beautifully together. Savor vintages from the Northwest and around the world in our unique Wine Bar. Pay us a visit! And experience shopping as it was truly meant to be.

Visit us a t 311 N. 1st , Sa nd poi nt , ID 208-263-2265 store s ca t a l og s onl i ne | col d wa t ercreek. com