Page 1

2013 - 2014

m a g a z i n e

50 Schweitzer Years of

1963–2013

Then & Now Snow Inspiration Ghost for Artists Anatomy of a

Photo Essay

Mountain of


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SO office in the 1980s and 1990s

Dr. Frank Cipriano 1985

Dr. Frank Cipriano and Dr. Doug Cipriano at work 1998

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co n te n ts

schweitzer magazine 2013 - 2014 vol 6

features

12

Departments

18

6 Inside Lines

With CEO and President Tom Chasse

8 Face Shot: A giant of a man Carl Knotts keeps the chairlifts running

10 tips from the top

With seasoned Schweitzer veterans

26 Photo essay: Then and Now Highlighting 50 years of changes on the mountain

32 food and wine 12 The anatomy of a snow ghost

Schweitzer is haunted – by majestic tree-statues, that is

15 Inspiring artists

15

A beautiful landscape and positive community vibe fuel creative staffers

18 50 years of Schweitzer

Longtimers share a mountain of memories. Plus a 50-year timeline

Healthy eating: Options for the health-conscious abound

35 Off the Mountain

4 under-the-radar attractions

36 Dining a la Sandpoint A guide to noshing in town

38 This is Schweitzer

Stats, the particulars, calendar and more about the mountain and its town

42 Summer at Schweitzer

Come summer, the mountain blooms with activity

1963- 2013 2013 • 2014

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inside lines

Celebrate 50 years

A publication of

C

an you believe it? Schweitzer Mountain Resort is celebrating 50 years of winter operation this season. We’re pleased to devote much of this year’s Schweitzer Magazine to a look back at five truly amazing decades here on the mountain. For some of us, including myself, our own Schweitzer stories began recently. In my case, I first discovered Schweitzer seven years ago, and the memories I’ve shared with family, friends and the staff here on the mountain are among my most cherished. For others, the story of Schweitzer spans generations, with some of our guests having skied here every season for 50 years. The story of Schweitzer over the past 50 years has been equally shaped by you, our valued guests, as well as many, visionary, current and past team members. From our founding fathers to the hundreds of faces that have worked on the mountain past and present, the Schweitzer of today owes a debt of gratitude to so many that helped along the way. And to the hundreds of thousands of skiers and snowboarders that have carved turns down the mountain since 1963, we thank you for your contributions to the Schweitzer story. Without your support, we certainly wouldn’t be celebrating this historic milestone. Our hope this winter is to celebrate 50 years through a series of events, exhibits and shared memories. With technology, we’re hoping that you’ll get in on the celebration, too! We encourage our guests that are active on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to use #schweitzerturns50 for memories, photos, and anything you’d like to share. Maybe you possess a season pass from the first year of operation? Scan it and share it with us – the more you share, the bigger our “electronic scrapbook” will become. As we celebrate this historic milestone, it’s also a great time to look toward the future. Over the summer, we invested an additional $1 million in capital improvements, including a new snowcat, Schweitzer CEO and President Tom Chasse a new market/state liquor store in the village, new rental equipment, new website and a host of other projects across the resort. Each of these improvements is designed to enhance the guest experience and provide the level of service you’ve come to expect from our team. So I invite you, your families and friends to celebrate 50 years of Schweitzer with us this winter. Whether you’re visiting us for the first time or have been enjoying us for years, we welcome you to discover The Schweitzer Difference this winter.

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Schweitzer Mountain Resort 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Road Sandpoint, ID 83864 208-263-9555 www.schweitzer.com

Published by Keokee Co. Publishing, Inc. Sandpoint, Idaho

Publisher Chris Bessler

Editor Billie Jean Gerke Copy Editor Beth Hawkins Art Director Jackie Palmer Sales Director Clint Nicholson

Keokee Co. Publishing, Inc. 405 Church St. Sandpoint, Idaho 83864 208-263-3573 www.keokee.com Entire contents © Keokee Co. Publishing, Inc. 2013 All rights reserved Schweitzer Magazine is the official publication of Schweitzer Mountain Resort, published annually and distributed to Schweitzer visitors; local advertisers’ restaurants, retail shops and other establishments; and by mail to season pass holders, mountain lodging guests and potential real estate clients. Schweitzer Magazine is published for Schweitzer by Keokee Co. Publishing of Sandpoint. For advertising information, contact Keokee Publishing. View the digital flip-page edition at www.schweitzermagazine.com

Warm regards,

On the cover Blending the old and the new. The original lodge may be gone, but the memories remain as Schweitzer looks toward the future and 50 more great years. Photo illustration using images by Ross Hall and Sean Mirus

Tom Chasse, CEO and President

Contents page Photographer Ross Hall captured classic images like this one of the original day lodge and parking lot during Schweitzer’s first ski season, 1963-64.

schweitzer magazine | 2013 • 2014


It’s all downhill from here. Congratulations, Schweitzer Mountain Resort, on 50 successful years of providing family fun and memories to last a lifetime. Bonner County Branch 477181 N. Highway 95 (208) 619-4000 | www.stcu.org

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Thanks Schweitzer, for 50 Sweet Years!

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fa c e s h o t

A giant of a man Carl Knotts keeps the chairlifts running

By Katie Ross. Photo by Sean Mirus

Y

ou may not have heard of him, but Schweitzer Lift Maintenance Manager Carl Knotts is kind of a big deal – both literally and figuratively. He stands well over 6 feet tall. He is also responsible for the upkeep and problem solving of all mechanical components of chairlifts at Schweitzer Mountain Resort. Knotts, 54, is a native of Portland, Ore., and spent 27 years working at ski resorts in Oregon before coming to Schweitzer five years ago. The transition, he said, was somewhat of a calling. “I had been approached to work here by (Mountain Operations Director) Bill Williamson a few times,” Knotts said. “Then, this feeling started that it was time for Schweitzer to take off, so here I am. I came here to help Schweitzer grow and continue to be a wellrespected ski hill.” Here at Schweitzer, Knotts’ job description is pretty straightforward: Provide safe, reliable lift services to guests and employees. But there’s a

“Safety, both for my staff and our guests, is the most important aspect of my job.”

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schweitzer magazine | 2013 • 2014

lot more to it than fixing simple problems when they arise. “It takes a group of people who work together to constantly improve,” Knotts said. “We’re preparing lifts for the day, doing inspections and then responding to any issues. We’re kind of like firemen.” The lift maintenance crew spends their days on the mountain to ensure the lifts run smoothly and, most importantly, safely. “Safety, both for my staff and our guests, is the most important aspect of my job,” Knotts said. “The key component for ensuring safety in the wintertime is a solid summer of preparation.” The crew spends the summer focusing on major issues and overhauls, such as the recent upgrades to the Great Escape Quad and Musical Chairs. “There’s so much to get done; summer is when we make or break what the winter’s going to be,” Knotts said. “Summers are the hardest part of the job.” At the end of the day, Knotts just wants to “build a lot of lifts.” “It gets in your blood; you think you’ll be here for a year or two,” he said. “Then you end up staying for your career.”


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t i p s f ro m t h e to p “Spend an early morning on the Nordic trail system for some perfectly groomed corduroy and fresh tracks.” –Arlene Cook

the new eco-friendly, slopeside community

schweitzer

with seasoned

veterans “When the morning calls for great carving, Bernie and I head straight to Kaniksu. It’s groomed nightly and with its northeast exposure, the snow is always consistent. Starting out steep at the top, this run rolls into the perfect pitch for laying on the edges.” –Ron Nova

“If it’s a powder morning and you want to maximize your turns and vertical, head to the Great Escape Quad. A lot of people head for the North Bowl, but I prefer the nice lines between Headwall and Abracadabra.” –John Monks

Mountainside “Watch which direction the wind is blowing from. If it is from the south or southwest, which is the prevailing direction, you will find deeper snow on northfacing slopes like Shoot the Moon. If the wind is from the north, check out JR or Quicksilver.” –Jerry Binder

“On Saturdays save a little energy for dancing at Taps. Some really amazing bands perform from 3 p.m. until 6 p.m. Dance in ski boots, snow boots, or barefoot.” –Carol Bray

“If it’s a powder day, you can’t get to the lift too early! It’s a party anyway, because you’re usually standing around giddy with all your friends waiting for the bell to ring.” –Bart Rayniak

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schweitzer magazine | 2013 • 2014

“My favorite place on a powder morning is Whiplash because the slightly closer runs get bypassed. Also it faces northeast and often gets loaded up in our typical snowstorms coming from the southwest. If fresh snow is lacking, I gravitate to the classic Schweitzer runs like Stiles: steep, wide and perfectly groomed.” –Scot Auld

“Go ski the chair lines that have all been recently brush cut. All five chair lines are steep, narrow, technical and a challenge to ski nonstop. Plus there is treasure in them there chair lines. Yes, trash. I love picking up Schweitzer trash. My motto is ‘Schweitzer Mountain, trash free.’” –Larry West


Photos by Steven Devine

“One of my favorite escapes from the office is to head out on the snowshoe trails. It’s quiet and the workout can be as intense as you want it to be, especially after some fresh snow.” –Mary Chorzempa

Banking for the Long Run

“For a laid-back atmosphere and the widest selection of beer on the mountain, visit Gourmandie.” –Mary Weber-Quinn

“We chose Panhandle State Bank because we need a full range of business services, and we want the local connection with a bank that values the customer experience every bit as much as we do.” “For those days when the visibility is less than perfect, head to Stella for some great cruisers and powder stashes. Be sure you have a goggle lens designed for low light conditions. Having two pairs of goggles, or two lenses that you can interchange, is worth the small investment. Schweitzer is often above the clouds when it’s gray and dreary in the valley. Come up for a dose of vitamin D.” –Suzanne LeTourneau

Tom Chasse, Schweitzer CEO

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Snow ghost The anatomy of a

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schweitzer magazine | 2013 • 2014

By Katie Ross Photos by Sean Mirus


S

chweitzer Mountain Resort is haunted. Not by

the traditional spirits of the departed but by the majestic tree-statues known as snow ghosts. These unforgettable formations that stand guard over Schweitzer’s South and Outback bowls are one of the mountain’s signature features. Snow ghosts have also been the subject of many photographs, including some timeless images by famed Northwest photographer Ross Hall. The making of the trees’ ghost-like visage is something of a phenomenon. Their formation is not simply an accumulation of snow or frost; it is actually the result of layers of ice called rime. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), rime ice is an opaque coating of tiny, white, granular ice particles caused by the rapid freezing of super cooled water droplets on impact

with an object. Clouds, wind and fog carry supercooled (up to 40 degrees below zero Fahrenheit) water droplets. Lacking a solid object to freeze around, the moisture exists in a liquid state until it comes into contact with trees, lift poles and other obstacles. It then freezes in layers on the surface. The ice tends to freeze in a windward direction, which results in the trees looking stooped and having ghost-like tendrils. According to Mark Moore, a retired meteorologist and founding member of the Northwest Weather and Avalanche Center (NWAC), the snow ghost formations are common to many mountainous areas but not exclusively so; the formations can occur anywhere water droplets can become supercooled. “It’s simply an act of nature,” Moore said. Moore also cautioned skiers and riders to be wary of snow ghosts once the weather begins to warm. “Snow ghosts can be dangerous when shedding their layers of rime,” Moore said. “Falling chunks can land on skiers or trip them up.” So where’s the best place at Schweitzer to view these natural wonders? Some favorite spots include areas around the Idyle Our T-Bar and at the top of the Lakeview Triple. Or, if you prefer to stay inside, walk down the Selkirk Lodge lobby hallway and behold some of historic photographer Ross Hall’s exquisite, vintage, black-and-white snow ghost photographs. Wherever you go to gaze at these wintertime marvels, you surely won’t be disappointed. 2013 • 2014

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inspiring

artists

By Kerri Kuntz. Photos by Sean Mirus

L

ook outside, go outside, be outside – and prepare to be inspired. Sandpoint is a unique, creativeinspired community filled with talented people who simply like to live surrounded by and inspired by the mountains and nature. The natural world here induces a more positive effect on our soul than the bustling energy of the city. Just ask these creative-minded Schweitzer employees who live, work and play here.

“It would be hard to separate skiing from my art.”

Liliani Barberi

ski instructor and artist

A

“Activity and being outdoors is a really good way to get the creative process going.”

sixth-year ski instructor at Schweitzer and race coach, Liliana Barberi’s 15-year journey with pastel painting began because she couldn’t afford to decorate. She painted two apples with soft pastels to brighten a bare wall and add color to her home. “But my apples felt lonely so I drew two pears and that led to more creative exploration.” Barberi, born and raised in Poland, immigrated to the United States in 1984. Barberi, 55, is immensely inspired by nature, and that is reflected in her work, both artistically and as an instructor. “There is not a single day, either driving to work on the mountain, or just looking outside my windows, that I don’t notice beautiful things around me,” Barberi said. “I often point it out to my students because it is not just about making perfect turns but also about being out there as a part of this vast, magnificent landscape.” Had it not been for those bare walls, the world may have missed out on some of the most stunning and diverse pastel art – from Schweitzer scenery to watermelon to ski angels.

Teresa Lunde

owner services liaison and author

T

he cliché “Never judge a book by its cover” is particularly fitting when it comes to Teresa Lunde. The owner services liaison for Schweitzer, Lunde is classy, professional and proficient – and you would never guess she is working on her third romance novel under the pen name Tesa Devlyn. Lunde, author of “Dangerous Disguise,” set in the town of Hope, Idaho, and “Just Plain Lucky” set in Kalispell, Mont., is currently searching for a publisher for her third novel. Next she will start a new trilogy of novels. “I love settings,” Lunde said from her office at Schweitzer Real Estate. “I’ve had people tell me my settings are like a character.” With the good fortune of growing up in beautiful northern Idaho, it’s no wonder she emphasizes place in her novels. Lunde, 56, hopes her novels will be a source of retirement income in the future, but for now, she enjoys the creative inspiration she gets from the drive up the mountain and reconnecting with skiing by taking some lessons. “Creativity flows a lot more smoothly when you know what you are doing,” Lunde said, laughing, in reference to both skiing and writing. 2013 • 2014

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“When I can quiet the voices in my head, that’s when the creative stuff comes up.”

Mike Thompson

ski patroller and musician

M

Samantha Carston

gourmandie supervisor and musician

T

he interesting thing about creativity is that it’s contagious. The mountain environment inspires one person, that one inspires another, and the mountain connects us all. Samantha Carston meets a lot of people at the Gourmandie, and she is inspired by them every day. Carston, 34, grew up with a heavy musical influence in her family. She has been singing at family and friend gatherings since a young age and played in a family band. Carston traveled a bit, but after relocating back to her roots in the Inland Northwest in 2007, she has been performing locally in several jazz and blues bands. She might even be spotted at an occasional after-after party in the local pub on the mountain. An avid snowboarder with a lighthearted personality, Carston performs mostly vintage and modern classics with an incredible, sultry, versatile voice. She also has a good sense of humor. “Performing is like playing in different conditions of the snow,” Carston said. “Sometimes it will blow your mind, and sometimes you just want to quit and go to the bar.”

Photo by Jesse Hart

ike Thompson, 51, was working a high-stress construction job in San Diego 15 years ago when he played out a take-this-job-and-shove-it type of scenario. Nowadays, Thompson is living his dream. Thompson writes, engineers and performs his own music. He has been playing professionally in various bands since age 17 and has played with various rock, bluegrass, jazz and fusion bands. He and his wife regularly perform mindboggling, inspirational melodies as an acoustic duo, Mike and Shanna. Oh, and many of the jingles heard on local radio – yep, they are Thompson’s creations, too. “Nature is certainly a main inspiration for me,” Thompson said. When he first moved to the area, he spent most days hiking around while writing his first album, “Tinkling Bernese.” “Being alone in the wilderness, I always have music going on in my head,” Thompson said, while sitting in the patrol dispatch shack on the top of the mountain. “It’s like church for me. If I’m not being creative, I get cranky.”

“You meet some really crazy people here, but everyone has a story that is inspiring.” Mike and Shanna Thompson perform at Eichardt’s


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50 Schweitzer years of

Longtimers share a mountain of memories By Marianne Love. Photos by Jim Parsons Jr. and Ross Hall

Bob Aavedal tends to downplay his role as a Schweitzer original. Aavedal directed parking when Schweitzer Basin Ski Resort first opened Wednesday, Dec. 4, 1963. He helped build and operate chairlifts at Schweitzer and worked part-time as a ski instructor. For 43 years, Aavedal owned and operated the Alpine Ski Shop on the mountain and in downtown Sandpoint before retiring in July 2012. Aavedal’s low-key manner changes when assessing Schweitzer’s impact over the past 50 years. “Best thing that ever happened to Sandpoint,” he said. Indeed, the words “Schweitzer,” “Sandpoint” and “best” have become synonymous in recent years, as both community and resort have received wide acclaim, including USA Today and Rand McNally’s “Most Beautiful Small Town” and Ski Magazine’s “Best Kept Secret in North America.” Besides its long snowpack and sensational view of Lake Pend Oreille, the mountain maintains another secret for success: loyal followers who have stuck with Schweitzer, contributing their vision, talents and support throughout its various stages of growth.

Over the Hill

to Schweitzer by foot, all-terrain vehicle and even garet Toomey from Post Falls purchase Schweitzer flyovers reinforce Fowler’s belief in the area. DiscusBasin lift tickets Nos. 1 and 2. Jack McArdle of Clark sions with friends and Sandpoint community leaders Fork purchases the first season pass. Jim Parsons Jr. such as Bud Moon, Jim Parsons Sr., Mayor Floyd Gray buys the first family season pass. and banker Bill Ballard result in fundraising efforts, 1963-64: Austrian skier Werner Beck starts junior including stock sales and federal grants. racing program. “Sometimes you can’t see the forest for the trees, and 1963: Fowler’s concept unfolds into reality as road is January 1964: T-bar is added to south part of bowl. it took a visitor (Dr. Jack Fowler) to discover the big constructed and Schweitzer facilities take shape. basin above Schweitzer Creek. Here was Cinderella February 1964: Stockholders meeting determines Opening Day: Dec. 4, 1963: Sam Wormington and just waiting for her Fairy Godmother … this Fairy Godcrew open the resort. Chair 1 at 5,100 feet with a need for lift expansion and that the facility should be mother turned out to be many, many people taking on extended to Colburn Basin to the north. Current incapacity of 660 skiers per hour begins operation, as insurmountable tasks.” vestment in lodge, road, land and does rope tow. Three-stolifts amounts to $575,000. After –Sam Wormington, Schweitzer’s first ry rectangular ski lodge, April 1960 January 1964 2.5 months of operation, cash manager, in his book “The Ski Race” designed by Spokane artaken in exceeds operating costs. chitect Grant Groesbeck, opens. Daily lift rates are March 1, 1964: Official Schweitzer April 1960: Spokane’s Dr. Jack Fowler $4 with rope tow $1.50. dedication ceremony. stops for roadside break at Hope on Season tickets sell for return from a skiing trip to Big MounSummer 1964: Construction of $150 for a family – and tain and notes the amount of snow in Red Cricket Condo, the first condoeven less for ski club Schweitzer bowl. Seed is planted to minium in Idaho, occurs on Fowler members. Jim and Mardevelop a ski area. Subsequent trips property.

Schweitzer’s 50 Years

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schweitzer magazine | 2013 • 2014


During Schweitzer’s first season, Jim Parsons Jr. captured this image of the original, three-story ski lodge from the area of the present-day Cat Track.

1963- 2013

Fifty years ago, Aavedal, along with local residents and skiers from around the Northwest and Canada, participated in Schweitzer Ski Basin’s opening day. Blue skies, brilliant sunshine and sparkling white snow energized their enthusiasm to usher in a new era of winter fun for the region. The stage had already been set by visionaries, strategists and promoters: Dr. Jack Fowler, architect Grant Groesbeck and U.S. Ski Association president Dr. Merritt Stiles of Spokane. Several Sandpoint-area businessmen, including Jim Brown Jr., Bob Cox, Bud Moon and Bill Ballard, recruited Canadian Sam Wormington from Kimberley, B.C., to spearhead the overall operation. Fresh from developing North Star Ski Area in Kimberley, Wormington moved to Sandpoint in mid-1963 and hit the ground running while supervising construction crews, assembling staff and promoting the mountain. Local residents fueled the dream by purchasing $10 shares of Schweitzer stock. “Bud (Moon) was totally wrapped up in getting Schweitzer going,” Sandpoint resident Helen Newton said. “One day he said to me, ‘Helen, you and Skip need to buy shares in Schweitzer. It’s going to happen!’ ” Heavy equipment/construction experts Wayne Parenteau, Rennie Poelstra, Scottie Castle, Russell Oliver, Bud Palmer and others used their skills to build and maintain infrastructure, including the road from Sandpoint, a 500-car parking lot, the first lodge and a mile-long Riblet chairlift. Lorraine Montgomery Morgan sold lift tickets No. 1 and 2 for $4 apiece to Jim and Margaret Toomey of Post Falls. Sandpoint photographer Jim Parsons Jr., who snapped hundreds of photos of early promoters during Schweitzer’s initial development, purchased the first family season pass for $130. Clark Fork’s Jack McArdle bought the first individual season ticket for $100. The Leonard Haugse family from Pastime Café ran the food concession. “We were busier than heck,” Sandy Haugse Terry re-

Jan. 15, 1978: Dedication of Schweitzer Chapel, a newly 1967-68: Chair 2 replaces T-bar. Chair 3 replaces nighter guests. Outback Inn is built in Colburn Basin. completed ecumenical worship center. Also used in latrope tow. Chair 4 is installed; opens up new terrain Construction of The Overnighter Hotel with 36 rooms; er years as a venue for Schweitzer Institute of Music in on south-facing slope. T-bar 2 is moved to top of adjoins the Keg Restaurant. T-bar Trail constructed to conjunction with the Festival at Sandpoint. Chair 4 to serve Swede Creek area. Parking lot is en- access bottom of T-bar from Chair 4. larged. Bear tracks in new cement at base of Chair 3 1978-79: Lodge improvements include enclosure of 1973-74: Main road into basin is paved. inspire naming Chair 1 Grandpa Bear, Chair Two Mama first deck. Addition of second deck provides space for Bear, Chair 3 Baby Bear and Chair 4 Papa Bear. Summer, 1974: Schweitzer hosts exhibit at Expo ’74, Bierstube, the bar on the upper floor. Mill Building conthe Spokane World’s Fair. structed. Ski Shop established in Mill Building. 1969: Construction of Blue Beetle Condos. 1974-75: Chair 7 is installed to increase capacity on 1981-82: Ecosign (ski-area planning company from 1970-71: T-bar moved to Colburn Basin to serve NoWhistler, British Columbia) is hired to devise first Joke Run. Two T-bars installed to serve Swede Creek front side. Lower terminal is installed below lodge for easier skier access from parking lot. Maintenance build“Schweitzer Master Plan.” better. Powder House is built at bottom of Downing constructed. the-Hatch run to improve 1982 to Mid-1980s: With food service and provide 1977: Sam Wormington purchase of Schweitzer 1971-72 1977 1982 to Mid-1980s mid-mountain warming leaves Schweitzer and stock from community hut. T-bar is installed on moves on to Mt. Spokane. owners for $15 per share, Sky-Edge Run to service Dan Larson serves as manJim Brown Jr. family and top of Stiles Run. ager for a short time, folPack River Management lowed by Ski School Directake over sole ownership of 1971-72: Colburn Basin is tor Bill Haskins. Schweitzer. opened. Chairs 5 and 6 are installed for new area. T-bar 1977-78: Sun deck is added 1984-85: Ecosign hired Summer 1964 3 is moved to serve Overto main lodge. to do second “Schweitzer

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Looking back at 45 years in lift maintenance: Jim Robertson After 45 years of building and maintaining Schweitzer chairlifts, Jim Robertson could retire. He’s content, however, to continue working in his present role as lift maintenance assistant to Carl Knotts (see story, page 8). “I love the mountain,” he said. “I have always enjoyed what I do and all the friends I’ve worked with throughout the years.” Robertson joined the Schweitzer staff in 1968 after “hounding” manager Sam Wormington for a week. “My first day on the job was digging a tower foundation with a shovel,” Robertson said. “Sam dropped me off … to dig a very large hole in the side of the mountain. He left for town. Partway through the morning, my shovel broke. I spent the rest of the day enjoying the view, waiting for Sam to return.”

Since that day, Robertson moved from chair lift construction to lift maintenance. “In 1990, we had our first detachable chair lift installed – one of the biggest challenges of my career,” Robertson said, “learning the mechanical and electrical aspects. Through the years, we installed a few newer style lifts, and they have become more second nature.” Nowadays, the lift maintenance crew heads out by 6 a.m. to run lifts, making sure they’re ready for the day. “Some mornings are a challenge due to severe weather forming a layer of ice which we have to remove for the lifts to run properly,” Robertson said. “Not a fun job. Some days after putting in eight to 10 hours during the day, we have to continue working into the night doing repair work.” During the off season, Robertson and his colleagues examine every lift “from top to bottom,” completing scheduled maintenance and repair work. “Working on lift maintenance is anything but humdrum,” Robertson said. “The job involves a large variety of things to do and many challenges.”

called. She remembers steadying food containers, including her dad’s fresh cinnamon rolls, on her lap while mom Helen drove the family Corvair up the often challenging Schweitzer Road. Delores Kelly, a local bookkeeper known for financial vigilance and her calm, steady nature, supervised the office and ticket sales. Diane Ekwortzell Gartrell worked with Kelly that first year. “Sam would pick us up in a big, plain Jane Suburban 4-wheel drive,” Gartrell said. “The road was not paved and, because of the early hour, it might not have been completely plowed. It was not unusual to slide off the road several times on the way up the hill. On the trip down, we would often pile out of the truck to help push someone out of the ditch.” Meanwhile, Parsons operated his Schweitzer Ski Haus in the lodge with help from high school students, including Gary Johnson and Chris Thompson. “I remember being really nervous that first day. There was a long line of people at the door, all wanting rentals,” Johnson said. “It was on-the-job training, but we managed to get through that first day. It wasn’t rocket science in those days.” The overall mood was giddy and giggly. “It was a funny but busy day. A lot didn’t know how to ski. Everybody was happy and laughing about each other falling,” inaugural ski patrolman Zane Lund said. “A lot got off at Midway. The rental shop didn’t know how to adjust skis and bindings, so the ski patrol was trying to adjust them, using quarters for screwdrivers.” Five decades later, many first-day pioneers, including Aavedal, Lund and former ski instructor Jean Martin, still often show up at Schweitzer, eager to enjoy skiing the slopes. Lund, of Samuels, first skied while serving in the Army in Alaska. After returning from service, he was pumping gas into his vehicle when a tall, lean stranger walked up and said, “I hear you know how to ski.” Within minutes, Sam Wormington offered Lund a job.

riding. Bike rentals become available. Master Plan.” Economic Research Associates hired to do from Pack River to continue developing both ski and resimarket research in conjunction with master plan. Both dential facilities at Schweitzer. Chair 6 is relocated to top 1989: Jim Brown Jr. dies. Daughter Bobbie Huguenin of North Bowl, bringing access to more terrain in Colburn point to addition of destination facilities. Ownership demoves from managing partner to full leadership of Bowl while providing another return (other than Chair 5) cides proposed village is too risky at the time. Schweitzer Mountain Resort. to front side. Provides scenic skiing on Great Divide Trail. 1985: Inaugural Festival Cup held to benefit the Festival Kaniksu Trail is added and becomes second-longest inMay 27, 1990, 7:30 a.m.: Original lodge is torched and at Sandpoint, which initiates Schweitzer Institute of Music razed to make way for expansions. termediate run at Schweitzer. Lodge and Mill Building rewith composer Gunther Schuller as artistic director. modeled. Babe’s Restaurant added to lodge. Mill Building 1990: Beginning of 10-year, $100-million plan to convert 1985-86: Pack River Lumber Company’s subsidiary expansion allows for larger ski shop as well as ticket and Schweitzer Mountain Resort into world-class destination administrative office. builds Crystal Run Condos to initiate the “ski-in, skiresort with plans to create a “village.” Construction of out” concept. Green Gables Lodge, Headquarters Day Lodge and Great 1988: Schweitzer Basin Ski Area name is changed to Escape high-speed quad chair. Chair Schweitzer Mountain Resort. 1986: Tim Hinderman from 2, Chair 3 and Chair 7 are removed; Name change signals multiBig Mountain takes over as 1985-86 1988 1990 Chair 2 replaces the beginner Trecreational use for the area. general manager. Summer bar; night-skiing and snow making chairlift rides begin. 1988-89: Addition of Creek equipment installed; road improved, Side Condos. Main parking 1987-88: Schweitzer is retrails and slopes renovated. lot resurfaced. New ski runs zoned from “recreational” to April 5, 1991: Flash flood causes added. Schweitzer advertises “planned unit development.” road washout between switchbike trails ranging from 3-15 Land-use map is filed at Bonbacks two and three; strands kilometers and 10 miles of ner County Planning Office. guests at Schweitzer for two days mountain roads for summer Move indicates commitment

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Photos by Jim Parsons Jr.

Top: Customers line up to buy tickets on the first day of operations, Dec. 4, 1963, from Lauraine “Lori” (Morgan) Montgomery. An adult lift pass cost $4. Above: Sam Wormington, apparently instructing some beginner skiers, was a dynamic force who managed the fledgling ski resort for its first 13 seasons.

and closes resort. Washout contaminates city watershed. Later that spring, Gov. Cecil Andrus approves $499,385 state economic development grant to help with the $900,000 cost of repairing and realigning the road. Resort reopens July 4. 1992: U.S. Department of Commerce awards $750,000 grant for further repairs on Schweitzer Road, including paving the lower, repaired section and stabilizing the upper section against erosion. 1993-94: Steve Cramer serves as general manager. Jan. 14, 1994: Biggest day ever when 5,803 tickets were sold; considered a bit of a fluke since it was Friday and $5 Day. 1994 1994: Schweitzer Snowboard Club, headed by Dr. Bob Rust along with parents and snowboarders, is organized. Curt Stewart serves for one year as manager. 1995: Kevin Rowe and Dave Morris build first Schweitzer Half Pipe. November 1996: With revenues failing to

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“One day I was skiing with Gary Valleries. He fell and said his leg was broken,” Pucci said. “ ‘Are you sure it’s broken?’ I asked him. When he said ‘Yes,’ I said, ‘Great! I’ve got a job.’ We laugh about that to this day.” Pucci served on the patrol for 46 years, with just one break, and that wasn’t a leg. Taking a year off in 1971-72, he worked as a carpenter on Condo del Sol construction. “I’d look up at the mountain and knew I had to go back,” he said, “so I got on my knees, begged Sam (Wormington) for forgiveness. He said I could come back.” Pucci, 69, stayed until his retirement in 2012, chalking up a record 46 years with Schweitzer. These days the longtime motorcycle enthusiast takes his Harley Road King on trips when not working on carpen-

Stories of Schweitzer flow easily for Pucci. He started skiing with a former girlfriend during his 1963 Christmas break from North Idaho College. “I wasn’t very good. I floundered but pretty much taught myself, with tips from ski patrol friends,” he recalled. One day ski instructor Arnold Bircher gave him a lesson on the mountain’s face. “Point your belly button downhill and go for it!” Bircher told his student. Pucci eventually headed the ski patrol, dealing with everything from minor injuries to fatalities to compiling a manual on avalanche control. A four-day search for avalanche victim Rick Metcalf in 1981 left a lasting impact on Schweitzer personnel and the community. “He (Rick) was the husband of one of my female ski patrol members,” Pucci recalled. “The intensity, community support, food and caring for people on the support team was amazing. “After four days, we brought in avalanche rescue dogs from Colorado. We took them to the top of the hill, made two, three trips down. They were getting pretty frazzled. After one more trip, they found him. It was a sadness I’ll never forget.” In the early days, each spring, Pucci used two cars to get to Schweitzer.

He drove his new 1967 Pontiac to the mountain base, then transferred to his ’53 Plymouth clunker. “Four or five of us would ride up,” he said. “We didn’t care about the car because the road was so bad.” Lighthearted fun and camaraderie among the patrol over the years made up for darker moments. Occupied porta potties toppling over and “trials” with “prosecuting attorney” Dwayne “Blackie” Black, declaring guilt before learning the crime kept the patrol on their toes. Pucci cherishes his long association with Schweitzer. “It’s made my life so nice because I had year-round employment with Schweitzer in the winter and a summer job,” he said. “The boys, Allo, Jonah and Adam, all grew up skiing. Being around the guys I’ve hired 20 to 30 years ago and seeing their kids become ski patrolmen. That’s the best.”

Photo by Ross Hall

Undeterred, he skied with patrol members, just in case.

try or concrete projects, snow removal or driving commercial vehicles.

Pucci still skis occasionally at Schweitzer and grabs a free beer from Pucci’s Pub, named in his honor by owners, the late Fred Darnell Jr. and Eric Solontai. “Freddy wanted to honor John because all the lifties and employees thought so much of him,” Karla Darnell, Fred’s mother, said. “We all love John so much. He went the extra mile (when Fred died from cancer). He deserves a tribute.”

Photo by Sam Wormington

Back in the mid-1960s, hoping for a spot on Schweitzer’s Ski Patrol, John Pucci learned that his chances were so slim that a patrol member would probably have to break a leg.

Photo by Jim Parsons Jr.

Serving ski patrol for 46 years: John Pucci

meet expectations, the Brown family asks court to put the Schweitzer.” Promotional concept involves tying in the lake Selkirk Lodge undergoes renovation. Major landscaping resort into receivership while attempting to pay off debts. and other recreational opportunities. “We envision an elas- project beautifies village. Sandpoint attorney Ford Elsaesser is appointed by court tic band between the lake and the mountain,” said General Dec. 28, 2002: Record day for standard ticket prices. Tickto run Schweitzer during this period. Manager Tom Fortune. et sales totaled 5,560. 1996: Half-pipe area above pool becomes tubing hill. 1999: Terrain park with music, handle tow and park opApril 2003: At season’s close, more than 4.5 million erations tower opens with Teague Mullen as park super1997: Brown family files for bankruptcy. Schweitzer ski passes have sold since Jim and Margaret visor. Toomey purchased tickets 1 and 2 in 1963. Dec. 31, 1998: Harbor Properties, Inc. from Seattle, owner 2000-01: Stella, Idaho’s only high-speed, six-passenger of Stevens Pass and Mission Ridge in Washington, purJuly 2003: NORBA mountain bike race attracts thousands chases Schweitzer from U.S. Bank. Tom Fortune assumes ski lift – along with $350,000 carriage barn and some to watch regional competition. local lore – adds state-of-the-art technology, more availposition as general manager. Winter 2003: “Harbor Three Mounable terrain and nostalgic feel 1999: Harbor Resorts invites tain” Pass offers opportunity to to Schweitzer experience. representatives from Sch2000-01 Summer 2002 1999 purchase single pass, valid on desig2001: Mountain Horse Advenweitzer as well as local leadnated dates at all three Harbor Proptures begins offering summer ers to a three-day workshop erties ski areas, Schweitzer, Mission trail rides at Schweitzer. to brainstorm planning stratRidge and Stevens Pass. egies for the future. Major Summer 2002: White Pine Dec. 4, 2003: Schweitzer kicks off renovation project results in Lodge opens, offering fully 40th anniversary celebration. 82-unit condominium Selfurnished condominiums with April 3-4, 2004: Employee reunion kirk Lodge (formerly Green full kitchens and fireplaces. includes free day of skiing, music, Gables) as part of the “New Chimney Rock Restaurant in

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From top: Skiers at the top of Chair One, circa 1964, included Bob Aavedal, third from left, a charter employee and Alpine Shop founder; first General Manager Sam Wormington; and a skier rides one of the T-bars that served the Swede Creek area, now Sunnyside.

Prior to Schweitzer’s opening, Lund cut brush with a hatchet for the rope tow and skied alongside Canadian ski team members, who trained on the mountain at Wormington’s invitation. Meanwhile, on opening day, Jean Martin and her former husband left their home at the base of Schweitzer, joining the parade of cars headed for the mountain. Experienced skiing friends helped them get started. “As they passed us on their frequent runs, they would give us a few pointers,” Martin said. At the time, her savings account, targeted for attendance at North Idaho College the next spring, went for skis, boots and poles. The wooden skis with metal edges did not last long. “In the spring I went commercial fishing and saved enough money to buy a pair of metal skis,” Martin said. She and another local housewife Lucille McPherson eventually joined the ski school as instructors. Martin’s and Aavedal’s experiences mirrored many Schweitzer pioneers whose early involvement planted seeds for a lifetime love of skiing, career choices, marriages and always the desire to return to the mountain.

races, games, etc. 2004-05: Schweitzer closes March 5 due to low snow (7 inches in the village) but re-opens weekends in late March due to significant late-season snowfall. Among the worst seasons on record. 2005: McCaw Investment Group, or MIG, of Seattle takes over sole ownership of Schweitzer after dissolution of partnership with Harbor Properties. 2005-06: Idyle-Our T-Bar, Hermits Hollow Tubing Center, and SunKid Magic Carpet are constructed. The IdyleOur T-Bar/Little Blue expansion adds 400 acres of terrain and five new named trails. 2005-06 2006: Pucci’s Pub, owned by Fred Darnell Jr. and Eric Solontai, opens in Schweitzer Village, honoring longtime ski patrolman John Pucci. 2005: Tom Chasse, an East Coast ski veteran, takes over as CEO and president of Schweitzer management.

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From top: Summer chairlift ride on Chair One, circa 1970; an early torchlight parade and fireworks display, circa 1966.

“I met and courted my wife Diane on the slopes of Schweitzer,” Gary Johnson said. “She was from Georgia and seemed to like the way I skied. After about four years in the ski shop, I taught skiing in 1969 and 1970. Al Voltz and Chris Thompson ran the ski school. My wife and I volunteered to cut brush on ski runs for about four to five years and earned our season passes. Diane and I also ran a cross country ski school for about 10.” After his U.S. Forest Service retirement, Johnson and his wife returned to Sandpoint and their beloved Schweitzer. Meanwhile, Chris Thompson spent his career in the ski industry, certifying ski instructors and eventually serving as vice president/chief operating officer/general manager for a company that owned four ski resorts. Now retired, he works as a consultant at Schweitzer for the Snowsports Center and the Schweitzer Alpine Racing School (SARS). Thompson and Johnson concur with Aavedal about the resort’s influence on the area. “There is no doubt that Schweitzer has had a huge impact on Sandpoint and the surrounding communities,” Thompson said. “Since its inception, it has influenced the economic vitality of the region.” “Schweitzer definitely changed the face of Sandpoint – a slow process at first, but look at the place now!” Johnson added. “Sandpoint, Schweitzer and Lake Pend Oreille are now a big draw and have put this area on the map. The resort holds lots of great memories over the last 50 years. Thank you, Schweitzer!”

Photos by Ross Hall

This story reflects just a sampling of dedicated staff members and community supporters who contributed to Schweitzer’s development and ultimate widespread popularity. Many originals have passed on, but scores of others will likely be on hand to share their experiences at the 50th year celebration at Schweitzer Mountain Resort Dec. 13-14. See timeline. Also, visit www.schweitzeroriginals.blogspot.com for additional reflections.

2007: Schweitzer visionary Jack Fowler and first 2011: Schweitzer adds to Bottle Bay Resort and Mato commemorate the anniversary. Community Day manager Sam Wormington take the last ride on rina, taking over six rental cabins. with $10 per day ticket revenue donated to local 44-year-old Chair 1, which is replaced that year by 2011: 750-foot zip line opens near Hermits Hollow charitable organizations. two lifts. The Basin Express and the Lakeview Triple Tubing. Dec. 14, 2013: Celebration of Founders Day. Special open in December. invitations to folks responsible for getting the mounNov. 12, 2011: Earliest opening in 25 years. 2007: MountainSide construction begins. tain going. Pre-opening ceremony with special guests Feb. 19, 2012: New one-day record for full-price on the first chairs – even if it is just a chair ride. All 2008: Bear Grass Cruiser mountain biking trail conskier visits – 5,658. guests can purchase a $19.63 lift ticket for the mounstructed. Summer 2012: Mill Building remodeled and Ski & tain. Après party will follow in Taps with live music and 2008: Schweitzer assumes operation of Bottle Bay Ride Center revamped. Gourmandie expanded. the opening of the Snow Ghost Time Capsule, sealed Resort and Marina’s restaurant on Lake Pend Oreille. Great Escape Quad receives new electrical system. 25 years ago. 2008-09: Cutting-edge, Musical Chairs double snow-making equipment chairlift extensively re2007 Dec. 13-14, 2013 For more on Schweitzer’s history, see installed. built, with a new drive, “Looking Back on Schweitzer: The Hispaint and chairs featur2009: First year for 24 tory of Schweitzer Mountain Resort” ing restraining bars. Hours of Schweitzer, a by Jack Fowler, “The Ski Race,” by ski relay fundraiser inDec. 13, 2013: 50th Sam Wormington, and the Winter 2004 spired by local child Hank Anniversary Celebraissue of Sandpoint Magazine, or visit 1963- 2013 Sturgis, to raise funds for tion. Special banners, the Bonner County Historical Museum cystinosis research. pins and retail goodies 2011 (see story, page 35).

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schweitzer magazine | 2013 • 2014


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Although Schweitzer is half a century old and has evolved, grown and matured, its heart remains constant. While it may look considerably different, the mountain’s heart shines, as always, with unbridled enthusiasm. This is a place of joy – made up of great snow, happy guests and dedicated employees. Yes, Schweitzer has changed physically, as is evident in this “Then and Now” photo essay. The contrasts from 1963 to 2013 may appear shocking, but take a few runs and you’ll realize what’s truly important hasn’t changed much at all.

p h o to e s s ay :

then and

now

Skiers soak in the view high atop South Bowl while they wait for their friends to get off Chair One, as seen during Schweitzer’s first season, 1963-64. ||

The Lakeview Triple is newer and the trees have grown, but the view still makes it a great place to wait for friends.

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||

Photo: Sean Mirus

||

Photo: Ross Hall

||


The original lodge, circa 1969, served the mountain for 27 seasons and was located where the Great Escape Quad now begins. What used to be nothing but parking is now Schweitzer’s quaint ski-in/ski-out village. Compare this photo and the one below and notice how they were combined to make the photo illustration that appears on the cover.

||

PhotoS: Ross Hall / Sean Mirus

||

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p h o to e s s ay

t h e n a n d n ow

Afternoon runs in the sun are as much fun now as they were in 1963. | |

PhotoS: Ross Hall / Matt Conger

As Schweitzer has grown over the years, so have the trees and the village.

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||

||

PhotoS: Ross Hall / chris bessler

||


The “bubbles” on Chair 4 (Sunnyside), seen circa 1970, were a unique but short-lived addition to the lift. Below, although the Sunnyside Chair only runs on busy days now, it is still a favorite amongst Schweitzer veterans.

||

PhotoS: Ross Hall / Sean Mirus

||

2013 • 2014

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pmhoouto n t aeisns ay living

t h e n a n d n ow

the new eco-friendly, slopeside community

Mountainside A look back at some of the original Schweitzer Ski School members, from left: Ski School Director Ken Pobst and wife Eleanor, Danny Daniels and wife Maxine, and Hal “Red” Edwards. Below, the current team at Schweitzer includes Snowsports School Director Terry McLeod and wife Lisa, President & CEO Tom Chasse and wife Donna, and Mountain Operations Director Bill Williamson.

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||

PhotoS: Jim Parsons Jr. / Sean Mirus

||


R ro ip d Ca cke ow sc re n g ad d ro Tr e all om st ad Ti -m i e p sp abi tio de oun rs, of ee lity na l iv ta flo un d c on l ca er in at co on h m an sk th m tro ar be in is. rou pr l. d s r u cr R g om T n n ed os h p isi he ow. der ib sig o le n wd ng Ex T fo al ol’ e on pe ip a ot w l-m s u r, r an ien nd it ou niq dice h d ce ta a nt ue th of s il g ai c ro f-t er ro gr n om u ra ie ck ess ex g il v s c er iv pe bin h t er on pr e s rie at he sa qu ov id nc ion tre til er id ec e ity s e e ut fo of A es o . the as s p re u n en y m rov ve to ou tir an id ry Tu r a e e sk rn w e p m uv o ie R ard ou e w r t oc r e nt ab rf yp ke wi ai il ul e. r, nn n ity e Ex in ac , p dg te g n hi la e nd e ev yf gr ed w b in ul ip g a ne an Si re de ed w ss d c cu o ho an o ta f le d e nfi nd ne ff de w or nt be tle nc ss hm ar k


fo o d a n d w i n e

Healthy Eating Options for health-conscious consumers abound

D

By Katie Ross. Photos by Sean Mirus.

oes the sizzle of a deep fryer make you cringe? Is wheat gluten your No. 1 enemy? Fear not, health-conscious consumers, Schweitzer Mountain Resort’s restaurants and cafés have you covered! Over the last few years, Schweitzer has made a commitment to offering a variety of healthier, cleaneating options on the mountain. The typical ski resort staples – chicken strips, pizza and burgers – are still available but are now supplemented with fresh produce, vegetarian options and gluten-free alternatives. Schweitzer’s premiere restaurant, the Chimney Rock Grill, has something for everyone. For a fresh take on a great deal, try the salad bar: crisp lettuces and a variety of toppings make this option a daily favorite. Accompanying the salad bar, many of the daily soups are low fat or gluten free. Chimney Rock also offers a black The Chimney Rock black bean burger, top, and organic granolas from The Mojo are just a bean veggie burger that can few healthy dining options at Schweitzer. be made gluten-free; and 32

schweitzer magazine | 2013 • 2014

tofu may be substituted in the pork tacos, which are gluten-free, salmon tacos or Szechuan chicken. “With things like food allergies and lifestyle choices, we really wanted to embrace alternative eating options this year,” said Chimney Rock Manager Kelley Kennedy. “All our menu items are also made to order and can be customized to suit most dietary needs.” The Mojo Coyote Café, the coffee shop hotspot on the mountain, offers a variety of breakfast, lunch and baked goods. Gluten-free cookies from the WOW Baking Company are Manager Cassandra Ankney’s favorite treat. The Mojo also has wholesome foodstuffs such as yogurt and granola, hardboiled eggs, and low-fat cereals. “We try our best to have options for health-conscious people,” Ankney said. “In addition to our food selections, we also have soy, rice and almond milk that can be substituted in our coffee drinks.” If you’re looking for the upscale experience, The Gourmandie, Schweitzer’s gourmet market, stocks a variety of organic and local products. Favorite selections include locally made salsa, organic crackers, artisan meats and cheeses, and several types of gluten-free beer. Even the Lakeview Lodge cafeteria, famous for its fries and Mexican fare, has something for the health enthusiast: Check the middle island for baskets of fresh fruit and the drink coolers for juices and hummus.


2013 • 2014

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Hoot Owl Café

30784 Idaho State Highway 200, Ponderay | 208-265-9348 It’s easy to drive right past the Hoot Owl with its rustic exterior, but there is a reason the parking lot is always full. The interior walls are decorated with local artwork and historic photos of Sandpoint and Lake Pend Oreille. Bring your appetite because this classic diner serves hearty helpings that will keep your stomach full and happy all day long.

Bonner County Historical Museum

611 S. Ella Ave., Sandpoint | 208-263-2344 This little-known historical gem is located near Lake Pend Oreille in beautiful Lakeview Park. The museum features exhibits that chronicle the history of Bonner County and all its residents, from the Kalispel and Kootenai peoples to early settlers. The museum offers educational programs and exhibits year-round.

3

Laughing Dog Brewing

3 4

Laughing Dog Brewing’s taproom Courtesy photo

Western Pleasure Guest Ranch sleigh ride

1109 Fontaine Dr., Ponderay | 208-263-9222 Stop by this local brewery for a tasting or tour – and dogs are welcome! The tasting room is open daily and features, quite possibly, the world’s greatest collection of growlers. Supplement one of Laughing Dog’s 15 distinct brews, including seasonals like the famous Cold Nose Winter Ale, with a T-shirt or signature glass. Any way you pour it, this local brewery embodies “fetchingly good beer!”

4

Western Pleasure Guest Ranch

1413 Upper Gold Creek Rd., Sandpoint | 208-263-9066 Cozy up to a warm, log cabin fireplace and enjoy breathtaking scenery at this quaint guest ranch. Whether you’re staying overnight or just looking for a day trip, a premier amenity in winter is the ranch’s famous sleigh rides, accommodating two to 12 passengers. Let the winter wonderland cast its spell as you are whisked through snowy fields and old-growth forests. 2013 • 2014

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Connie’s Café

Take Oute Availabl

202 N. Second Ave. Enjoy authentic Thai food in a welcoming atmosphere. All of Bangkok’s dishes, including a wide variety of vegetarian, are cooked to order using the freshest ingredients with no added MSG. Bangkok offers a fine selection of wine and beer as well as Thai tea and coffee. All desserts are made on-site. Enjoy your meal on our sidewalk dining area. Closed Sundays.

323 Cedar St. Historic hospitality! Connie’s Café, the landmark Sandpoint restaurant, is known as ‘a coffee shop with dinner house quality.’ The eatery’s wholesome, made-from-scratch menu is filled with mouth-watering breakfast, lunch and dinner dishes of the highest quality, while the relaxed, beautifully restored 1950s decor makes everyone feel right at home.

208-265-4149

208-255-2227

Ivano’s Ristorante

Kokanee Coffee

102 S. First Ave. Serving the community for more than 27 years, Ivano’s Italian dining accompanied by classic wines and gracious atmosphere add to the enjoyment of one of Sandpoint’s favorite restaurants. Pasta, fresh seafood and steaks, veal, chicken and vegetarian entrees round out the fare. Gluten-free menu. Also open on the Hope Peninsula in summer and at the La Rosa Club, a casual gathering place featuring craft cocktails, martinis and an innovative food menu with plates and bites designed to be shared.

509 N. Fifth Ave. Kokanee Coffee’s mission is to serve outstanding coffee – or a perfect shot of espresso in every cup.

208-263-0211 www.IvanosSandpoint.com

208-597-7831 www.kokaneecoffee.com

Kokanee blends and roasts its coffee in small and tasty batches using organic beans, plus offers homemade soups, wraps and pastries every day. Open 7 days a week! Wi-Fi available. Visit Kokanee Coffee on Facebook for daily specials.

Monarch Mountain Coffee 208 N. Fourth Ave. Sandpoint’s original coffee roastery serving Idaho’s freshest coffee since 1993. Bring all your friends for the very best espresso drinks, real fruit smoothies made with all-natural ingredients, handcrafted milk shakes, granitas, iced or hot tea, yerba mate and fresh lemonade. Enjoy Monarch Mountain’s half-pound breakfast burritos or homemade soup.

208-265-9382 www.facebook.com/monarchmountaincoffee

Pita Pit 116 N. First Ave. “Fresh Thinking, Healthy Eating.™” A place with great tasting food that’s healthy, fresh and still served fast. Our pitas have lean, savory meats that are grilled to perfection, a large choice of crisp, fresh veggies, and exotic toppings, including our own zesty signature sauces. Come in and try a Gyro, Chicken Souvlaki, a vegetarian Falafel or one of our breakfast pitas. 208-263-8989 PitaPitUSA.com


Eichardt’s Pub & Grill

Evans Brothers

212 Cedar St. A comfortable pub and grill, Eichardt’s is located downtown in a charming, historic building. This relaxing pub mixes casual dining with seriously good food. There’s something for everyone – more than a dozen beers on tap, good wines including oak cask local red wines, and regional touring live music. Upstairs you’ll find a fireplacewarmed game room with a pool table, darts and shuffleboard. Eichardt’s has been nationally recognized and locally supported since 1994. Open daily at 11:30 a.m. for smokeless dining seven days a week.

524 Church St. An artisan coffee roaster not to be missed. Organic brothers and direct relationship coffees roasted daily in the center of the revitalized Granary Arts District. Studio 524 Coffee Lounge features the region’s best baristas, latte art and limited Roaster Reserve coffees dripped to order. Local, gluten-free pastries and burritos, free parking, Wi-Fi. Enjoy the artistic, neighborhood atmosphere. Evans Brothers Coffee also available at Super 1, Yokes, Winter Ridge and many of Sandpoint’s finest restaurants. Visit on Facebook for upcoming events and tastings. 208-265-5553 www.EvansBrothersCoffee.com

208-263-4005

MickDuff’s Brewing Co.

The Little Olive 124 S. Second Ave. One of Sandpoint’s newest restaurants welcomes its guests to enjoy Mediterranean cuisine for lunch and dinner in a quaint, comfortable setting. A mix of Greek-inspired dishes are made with the freshest ingredients available. Dressings and sauces are made in-house daily. The beer and wine menu is extensive, featuring more than 45 beers. Right next door is Sandpoint’s newest sushi restaurant, The Big Tuna, where you can order a sushi roll from the menu or roll your own. 208-597-7499 www.littleolivefood.com

312 N. First Ave. Come and enjoy MickDuff’s fine handcrafted ales in a family dining atmosphere. They offer a variety of top-of-the-line beers ranging from fruity blondes to a seasonal porter. MickDuff’s also brews a unique-style root beer for those young in age or at heart. The menu is packed full of flavor with traditional and updated pub fare. You will find toasted sandwiches, hearty soups, gourmet hamburgers and much more at this cozy brewpub located in downtown Sandpoint. 208-255-4351 MickDuffs.com

Sweet Lou’s In Hope, 46624 Highway 200, overlooking Lake Pend Oreille at Holiday Shores Marina, check the website for hours. In Ponderay, 477272 U.S. Highway 95, open every day 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Proudly serving hand-cut steaks, freshly gound burgers, wild salmon and smoked ribs. Both locations offer a family-friendly atmosphere with full bars and tasty items. Come hungry, stay late, eat well. Hope 208-264-5999 Ponderay 208-263-1381 www.sweetlousidaho.com www.facebook.com /sweetlous

at c i t y b e a c h

Trinity at City Beach 58 Bridge St. The “new Café Trinity.” Enjoy breakfast, lunch and dinner with the best view of Lake Pend Oreille. Deck seating. Outstanding menu featuring seafood, steaks, salads and appetizers. Full bar serving a great selection of wines, beers and cocktails featuring a daily happy hour. Open daily from 7:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. Located at the Best Western Edgewater Resort adjacent to Sandpoint City Beach. 208-255-7558 TrinityatCityBeach.com


this is schweitzer

Schweitzer still fabulous at

50 years

S

ituated in the Selkirk Mountains in Idaho’s Panhandle, Schweitzer Peak towers above an open bowl easily visible from the idyllic town of Sandpoint, Idaho. As a glistening beacon, that snow-loaded peak guides people to Schweitzer Mountain Resort. While Schweitzer Bowl may cause onlookers to gape, their jaws really drop when they discover that’s only half the mountain. The Outback Bowl adds a whole ’nother side, totaling 2,900 acres of terrific terrain, not to mention many more acres of accessible backcountry. Since its beginning in 1963, Schweitzer Mountain Resort has transformed into a destination ski and snowboard mecca lauded for superb tree skiing, outstanding snow and dramatic views. Exploring all those acres is made all the more fun with 2,400 vertical feet and an average annual snowfall of 300-plus inches. Schweitzer isn’t the only one winning accolades. Its music-and-arts-loving hometown of Sandpoint has been named a “Top Ski Town” and “Most Beautiful Small Town in America” by USA Today and Rand McNally and one of the “Top 10 Coolest Mountain Towns” by Men’s Journal. Titles aside, it’s the friendliness of both the town and the mountain that keeps people coming back year after year for a truly unforgettable experience. Beyond its unspoiled and uncrowded terrain, Schweitzer Village offers shopping, dining, nightlife and luxurious perks – all at an easygoing pace that invites guests to really relax. 38

schweitzer magazine | 2013 • 2014


dining

Schweitzer Village has something to suit everyone’s cravings, from the Chimney Rock Grill’s fine-dining atmosphere, featuring burgers, steaks, salads, pasta and seafood, to the Mojo Coyote Café’s casual eatery, offering lunch specials and freshly baked pastries. Other village options include tavern fare at Pucci’s Pub, Mexican cuisine at the Lakeview Café, après-ski at Taps, gourmet pizza at Sam’s Alley, and coffee at Cabinet Mountain Coffee. The Outback Inn, located in the mountain’s Outback Bowl, offers hot food and cold drinks inside or on the deck near the bonfire. For the gourmet with a flair for food, Gourmandie stocks everything needed to create delicious hors d’oeuvres or full-blown meals.

shopping

Anyone needing a ski break can choose from several shopping options at their fingertips in the village. The Source and The Alpine Shop sell mountain gear essentials like goggles and gloves, plus specialty equipment and demo rental equipment. The Artists’ Studio, a local artist cooperative, showcases unique photos, drawings, paintings, glass art, jewelry and more. Gourmandie offers highend provisions, beer, wine and culinary treats from around the world. The shop now also features unique local artisan jewelry, gifts, and home/condo décor. Debuting this winter is The Market at Schweitzer, featuring fine spirits, sundries and ice cream.

services

Drop off your children, ages 4 months to 6

years, at Kinder Kamp for lessons, crafts and snacks, then head to the Ski and Ride Center to try the latest demo equipment. Afterward, treat yourself to the healing services at the Solstice Center for the Healing Arts, providing a wide range of therapies that specifically target ski-related aches and pains.

ski and ride center

The Ski and Ride Center features top-quality rentals from Rossignol and a full-service tuning and repair shop with one of the region’s most extensive alpine demo fleets. Lesson packages and specialty clinics taught by certified coaches are offered for skiers and riders of all levels and ages. (208-255-3070)

lodging

The condominium-style, slopeside White Pine Lodge boasts gas fireplaces, views overlooking Schweitzer Village or Lake Pend Oreille, and other amenities such as full kitchens, cable TV and DVD players. Also slopeside, the Selkirk Lodge features similar amenities in European-style hotel accommodations. Other condominiums are located throughout Schweitzer Village and feature full kitchens, gas or wood fireplaces, and luxury amenities. (Schweitzer.com, 877-487-4643)

selkirk powder

Located 100 yards from Schweitzer’s Great Escape Quad, Selkirk Powder’s guided snowmobile tours zip along groomed logging roads through thousands of acres of private and state-owned forests on four-stroke Arctic Cats. Daylong cat-skiing adventures have

skiers and riders on untracked powder by 9:30 a.m., thanks to Schweitzer’s six-minute summit lift. Ski the backcountry side down to the cat waiting at the bottom. Customers typically complete up to 10 runs and rack up as much as 14,000 vertical feet on 3,000 acres of diverse terrain. (www.SelkirkPowder.com, 866-464-3246)

meetings and events

Looking for a place to host your mountaintop wedding, corporate retreat or family reunion? Schweitzer’s Group Sales provides a unique setting for events, customized to fit any group’s needs. Features include comprehensive audio/visual equipment, custom banquets, bars and more. Outdoor group activities – skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing, geocaching and tubing. Beyond coordinating all the tiny details, the Schweitzer staff is wholly committed to creating memorable experiences for groups. (208-263-9555 ext. 2820)

mountain activity center

Staff members at the Mountain Activity Center, located on the first floor of the Selkirk Lodge, offer a variety of adventures and day-out suggestions to help round out a vacation at Schweitzer. Guests may opt for a moonlit snowshoe hike or an evening in Sandpoint. The center staff also operates Hermit’s Hollow Snowtubing and Schweitzer’s zip line, located a short walk from the village. The Mountain Activity Center makes it easy to organize a day on or off the mountain. (208-255-3081)


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Schweitzer is located at 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. in Sandpoint, Idaho. The resort is 45 miles from Coeur d’Alene/I-90 and two hours from Spokane International Airport. The nearest business district is 11 miles away in the city of Sandpoint and can be reached via the SPOT bus connection.

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The Stomping Grounds Terrain Park offers an extensive variety of some of the most unique custom park features around. Rails, boxes and jumps keep the experts entertained while beginners build skills in the Terrain Garden on smaller rails and jumps. The Southside Terrain Park features hiker-friendly, unintimidating, medium-sized features. It’s Schweitzer’s newest park, replacing the Starfish Park, and is located on Crystal Run.

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stats

calenda r December 2013 14 Founders Day Celebrate Schweitzer’s 50th anniversary with $19.63 lift tickets and an apres party in Taps where the Time Capsule will be opened!

24 Santa Skis at Schweitzer Santa skis on the hill and passes out treats from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. with Mrs. Claus. At 2 p.m. they lead a balloon parade from the top of the Basin Express chair down to the village. Follow him into the Selkirk Lodge for cookies and to deliver your last-minute wishes from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m.

31 New Year’s Eve Parties Parties for all ages including the rockin’ concert in Taps, the tubing party and the ever-popular “tween” party for the kids. These parties sell out – be sure to purchase your tickets early! Tickets available at The Activity Center starting Dec. 1.

January 2014 2-5 SARS Northwest Cup Race 10-31 Junior Race Series on NASTAR Local race series on Friday nights in January.

11 Winter Trails Day Learn to cross-country and skate ski.

19 Northern Lights at Schweitzer Torchlight Parade and Fireworks. Party follows in Taps.

21-26 Western Regional Speed Series (SARS) on Zip Down 25-26 USASA Races

2013-2014

1-2 College Daze 8-9 Chad Engstrom YSL Race 14-23 Sandpoint Winter Carnival Family-friendly events to celebrate winter in Sandpoint including Taste of Sandpoint, Skijoring, K-9 Keg Pull, Rail Jam and more.

15-17 Presidents Weekend Celebration 20-23 Masters Ski Race 22 Winter Carnival Finale 22 Final Starlight Party Our annual themed party is a “not to be missed” event!

March 2014 21-22 24 Hours of Schweitzer 24-hour skiathon raises funds for cystinosis research.

29 Winterfest Join us to taste a variety of beers at our snow bar!

April 2014 5-6 Tropical Daze Bring out your Hawaiian shirt for some fun in the sun! Pond skimming and lots of family activities daily, plus the ever-popular Downhill Dummy Derby Sunday.

Summer 2014 events June 29 Summer Celebration July 19 Mountain Music Festival

Slopestyle and alpine events.

August 3 Huckleberry Festival

31 Toyota Ski Free Day

August 30-September 1 Fall Fest

February 2014 7-28 Starlight Racing

All dates and information subject to change. For more events and up-to-date information, visit www.Schweitzer.com or call the Mountain Activity Center at 208-255-3081.

A perennial favorite for locals, Friday night races followed by 21-and-over parties in Taps.

MOUNTAIN TERRAIN Skiable Terrain: 2,900 acres Tree Skiing: more than 1,200 acres Summit Elevation: 6,400 feet Village Elevation: 4,700 feet Lowest Elevation: 4,000 feet Vertical Drop: 2,400 feet LIFTS Schweitzer features nine lifts with an uphill capacity of 12,500 people per hour. Lift Type Lakeview Triple Basin Express Quad Great Escape Quad Sunnyside Double Stella 6-Pack Snow Ghost Double Musical Chairs Double Idyle Our T-bar Musical Carpet Carpet

Rise 710 feet 1,063 feet 1,678 feet 1,280 feet 1,550 feet 1,906 feet 592 feet 60 feet 100 feet

Time 4.5 minutes 4 minutes 5 minutes 8 minutes 5.5 minutes 13 minutes 6 minutes 4 minutes 4 minutes

TRAILS Alpine Runs: 92 designated runs Longest Run: 2.1 miles (Little Blue Ridge Run) Open Bowls: 2 (Schweitzer and Outback) Nordic: 32 kilometers Ability-level breakdown Beginner: 10 percent Intermediate: 40 percent Advanced: 35 percent Expert: 15 percent HOURS 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Twilight skiing: Fridays, Saturdays and holidays from Dec. 26 to March 1 from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.

2013 • 2014

| schweitzer magazine

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summer

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summer

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schweitzer magazine | 2013 • 2014

inter guests to Schweitzer may have a difficult time imagining a summer world of hiking, biking, wildflowers and waterfalls beneath all that snow, yet that’s exactly what the resort offers up when the seasons change. From late June through Labor Day, the mountain features unique thrills, from lift-serviced mountain biking and downhilling to scenic chairlift rides, zip line, live music, festivals and much more. Take the Great Escape quad chairlift to the top for jaw-dropping views of Lake Pend Oreille and the rugged Selkirk and Cabinet mountains. From the top, a variety of mountain biking trails are available, including the signature Beargrass Route. For hiking, a scenic summit loop won’t disappoint, or enjoy the nature trail back to the village. A mountaintop disc golf course and summit activity center are also available, as is horseback trail riding through Mountain Horse Adventures, located on-site. Recent additions include mining for gems at the Cranky Jennings Mining Company sluice box, aerial thrills on the 750-foot zip line, and the popular “Air Jumper” bungee trampoline. Not to be missed is huckleberry picking, with August providing prime picking opportunities. This tasty and uniquely Northwest fruit is a celebrated part of the local culture. In fact, Schweitzer’s own Huckleberry Festival in early August pays homage to the berry and should be part of any summer itinerary. Other summer festivals of note are the Mountain Music Festival in July and Fall Fest over Labor Day weekend – featuring more than 50 Northwest microbrews and wines available for tasting. In the village, the Chimney Rock Grill serves up tasty options for lunch or dinner, either indoors or out. Other activities include shopping at The Source and the Artists’ Studio, enjoying a selection of fine wines and provisions at Gourmandie, or stocking up on sundries and spirits at the new Market at Schweitzer. Schweitzer’s lodging options position guests in the heart of the action and within close proximity to town and the lake. Several popular package options are available, including the value-oriented, third-night-free program, plus cabin rentals at Bottle Bay Resort and Marina. Speaking of Sandpoint, summer is high season for this gem of northern Idaho. A wide range of events, including the highly anticipated Festival at Sandpoint outdoor music series, delights young and old alike. Summers in Sandpoint revolve around the lake, with City Beach a central gateway to water adventures. Summer is also high time for group events at Schweitzer. Each year, the mountain successfully plays host to mountaintop weddings, casual family reunions and company outings. The group sales team is ready to help make any group function a reality with a call or visit to their office in the White Pine Lodge; phone 208-263-9555 ext. 2820.


slope side ownership MOUNTAIN REAL ESTATE LLC

Bring your family, your friends, your dreams MountainSide at Schweitzer is a collection of contemporary mountain homes adjacent to the Schweitzer Village. With the ski and summer resort in your backyard, and the expansive view of Lake Pend Oreille and the Selle Valley in your front yard, the possibilities are endless any time of year. The homes are fully furnished with access to a pool, hot tub and more.

3 bedroom 3 1/2 bath Call for details

Discovery Center is located in the Schweitzer Village 208.255.7300 • www.schweitzerrealestate.com

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Schweitzer Magazine 2013-2014  

Lifestyle and visitor magazine for Schweitzer Mountain Resort

Schweitzer Magazine 2013-2014  

Lifestyle and visitor magazine for Schweitzer Mountain Resort