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HIKING THE SELKIRK CREST A 10-day journey over 16 peaks

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A CAROUSEL OF SMILES Local artists restore vintage ride

WOMEN OF CHANGE Five who make a difference

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HIKING THE SELKIRK CREST A 10-day journey over 16 peaks

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A CAROUSEL OF SMILES Local artists restore vintage ride

WOMEN OF CHANGE Five who make a difference

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HIKING THE SELKIRK CREST A 10-day journey over 16 peaks

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A CAROUSEL OF SMILES Local artists restore vintage ride

WOMEN OF CHANGE Five who make a difference

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Anytime Info

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www.LakesideEstateAtCapeOfArt.com 235’ of shoreline w/patios & 2 docks On 2.53 AC w/ 30AC common area 12,000SF Home & a beachside pavilion ATI #1538 $6,995,000 Hope, Idaho

For recorded information or to speak to the listing agent, call 208.449.0071 and use the 4-digit property code.

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www.MeadowviewRanchAtPackRiver.com ATI #1431 $2,295,000 Sandpoint, Idaho

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www.ScenicBottleBayHome.com ATI #1338 $1,595,000 Sagle, Idaho

www.RanchAtHiddenValley.com ATI #1374 $1,545,000 Sandpoint, Idaho

www.WarrenIslandShore.com ATI #1577 $1,195,000 Hope, Idaho

www.GarfieldBayCabin.com ATI #1471 $525,000 Sagle, Idaho

www.HolidayShoresMarinaCondo.com ATI #1588 $368,900 Hope, Idaho

www.KootenaiBayWaterfront.com ATI #1487 $759,000 Sandpoint, Idaho

www.28AcresGypsyBayRd.com ATI #1443 $699,000 Sagle, Idaho

www.WestshoreWayLots.com ATI #1156 $349,000 Laclede, Idaho

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C ommitted to providing a luxury experience. Dedicated to achieving results!

Cindy Bond, Associate Broker, Owner, GRI, CRS www.CindyBond.com cindy.bond@sothebysrealty.com 208.255.8360

© MMVII Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Claude Monet’s “Marine View With a Sunset,” used with permission. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated, Except Offices Owned And Operated By NRT Incorporated. Sandpoint office: 208-263-5101, 200 Main Street, Sandpoint, ID 83864.


www.TSSIR.com

106 JaCLin Way, Sandpoint MLS # 201900116 $14,350,000 iconic Lpo estate sits on 2+ acres and commands 635 feet of private shoreline. includes dock and boathouse plus separate guest home.

240 MooSeWood, SaGLe MLS # tbd $970,000

Magnificent home tucked onto 8.8 private acres above Sourdough point boasts a 270 degree view of the lake and mountains beyond. Sourdough boatslip and amenities included.

38 CattaiL Lane, prieSt river MLS # 201900112 $569,000 Serene retreat with 300+ front feet of pend oreille river shoreline. perfect place for those summer vacation memories to be made.

817 kanikSu SHoreS, Sandpoint MLS # 201900136 $1,975,000 Stunning timberframe home with 100 feet of private waterfront in kaniksu Shores neighborhood with professional rock and landscape.

702 Sandpoint avenue #7110, Sandpoint MLS # 20190121 $535,000 elegant 3 bedroom/2 bathroom first floor residence at the Seasons. includes all of the Seasons’ extensive amenites.

neW

neW to tHe Market! incredible treed building lot with 170 feet of bottle bay shoreline. build the home you have always dreamed of and live your best life on the lake!

private 5 bedroom stunner fronts Fry Creek with dock and boatlift. Gracious timberframe home was built for entertaining with pool, casita and rec room with second kitchen.

301 iberian Way #250, Sandpoint MLS # 20190642 $405,000 Freshly renovated 2nd floor residence at Condo del Sol is a beauty with sleek finishes contrasting well with warm wood accents.

G N I PEND

G N I PEND 73 FaWn drive, SaGLe MLS # 20190837 $549,950

33 birCH bankS road, SaGLe MLS # tbd $1,590,000

nna Geri Court, Sandpoint MLS # 20183027 $534,000

Located in the northshore neighborhood, this is one of the few vacant parcels within the city limits of Sandpoint. it boasts 100 front feet of private pend oreille river shoreline and huge views.

1218 n diviSion avenue, Sandpoint MLS # 20190844 $1,100,000

two story commercial office building is attractive with timberframe accents and ample windows for abundant natural light. paved parking for customers and employees, fully ada compliant and strong lease history.

Lot 6 teaL Lane, SaGLe MLS # 20183618 $352,000

Lot 24 teaL Lane, SaGLe MLS # 20190751 $87,500

This .44 acre waterfront lot is in the community of Swan Shores and sits on 100 feet of private shoreline along the pristine pend oreille river.

1309 ponderoSa drive, Sandpoint MLS # 20190845 $800,000

Commercial office building is located in an area of mixed use with easy access off division ave near baldy Mountain rd. Floor to ceiling windows allow natural light and 2nd story balcony adds architectural interest as well as function. Strong lease history.

Dedicated to the extraordinary the exceptional and the unique.

.6 acre secondary waterfront lot is located in the heart of the quaint neighborhood of Swan Shores. all residents have access to a community waterfront area that includes a boat ramp and picnic area.

815 W Lake Street, Sandpoint MLS # 201900029 $250,000 perfect building lot is located in South Sandpoint and is zoned for commercial use. it fronts Lake and olive with exposure to Hwy 2 as well.

Chris Chambers www.ExtraordinaryIdaho.com 208-290-2500 chris.chambers@sothebysrealty.com 200 Main, Sandpoint, Idaho

© MMVII Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. “Maine Bay Bar Harbor Area” by John Newcomb used with permission. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated, Except Offices Owned And Operated By NRT Incorporated. Sandpoint office: 208-263-5101, 200 Main Street, Sandpoint, ID 83864.

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Sandpoint's Finest LUXURY VACATION HOME RENTALS

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Stay in the *best* luxury vacation home rentals in the Sandpoint area. From exceptional waterfront ‘family reunion’ retreats, Seasons at Sandpoint condos, Dover Bay homes or Schweitzer. Each home is fully appointed and comes with 24/7 concierge service. 24’ Cobalt boat, kayaks and stand up paddle boards now available for rent (free delivery & pickup for most homes). At a Daugherty Management home, you’ll create memories that will last a lifetime!

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Big enough to serve Small enough to care Charlie Parrish 208-290-1501

Becky Freeland 208-290-5628

Curt Hagan 208-290-7833

Charesse Moore 208-255-6060

Courtney Nova 208-290-7264

Ron Nova 208-304-2007

Kathy Robinson 208-255-9690

Maddie Gill 208-597-3955

John Dibble 208-290-1101

Danny Strauss 208-290-2946

Brian Jacobs 208-610-3188

Chelsea Nova 208-304-8979

Kris Kingsland 208-290-1509

Luke Webster 208-255-8597

www.Evergreen-Realty.com // www.SchweitzerMountain.com 321 North First Avenue, Sandpoint ID Toll Free 800.829.6370 // Office 208.263.6370 // Fax 208.263.3959 Evergreen Realty is pleased to sponsor our local Habitat for Humanity

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features 94 Lake Pend Oreille 104 it’s a fishy place

Locals share some favorite spots A guide to fishing LPO

108

Lake pend oreille idaho club A lake protector

109 don’t wake the lake Learn to Ride the Core

110 111

38

45 49

on 90

PHOTO BY WOODS WHEATCROFT

er 7

51 61 67 69 75 80 91

a party going on

Love is growing for pontoon boats

National sailing race

Sandpoint Sailing Association hosts Thistle Regatta

hiking along the selkirk crest

Adventurer bags 16 peaks, and 29,000 vertical feet

Crawdads goes big screen Local’s debut novel optioned for film

A traveling time machine

Feelin’ Groovy Bus Tours to explore Sandpoint and beyond

taking public art to the limit

Carousel project becomes huge public art project

seven decades of growth

Bonner General celebrates a milestone

mattox farm productions Area music scene continues to grow

idaho mythweaver comes full circle Thirty years of preserving native voices

helanders pass the racket SWAC becomes a YMCA

the core of a community Five women who are making a mark

CHAFE150 is Cranking Up the Ride New routes and distances in signature event

Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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conte nts

PHOTO BY FIONA HICKS

departments 12

almanac

30

calendar

34

interview

57

pictured in history

102

Lake map

112

photo essay

168

sandpoint of view

Who, what, where, when and why in Sandpoint Annual and upcoming events Space Artist Lucy West

Sandpoint’s City Beach

It’s a really big lake to experience Our mighty and magnificent lake The crossing

146 REAL ESTATE 30

104

116

lake luxe

125

keeping sagle rural

129

first time homebuyers

133

parking changes spur development

135

the bridge is full

136

marketwatch

139

natives and newcomers

A quartet of homes selling in the millions Community shapes the future of Sagle Tips and tricks to make your dream come true City loosens parking requirements for businesses

New owners, businesses bring life to Cedar St. Bridge

Introductions to the old and new in Sandpoint

DINING GUIDE 150

146

in search of the craft cocktail

150

more than a store

155

there’s a new view

156

a comfortable pub

162

sandpoint area dining guide

Old favorites with a new twist

The surprises inside our local ‘country’ stores View Cafe rebuilds after fire Eichardt’s hits the quarter century mark Dining around Sandpoint

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE S U M M E R 201 9, VOL. 29, NO. 2

ON THE COVER

116 8

DAWN ON THE LAKE. A majestic sunrise from the lake shore at Sam Owen. Ahem... note the firepan, which protects the lake’s water. By Doug Marshall.

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SANDPOINT MAGAZINE | SUMMER 2019

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Truly

Exceptional Real Estate Services

Simplify your life. Going Above & Beyond is our

Standard. 208.265.7362

113 N First Avenue, Sandpoint, ID 83864

TODD BRADSHAW (208) 304-1000 JEREMY DUNN (208) 610-5501

TOBY ATENCIO (316) 305-5599

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PHOTO BY SANDY BESSLER

LANDON ENJOYS TOP-OF-THE-WORLD VIEWS PHOTOOTIS BY FIONA HICKS

conte nts

THE PUBLISHER, SAILING ON A BROAD REACH, HEADED TO THE MONARCHS.

Publisher’s note

When I got my first glimpse of our gorgeous, fold-out cover photo by Doug Marshall, my immediate reaction was: “Wow.” What a classic Lake Pend Oreille image—cozy tent, still water of the massive lake, the glow of sunrise on the mountains, setting moon, paddleboarders (with dog on board). Anyone out there want to put themselves in that scene? This summer an awful lot of us will do just that, or some version of that. With our mountains, rivers, forests and wildlife, we’re blessed with many natural assets here, but big, beautiful Lake Pend Oreille is surely the one that makes Sandpoint unique. In that vein, we present this issue of Sandpoint Magazine, with a pile of stories about our lake and the favorite ways and places locals like to swim, paddle, lounge, and recreate around it. We hope it helps you discover new things about our lake. Disclaimer as to an ulterior motive: we hope it also inspires a deep affection to ensure big, beautiful Lake Pend Oreille stays healthy and clean. Of course, there’s a lot more going on this summer than just an ol’ lake. From the hiking and biking in our mountains to the events and festivals in town, Sandpoint summers are simply splendid. Why, some of us even have a wedding to ride herd on. By all means, get out there and get your own piece of the splendor.

contributors When Carrie Scozzaro interviewed artist Lucy West “(Looking to the Heavens,” p. 34) it wasn’t their first meeting—they had both exhibited at POAC. A visual artist and writer, Carrie focuses her writing on art, education, culture, travel and food. A former high school art teacher, she currently teaches art for North Idaho College, including on the Sandpoint campus.

Cameron Rasmusson is a Sandpoint-

based journalist covering Idaho politics, culture, and current events. A mainstay at the Sandpoint Reader, he freelances for a variety of local and state publications. He is interested in covering a variety of topics although, admittedly, not all of them are as fun as “In Search of the Craft Cocktail” (p. 146).

Fiona Hicks is a world-travelled homeschooling mom and photographer whose love of wild places and of family guide her lens. Her quest in photography is to combine the two by capturing the essence of people engaging each other in nature... as she does in the photo opening “Local Favorites of Lake Pend Oreille” (p. 94-95).

Chris Bessler

Publisher Chris Bessler C.O.O. Jeff Lagges Editor Trish Gannon Assistant Editor Beth Hawkins Advertising Director Clint Nicholson Advertising Sales Miriam Robinson Art Director Pamela Morrow Design Team Laura Wahl, Robin Levy, Jackie Palmer and Ben Garrison Social Media Lisa Howard Office Manager Susan Otis C.T.O. Michael Russ Distribution: PSNI Panhandle Special Needs Inc. CONTRIBUTORS: Ralph Bartholdt, Nate Bessler, Brent

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Binnall, Jillene Binnall-Straub, Bonner County History

Sandpoint Magazine is published twice yearly,

Museum, Toni Britton, Foster Cline, Pete Comstock,

in May and November, by

Rich Cower, Cassandra Cridland, Susan Drinkard,

Keokee Co. Publishing, Inc.

Susan Drumheller, Jason Duchow, Mark Edmundson,

405 Church St., Sandpoint, ID 83864

Ben Garrison, Dann Hall, Sherri Hatley, Fiona Hicks,

Phone: 208-263-3573 Email: inbox@keokee.com

Leland Howard, Cate Huisman, Clay Hutchison, Claire

©2019 by Keokee Co. Publishing Inc. All rights

Keener, David Keyes, Lyndsie Kiebert, Linda Lantzy, Jennifer Lamont Leo, Rich Lindsey, Marianne Love, Jerry Luther, Doug Marshall, Kirk Miller, Mike Moore, Ben Olson, Amy Peterson, Tamara Porath, Rick Price, Tom Puckett, Patti Ragone, Cameron Rasmusson, Terry Sasser, Selkirk Fire & Rescue, Bill Schaudt, Carrie Scozzaro, Bill Shafer, Josh Smith, Marie-Dominique Verdier, Corey Vogel, Mark Vogt, Dyno Wahl, Woods

reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Subscriptions: $12 per year, payable in advance. Send address changes to the address above. Visit our web magazine published at www. SandpointMagazine.com. Printed in USA by Century Publishing, Post Falls, Idaho.

Wheatcroft, Paula Jensen Wilkinson, Wes Yandt.

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE | SUMMER 2019

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almanac

Twenty-Five YEARS OF

CHALLENGE

THE LONG BRIDGE SWIM: HAPPY, FUN, AND OH, SO INSPIRATIONAL! by Trish Gannon

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ear zero of the Long Bridge Swim, in 1995, one lone swimmer set out from the south end of the Long Bridge, determined to swim all the way to Dog Beach because he “thought it would be a good idea” to do so. Friends came to cheer him along the way and some mentioned that if they’d known sooner he was going to do it, they would have joined him. That is how, in Sandpoint, an event is born and now the Long Bridge Swim is celebrating its 25th anniversary. That lone swimmer was local therapist Eric Ridgway, whose infectious enthusiasm and positivity kicked off an event that’s now lasted two-and-a-half decades. “It’s amazing how the community got behind this from the first,” he said. “I was really excited that first year of the event (1996), but I had no idea what to expect. We had almost 70 people

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L O N G B R I DAGLEM S IM AW N AC

ABOVE: THE LONG BRIDGE SWIM IS A TREAT FOR SWIMMERS AND SPECTATORS. COURTESY PHOTO BELOW(TOP): JIM ZUBERBUHLER AND ERIC RIDGWAY AT THE EVENT AWARDS IN 2016. PHOTO BY ROB DAVIS. PHOTO BELOW(BOTTOM) FUNDS FROM THE LONG BRIDGE SWIM SUPPORT LESSONS FOR AREA YOUTH—LIKE THIS ENTHUSIASTIC GROUP.

register, which exceeded my wildest dreams.” The event now draws over 700 swimmers, plus an additional 300 volunteers, each year. The Long Bridge Swim is a 1.76 mile, open water swim that spans the length of the Long Bridge leading into town. Swimmers start in the water at the south end of the bridge, and finish up on Dog Beach. “There are endurance swims all over the place,” said Ridgway, “but ours is unique in the world as the best spectator swim: people can watch their favorite swimmer almost the whole way.” The Swim, which now hosts participants from all over the country (and even from other countries), attracts people of all ages who want to test their mettle on the water. The youngest swimmer to ever complete the race, at age 5, was Seal Gosnell, of Portland, Oregon. She completed the swim in 2007 in 1 hour, 50 minutes, and 23 seconds. If Graham Johnson returns to swim this year, at age 88 he will again be the oldest swimmer to ever compete. Johnson, of course, is an old hand at swim events: “Graham was the South African junior [1946 and ‘47] and senior [‘48, ‘49, and ‘50] national champion swimmer and represented South Africa at the 1952 Helsinki Olympic Games,” said Jim Zuberbuhler, race director and board chair for the event since 2012. “After retiring from swimming for 20 years, he became a master swimmer at age 41 and has been a world champion for the past 47 years, holding dozens of records along the way.” Zuberbuhler, while not a ‘founding’ swimmer, is now looking at his 19th year as a participant in the event. “I didn’t know if I could do it my first year (2001),” he said. A financial advisor at D.A. Davidson in Sandpoint, Zuberbuhler was fated to become a part of the Long Bridge Swim. His first day in Sandpoint he hiked the Mineral Point trail and met Eric Ridgway mid way. “He told me all about this swim and how I needed to do it,” said Zuberbuhler. The second person he met in town was swim coach Mike Brosnahan. “The universe was telling me something,” he said. In 25 years, the Long Bridge Swim hasn’t just grown into a national event; it has become a major part of water safety for children in Bonner County. Ten years ago, leveraging the success of the Swim by attracting generous local business sponsors, the group launched a swimming initiative, with the mission of having no child get past third grade in Bonner County without learning how to swim. They now serve over 1,000 children each year, including students from the local public and private schools, along with home-schooled students. “This will be the Swim’s greatest legacy,” said Zuberbuhler. “I am proud to be a part of this.” His children, Max and Sierra, will be joining him for this year’s event. With almost 2 miles of often choppy water, this event is not just about the swimming; it’s also about the hundreds of volunteers who support the swimmers, and become a part of this epic experience. “(The Long Bridge Swim) shows us that humans coming together can accomplish so much more than we can as individuals. It’s about having fun; being happy; challenging ourselves; and doing things we didn’t think we could do,” said Ridgway. “Professional participants have told me this is the most fun they’ve ever had on a swim.” Learn more at www.longbridgeswim.org. Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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FURNITURE

Custom Design Available

GALLERY

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Over 100 Local Artisans

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D AV I S G R O C E R Y

ABOVE: THE DAVIS FAMILY AT THE NEW STORE. RIGHT: HELENA DAVIS AND HER COUSIN, ASHLYN MATTHEWS SAMPLE THE OFFERINGS.

B E E R, BAS ICS & B LU E TO NGU ES Davis Grocery offers Hope community convenience, good prices, and a local gathering spot by Cameron Rasmusson

I

t was healing that brought Ross and Jamie Davis to Hope, but somewhere along the way they helped tie a community together. They originally moved to this lakefront community so Jamie could recover from late-stage Lyme disease away from the chaos of Seattle. “I just felt called to the land,” Jamie said. “Looking out onto the lake, it just felt so healing and therapeutic.” But when opportunity came knocking, Ross’s 15 years of grocery experience led the Davis family to undertake their life’s next challenge: opening a rural grocery store. It just so happened the former Hope Marketplace offered the perfect venue for the project. Set along the Lake Pend Oreille shoreline between Clark Fork and Sandpoint, Hope’s resorts, marinas, and restaurants make recreation a foundation of its economy. For those who live there, however, the traveling distance to basic amenities is a daily aggravation—especially when winter weather makes driving dangerous. Thanks to Davis Grocery, residents have one less worry when the snow flies. “At least a couple times a day I hear a customer say, “I am so glad

you’re here,” especially when the roads are terrible,” said Ross. While gas stations offer up basic necessities, only a grocery can negotiate with suppliers to purchase goods at the most affordable rates. Getting suppliers to work with Davis was a challenge, but they have come to the table, allowing those savings to be passed on to customers. Ross remarked that some have been hesitant to visit the store, fearing prices will be too high. But, he said, “I’m keeping my prices as close to town prices as I can get. I have similar prices to [most items at Sandpoint grocery stores], and some stuff I’m actually better than they are.” The grocery also supports Hope’s strong community identity. Beyond the random bump-ins with friends and neighbors, residents enjoy holiday events, wine clubs, live music, and more. Located at 620 Wellington Pl., next to the Hope post office, Davis Grocery is open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., seven days a week. In addition to grocery staples, the store offers beer, wine, and fresh produce, along with a cafe and coffee shop. Learn more about our area’s unique groceries on p. 151. Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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almanac

B G H E M E R G E N C Y TA L LY B OA R D A visual reminder you’re not the only one story and photo by David Keyes

I

BONNER GENERAL EMERGENCY ROOM’S CREATIVE TALLY BOARD OF ACCIDENTS FROM 2018 SHOWS INSECTS ARE A BIG SUMMERTIME THREAT.

n 2004, two nurses decided to lighten up the mood for rightfully nervous emergency department visitors and produced an artistic way to tally the many maladies that visitors bring to the emergency room. Bat bites? Check. Fireworks accidents? Check. Bee stings, fish hooks? Lots of checks and so much more. The whimsical artwork serves a couple of purposes, said Marian Martin, the emergency department’s nurse manager. “Most people count up how many people have been injured doing the same thing,” she said. “They are relieved they aren’t the only one.” She added that most of those visiting the emergency department are “anxious about what will happen, but the board breaks the ice and can get patients talking and sometimes laughing about their story.”

Peace of mind starts with a plan. Having a solid plan in place protects your home and assets for you, your children, and grandchildren. We can help navigate the many options available and ensure that you end up with a plan that’s right for you. ESTATE & ASSET PRESERVATION PLANNING • LONG TERM CARE • ELDER LAW SANDPOINT OFFICE 229 Pine Street, Sandpoint ID, 83864 • (208) 263-3585 16

D E N I S E S T E WA R T

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SANDPOINT MAGAZINE | SUMMER 2019

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A L M A N AC

R E S E T T I N G T H E S TAG E Montana Shakespeare in the Parks hopes “All’s Well that Ends Well” with relocation to Memorial Field by Carrie Scozzaro

“F

eather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health!” proclaimed Romeo in one of Shakespeare’s most well-known plays, “Romeo and Juliet.” The ghost of Shakespeare’s famous, starcrossed lover hovered in the smoke during last summer’s Montana Shakespeare in the Parks’ rendition of “Othello,” prompting sponsor Christine Holbert of Lost Horse Press to bump this summer’s performance of “Henry IV, Part I” to July 27. That enabled relocating the event to Memorial Field from the Bonner County Fairgrounds, where it had been staged since 2015. “(Memorial Field) is more expensive than the Fairgrounds, and there are other logistics that will need to be addressed, but ultimately, the local audience, the actors, and out-of-town folks who attend the performances will be delighted with the setting and the scenery,” she said.

THE 2018 SHAKESPEARE IN THE PARKS PRODUCTION, WITH A SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCE, WAS THE LAST TO BE HELD AT THE BONNER COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS. COURTESY PHOTOS.

www.AlpineShopSandpoint.com TWO LOCATIONS

Schweitzer Mountain in the Village 208.255.1660

213 Church St Downtown Sandpoint 208.263.5157

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almanac

Free Estimates ISA Certified Master Arborist 208.610.4858 www.skywalkertreecare.com

A P L AC E FO R P U PS Ponderay Dog Park the “ultimate collaboration” by Lyndsie Kiebert

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BY WYNDHAM

www.LQ.com 800-531-5900 Reservations 208-263-9581 415 Cedar Street • Sandpoint, ID 83864

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here is nothing like the love North Idahoans have for their dogs. Sure, skiing and craft beer are a close second, but the chance to spend time with a furry best friend in the great outdoors we call home is hands-down the ideal pastime for many in this neck of the woods. But where to go? After countless donations and hours of thoughtful work, the Ponderay Dog Park, on Kootenai Cut-Off Road, is slated to open in June. The off-leash park, located on two acres next to the Panhandle Animal Shelter, may be the ultimate collaboration between businesses reaching far beyond Bonner County—a collaboration spearheaded by volunteer Steve Nybank, the project manager. A retired airline pilot, he said he traveled to various cities to observe interactions between people and their dogs to get ideas for the perfect North Idaho dog park design. “I love dogs. I love people—and people love getting together at dog parks and chatting about dogs,” Nybank said. “It just kind of expanded from there.” This ADA-compliant dog park will feature separate areas for small and large dogs, an agility course, a covered entryway, and a gazebo. Materials used to build the space include a quarter mile of fence, 50 truckloads of rock and pea gravel, and countless personal touches, from antique fire hydrants to metal silhouettes of dogs and people. Created by Sandpoint High School’s welding class, they will be mounted on the perimeter fence. From the garbage cans to the tree species, Nybank has thought of every last detail, and businesses and other private citizens have stepped up to make it happen financially.

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“It’s so rewarding to see so many business owners, already operating complex businesses, take time from their demanding schedules to support our community,” Nybank said, going on to describe the $200,000 project as a “total team effort.” Panhandle Animal Shelter Executive Director Mandy Evans said the park is just as beneficial for local dogs as it is for their humans, as it will provide a space to connect dog-lover to dog-lover. “As a dog-loving community, the park offers all residents an accessible opportunity to get outside with their dog,” Evans said. “It’s been directly due to our community and their support for the project.” To stay up to date on the Ponderay Dog Park, visit www.pasidaho.org or find Panhandle Animal Shelter on Facebook.

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A JOURNEY OF HEALING Holocaust survivor pens book by Beth Hawkins

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MARY FRIEDMANN BERGES REVIEWS COPIES OF HER NEW BOOK, NOW AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE. STAFF PHOTO.

ary Friedmann Berges is a perfect example of joyful energy at 83 years young. She drives to Canada every Tuesday to play bridge, hosts weddings and events on her Bonners Ferry property overlooking the Kootenai Valley, and greets everyone who crosses her path with a friendly hello. But it took nearly a lifetime of overcoming severe anxiety and sadness to get to this happy place. And the vibrant senior is now sharing her story with the world in her new memoir, “Finding the Light Within: My Journey of Healing After the Holocaust.” Berges’ story began in Belgium, where she was born in 1935. She recalls an early childhood filled with love and laughter in a Jewish family that included her older brother, mother, and father. Then, during World War II, millions of people were sent to concentration camps and killed as part of a German policy to eradicate all European Jews. Thousands of Jewish children survived the carnage only because they were hidden by their parents with friends and relatives, or in Catholic orphanages. While her parents were lost in the Holocaust, Berges and her brother were two children who survived. In the decades to come, Berges would be haunted by feelings she did not understand: abandonment, along with self-perceived inadequacies and depression. But with perseverance and the aid of those around her, she discovered a place where she belonged. Working on her book hasn’t been easy, as it has brought back many painful memories from her past. But Berges believes her ability to find happiness and joy, and accept the love of family once again, is a lesson of how every person can change and find fulfillment at any age. “Despite the relentless turmoil within us, it is possible to overcome challenges,” she said. “Finding the Light Within” was published in April 2019, and is available in paperback at local bookstores in Sandpoint and Bonners Ferry, and online at www.keokeebooks.com.

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A AC AL LM M A N AC

T H E I R S TO K E E P National literacy program in Sandpoint by Carrie Scozzaro

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choolchildren are surrounded by books, yet so many cannot afford to have any of their own. This irony was not lost on Book Trust founder Adrienne Schatz, whose experiences seeing others go without books led to her creating what would become a national literacy organization dedicated to providing books to the very youngest readers. A similar philanthropic spirit moved part-time Sandpoint resident Karen Quill to bring that national program— Book Trust—to Sandpoint after seeing its effects in Maui, where Quill also lives and served on the local Book Trust advisory board for six years. “In 2014, I started The Village Green Project, an Idaho nonprofit, for the purpose of bringing the Book Trust program to the Lake Pend Oreille School District,” said Quill. Funded in part by Sandpoint Rotary, Community Assistance League, Equinox, Community Strategies, Selkirk Realtors, Baxter’s, 41 South, Trinity, and assorted grants, Village Green has provided over 20,000 books per year to 1,047 LPOSD kindergarten through third graders, all of whom get to keep their books. “It’s not just about helping students buy books,” said Quill. “The program has components that make reading and owning books something to celebrate.” The program involves 47 LPOSD teachers at all seven elementary schools, including Hope Elementary, where Sherri Hatley is principal. Hatley said the program allows kids to branch out to books the school might not have, and helps reluctant readers. “It’s not even just that it’s their book; they got to choose it.” Book Trust is a valued supplement to other district programs that encourage early and proficient readers. “Reading underpins all learning,” Hatley said. “We’ve seen that good readers are better students; it even lowers discipline problems.” And it’s fun. “The excitement is palpable,” Hatley said, “the day the book orders arrive.” Learn more on Facebook at VillageGreenProject or at www.booktrust.org.

HOPE ELEMENTARY STUDENTS CELEBRATING BOOK ARRIVAL DAY. PHOTO BY SHERRI HATLEY

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SAN D PO I NT

Rising

Progress made on historic buildings claimed in downtown fire by Ben Olson

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he smell of smoke lingered in the air months after a fire gutted three of Sandpoint’s historic downtown buildings. The fire, which affected seven businesses and claimed an estimated $4 million in damages, broke out in the wee hours of February 11, 2019. Selkirk Fire Chief Ron Stocking remembers his pager going off around 1:15 a.m. “It was 11 degrees and snowing,” he said. “Our hose lines froze very quickly. Using water, with spray going everywhere, compounds the nastiness of those conditions.” More than 40 firefighters responded to the blaze, some from as far away as Kootenai County. “Some of our firefighters had a half inch of ice covering their helmets because of the fire hose spray,” Stocking said. “It was cold and miserable.” With sub-freezing conditions, all the water that was pumped onto the flames froze in a solid mass, creating an obstacle for fire investigators to gain access and determine a cause. Sandpoint City Administrator Jennifer Stapleton said a wall was initially taken down and the sidewalks closed around the fire site for public safety. The sidewalks will remain closed through the summer as crews finish cleaning up the site. “What complicated this whole situation was the basement building walls were supports for the sidewalks,” Stapleton said. It wasn’t until April 11 when fire investigators were finally able to gain access to the buildings. The fire was ruled accidental by Deputy Fire Marshall Jason 22

Blubaum, but the cause is still undetermined. Investigators believe the fire started in the basement between the lower level ceiling and the first level floor—the point of origin being the wall between Chocolate Bear and the former Ol’ Red’s Pub. “As we cleared the debris in the basement … the point of origin became clear when we found the glass door to Ol’ Red’s intact,” Blubaum said. “That became a real game changer.” Contractors immediately began hauling away the debris from the site and city officials pushed the fencing closer to the walls to open up as much of the drive lanes on First Avenue and Bridge Street as possible. To mitigate the unsightliness of the fire, the city of Sandpoint worked with the Bonner County History Museum and the Historic Preservation Commission to showcase historic photos of Sandpoint on vinyl panels which fit into the chainlink fences. “We received a $7,500 grant from the BNSF Railway Foundation to support downtown beautification efforts and maintain economic vitality following the fire,” Stapleton said. “When people are walking by, they’ll get to think about the history rather than the unfortunate incident that happened,” said Museum Curator Heather Upton. Stapleton said the city is working with Avista Utilities to move all overhead power lines behind the building and along the alley underground later this year. “These discussions have been ongoing for months and the building fire became kind of an impetus to get the project started sooner,”

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D O W N TA OL WMNAF RE NIAC

LEFT: THE AFTERMATH. PHOTO BY MARK VOGT. ABOVE: FIRE PERSONNEL RESPOND. PHOTO COURTESY SELKIRK FIRE & RESCUE.

Stapleton said. Design plans for Farmin’s Landing, the strip of land along the shore of Little Sand Creek, have also been revisited, with the city planning to pick up conversations with the building owners and businesses along the block. In 2017, the city received a grant from the LOR Foundation for $25,000 to initiate planning for this area as part of the Downtown Revitalization project. A GoFundMe account was started by Eichardt’s Pub to support the businesses impacted by the fire, raising just short of $5,000, and a second has now been established. The historic buildings have held a storied past in Sandpoint. The building on the corner of First and Bridge was originally built with bricks fired right here in Bonner County in 1913 by William Abbott. It housed the Abbott Saloon, a restaurant called “The Grill,” and the Gem Theater, which seated 400 people and was hailed as “one of the best equipped picture shows in the Northwest.” When the ornate Panida Theater was opened in 1927, the Gem Theater closed down as a regular movie house. It was later used for stage shows, rifle shooting competitions, high school graduation ceremonies, political events, a bowling alley, and a bakery. When the Panida received a new sound system in 1946, the old system was transferred to the Gem, which was remodeled and renamed the Lake Theater, but it was destroyed just two years later by fire. It would be remodeled again several times, most recently in 1970 when Jim and John Pucci opened the Middle Earth Tavern, which later became the Down Under Saloon, Three Glasses, the Tunnel, and finally Ol’ Red’s Pub. “An unfortunate loss like this is also an opportunity to bring new life to a community,” Stapleton said.

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P I C T U R E Purrfect

Toni Britton helps shelter cats find homes with her photography by Lyndsie Kiebert

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oni Britton has a knack for capturing cats—with her camera, that is. Her name is easily recognized by anyone who frequents the Panhandle Animal Shelter Facebook page and sees the cat photos with her watermark. Britton said cats are not exactly willing photography subjects, so it usually takes several attempts to get a photo she finds acceptable, often a close-up of the animal’s face, emphasizing its eyes and unique markings. It’s a process with a priceless payoff. “Sometimes somebody will say, “The reason this cat got adopted was because of your picture,” and that makes me feel good,” she said. “It motivates me.” Her tips for getting a good picture of a cat? “Patience, no flash, more patience, get down on their level, more patience. It always helps to have a helper to get their attention or hold them,” she said. “Plus, more patience.” Britton began volunteering at PAS 10 years ago. “I’ve cleaned, I’ve mopped, I’ve fostered 150 kittens,” Britton said, noting that she removed all the furniture from her guest bedroom and added several cat trees, making it into a foster room. “It’s a lot of work but it’s a lot of fun.”

Supporting Education and Organizations in Bonner County

PAS Executive Director Mandy Evans said there are numerous ways, in addition to volunteering, to make an impact at this no-kill shelter. Donations of money, pet food, or gently used thrift store items are always welcome. Evans said the thrift store accounts for 84 percent of operating revenue. All of it adds up to PAS being able to offer more community assistance. In addition to the intake and care of animals in need, PAS provides a Trap-Neuter-Release program for feral cats, a community dog and cat food bank, and the Home to Home adoption website that allows people to re-home their pets without surrendering them to the shelter (www. home-home.org). “We know when we tell somebody “Yes, we can,” it’s because our community allowed us to do that,” she said. Evans commended Britton for her dedication to the shelter’s cats. “You can’t train empathy and passion, and she has it in spades,” Evans said. The shelter is located at 870 Kootenai Cutoff Rd. in Ponderay, and offers information online at www.pasidaho.org and on Facebook at PASIdaho.

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S H E LT E R P H O T OA GLRM AA PN HAC ER

ABOVE: TONI BRITTON. AT RIGHT: BRITTON’S COMPELLING PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE SHELTER’S CATS OFTEN LEAD TO THEIR ADOPTION.

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A R T I N T O ATLHMEA AN TAC ER

TURNING ARTWORK INTO THEATER

PATTI RAGONE’S ILLUSTRATION OF “TAXI,” WHICH WAS USED IN A CHILDREN’S BOOK.

Teresa Pesce brings the works of local artists to life on stage this summer in Sandpoint by Ben Olson

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hen Teresa Pesce is moved by a piece of art, she doesn’t just appreciate it, she figures out a way to turn that artwork into a whole new medium on stage. Pesce will be showcasing a series of one-act vignette plays at the Little Panida theater in July, each inspired by the artwork of a local artist. “That’s why I call it “Art as Theatre.” (Note that Pesce uses the English spelling in the title.) “It’s not just pure theater,” she said. “I’m taking art and expressing it as theater. … I love the idea of an artist being inspired to write something and a writer being inspired by their art. I like the chain of creativity there.” Pesce chose a handful of local artists’ works for the project, sometimes compulsively writing the scripts that satisfy the marriage of two genres. “I love writing them,” she said. “I can’t stop writing them. They tell a story that I see in the picture.” One such play, “The Bridge,” is inspired by a painting by Connie Scherr.

“I tell the life story of two close friends from early childhood until the death of one, based on them meeting at this bridge between their homes,” Pesce said. Pesce penned three plays based on the work of Patti Ragone, one called “Taxi,” which follows a Jack Kerouac type character who left his wife and child. “I run out of adjectives describing Patti’s brilliance,” Pesce said. Scott Kirby’s painting “Nocturnal Landscape” inspired Pesce’s play, “Elvis Has Left the Building,” following the story of two siblings in their early 50s whose mother has Alzheimer’s, but she’s in a beautiful place in her mind so they discuss whether to visit her or not. Pesce will present six plays in all based on the works of Kirby, Ragone, Scherr, and a painting by Suzanne Jewell, “Three Houses.” Scott Johnson will be producing and directing the series. “Art as Theatre” will be presented in mid- to late-July at the Panida Little Theater. Call (208) 263-9191 for dates, times, and ticket prices. Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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noteworthy don’t love it to death!

In our summer 2018 issue, the story “On the Hunt for Hidden Gems” informed readers about the amateur search for quartz at Solo Creek, and prompted a response from staff at the Idaho Panhandle National Forest. “There is increasing concern that the site is being loved to death,” they warned. “Due to decades of digging, the site is littered with deep holes, hazardous trees, and trash.” Would-be rockhounders are reminded that responsible digging requires no digging under trees; backfilling any holes that have been dug; no creation of tunnels (the roof of the tunnel will eventually fail); and the reminder to pack it in, pack it out. If visitors to the Solo Creek site, located in the Priest Lake Ranger District, cannot obey these simple rules, IPNF may be forced, in the future, to actively manage the site—at a financial cost to taxpayers, and potentially to users. No matter what activities we undertake on our public lands, the prime imperative should always be to leave it better than we found it.

Lantzy Guide Book

Celebrated area photographer Linda Lantzy is debuting the photo book, “Discovering Idaho’s Scenic Drives and Backroad Treasures,” in June. A visual guide for photographers and sightseers, the book features Lantzy’s stunning scenic photography, while describing “places you may have never imagined,” she writes.

Thank You

Highlighted are 48 scenic drives throughout the state of Idaho. Five of those routes are located in Bonner and Boundary counties: one at Priest Lake, two near Bonners Ferry, and two in the Sandpoint area. Learn more at www.idahoscenics.com.

Wooden Boat Show

This summer represents the 17th year in Sandpoint for the Inland Empire Chapter, Antique and Classic Boat Society’s annual show. Participants gather from far and wide to display preserved and restored boats built over the last hundred years as Sandpoint represents the only point-judged show located in the Pacific Northwest. Boats arrive on Friday, July 12, docking at the Sandpoint Marina and along the Sand Creek boardwalk. The official show begins at 10 a.m. Saturday with a parade of boats up Sand Creek and around to City Beach at 3 p.m. This year’s theme is “Over the Top,” celebrating the Inland Empire Chapter’s award for Chapter of the Year among the 53 chapters of the ACBS with over 8,000 members nationwide. This is the first time a chapter has received this award west of the Mississippi. Learn more at www.inlandempireacbs.net.

COMMUNITY OF SANDPOINT, BONNER COUNTY & THE AMAZING VOLUNTEERS

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NOTE OA RN TH Y AW LM AC FROM LEFT: A NEW GUIDEBOOK INCLUDES AREA SIGHTS; SNOW GHOST IS NO MORE. PHOTO BY RICK PRICE; THE AURORA DANCES OVER SANDPOINT. PHOTO BY KIRK MILLER.

Putting the ‘chair’ in charity

In order to make way for two new lifts on the mountains, long-time Schweitzer powder pigs had to say goodbye this year to Snow Ghost, a tried and true friend that John Grollmus, in a December 13 article for the Inlander, called “the grand chariot in the sky.” Now Schweitzer is offering those old, double-seat chairs up for auction, in order to support local charities. Those interested can fill out an application online at www.schweitzer.com and, if selected, will make a ‘chair donation’ of $2,000, writing the check directly to one of a number of preapproved 501(c)(3) charities. In return, they will take home, this summer, one of those chairs that Schweitzer fan Rick Price called, “one of the last of the two seaters ... the end of an art form.”

Bird Museum Leaves Town

The Bird Aviation Museum and Invention Center will relocate to Coeur d’Alene’s Pappy Boyington Field in June. First established on the Bird Ranch in Sagle, the museum featured 21 vintage aircraft, along with classic cars and motorcycles, that Dr. Forrest Bird had collected throughout his life. It also featured an invention center that highlighted the cre-

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ativity that Pamela Bird had fostered in her own career supporting inventors. And not to be missed were many prototypes of the Bird respirator, an invention which made the doctor famous and saved lives throughout the world. (Read about the Birds and their museum at www.sptmag.com/ museum, and more about Dr. Bird at www.sptmag.com/sages) After the Birds’ deaths in 2015 Pam’s daughter (Dr. Bird’s stepdaughter) Rachel Schwann carried on with the museum. The move to Coeur d’Alene, it was announced, will allow the museum to remain open year round, while affording easier access for visitors.

Missed the Aurora? There’s an App for That!

Missed the Aurora again? Never fear, the answer is here! There are now free apps that notify you when the northern lights may be visible at our location. And they’re visible here more frequently than you might realize, normally several times a year. Try My Aurora Forecast or AuroraCast; available for both iPhone and Android. In our area, a Kp index of 5 to 7 heralds a good display. Often the best time for viewing is in the wee hours of the morning; spring and fall give the best calendar views. If your backyard features a good, open view to the north, you’re set. If not, drive around a bit and you’ll likely find a great spot with a northern view (like the ‘secret’ place local photographer Kirk Miller found in the photo above). Do that, and chances are good you can check off “seeing the northern lights” from your bucket list.

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SUMMER 2019

CALENDAR OF EVENTS JUNE Sandpoint Farmers’ Market. Open-air market at Farmin Park is held Wednesday afternoons and Saturday mornings through October. www. SandpointFarmersMarket.com. 1-2 Sandpoint Sojourn with Pancakes. Greasy Fingers Bikes N Repair hosts a one-night bicycle trip as part of Adventure Cycling Association’s #biketravelweekend. Learn more @GreasyFingersBikes on Facebook. 208-255-4496 9 Bay Trail Fun Run. Annual 5k and 10k along Lake Pend Oreille and Sand Creek, sponsored by Friends of Pend d’Oreille Bay Trail and Trinity at City Beach. www.POBTrail.org. 15 CHAFE 150. Sandpoint Rotary’s annual benefit ride takes bicyclists on a 150-mile route through Idaho and Montana; or opt for 100, 80, 40, or 30-mile distances or the new 4-mile family fun ride. See article p. 91. www.CHAFE150.org. 15 Challenge of Champions. Annual bull riding and barrel racing contest at the Bonner County Fairgrounds. www.BonnerCountyFair.com. 21 ArtWalk Opening Receptions. POAC sponsors the annual revolving art exhibit starting with Friday evening opening receptions from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at 20-plus downtown galleries; art exhibits remain on display through Sept. 10. www.ArtinSandpoint.org. 208-263-6139 22 DogFest North Idaho. Dog-gone day of fun. See Hot Picks. 23 7B Sunday. Summer season opener at Schweitzer Mountain Resort with chairlift rides, family activities and wine tasting. www. Schweitzer.com. 208-255-3081 27 Yappy Hour. A tail-waggin’ good time! Greasy Fingers Bikes N Repair, 108 N. Third Ave., hosts Yappy Hour from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Bring your dog and enjoy a Panhandle Animal Shelter benefit with live music, beverages, and fun. 27 Summer Sampler. Greater Sandpoint Chamber of Commerce hosts the annual tasting event at Farmin Park featuring fine cuisine from area restaurants. www.SandpointChamber.org. 208-263-2161

JULY 4 Fourth of July Celebration. Sandpoint Lions Club sponsors parades downtown in the morning; stage performances and a raffle follow at City Beach in the afternoon, plus fireworks at dusk. 208-263-4118 11 Festival at Sandpoint Art Unveiling. Fine art poster for the Festival unveiled at Dover Bay.

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www.FestivalatSandpoint.com. 208-265-4554 12-14 Sandpoint Antique & Classic Boat Show. View wooden boats, enjoy waterthemed activities, contests and more along Sand Creek Boardwalk at the 17th annual event sponsored by Inland Empire Antique & Classic Boat Society. 208-255-1876 13 Beerfest. Sample local brews and enjoy a festive block party, sponsored by the Sandpoint Chamber. www.SandpointChamber.com. 208-263-2161 13 Shangri La at the Lake. Underground Kindness’ 7th annual fundraiser featuring dining, dancing, auctions, and presentations. Proceeds benefit their work in public schools, the juvenile justice center, Kinderhaven, and the Sandpoint Teen Center. www.UndergroundKindness.org.

AUGUST 1-11 Festival at Sandpoint. Sit under the stars and enjoy the 36th annual internationally renowned outdoor concert series on the lawn at Memorial Field. www.FestivalatSandpoint.com. 208-265-4554 2-3 PRCA Rodeo. Evening action at the Bonner County Fairgrounds. www.BonnerCountyRodeo.com. 2-3, 9-10 Aftival. The Hive, 207 N. First Ave., hosts concerts following the Festival at Sandpoint. Visit www.LiveFromTheHive.com for a full rundown of performers. 3 Long Bridge Swim. 1.76-mile open water swim now in its 25th year. See article, p. 12. www.longbridgeswim.org.

14 Jacey’s Race. Competitive 5k race for runners and walkers, and 1k fun run for kids benefits local children with cancer or lifethreatening illnesses. www.Jaceys-Race.com.

4 Huckleberry Color Fun Run. Join the crazyfun event at Schweitzer Mountain Resort—a perfect outing for the entire family! www. Schweitzer.com. 208-263-9555

14 Annual 6-Pack Alleycat Ride. Greasy Fingers Bikes N Repair hosts this 10th annual scavenger hunt on bicycles, with all proceeds benefiting a local charity. 208-255-4496

9-11, 16-18 Artists’ Studio Tour. Annual self-guided driving tour of working studios through North Idaho. www.ArtTourDrive.org. 800-800-2106

19-21 Northwest YogaFeast. Eureka Institute’s 9th annual experience that frees the spirit, feeds the soul, and nurtures the tummy! www. Eureka-Institute.org. 208-263-2217

10 Wings Over Sandpoint Fly-in. Regional pilots fly into Sandpoint Airport, or Dover Bay for seaplanes, during 14th annual fly-in featuring a breakfast and aircraft display. Sponsored by the Sandpoint EAA Chapter 1441. 208-255-9954

20-21 Northwest WineFest. Outdoor concerts, wine tasting, plus family activities at Schweitzer Mountain Resort. www.Schweitzer. com. 208-255-3081 25 Yappy Hour. A tail-waggin’ good time! Trinity at City Beach, 58 Bridge St., hosts Yappy Hour from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Bring your dog and enjoy a Panhandle Animal Shelter benefit with live music, beverages, and fun. 26 ArtWalk Reception. POAC sponsors an additional revolving art exhibit on Friday evening from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at 20-plus downtown galleries; art exhibits remain on display through Sept. 10. www.ArtinSandpoint.org. 208-263-6139 27 Crazy Days. Downtown merchants offer big deals in annual sidewalk sale. 27 Shakespeare in Sandpoint: Henry IV, Part I. Montana Shakespeare in the Parks performs at Memorial Field, hosted by Lost Horse Press. Gates open at 3 p.m. and the play starts at 6 p.m. Arrive early with chairs, blankets, and picnics in tow to visit and enjoy pre-play performances. Free and open to the public. See article, p. 17.

10-11 Arts & Crafts Fair. POAC’s 47th annual juried art exhibit at Sandpoint City Beach, with artists’ booths, kids’ activities and more. www. ArtinSandpoint.org. 208-263-6139 16-17 Spokane-to-Sandpoint Relay Race. Pacific Northwest’s 12th annual premier team running event starts at Mt. Spokane, ends at Sandpoint City Beach. www.SpokanetoSandpoint.com. 541-633-7174 16-17, 23-24 First Wave. The Heartwood Center, 615 Oak St., hosts the Unknown Locals presentation of the pre-post-apocalyptic comedy at 7:30 p.m. each night. See how unpreparedness and reluctance culminate in this original play by Chris Herron. 208-946-6174 21-24 Bonner County Fair. Old-fashioned country event at the Bonner County Fairgrounds concludes with a Demolition Derby on Saturday night to round out the fun. www. BonnerCountyFair.com. 208-263-8414 23 Challenge of Champions. Bull riding and barrel racing contest at the Bonner County Fairgrounds, with a dance to follow. www.BonnerCountyFair.com.

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HOT PICKS See complete, up-to-the-minute calendars at www.sandpointonline.com

this day’s going to the dogs Gather family, friends, and your favorite pooch for a day of crazy canine games, contests, vendor booths, demonstrations, food, and music during DogFest North Idaho, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, June 22, on the lawn outside Forrest Bird Charter School, 614 S. Madison Ave. DogFest is a fundraiser for the Inland Northwest Chapter of Canine Companions for Independence, whose mission is to provide skilled assistance dogs to people with disabilities at no cost! Meet the program’s graduate assistance dogs and hear heartwarming stories about how lives have blossomed after receiving a trained assistance dog. Visit the Love Shack and meet the program’s pups in training! All are welcome to join a team, or start one, for a shot at prizes and more. www.CCI. org/DogFestNorthIdaho.

rennaissance Faire Prepare thyself for merriment! Enjoy two days of chivalry, excitement, and fine entertainment at the second annual Sandpoint Rennaissance Faire, taking place on Labor Day weekend (Aug. 31 and Sept. 1) from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Events include the joust, music, comedy, medieval fighting, and demonstrations. Epona Equestrian Team jousting tournaments take place at 11 a.m. and 5 p.m. on both days. Tickets are $10 for adults, $5 for seniors and children ages 5-17. Or get an adult ticket for $8 by bringing a bag of canned food for the Bonner County Food Bank. Please, no pets. Harken to the tune at 784 Shingle Mill Rd. www.SptRenFaire.com

to the mountains we go How did we celebrate Labor Day Weekend before there was a Fall Fest at Schweitzer Mountain Resort? Beats us, because the perennial end-of-summer favorite event has been going on for 27 years and counting. It’s a hit for obvious reasons: 80+ beers and ciders to taste, 10 bands performing live (bring your lawn chairs!), and four glorious days—Friday, Aug. 30 through Monday, Sept. 2—to take it all in. Hop on the chairlift to the summit for sightseeing, hiking, mountain biking, or a leisurely lunch at the Sky House. Everyone loves this event … hence, book a room early! www.Schweitzer.com. Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E 012-033_SMS19_Almanac.indd 31

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calendar

FESTIVAL AT

SANDPOINT The 37th annual Festival at Sandpoint, held at Memorial Field on Lake Pend Oreille, takes place August 1-11. Buy tickets by calling 208-265-4554 or go to www.FestivalatSandpoint.com.

29 Yappy Hour. A tail-waggin’ good time! MickDuff’s Beer Hall, 220 Cedar St., hosts Yappy Hour from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Bring your dog and enjoy a Panhandle Animal Shelter benefit with live music, beverages, and fun. 30-Sept. 2 Fall Fest. At Schweitzer Mountain Resort. See Hot Picks. 31-Sept. 1 Coaster Classic Car Show. Nostalgic cars at Silverwood Theme Park. www. SilverwoodThemePark.com. 208-683-3400 31-Sept. 1 Sandpoint Renaissance Faire. Prepare thyself for merriment with two days of chivalry, excitement, and fine entertainment in the countryside on Shingle Mill Road. www. SandpointRenFaire.com.

SEPTEMBER 7 Injectors Car Show. 20th Annual Powered by the Past show from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. in downtown Sandpoint. www.SandpointInjectors. com. 208-263-9780 9-14 WaCanId Ride. Tour two states and one province on the annual 350-mile/560-kilometer ride, presented by the International Selkirk Loop and Rotary International. www.WaCanId. org. 888-823-2626 15 Scenic Half. Presented by the Sandpoint Chamber of Commerce, this 11th annual event features a half marathon and 10k fun run. www. ScenicHalf.com. 208-263-2161 27-29 Head of the Pend Oreille Regatta. The Pend Oreille Rowing and Paddling Association’s 9th annual regatta features rowing clubs from the Northwest and Canada competing in a 1.7k headrace and a 1k stake race at The Mudhole in Priest River. Great event for racers, spectators alike! www.PORPA.org. 29 Yappy Hour. A tail-waggin’ good time! Eichardt’s Pub, 212 Cedar St., hosts Yappy Hour from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Bring your dog and enjoy a Panhandle Animal Shelter benefit with live music, beverages, and fun.

OCTOBER Weekends in October - Scarywood. Silverwood Theme Park transforms into Scarywood, weekend evenings in October. www.SilverwoodThemePark.com. 12 Harvest Fest. Sandpoint Farmers’ Market closes out the season with entertainment, food booths, activities, displays at Farmin Park. www. SandpointFarmersMarket.com. 208-597-3355

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 1 - NATHANIEL RATELIFF & THE NIGHT SWEATS The soulful R&B combo’s hit songs like “S.O.B.” and “Hey Mama” are grounded in old-school soul, with familiar elements of jazz, folk and even country. They’re known to deliver a musical experience unlike any other, so don’t miss out on the fun! With special guest Lucius. Concert starts at 7:30 p.m.* Dance show FRIDAY, AUGUST 2 - WALK OFF THE EARTH One part folk-pop, one part sketch group, and one part musical experimenters, this Canadian band has set the concert scene on fire with their dynamic live shows. Their cover of Gotye’s “Somebody That I Used to Know” received big views … and a record contract! With special guest The Shook Twins. Concert starts at 7:30 p.m. SATURDAY, AUGUST 3 - JACKSON BROWNE It doesn’t get any better than rock and roll legend Jackson Browne, who has sold more than 18 million albums in the U.S., writing and recording songs such as “Running on Empty” and “Somebody’s Baby.” In 2015, Rolling Stone ranked him as one of the “100 Greatest Songwriters of All Time.” Concert starts at 7:30 p.m. SUNDAY, AUGUST 4 - FAMILY CONCERT Musical fun for the young and young at heart! The Festival presents the Community Orchestra and Studio One Dancers, along with preconcert activities including the instrument petting zoo, an animal petting zoo, face painting, games, and the Parents Corner with mini-massages. Activities begin when the gates open at 2:30 p.m.; concert starts at 5 p.m. THURSDAY, AUGUST 8 - LAKE STREET DIVE Back by popular demand, Lake Street Dive is an indie pop, jazz, and soul sensation! From their infectious reinvented covers like “Rich Girl” to fresh hits such as “Good Kisser,” the unique group explains: “We want it to sound like the Beatles and Motown had a party together!” With special guest Darlingside. Brewfest night. Concert starts at 7:30 p.m. FRIDAY, AUGUST 9 - THE AVETT BROTHERS The alt country superstars produce a novel sound that’s hard to pigeonhole, combining bluegrass, country, punk, pop melodies, folk, rock, indie rock, honky tonk, and ragtime. The Grammy nominated group performs one of the most exciting live shows you’ll experience - get your tickets early! With special guest Che Apalache. Concert starts at 7:30 p.m.* Dance show SATURDAY, AUGUST 10 - KOOL AND THE GANG Celebrate summer with the funk rock superstars! Formed in 1964, the group has explored many styles including jazz, soul, rock, pop, and funk, earning them two Grammys. Their discography spans 23 albums and 70 singles including hits “Get Down On It” and the No. 1 “Celebrate.” With special guest Leroy Bell and His Only Friends. Concert starts at 7:30 p.m.* Dance show SUNDAY, AUGUST 11 - SPOKANE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Savor an evening with the Spokane Symphony, with special guests Sybarite5—classical music’s dynamic new ensemble, classically trained to knock your socks off! The program begins with Mozart’s Eine Kleine Nachtmusik, followed by Sybarite5’s set. The second half of the program features Tchaikowsky’s Serenade for Strings. Wine tasting at 4:30 p.m.; concert at 7:30 p.m.

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When the Market is GOOD... Brokerages and Agents pop up like weeds looking for your business, all trying to show you their new toy. When the market cools, good luck finding them again!

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Sandpoint Office

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5/9/19 8:16 AM


LOOKING TO THE

HEAVEN

All along I’ve used my creativity to explore the things I’m curious about, to look at how nature or physics works, to investigate our human traits and human nature, to explore science and the cosmos...”

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A RT I ST LU CY W E ST

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INTERNATIONALLY RECOGNIZED SPACE ARTIST LUCY WEST EXPLORES THE MYSTERIES OF THE UNIVERSE by Carrie Scozzaro

L

ucy West’s eyes appear to be extraordinarily large and bright, maybe due to the glasses she wears, but more likely owing to her keen fascination with the world around her. West’s 30-year artistic career spans numerous genres, including northwest landscapes, aquatic life, portraits, figurative work, and those that explore spirituality. The genre for which West is best known, however, is space. She is a member of the International Association of Astronomical Artists and is a two-time recipient of the Best in Show honor at the internationally celebrated annual space conference, Spacefest.

Q. Walk us through how you got interested in space as a subject matter for your artwork. A. After graduating high school I headed to Daytona Beach in 1984 in an effort to expand my business options as an artist. I was 19 years old and had just learned how to airbrush the year before. This led me to work in the Florida tourist industry airbrushing t-shirts, motorcycle tanks, murals, advertising posters, etcetera. It was my pure luck that Daytona Beach is so close to Kennedy Space Center, where I witnessed numerous shuttle launches from my front yard, or from the beaches near Cape Canaveral, or from the beachside storefronts I was working in at the time. When shuttle launches occurred, my studio windows would literally shake as if there was an earthquake. Being so close to Kennedy Space Center did the only thing it could do: fuel my interest in space exploration, an influence that soon showed up in my art. By the early ‘90s NASA figures began to hear about my work and started commissioning fine art pieces to commemorate retiring Apollo and/or shuttle dignitaries, and works that related to the shuttle program. After all, this was at the height of the shuttle era.

Q. How did you end up in Sandpoint? ABOVE: “ALCHEMY OF LIGHT,” PHOTOGRAPHED BY MARIE-DOMINIQUE VERDIER; INSET: WEST IN HER STUDIO, PHOTOGRAPHED BY JILLENE BINNALL-STRAUB. SEE MORE OF WEST’S PAINTINGS AT WWW.LUCYWESTSTUDIOS.COM

A. In 2000 I took a leap and moved to southern California. When I first met my husband [Brent, in 2004] he used to tell me about this beautiful place called Sandpoint and describe the lake, mountains, wildlife, and it all sounded so incredible. My first experience of North Idaho was during a July 4 holiday in 2004 when Brent brought me to the cabin on Bottle Bay so I could meet his parents, and I was immediately smitten SandpointMagazine.com

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almanac with them and with North Idaho. Happily, after much searching, Brent and I found a house and moved to Sagle in 2005. We married on July 4, 2006. From the second I placed foot on ground here, it’s felt as if I’ve been here my whole life. One of my first paintings here was “Alchemy of Light” (pictured on previous page); it symbolizes myself and Brent as two shining stars and reflects the confluences of circumstances in my life.

Q. Your house is on the Artists’ Studio Tour. Tell us a little bit about the house. A. In 2016 we took the plunge and built our dream home on a ridge above Contest Point. We did most of the building ourselves. Brent has architecture in his background and designed our home to also be a working gallery for my art. Our view takes in Schweitzer Mountain to Scotchman Peak, a stunning vista any time of year and one that changes from hour to hour. I’ve never been more productive or inspired. And the pristine dark skies of this area continue to feed my passion for astronomy.

Q. Let’s talk about your passion for astronomy and where that’s brought you in your artmaking.

AT TOP: ARTIST LUCY WEST WITH ALAN BEAN, THE FOURTH MAN TO WALK ON THE MOON, PHOTOGRAPHED BY BRENT BINNALL. ABOVE: “EMBERS OF EXPLORATION AND ENLIGHTENMENT,” PHOTOGRAPHED BY LUCY WEST.

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A. All along I’ve used my creativity to explore the things I’m curious about, to look at how nature or physics works, to investigate our human traits and human nature, to explore science and the cosmos. My primary body of work is science-based, realistic renderings of astronomical objects such as galaxies, planets, moons, and nebulae [see her works “Orion Nebula,” “Mighty M106,” “Waking Wanderer,” “Intrepid Explorer”]. But I also like to use scientific data in a more abstract approach and attempt to express that information through energetic movement, color, and form [as in “Momentum,” “Collide,” “Patterns of the Universe”]. I also enjoy creating conceptual compositions that tell our human story about our species’ journey throughout time from Earth to

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A RT I ST LU CY W E ST the stars [shown in “Origins,” “Embers,” “Discovering Earth”]. And then there’s the traditional pieces that approach pretty landscapes, waterscapes, and nature and wildlife.

Q. Your work about space, however, has brought you the most recognition, and the opportunity to interact with a segment of society few people could ever experience. Tell us about that. A. Anyone close to me knows that one of my favorite experiences has been meeting the men who walked on the moon. But the best was meeting and befriending one of my heroes, astronaut/artist Alan Bean, the fourth man to walk on the moon. He is the person who inspired my decision to become a “space artist” after I stumbled on his paintings in a book that I plucked from a library shelf in the 1990s. His paintings beautifully depict his time on the moon in a very human way. They are surprisingly colorful, textured, and emotional. They also contain actual moon dust! When I realized the emotional impact his paintings were having on me, that’s when I told myself, “Yes, I want to do what he’s doing, express my passion for space exploration through my art.” I could not have known that many years later I would meet this extraordinary man who inspired one of the major directions in my life. Alan passed away in May of 2018 and it was a hard blow to my spirit because five months prior I lost the first and most prominent hero of my life, my dad… and then Alan. And as life so often has a tendency to churn the waters of hardship, I lost the most important person in my life in January 2019, my amazing, vibrant mother. Within a 13-month period my life became completely different. I had lost three of the people who had some of the greatest influence on why and how I became who I am. I believe I am changed forever by these losses and I think my future artistic endeavors will reflect these changes. How, I do not know… I’m almost intrigued by the thought of what will be expressed on canvas. In fact, I am looking forward to discovering what new art is developing within me.

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What’s in your heart? “When I go into the Scotchmans, I love

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imagining what that place looked like thousands of years ago, because it’s what it looks like today. I like to think that my kids and their kids will be able to go there and find their F R I E N D S O F own wild SCOTCHMAN PEAKS W I L D E R N E S S place.”

www.scotchmanpeaks.org • Save The Wild Scotchmans!

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HIK

features

WHEN HIKING THE CREST, THE VIEWS GO ON FOREVER. THIS CAMP SPOT WAS LOCATED BETWEEN GUNSIGHT AND MOUNT ROOTHAAN AND HIGHLIGHTS THE GRANDEUR OF OUR LAKE-TOMOUNTAIN COUNTRY AS THE SUN SETS OVER PRIEST LAKE.

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IKING along the

100 MILES, 16 PEAKS, AND 29,000 VERTICAL FEET ... IN 10 DAYS, ON FOOT

A

story and photos by Mark Edmundson

DVENTURES OFTEN START WITH JUST A FEW WORDS. “I wonder if you could hike from Mount Baldy to Parker Peak along the Selkirk Crest?� I commented to nobody. That my wife, Jill, barely raised an eyebrow gave me just enough of a nudge to give it a shot, making the hike in several stages. With smoke-free skies and a ten-day weather window, I took off from the Mickinnick trailhead up and over Baldy to Schweitzer. While bushy, a fairly developed game trail allowed me to finish the 16 miles in time to catch the chairlift at Schweitzer down from the top, and sleep in my own bed. The next morning, my twin daughters and I caught the chairlift back up to the top and headed for Keokee Peak and the Caribou Hut, where we would spend the night. The terrain flopped between tight baby trees and pig-sized boulder fields. We took turns leading and joked that there were no wrong turns as there was no trail. We laughed that night in our sleeping bags, realizing that how raw our shins were from bushy meandering was a mark of how far we were definitely off trail! In the morning, my guest hikers left and I took off for Mount Casey and points north by myself. My goal was just north of Jeru Peak, where Jill would join me the following morning. The south faces were generally grassy and fast, while the north sides were

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features

The section between Jeru Peak and the Harrison Lake trailhead seemed like the heart of the adventure. It felt the most remote, had amazing views of both Pend Oreille and Priest Lake, and was bursting with streams, small ponds, and emerald lakes. OVERLOOKING SANDPOINT NEAR THE START OF THE HIKE.

challenging and slow. Soon, I was in the Sundance burn zone and the terrain changed completely. At the top of Jeru a burned down lookout tower was all that remained. The concrete pilings were just big enough to sit down on. The views north were a teaser for what was ahead. The section between Jeru Peak and the Harrison Lake trailhead seemed like the heart of the adventure. It felt the most remote, had amazing views of both Pend Oreille and Priest Lake, and was bursting with streams, small ponds, and emerald lakes. The trail traversed above massive granite walls and provided views of almost all of the route from Schweitzer to Parker Peak. Of the 16 named peaks along the route, seven would be summited in just three days. Throw in the numerous surprise appearances of Chimney Rock and it’s no wonder we were constantly uttering, “This is unreal.” After hiking up and over Gunsight Peak, we made camp on a rolling granite ridge overlooking Priest Lake. 40

The next day gave us wonderful views from the top of Mount Roothaan and the grassy, granitefilled meadows surrounding Chimney Rock were invigorating. But leaving the Chimney Rock trail and traversing to Silver Dollar diminished our excitement as the hiking became slow and tedious. After finally getting to the top, I could see a small pond below the peak that would be our night’s camp spot. The scramble down was slow but safe. The water was barely knee deep in that pond but a clean body sure does sleep better! Leaving the shadow of Silver Dollar Peak was easy going and before we knew it, Jill was summiting the South Twin. With a slow steady pace we moved on, gaining the North Twin and the familiar views of Beehive Lake and Harrison Peak. Eventually reaching the Harrison Lake trail, we began our descent to the car for a few days’ rest at home. The plan from that point was for the whole family to join me in summiting Harrison Peak, then I would

head north alone for the remainder of the hike. The stay at the top was brief as I was eager to head north into zones I knew very little about. I scrambled down the back of Harrison Peak into the bowl of Two Mouth Lake. A pretty good bushwhack with marginal views and a steady squadron of bugs had me second guessing my route choice. I made it to the upper lake and got in a swim. Hiking the Two Mouth Lake trail was short and sweet, as leaving the trail meant grabbing a handful of branches and pulling myself uphill. Slowly, I made it out of the jungle, well-scraped up, but happy to be back up high where the granite ridges provide a much better walking surface. The big challenge that remained was climbing Myrtle Peak. If I could get close to the base and make camp then I could get an early start in the morning. I passed some nice granite slabs and some decent grassy spots, but I kept looking as I still had energy to walk. And then

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features

PHOTOS, CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: HEADING NORTH OFF HUNT PEAK, THE RIDGELINE OF THE SELKIRKS BOASTS A RUGGED BEAUTY, WITH

I came upon the most massive granite dome I have ever seen. It was full of cairns and rock mosaics. It even had a granite rock bench someone had made with views of Harrison Peak. After a good night’s sleep, I got an early start on Myrtle Peak. The climbing was hard, but I was in the shade and had lots of energy. The ridgetop hiking connecting Myrtle Peak to Ball Lake was an elk highway. It was the most enjoyable offtrail cruising yet, and the front row view of The Lion’s Head inspired thoughts of future off-

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trail adventures. Before long, I was looking down on Ball Lake and imagining how great the swim would feel. Getting back on trail was a relief and the views above Pyramid Pass breathtaking. Long Lake, with its massive granite apron, would be my destination and my last night of the trek. Only one day remained on my adventure and I was ready to finish it off. The 16 miles out would include a detour up Parker Peak. The ridgetop trail was smooth and I was slowly

getting closer to my goal. The last few miles were a trudge, though; the views were not so great. I was ready to be done. I reached the Parker Peak trailhead and climbed down to Parker Creek, took off my shoes, and soaked my feet. Jill showed up in the car with a cooler of Izzies in the back. My trek of roughly a hundred miles over 16 peaks and 29,000 vertical feet was over. My adventure ended much as it had begun, with just a few words: “That was fun.”

CHIMNEY ROCK JUST VISIBLE IN THE DISTANCE; MARK AND JILL AT CHIMNEY ROCK; JILL AT A TARN JUST BELOW SILVER DOLLAR, THE DAY FIVE CAMPSITE.

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Big Sn C R AW D A D S G O E S

LOCAL AUTHOR DELIA OWENS DOMINATES BEST-SELLER LIST

“I

by David Keyes

SAW US IN THEM.” Most people are not in a position to compare the social structure of lions and humans, but Delia Owens has made it her life’s work, as well as one of many themes for her best-selling novel, “Where the Crawdads Sing.” While spending 20 years observing lions and elephants in remote Africa with her husband, Mark, the spark of an idea entered her scientifically trained brain. She remembers jotting down notes for what would become her first novel in a tent she and Mark called home for seven years in Botswana’s Kalahari Desert. She had no clue these observations—along with many she collected growing up in the South and while living in Bonners Ferry in later life—would marinate into a novel that has owned the top of the New York Times’ bestseller list for 32 weeks—12 of them as the number one Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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features fiction book in the country as of early May. Lionesses are the glue that keeps the lion community together. The group of female lions—a pride of lions actually refers to the females—depend on each other to raise offspring while protecting youngsters from harm. They look out for each other, pure and simple. The comparison with her friends couldn’t have been more clear. Owens had her own pride of women, with some of the friendships dating back to kindergarten and many since second grade. As her pride has gotten older, it isn’t uncommon for one or more to convalesce at another’s home following various maladies. “I wish everyone could have that,” she said. “It is so deep and meaningful.” So what happens when a young female grows up without other females, and is thrown into the middle of a murder, to boot? Although there are no lions, and the book is set half a world away, that question is what underlies the story, and the answer is what makes a best-selling novel.

Where the Crawdads Sing” defies conventional description. It is part romantic novel, part murder mystery and all together something much deeper for some readers.

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W H E R E T H E C R AW D A D S S I N G Owens’ vivid descriptions, flowing writing style, and science knowledge come through in her debut in fiction. She and her former husband, Mark, co-authored two best-selling, non-fiction books while in Africa, “The Cry of the Kalahari” and “The Eye of the Elephant.” They left for Africa in the 1970s as graduate students at the University of Georgia after selling everything they owned and buying two, one-way tickets. They brought worldwide attention to the slaughter of elephants and spirited a new sense of conservation in Africa. (Read more about the couple in the Summer 2000 issue of Sandpoint Magazine at www.sptmag. com/Owens. ) Book sales gave them the means to live anywhere they wanted, and their preference was pretty simple—away from people, near nature and outside adventure, and no jets flying overhead. They made several trips back to the United States during their African adventure and would spend some of that time seeking out their new home. They used their Rand McNally map to point the way. On one trip they drove through Bonners Ferry on their way to Canada and decided to take a look around. Soon they discovered a 720-acre plot of land in the Curley Creek Valley near Moyie that checked off all of the boxes, and they moved here in 2000. “Believe it or not, moving here was the first time we had ever lived in the mountains,” Owens said. “To be able to ride horses on our property and to not see civilization is wonderful. I love having the Purcells and Cabinets so close; it is a blessing and I hike them when I can.” The majestic log home they helped to build includes more than 250 tons of rock from their property used to construct five fireplaces, along

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with a wall in their dining room. They also deconstructed two 80-year-old barns to reclaim the wood for all of their window frames. Unfortunately, this information comes from a real estate website that lists their Thunder Mountain Wildlife Estate for sale for $4.5 million. Owens will soon be moving closer to her pride in the Atlanta area. “As much as I enjoy living here, I am isolated from my friends,” she said. “I am in good health and so are they so the time is right to be even closer. This is not to say anything bad about the many friends I have

here. I have been so lucky.” Here in this lovely seclusion was where she did the bulk of the writing for “Where the Crawdads Sing,” a novel she describes as a “socio-biological thriller.” The title comes from something her mom used to say when she was growing up in Thomasville, Georgia. “My mom would tell me to “go out yonder where the crawdads sing” as her way of getting me out of the house and to go explore.” Set in the coastal marshland of North Carolina from the 1950s through 1970,

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Owens’ story focuses on Kya Clark, who was abandoned by her family as a girl and is now surviving in the wild. Locals have named her “the Marsh Girl.” Those early years are contrasted with her later life, when Kya is suspected in the death of a young man. Bonners Ferry friends and neighbors play a role in the book. Owens’ neighbor Tim Cady, a former teacher, will see parts of his personality in Tate. Bonners Ferry’s late Mayor Harold Sims’ name lives on in the novel; several other people and landmarks are also included. Owens enlisted a cadre of North Idaho friends, as well, to critique and proofread her novel during various stages. “We have a great family of friends in Bonners Ferry,” she said. “They helped make the book happen. Couldn’t have done it without them.” Owens has worn out several suitcases on a 25-city book tour that started in earnest late last year. She spent four weeks at home in late March and early April before she was off for another tour, which would include Seattle and New York, plus many stops in between. “Where the Crawdads Sing” was a selection for actor and director Reese Witherspoon’s Hello Sunshine book club; when the story was optioned by Fox 2000 to be made into a movie, it was announced that Witherspoon would be directing. Owens has visited Los Angeles several times as that project is now ramping up. She was touched when Witherspoon recommended her book, and honored she enjoyed the novel enough to make a movie from it. “Humbling and moving at light speed,” is her reaction to both the success of the book and the plans for a movie version. Owens is also working on her second novel. “No ETA on that one,” she said. “It took me 10 years to write my first novel, so no reason to think it will happen faster than that.” Photos courtesy Delia Owens and Random House Publishing.

• Fostering Music & Theater Arts in the Northern Panhandle

208.265.4444 • www.sandpointconservatory.org 110 Main Street • P.O. Box 907, Sandpoint, ID Like us on • mcs@sandpointconservatory.org 48

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BUS TOURS

MICHELLE KEENER IS FEELING THE VIBE AS SHE WORKS ON GETTING READY FOR THE TOURING SEASON. PHOTO BY CLAIRE KEENER

IN A TRAVELING TIME MACHINE Michelle Keener close to realizing her lifelong dream with Feelin’ Groovy VW bus tours by Carrie Scozzaro

S

ome kids want to be famous athletes when they grow up. Or doctors. Or follow in a family member’s footsteps. Michelle Keener wanted to be a cruise director like Julie McCoy on the ‘70s television series “The Love Boat.” “The thing I really love doing is getting friends together and creating joy—having dinner parties and game nights, going on adventures, experiencing new places, and creating memories,” said Keener, whose varied background includes public relations and marketing, plus earning tour industry certifications. Keener is a cancer survivor who experienced a relapse in 2013, just after relocating to Sandpoint with her husband and children. “I tried to keep it all in perspective and saw a tiny light streaming through the blinds as I lay in bed, barely able to roll over or even walk, and that little light was God telling me to hang in there,” said Keener. After spending a summer as a second mate on Lake Pend Oreille Cruise’s Shawnodese, and encouraged by its owner Linda Mitchell, Keener wrote a business plan and found investors. She also began hunting for a vintage VW bus that would fit the bill for a tour company. Early this year, with the help of VW UNLTD, and Chuck Luettgerodt of Inland Aviation Specialties, Keener found a 1976 VW Transporter bus she nicknamed Gwennie—short for Gwendolyn—the Wandering Bird, and Feelin’ Groovy Tours was born. Luettgerodt, whose specialty is complete restorations (including an

aircraft that won a Gold Lindy at the 2016 AirVenture in Wisconsin, one of the largest aviation gatherings in North America), is spearheading Gwennie’s restoration. Why a VW bus? “I’ve always loved the boxy charm of the VW bus, the big steering wheel, the togetherness of good friends, and laughter,” said Keener, who remembers abundant traveling while growing up in central California. “My brother and I grew up in the military and we moved a lot so we spent a lot of time on road trips, traveling back and forth across the country.” Feelin’ Groovy Tours won’t go quite as far afield. “Most of our tours will be within a 25- to 90-mile radius of Sandpoint,” Kenner said, so the touring area includes all things Sandpoint and Hope, Bonners Ferry and Sagle, as well as Farragut State Park, Coeur d’Alene, Rathdrum, Wallace, and more. The tours, which Keener has developed with the help of focus groups, will incorporate history, geology, people of interest, wildlife, art and artist’s studios, a Clydesdale ranch, museums, farms, and more. She’s had fun with the process, including naming the tours after ‘70s songs. Purple Haze, for example, will include a visit to the Sandpoint Lavender Farm. “Our goal is for our guests to take a step back in time, chill out, and enjoy North Idaho’s stunning, pristine countryside in a beautifully restored, low-tech, boxy-yet-charming, groovy time machine of fun.” Learn more on Facebook at FeelingGroovyTours Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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BNSFNorthwest.com

For nearly 150 years, BNSF Railway has connected this region to the global marketplace — serving as one of the top transporters of consumer goods, agriculture, energy, and housing materials. By moving millions of carloads of freight through Washington and Idaho each year, BNSF Railway is proud to help feed, supply, and power homes and businesses in the Pacific Northwest and across North America. Connecting the Pacific Northwest since 1873

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Taking public art

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COMMUNITY PITCHES IN TO HELP LOCAL COUPLE REALIZE THEIR DREAM OF RESTORING HISTORIC CAROUSEL by Carrie Scozzaro

I

NO DETAIL IN RESTORING THE PONIES IS OVERLOOKED; EVEN THEIR TEETH RECEIVE PAINSTAKING ATTENTION. FACING PAGE (FROM LEFT): ERIN CRAMER WORKS ON FINISHING DETAILS; DAVE SMITH IS ONE OF THE PONIES’ “DENTISTS”; RENO HUTCHISON PAINTING ONE OF HER FAVORITE PONIES. PHOTOS BY CLAY HUTCHISON.

T MAY TAKE A VILLAGE, AS THE SAYING GOES, TO RAISE A CHILD, BUT WHAT ABOUT A VINTAGE CAROUSEL? It’s taken much of Sandpoint—several hundred volunteers to date—and then some to bring the Carousel of Smiles to life in what owners Reno and Clay Hutchison believe may be Idaho’s largest public art project. “One of the problems we’ve had is not being able to use all the people who want to help,” said Clay. As anyone who has followed the narrative knows, the Hutchisons had been in pursuit of a carousel like the one in Reno’s former hometown of Butte, Montana, which tragically burned down in 1973. The one they acquired and brought to Sandpoint two years ago was a 1920s exemplar of carver Allan Herschell’s work, whose signature “Trojan” horse features a cropped mane and robust figure. Clay figures the traveling carousel—it could be disassembled, packed and

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CAROUSEL OF SMILES

reassembled quickly for use in fairs and carnivals—was abandoned in 1952 in a farmer’s field near Kansas City. That’s where Clay’s sister-in-law happened to be in 2000, visiting the family of the man who had acquired the Herschell model 30 years prior from the farmer, with the intent to restore it. It was kismet. The Hutchisons had lucked out; so-called Golden Age carousels—hand-painted, hand-carved whimsies from the 1890s to 1920s—once numbered several thousand nationwide. Varying estimates put the remaining number at 150 to 200, with even fewer intact and still functional. MANAGING THE HERD. Even before the ink was dry on newspaper articles announcing the December 2016 arrival of the carousel in Sandpoint, town was abuzz, with interest from people like Jan Griffitts, who now serves on the board of the registered 501(c)

(3) nonprofit. More than 150 people witnessed the unpacking of two trailers in which the carousel’s 36 horses, ticket booth, brass poles, art panels, and machinery had been hibernating since the carousel was abandoned in 1952. Many artists enthusiastically offered support, including Gabe Gabel, a nationally-recognized horsewoman and sculptor who has since donated six wax horse maquettes from which bronzes can be made and sold. Valeria Yost created “Chasing a Dream,” an original painting from which a limited editon of prints is being sold to support the carousel. Janene Grende has donated an original painting on silk, to be sold at a later auction. More than 50 artists have expressed an interest in having their work incorporated into the 14 panels lining the interior of the classic amusement park ride. And while the Hutchisons are still mull-

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ing over the creation of a rotating art display there (no pun intended), work is well under way on painting the ponies. The group of 98 or so brush-wielding volunteers—dubbed “Painters of the Lost Art”—are being guided by Betty Largent, best known locally for her restoration work on Spokane’s Looff Carousel and in carousel circles as the president of the National Carousel Association. After attending an October 2018 call-forartists at the East Bonner County Library, having a hands-on opportunity with the carousel sounded good to artist Erin Cramer, who mostly uses her fingers to paint in oil on canvas. “We just thought (the carousel) would be an awesome project for the whole family to be involved in,” said Cramer, who recruited her husband, mother-in-law, and father-in-law, who is a finish carpenter, to help restore and paint one of the ponies as a family project.

(833) 2GROOVY (833) 247- 6689

She’s looking forward to staying involved, she said, and admires the Hutchison’s passion for the carousel, which she described as infectious. “It just makes you super-excited to be involved.” Before the ponies can be painted, however, they must be checked for structural integrity and restored by the 70-plus member “Godfather Squad,” so named because the horse’s heads must be cut off to remove interior metal and repair any damage, before they’re reassembled with the greatest of care. “Some are finding specific niches, for example,” said Clay, who notes that Dave Smith “is getting good at making replacement teeth for ones that are missing.” (Think dentures.) As it turns out, the carousel animals need much more attention than the mechanism from which they’re suspended as they spin endlessly around.

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“The carousel basically is and was totally functional, which makes it an incredible find,” said Ken Keeler, who heads up the Gear and Grease Gang. Lacking any assembly instructions, this group nevertheless assembled the carousel for its unveiling in 2017. Keeler anticipates that the electrical and some other minor elements will need to be updated once a permanent site is determined and the carousel is reassembled for what many people—certainly the Hutchisons—hope is the herd’s new home in Sandpoint. BEYOND THE NORTHWEST. As many volunteers as have come from Sandpoint and surrounding communities, the impact of the carousel extends beyond Bonner County. The Carousel of Smiles has generated interest from artists elsewhere in the Northwest, including Missoula, where a group of woodcarvers who were instrumental in carving the horses for A Carousel for Missoula asked to be involved. According to Reno, they quipped, “We’re a bunch of old guys with sharp tools and nothing to do.” Aided by social media, the Hutchisons have been in touch with a collector in Washington, D.C. who has Allan Herschell manuals, and also with the great-grandson of Ward Oliver, who is credited with creating the faces on the rounding board shields, known as “The Four Winds.” They’ve shared the vision—18 horses done by the end of 2019, all work done in 2020 and installation commencing in 2021—locally and nationally, forging relationships with enthusiastic individuals and like-minded national organizations dedicated to preserving and promoting America’s iconic carousels. Juta Geurtsen, community development director with the Idaho Commission on the Arts, is working with the Hutchisons on ways to be involved. “There is great creative and economic impact in this endeavor, and I am excited for the creative placemaking effect of a project of this size and scope, for the community of Sandpoint and for the state of Idaho.” “We’ve created a whole new community (within a community),” said Reno. Learn more at www.thecarouselofsmiles.org.

www.FeelinGroovy.tours

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FINE JEWELRY, LEATHER WORKS, SALON ARTISAN AND FAIR TRADE, SOUVENIRS TATTOOS, ARCADE, TOYS, FAMILY FUN DINING, WINE, ART, BOUTIQUE CLOTHING

15 NEW SHOPS In the heart of downtown Sandpoint

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JUST

Beachy

AERIAL VIEW OF WORK AT CITY BEACH, C. 1940S, PHOTO COURTESY OF DANN HALL, BY ROSS HALL

P I C T U R E D I N H I S T O RY

THE STORY OF CITY BEACH by Jennifer Lamont Leo

L

ONG BEFORE THE ARRIVAL OF WHITE SETTLERS, AREA TRIBES MET TO CAMP AND FISH ON THE FLAT, SANDY AREA TODAY CALLED CITY BEACH. Northern Pacific acquired the property in 1864 through a congressional land grant, but it remained virtually untouched until the railroad’s arrival in 1888. During World War I, Sandpoint’s Company A practiced drills on the beach. A photo shows a rough, flat stretch of sand and rock bordered by the railroad, with a grove of trees in the background. After the Armistice, the Women’s Committee of Bonner County—formed by the Council of Defense to assist with war work— reorganized as the Sandpoint Civic Club and took on the establishment of a “municipal bathing beach” as one of its earliest projects. The railroad granted acreage “east of the railway and south from the city dock to the long railway bridge” in perpetuity for use as a city park. Partnering with the Chamber of Commerce, the Civic Club funded two bathhouses and “a matron to care for the children on the beach, the women’s bathhouse and the morale of the beach in general,” according to club cofounder Nell Irion. The club also erected billboards to entice passing motorists.

Flooding often made the beach unusable—some years until midsummer. In 1939 the Spokesman-Review reported plans to construct “a beach park, boat harbor, and summer attraction second to none in the Inland Empire.” With Works Progress Administration assistance, suction dredge equipment pumped sand from the lake bottom to raise the beach. Now oval-shaped, the park featured a circular drive, a new bathhouse, and shaded picnic areas, though original plans were apparently scaled back as they included a formal garden, red-tiled pergola, and benches to “invite one to linger and contemplate the beauty of myriad of flowers and a fountain, all in a picture frame of evergreen hedge.” In spite of optimism that the park now stood “to a point well above high water,” it, along with much of Sandpoint, flooded again in 1948. Ultimately, the 1955 opening of the Albeni Falls Dam saved the beach. Federal funds for “encroachment damage” from the dam project provided enough fill and sand to rebuild City Beach and alleviate future flooding. Since then the Sandpoint Lions Club has made the beach a high priority and has contributed many improvements over the years, such as the iconic barbecue pavilion. Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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Artfully San

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www.conniescherr.com 58

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andpoint Fine Art - Jewelry - Fiber - Wood Glass - Pottery - Photography

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SANDPOINT SHOPPING DIS RICT

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Art Works Gallery

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Quality equipment and clothing for outdoor enthusiasts. Trek bikes. Bicycle and kayak rentals. Pend Oreille Lake Logo Wear. 314 N. 1st Ave. outdoorexperience.us @)

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PHOTO BY FIONA HICKS

B G H T U R N S 70

SE VE N DECA DES OF

Growth

BONNER GENERAL HEALTH CELEBRATES ITS PAST WHILE EYEING THE FUTURE by Cameron Rasmusson

F

ROM ITS START AS A REFURBISHED MILITARY HOSPITAL TO THE SPRAWLING, MULTI-BUILDING CAMPUS THAT DOMINATES DOWNTOWN SANDPOINT TODAY, THE EVOLUTION OF BONNER GENERAL HEALTH OVER ITS 70-YEAR HISTORY IS NOTHING IF NOT DRAMATIC.

It speaks to seven decades of growth and expansion—not just in size, technology and services, but also in its role as a community institution. What began as an effort to bring basic health services to Sandpoint is now an institution at the heart of the community and local economy. With 2019 marking the 70th anniversary of Bonner General’s incorporation, the hospital’s 450 employees, 62 physicians, 100 volunteers, and nine board members are celebrating seven decades of health care in North Idaho. Bonner General wasn’t the first health care facility to pop up in Bonner County. In October of 1902 the newspaper announced the newly constructed Sandpoint Hospital, under Dr. Nathan Goddard, was open for business at 315 Larch St. By spring, Dr. O.F. Page’s hospital would open, briefly, right next door, and in the next few years a number of additional hospitals—Reardon, Graham, Parnell, Moody and Sawyer, named for the doctors who operated them—would open their doors. Prior to this time, residents traveled to the county hospital in Rathdrum, or further afield, for needed hospital treatment. The longest lasting hospital was that operated by Dr. Page. In operation from 1903-1904, and then reopened in 1907 on Second Avenue, the 27-room, steam-heated Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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Page Hospital was built for $5,000, but it closed down during the Depression. Parnell Hospital opened in the ‘20s, followed by Graham Hospital, and then Page Hospital opened once again. According to a 1999 Bonner County Daily Bee article, the facility was an over-crowded, tight building with a reputation for fire danger. It was clear Bonner County needed a more modern facility. The problem of establishing such a facility, of course, boiled down to money. Project supporters proposed a $275,000 hospital bond, only to see it fail at the ballot box. Then an opportunity presented itself: an abandoned medical dispensary used at Farragut Naval Training Station. The only problem was moving the building from Farragut to Sandpoint when road transportation was impossible. The solution? Newspaper records at the time indicate the building was carved into 15 pieces and barged nearly 40 miles to Sandpoint, where it was reassembled into the first of

many facilities in Bonner General’s seven-decade history. Bonner General Hospital was formally incorporated on July 13, 1949. Board members Charles Pennington, C. H. Patton, Nell K. Reece, Merle Ebbe, and James Breinich signed the articles of incorporation. At a total cost of $118,000, the refurbished Farragut facility was praised as a model of financial efficiency. One visiting Chicago physician, according to the museum’s records, called it “a community project which everyone can and should support.” The county got its fair share of use out of the facility, relying on it for nearly 25 years until it was replaced by a $2,129,000, 46-bed Bonner General facility in 1973. That nearly bridges the gap between the hospital’s beginnings and the start of CEO Sheryl Rickard’s work there, a career that spans almost 33 years. In that time the hospital underwent a dramatic transition, from a reliance on inpatient care to outpatient services. Today, 75 percent of hospital rev-

“The 70th Anniversary of BGH is a great time to reflect on the people who made BGH what it is today, from our founding fathers to today’s health care team of dedicated and talented staff, skilled physicians, and generous volunteers,” said BGH CEO Sheryl Rickard. “I couldn’t be prouder than to be the CEO of this organization.”

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PAGE 61: A SKYWAY BRIDGE NOW CONNECTS THE HOSPITAL WITH THE BONNER GENERAL HEALTH SERVICES BUILDING, LOCATED IN THE FORMER TAYLOR PARKER CHEVROLET LOT. PHOTO BY FIONA HICKS. PIECES OF THE FARRAGUT NAVAL STATION WERE BARGED TO SANDPOINT TO BUILD THE FIRST BONNER GENERAL HOSPITAL. AT LEFT: THE PAGE HOSPITAL FIRST OPENED IN THE HOME OF ALEX AND ROSA PIATT AT 719 N. THIRD, AND IS CONSIDERED THE PRECURSOR TO BONNER GENERAL. LAST TWO PHOTOS COURTESY BONNER COUNTY HISTORY MUSEUM.

enue comes from outpatient care, up from 25 percent 30 years ago. “There are several reasons for that, including technology and partnerships with physician clinics. Technology has advanced such that many procedures done (before) as inpatients are now done safely on an outpatient basis,” Rickard said. “The length of time that patients are in the hospital has decreased significantly as well.” Increased cooperation between regional health care facilities was another key factor in moving the hospital toward its modern era.

In 1991, Bonner General, Boundary Community Hospital, Kootenai Health, Shoshone Medical Center, and Benewah Community Hospital reached an agreement on a cooperative plan to better serve the North Idaho area. “We recognized the common needs in our health care organizations, and the ability to be more effective and efficient by collaborating and working together,” Rickard said. “We still meet monthly. Our group is extremely unique since we are more collaborative

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than competitive, which I believe has made all five of our hospitals more successful.” The most dramatic change in recent years came with the completion of the hospital’s Health Services Building and skywalk in 2015, along with its rebranding from Bonner General Hospital to Bonner General Health a year prior. The skywalk’s dedication to longtime board member Jack Parker is one of the standout moments of Rickard’s career. “Recognizing Jack for his 50-plus years of service to Bonner General Health, his leadership and his commitment to the furtherance of health care in our community, was an honor and a pleasure,” she said. Another heartening development for Rickard is the revitalization of the Bonner General Hospital Foundation, the hospital arm that focuses on philanthropic activity. A major source of funding for the foundation comes from the Heart Ball, which itself has become a successful annual event. As Rickard looks to the future, one of her most important goals is to maintain Bonner General’s identity as an independent community hospital. She sees the hospital’s relationships with its local community partners as the best way to ensure that Bonner General remains an institution run by locals committed to local needs.

“As long as we remain financially viable and continue to provide high quality, compassionate care, we will be able to maintain our independence,” Rickard said. “We feel that we can meet the needs of our community better alone than if we were a part of a large health system.”

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EXPANDING

M AT T O X FA R M S

THE PANHANDLE

MUSIC SCENE

MATTOX FARM PRODUCTIONS BRINGS A PASSION FOR FAMILY-FRIENDLY LIVE SHOWS TO NORTH IDAHO by Lyndsie Kiebert

“W

HEN WE STARTED THIS WE WANTED TO DO FAMILY-FRIENDLY, GOOD MUSIC FOR A GOOD PRICE,” SAID ROBB TALBOTT. “THAT WAS OUR GOAL, AND (WE’D GO) WHEREVER THAT LED US.” “This” is Mattox Farm Productions, a business that hosts live music productions and helps others in booking talented musicians. The business was named for the family farm in southern Virginia where Robb and his wife, Tasha, tied the knot. Three bands played at their wedding, blurring the line between matrimony and music festival. In fact, theirs is a love story marked by music and mountains—

those mountains being the peaks of North Idaho. “We fell in love in these here mountains,” Robb said with a smile, then held out his wedding band to show the Selkirks carved in the metal, Chimney Rock providing the dead giveaway. His ring has a gold sun above the mountaintops. Tasha’s has a diamond for a moon. The Talbotts have produced shows across Panhandle venues featuring the likes of the Two Tracks, the Lil Smokies, Driftwood, and other nationally touring bands with Americana and roots influences. For two years they have produced Jack Frost Fest, a music festival held at the Heartwood Center during the transition between fall and winter, meant to hype locals up for the snowy season. The cou-

ABOVE: ROBB AND TASHA IN THE MOUNTAINS THEY LOVE. COURTESY PHOTO. RIGHT: DRIFTWOOD PERFORMS AT A MATTOX-PRODUCED SHOW AT THE HEARTWOOD CENTER. PHOTOS BY LYNDSIE KIEBERT.

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ple has also collaborated with the Eureka Institute to book bands for Sandpoint music staple Summerfest, slated this year for July 12-14. A free, Mattox Farm-produced summer concert series is planned with Washington Trust Bank as the lead sponsor for three shows on Wednesday evenings in Farmin Park. The dates are set for June 19, July 17, and August 21. Sandpoint Curry and Kochava will also serve as sponsors, and there are more details to come.

“We’re letting the community move this,” Robb Talbott said. John Edwards of the Eureka Institute said Talbott has “a real desire to bring people together and create community with the shows he produces.”

“We are in the throes of booking this year’s Summerfest and I’m already excited about what we have cooking,” Edwards said. When Talbott talks about his favorite live shows of all time, he is visibly transported. One such show was Runaway Symphony at the Pearl Theater in November 2018, co-produced with the Pend Oreille Arts Council. The orchestral folk band is fronted by Bonners Ferry native Daniel Botkin, making that particular show a homecoming. Botkin was incredibly sick but determined to play the show. Talbott said Botkin’s bandmates stepped it up to make the show the best it could be. “It was in the top five (shows) I’ve seen, because of the heart and passion they put out there,” Talbott said, taking a moment to pause, admitting that recalling that show made him emotional. “You could not help but sit back and appreciate their talent and their love for each other.” It was during that show that Talbott was reminded of what makes live music so powerful, and reinforced his goal to bring more live shows to his Pacific Northwest home. “One of their songs that has a lot of high notes in it, their drummer Jason just took it from him. He said he’d never sung live on stage before and he absolutely slayed it,” Talbott said. “The crowd went nuts. That’s live music.” Find more at www.mattoxfarm.com or @mattoxfarmproductions on Facebook and Instagram.

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M Y T H W E AV E R

Idaho

MYTHWEAVER Comes Full

Circle

THE PRESERVATION OF NATIVE VOICES CONTINUES by Cate Huisman

T

ABOVE: KALISPEL TRIBAL MEMBER J.R. BLUFF DANCING THE OWL DANCE AT A MINI POWWOW IN LAKEVIEW PARK. LEFT: FRITZ INTERVIEWS MARIE GRANT, A CHEWELAH-BAND KALISPEL ELDER. ALL PHOTOS COURTESY MYTHWEAVER.

O DESCENDANTS OF THE ORIGINAL INHABITANTS OF IDAHO, STORIES ARE HISTORY, AND TRIBAL ELDERS WHO KNOW THEM ARE A RESOURCE WITHOUT PEER. The stories reveal how humans are to live in balance with the natural world, with a reverence for other creatures on the Earth and a responsibility to protect them. This balance is not an option or an environmental ideal; it is a necessity. Anna Armstrong, current director of education for the Kalispel Tribe of Indians, sums up the import: “Preserving our stories is how we’re going to keep alive who we are.” For nearly 30 years, the Idaho Mythweaver has been helping to make sure these stories are not lost. The Mythweaver was born in 1989, when Sandpoint resident Jane Fritz pitched an idea to preserve Native stories to a group of tribal leaders at Idaho’s centennial celebration. Within an hour, she had received their unanimous support, so she formed a board, applied for (and received) a grant, and launched the organization’s initial, threepart project. The first part, Idaho Keepers of the Earth, involved making five, half-hour radio documentaries on the five tribes recognized in Idaho at the time: the Nez Perce, Coeur

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features d’Alene, Kootenai, Shoshone-Bannock, and Shoshone-Paiute. “Each of the half hour [programs] had a traditional story or legend that we built all of the voices around,” recalls Fritz, who interviewed tribal members for the programs. The next step was to give contemporary Idahoans an opportunity to hear the storytellers in person. For this purpose, seven elders from the five tribes traveled to 14 cities around the state in a tour called Speaking the Earth Mother. From tiny Kamiah to some of the biggest cities in the Treasure Valley, they told their stories in libraries, schools, and churches. Some of the elders were concerned that no one would want to hear their stories, but the halls filled. A third aspect of the project brought 60 teachers to Coeur d’Alene for a workshop in environmental education. The lead instructor was Mari Watters, a legendary Nez Perce storyteller who Fritz calls “one of the most remarkable teachers I ever encountered.” With the success of these initial programs, the Mythweaver continued to bring the stories and cultures of Idaho’s tribes to a wider audience. Native youth were trained in radio production so they could create their own audio works for both mainstream and Native American media. One notable student, Brian Bull, is a Nez Perce now frequently heard on National Public Radio, reporting from station KLCC in Eugene, Oregon. Of particular interest to those in Sandpoint, a program about life around Lake Pend Oreille, narrated by Kalispel tribal leader Francis Cullooyah, was included in an award-winning series of five features for regional public radio. As the turn of the millennium approached, the Mythweaver sponsored a return of Kalispel people to visit their ancestral fishing

and gathering area at the mouth of the Clark Fork River. The following summer, a second gathering included members of several other tribes who had also used the area, and a powwow and salmon feast were later held at Sandpoint. Perhaps it was only coincidence that in that same year, the state of Idaho decided to recognize the Kalispel as the sixth official Idaho tribe. In the past several years, a series of visits by Kalispel culture teachers to elementary schools in Sandpoint and Priest River have given fourth-graders a chance to immerse themselves in Kalispel culture over several months time. Students tasted samples of traditional food and saw different types of clothing; they played Kalispel games and danced to Kalispel drum songs; and then the students created their own cultural displays to present to the Kalispel upon a second visit. Another project of the past three years has been the Native Heritage film series at the local library, which has included films about tribes all over the country. The Mythweaver’s current work—Native Voices Preservation Project—goes back to its roots: In the years since the organization’s inception, its original tapes of Native stories have aged and become fragile. Many of the elders Fritz interviewed are no longer alive, and the current board feels an urgency to preserve their voices. So they decided in January of 2017 that their top priority would be to digitize their tape archive. As Fritz explains, “When you produce a radio story, you may choose 30 seconds of an hour-long interview.” While the radio programs have already been preserved, there is much more material on the original tapes. The Mythweaver hopes to preserve all they can of more than

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M Y T H W E AV E R 100 tapes in its collection. The digitized recordings will be stored in several museum archives, and copies will be given to the speakers’ tribes and descendants. “Imagine Nez Perce youth hearing the voices of ancestors they never knew, listening to their wisdom, teachings, and stories about how my people lived in harmony with all things. We can all learn from them,” said Diane Mallickan, a Nez Perce who is currently the organization’s president. So the Mythweaver has come full circle. As making those first recordings was Fritz’s first project with the organization, saving them will be her last. When this project is finished, she will retire to her cozy yurt at the edge of town.

“ FRITZ WITH KALISPEL TRIBAL ELDER FRANCIS CULLOOYAH ON

“I hope to walk away, to what I don’t know,” she said. “It’s been a remarkable gift to be working with Native peoples all these years.” She may have a chance to write her own story now.

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www.TSSIR.com Jeff Bond, Owner/Broker 208-255-8270 Jeff.Bond@sothebysrealty.com

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DJ Johnson, REALTOR®

Janea Bruner, REALTOR®

Licensed in ID & WA

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Broker 208-255-9890 Harry.Reichelt@sothebysrealty.com

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S WA C » Y M C A

Pass the Racket

Helanders

SWAC BECOMES A YMCA

W

by Trish Gannon

DON AND SUE HELANDER ENJOY A VACATION AFTER TURNING OVER THE KEYS TO SWAC. COURTESY PHOTO

HEN DON AND SUE HELANDER MOVED TO SANDPOINT IN 1982, THE ‘WHY’ WAS EASY: THEY HAD DECIDED TO LEAVE ALASKA FOR THE LOWER 48 AND, LIKE SO MANY, DROVE ACROSS THE LONG BRIDGE AND FELL IN LOVE. THE ‘HOW’ THEY WOULD HAVE TO FIGURE OUT. Don had spent 12 years as a surveyor on the Alaska pipeline and not long after arriving in Sandpoint, he and a friend decided to start a hot tub business. That same month, Sandpoint West Athletic Club opened, and Don’s new business—Mountain Spa and Pool—got the contract for selling the health club the chemicals for its pool and hot tubs. That’s where it all began. Helander wasn’t just a chemical salesman to the health club; he and Sue were charter members and, because he’d become interested in handball in Alaska, he helped SWAC in running handball tournaments. “It was the place to be,” he said. Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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features Five years later he sold the hot tub business. “I didn’t know what was next when I sold it,” he said. “But the general manager at SWAC had just given notice, and in August of ‘91 I took that job.” The club changed in the ‘90s, he said, with “group exercise leading the way. Two of the six courts were converted to a fitness studio. The early ‘90s also brought the Sharks Swim Team, formed by Nancy Lippi and the much lauded Mike Brosnahan. We taught Bonner County how to swim,” he said. By 1997, Don and Sue had bought the business from the original owners, but not the land and building; that took another five years. “We finally figured out a way to buy it all, but it was extremely risky.” It was a true family business. Sue was in charge of the fitness end, and Don was the master of the pool, courts, and facilities. Daughters Abby and Cody (“The girls were micro when we bought it.”) grew up in the place, learning to do everything as soon as they were old enough. “They helped us immensely. They were good years,” Helander reminisced. SWAC partnered with the community in numerous ways: via special education swim programs, Cub Scout honor badge certificates,

an annual middle school swim safety program, the city’s adventure camp, the annual Turkey Trot, and involvement in the Long Bridge Swim. They also sponsored lots of community programs tied to fitness: CHAFE 150, the Scenic Half, and the Pend d’Oreille Bay Trail Fun Run, to name a few. And handball, Helander’s not-so-secret passion. “We hosted 40 major court sports tournaments, including four state handball tournaments.” Tournaments would take up a long weekend, and the Helanders even provided full food service for the players and their families. There were also some tough times, like the winter of 2008-2009 when Bonner County got hammered with snow. “We were getting snow off the roof when I noticed a structural problem, and shut down the pool area immediately,” Helander said. The pool area was closed for three months and, by the end, they had proactively replaced the entire roof. “There’s a lot of challenges (in owning an athletic club),” he said. With two decades of long hours and working weekends under his belt, “I began looking for exit strategies.” But selling such a specialized business is much harder than selling a house—and it’s not something that most families would take

on today. It was years before Helander was approached by the Inland Northwest Chapter of the YMCA. “I feel good about who we handed it off to,” Helander said. “They have the capacity to do right by Sandpoint.” Mary Berry, director of communications and marketing for YMCA of the Inland Northwest, said a big part of the decision to purchase SWAC was that “the community wanted us!” For years the Sandpoint YMCA Advisory Board had been working to get the YMCA to expand into the Sandpoint area. “Bringing a YMCA to Sandpoint fulfills a long-term goal to enhance youth development and healthy living programs here,” said Kendon Perry, chair of what is now the Litehouse YMCA advisory board. “We are excited to be able to provide programs based on local community goals, be it chronic disease prevention, summer meals, or youth programming, in addition to a sliding fee scale for membership based on household income.” Because YMCA is a non-profit organization, the community is likely to see greater access to the facility. “We have a number of membership categories,” explained Berry.

Our goal is to provide access to healthy and fun opportunities for every budget. We realize sometimes monthly fees still remain out of reach, so thanks to charitable contributions through our Annual Giving Campaign, we are able to offer financial assistance when needed.”

A partner in that effort is Litehouse Inc., the national salad dressing ‘giant’ based right here in Sandpoint. Their generous contribution to the YMCA resulted in the facility’s new name: 76

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S WA C » Y M C A Litehouse YMCA. Long a supporter of community events and activities, Litehouse was established in 1963. Ed and Lorena Hawkins had opened a restaurant in Hope five years prior, and diners loved the dressing served there so much they would bring empty jars with them in order to take some home. Their first jars of dressing were sold at Roger’s Thrift in Sandpoint. As the company grew, so did their support of the community where they made their home, particularly in areas that benefit children. The company’s donation toward the YMCA was just another step in that established direction. “We made a contribution to the YMCA in order for the YMCA to bring Y programs and services to the citizens of Bonner County,” explained Kelly Prior, the new president of the company. “(We believe) strong communities are built by investing in our kids, our health, and our neighbors, and we are excited to work with the YMCA on achieving this vision.” He added, “Part of Litehouse’s decision to partner with the YMCA is their alignment with our own guiding principles.” As a company, Litehouse has been 100 percent employee owned since 2014, and Prior credits those owners with the company’s support of this new venture in Sandpoint. “Litehouse’s ability to make such a large contribution is a result of the hard work and dedication of our employee owners,” he said. “Without their ongoing commitment such a contribution would not be possible.” Fundraising at the Y is ongoing, with a goal to “expand programs and increase capacity through new spaces,” said Berry. The Helanders themselves made a significant contribution to the Y for this purpose. “The campaign will focus on preparing children and youth for success (like keeping teens safe and engaged after school), supporting the local community and economic development (by hiring local talent for child care, to health and wellness and construction), and providing affordable community access to healthy opportunities, through providing access to programs that improve health and well-being for all.” As for the Helanders, they’re already enjoying their new retirement, with as much time as possible spent with grandkids, or traveling, knowing they have handed off the racket in a way that will continue to benefit Sandpoint. “I hope we served the community well,” Helander said and, speaking for the family, shared their gratitude for the loyal staff and faithful members who participated in SWAC through the years.

FORMER SWAC, NOW LITEHOUSE YMCA, HAS ENTERED A NEW ERA IN SERVICE TO THE COMMUNITY.

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The Idaho Club The only Jack Nicklaus Golf Course in Idaho! The Idaho Club is a gated community located in the four season resort town of Sandpoint and minutes away from Lake Pend Oreille and Schweitzer Mountain Ski Resort. This estate homesite is situated on top of Moose Mountain with 180-degree panoramic views including the Green Monarchs, Bottle Bay and Lake Pend Oreille. This homesite has the driveway and building pad already installed and just waiting for your home design. This double estate lot is offered at $459,000. We also have additional lots for sale with home packages with Idagon Builders and prices starting in the low $600,000s. Call us for a private tour. ALL SHOWINGS BY APPOINTMENT ONLY. Rich (208) 290-2895

The Cottages

The ledges

A Waterfront Community on Lake Pend Oreille

Over Pend Oreille

The Cottages is a Waterfront Community that sits on the This 400-acre community sits on the shores of Morton Slough shores of the largest lake in Idaho...Lake Pend Oreille. We with big views overlooking the Pend Oreille River. We are are proud to offer new custom home builds by Peterson now offering new homes on the lower level lots in phase one Construction starting in the high $400,000s. These starting at $429,000. We also have 14 additional 20-acre river secondary waterfront homesites come with a large common view estate lots starting at $200,000 or you can purchase area, tennis courts and a community the entire upper 280 acres for your waterfront with a boat dock and room private retreat! This is one of the only for your canoes and kayaks. There remaining large acreages left within 15 are a limited amount of homesites miles of downtown Sandpoint. Call me available, so donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait on this one! today for your private showing. www.TSSIR.com Rich (208) 290-2895 Rich (208) 290-2895 Rich Curtis 038-089_SMS19_ShortFeatures.indd 78

888.852.2099

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www.TSSIR.com

Desirable South Sandpoint location for this 3 bedroom, 2 bath single level Craftsman style home, featuring a gourmet kitchen w/granite countertops, Huntwood custom cabinets and all stainless appliances. This open floor plan has a natural gas fireplace, recessed entertainment wall, dining area which opens out onto a covered rear patio. The master suite is very spacious with a large master bath and has a walk-in closet. Front & rear covered patios, central air conditioning, fenced back yard and sprinkler system. $349,900. Call Rich Curtis 208-290-2895

Here is your opportunity to own this Craftsman home in The Cottages Lakefront development. This custom home has 4 bedrooms with 2.75 baths which includes the bonus room above the garage. The home is slab on grade with a master on the main floor and a two car attached garage. Quality finishes throughout starting with the custom cabinetry, granite countertops in the kitchen and bathrooms. $489,000. Call Rich Curtis 208-290-2895

Hobby farm just 10 minutes to Sandpoint. This 3 bedroom 2 bath farm house with a large deck off the back side which has full southern exposure, is the perfect setup with two large barns and a two car detached garage. This property is fenced and ready for horses and sits on 5 level acres of pasture. It is priced to sell and will not last long so don’t wait. $349,900. Call Rich Curtis 208-290-2895

This is one of the original Founders lots on Moose Mountain in the gated community of The Idaho Club! This exclusive lot is part of the Idaho Club which hosts the Jack Nicklaus Signature Golf Course…the only one in the state of Idaho. This development sits on the shores of the Pack River and overlooks the largest lake in Idaho, Lake Pend Oreille. This homesite is located just 20 minutes to Schweitzer Mountain Ski Resort. $159,000. Call Rich Curtis 208-290-2895

Beautiful Waterfront lot with 100 feet of prime shoreline overlooking Oden Bay, the Monarch Mountains and Bottle Bay. A rare find on Oden Bay and it comes with a paid community drain field hookup large enough for a 3 bedroom home and the driveway is already into the homesite. It is ready to accommodate your new luxurious private waterfront home, just bring your building plans. Close to Schweitzer Ski Resort and Jack Nicklaus Signature Golf Course and only 10 minutes to downtown Sandpoint. $449,000. Call Rich Curtis 208-290-2895

This very desirable 13.9 acre Estate Parcel is situated in the upscale Syringa Heights area between Ravenwood and the Tupelo Ridge Estates neighborhoods, just minutes to downtown Sandpoint and Schweitzer Mountain Ski Resort. This beautiful almost 14 acres estate parcel has a natural meadow for your dream homesite which sits at the very top of the property. You are surrounded by 13.9 acres of mature trees which is a heaven for birds, deer, eagles and moose. OWNER FINANCING AVAILABLE! $325,000. Call Rich Curtis 208-290-2895

TRULY A MAGNIFICENT WATERFRONT PROPERTY WHICH HAS IT ALL! This Preston Point Peninsula homesite has approximately 165 feet of frontage on the shores of the Pend Oreille River with beautiful Southwest facing views for spectacular sunsets. This lot is gently sloped with mature trees on both sides naturally screening the neighbors for your privacy. The lot is cleared with power and septic system already installed and ready to build your dream home. $399,000. Call Rich Curtis 208-290-2895

Owner financing available for these last remaining Southern exposure waterfront lots with your own private sandy beach on Lake Cocolalla. These lots come with community water and septic drain-field already installed. For those who are looking for the benefits of a smaller lake, this body of water is great for water skiing, canoeing, kayaking, paddleboarding & jet skiing. This is a great year round fishing lake! $415,000. Call Rich Curtis 208-290-2895

Welcome to life on the Pend Oreille River. This 1 acre parcel in a gated community with paved roads comes with water hookup and use of assigned slip. Nestled in the exquisite neighborhood of Salishan Point where residents enjoy one of the finest private waterfront communities in North Idaho. Complete with marina, sandy beach, pavilion with fire pit and bathhouse with showers on 2.8 acres of common area. $90,000. Call Rich Curtis 208-290-2895

Rich Curtis, REALTOR® 208.290.2895 richard.curtis@sothebysrealty.com

Luz Ossa, REALTOR® 208.610.9977 luz.ossa@sothebysrealty.com

© MMVII Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Claude Monet’s “Marine View With a Sunset,” used with permission. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated, Except Offices Owned And Operated By NRT Incorporated. Sandpoint office: 208-263-5101, 200 Main Street, Sandpoint, ID 83864.

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at the

core of a

comm unity community WHEN READERS SHARED THEIR NOMINATIONS OF WOMEN WHO MAKE A DIFFERENCE, MORE THAN 100 NAMES FLOODED IN. LEARN MORE AT WWW.SPTMAG.COM/WOMEN.

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SA N D P O I N T WO M E N

WOMEN WHO MAKE A by Susan Drinkard

Difference

O

UR COMMUNITY’S SPIRIT OF GIVING IS ALIVE, AND MANY PEOPLE ARE WORKING TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE GREATER GOOD OF OUR HOME. THEY BENEFIT CHILDREN, ANIMALS, NATURAL RESOURCES, AND DEVELOP RECREATIONAL AND CULTURAL OPPORTUNITIES WE ALL ENJOY. IN THIS ARTICLE, WE FOCUS ON THE WOMEN. We could easily write about hundreds of women who have made a difference, but in the interest of space we feature five women whose efforts through their work, volunteer activities, or political activism have changed our community. Nell Irion lived in the early 1900s and paved the way for female leadership here; Mandy Evans is influencing animal shelter care management not only in Ponderay but throughout the country; Marilyn Sabella has for decades been instrumental in bringing the performing arts to us; Ruth Wimberly works quietly for eight causes in Sandpoint to help the underprivileged; Representative Heather Scott has helped to change the goals of Idaho’s Republican party. And now, see who these women are beyond their roles in the community.

Mandy Evans Mandy Evans is not afraid to bring innovation to animal welfare, which has proven to benefit our shelter, along with other shelters across the nation. As executive director of the Panhandle Animal Shelter in Ponderay the past eight years, the tenacious Evans has challenged traditional practices and thoughts. “We believe helping animals starts with supporting their owners. This means bringing empathy, understanding, and resources to our community that reach far beyond our shelter walls.” Evans created the Home to Home program, allowing pet owners who need to surrender to the shelter another option. Bypassing the shelter reduces stress for both the animal and its family. Her influence has spread and now this program is used in 10 states. She often consults with shelters throughout the nation. Surprisingly, Evans has an identical twin sister named Melanie who runs an animal shelter in Pleasanton, California, and they consult each other frequently. “Growing up they called us the ‘M and M’ twins,” she said. Evans left California, where she was chartering cruise ships, for Sandpoint, drawn to a better way of life and a stronger sense of community. She describes herself as a “passionate influencer,” which observers might describe as a generosity of spirit for others. Her passion is demonstrated in the amazing work the shelter is accomplishing. The organization has increased the animals helped annually from 1,200 to more than 5,000. The majority of their work happens within the community, either through their Pets for Life program, where a staff person is knocking on doors to assist owners and their pets, neutering pets through their low-cost voucher and community cat programs, or helping community members keep their pets or rehome them through their Home To Home program and helpline. When she is not working for our community’s animals, Evans needle felts, enjoys her time with her family (which includes a dog), and serves on the Sandpoint Waldorf School Board. “I believe in people and I feel so blessed to be a part of this community,” Evans said.

MANDY EVANS GETS HER GROOVE ON IN REHEARSALS FOR A COMMUNITY FUNDRAISER, DANCING WITH OUR STARS. COURTESY PHOTO.

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Marilyn Sabella Medical • Dental • Behavioral Health Pediatrics • VA Clinic Ponderay & Priest River Sandpoint Pediatrics Bonners Ferry Sandpoint VA

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She considers herself a “performing arts junkie.” Marilyn Sabella was first introduced to street music in Seattle when she was a little girl, and she was hooked. Her love for live performance has benefited Sandpoint and its environs now for decades. Sabella’s work and influence has contributed to Sandpoint’s reputation for excellent cultural and musical performances at the Panida Theater and the Festival at Sandpoint. Born Marilyn Dalby, she attended schools in Sandpoint, where her father owned the Signal Oil service station and bulk plant, which later became Exxon. Her mother taught piano lessons and the entire family were avid skiers, starting the first year Schweitzer opened in 1963. She recalls one spring day when she and friends skied on the mountain and then came down to City Beach to swim in the lake. She is still very active, walking miles each day with friends. From fourth grade to graduation, the late schoolteacher Marian Ruyle taught Sabella cello and was her orchestra instructor. “She piqued my interest in the performing arts,” she said. Sabella married while in college at the University of Idaho where she earned a teaching certificate and a B.A in English. “When my sons David and Peter and I moved to Sandpoint, there weren’t any teaching jobs available. I substituted, but the pay was $17 per day. So I went out on a limb, borrowed some money, and opened Eve’s Leaves in downtown Sandpoint,” she said. The women’s clothing store turns 39 this year. Sabella served 12 years on the Idaho Commission on the Arts and worked to create a tri-state partnership with Oregon and Washington— Arts Northwest—that helps facilitate performing arts touring among the three states. She also established the Holly Eve fundraiser almost 40 years ago, which has raised over a million dollars to date to support various programs in the community. She served on the Pend Oreille Arts Council board and booked their Panida performance series as well as the memorable free outdoor concert series, Sunday Concerts on the Lawn. “For POAC, I loved to book dance companies such as Gran Folklorico de Mexico and Caucasus, a thrilling Russian company. It was also really cool to book Western Opera Theater, which was the touring company for the San Francisco Opera,” she said. “POAC presented San Francisco Opera 19 consecutive years. Because the Panida stage was the smallest they performed on, their sets were designed to break into smaller versions to accommodate us.” A charter member of the Festival at Sandpoint, Sabella has served as vice president and president of the board. She usually attends every concert, including the family concert. “My favorite shows were Tony Bennett, Mark O’Connor and Boz Skaggs, but I must also include Natalie MacMaster and Pink Martini; and of course, the Spokane Symphony! “Although I studied piano with my mother, cello with Marian Ruyle, creative writing and drama at college, and sang in ensembles and choruses, I am not an artist, though my sister, Susan Dalby, is an amazing watercolorist and glass artist. I think that my best talent has been getting artists and audiences together,” she said.

w w w. s h a k a paw p e t m a r k e t. c o m

All healthy friendships start with a paw shake & good food 82

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Indoor Shooting & Archery Ranges Machine Gun/Gun Rentals Firearms Training Classes Open to the Public Locals and Visitors Welcome

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MARILYN SABELLA OUTSIDE EVE’S LEAVES, WHICH SHE BEGAN BECAUSE THE PAY FOR A SUBSTITUTE TEACHER WAS NOT ENOUGH TO LIVE ON. COURTESY PHOTO.

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Ruth Wimberly Ruth Wimberly is the embodiment of volunteerism. In the 13 years she and husband Dan have lived in Sandpoint, she has worked tirelessly for eight different causes in our community, and continues to do so. The couple moved from Sacramento, California after visiting friends here. They were seeking a place to retire with mountains and lakes, but more importantly, “we wanted a real community.” They attended a roast for the late Jim Lippi back in 2001 and were charmed “by the sense of community, the warmth, the humor” they observed. Wimberly was raised in St. Cloud, Minnesota and she can affect a Minnesota accent quite readily. She earned her undergraduate degree from North Dakota State in Fargo, and her master’s in human resources at Golden Gate University. Wimberly had a career in human resources and she continues to work out of her home as a consultant for local clients—Wimberly Resources. This requires keen knowledge of human resource law. She is most proud of her eight-year stint on the board for Kinderhaven, a group foster home and emergency shelter for children who have been removed from their home for protection. During two of those years she served as president; she presently sits on its advisory board. As president of the board of trustees for the Bonner County Historical Society, she leads school tours and works to continue efforts to sponsor more events at the museum, such as the movies in the park in the summer. Angels Over Sandpoint benefits from Wimberly’s involvement. She has streamlined the yearly backpack giveaway to underprivileged children throughout the county and volunteers at Angels’ fundraisers. At the St. Joseph’s soup kitchen she does cleanup some Friday evenings. Also, she volunteers at the food bank putting together food bags for children to take home from school on the weekends. She is a member of the Community Assistance League and volunteers at the Bizarre Bazaar. She has been on the kayak rescue team for 10 years for the Long Bridge Swim. She also volunteers each year at the arts and crafts fair at Sandpoint City Beach as a relief person for vendors, and works the front gate at the Festival at Sandpoint. She attributes her charitable nature and spirit of volunteerism to her mother. “Her philosophy was to be a part and to give back. I have three sisters and we all volunteer a lot.” When not volunteering, Wimberly hikes with the Monday Hikers, a group that snowshoes 3-6 miles or hikes 8-10 miles. She attends Cedar Hills Church. She enjoys downhill skiing, kayaking, and she gardens. She also enjoys cooking; she formerly taught home economics. In addition, Wimberly loves dogs and cats and is commanded to go on long walks by her dog every day.

KNOWN FOR HER INFECTIOUS SMILE AND JOIE DE VIVRE, RUTH WIMBERLY IS AT THE TOP OF HER GAME WHILE MARCHING IN SANDPOINT’S 4TH OF JULY PARADE. COURTESY PHOTO.

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Beautiful Homes begin at the Ponderay Design Center

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Heather Scott At the statehouse in Boise, Representative Heather Scott has served District 1A since 2015, representing the northernmost district in Idaho. She is known for what she calls a “common-sense conservative approach to politics with a primary focus on helping people to find solutions to problems with government.” Serving her district has proven to be challenging and rewarding and at first required some work style changes. After working in remote areas doing field work around the country for 20 years, she said it was difficult to get used to the business suits and high heels she is required to wear every day during the legislative session. “I don’t think I owned many dresses before I went to Boise,” she said. In person, at A.J.’s restaurant in Priest River, people come by and nod and smile at her. She has lively dark eyes and appears much younger than her 50 years. At home in Blanchard, she and husband Andrew enjoy a rural lifestyle on their 17 acres. She likes to hunt, fish, garden, and travel. Before politics, her gardening skills developed into a small business where for several years she sold starter plants and produce at a self-serve roadside stand on Highway 41. While growing up in rural Ohio, Scott’s mother taught her and her two sisters the value of hard work and making it on a limited budget while her father, a Vietnam veteran, was a steelworker. Never spending time in the

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IDAHO REPRESENTATIVE HEATHER SCOTT, DURING A 4TH OF JULY PARADE IN 2017. COURTESY PHOTO.

West as a child, a college course on the geology of national parks would determine her future: “We visited 12 national parks in the West in 14 days. I knew the second I graduated I wanted to live in the West.” After earning a B.S. in biology from the University of Akron, Scott moved to Utah, where she met her husband of 21 years on a blind date. Now in her third term as a House Representative, Scott was not interested in politics until a few years before she ran in 2014. She worked as an aquatic biologist with her husband for two decades on natural resource efforts related to hydroelectric projects around the country. The couple attend the Cocolalla Cowboy Church because they appreciate the simple messages of faith and the bluegrass music played there. Before running for office, Heather said, “I prayed for a new direction, for God to use me. I felt led to run for office,” adding that initially she had no idea how to go about it, so, she did a Google search (‘how to run for office’). Her husband was shocked by her decision to run; both have realized it’s a team effort to be successful. It hasn’t been all roses for Scott, who has been a controversial figure, sometimes even in her own party; she has seen the ugly side of politics more often than she would like. “People say nasty things. Politics can bring out the worst in people. There are people who have attempted to impugn my character, but I’ve remained true to who I am and what I believe from day one.” Scott states she will continue to be uncompromising on issues she sees as relating to the defense of liberty and freedom. “If you look at my voting record and talk to my constituents, you will see that I stand for American principles that apply across party lines,” she said.

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D Open i ng

Nell Cora Kruegel Irion was a mighty force in Sandpoint, and in the state. She was the first female superintendent of schools in Bonner County and the first female in Idaho to run for the U.S. Congress. Born in 1877, she arrived in Sandpoint after her marriage to husband Henry in 1902, and was the champion for nearly every cause in Sandpoint beginning in the early 1900s. She was accused of overstepping her role as a woman; if Irion was weakened by that, it is not evident in news clippings or her scrapbooks from that time. When she married her husband she had to keep it secret for eight months. In those days female teachers could not keep their job if they married. She did not get fired when their secret got out, perhaps because she was an exemplary teacher the school could not afford to lose. During Irion’s campaign for the office of NELL IRION WAS ONE OF THE rural superintendent, she was told a woman FIRST WOMEN IN NORTH IDAHO TO MAKE INROADS INTO POLIwould not be able to travel throughout the TICS. PHOTO BONNER COUNTY county. In 1910, when she was elected, the county HISTORY MUSEUM. extended to the Canadian border and she had 67 schools in her charge. She made it a priority to inspect every one of them, even though roads were nearly impassable at times. During her tenure as superintendent, Irion supported more training for teachers, improved heating and lighting in the schools, and hired janitors for custodial work instead of asking the teachers to do it. She believed in education for older citizens, as well. With the Sandpoint Civic Club, a library was opened in City Hall. She assisted with the war effort as a leader in the Red Cross during World War I. Irion represented Bonner County as a Democratic delegate at the state convention, and in 1920 was nominated to run for the U.S. Congress. She did not win this position; the incumbent, Burton French of Moscow, won. She did comment on Jeannette Rankin, the first woman elected to Congress, who represented Montana. Rankin was purported to have burst into tears during congressional discussions; Irion attributed that to the fact that she was a Republican. In 1936, Irion and the civic club were instrumental in the effort to build the Community Hall on First Street with labor and materials provided by the Works Progress Administration. That same year she was the first woman elected to Sandpoint’s city council. After her husband’s death in 1960, Nell became eccentric, dressing in men’s clothing. In her diaries, available to read at our local museum, she makes it clear that she was tired, and even though she was a progressive woman who wished she could have done more for Sandpoint and its environs in her life, she had to stop. She died in 1964.

For Personal A c

en t em ev hi

Nell Irion

rs oo

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WE ASKED OUR READERS, VIA FACEBOOK, TO SEND US NAMES OF WOMEN THEY BELIEVE HAVE MADE A DIFFERENCE IN OUR COMMUNITY, AND WHY. LEARN WHO THESE WOMEN ARE—A PORTION OF THEM PICTURED ON PAGE 80—IN THE WORDS OF THOSE WHO NOMINATED THEM, ONLINE AT WWW.SPTMAG.COM/WOMEN. Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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CHAFE

CHAFE

NEW ROUTES, DISTANCES

CRANK UP THE RIDE

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THE CHAFE 150 GRAN FONDO IS A UNIQUE EXPERIENCE FOR RIDERS FROM THROUGHOUT THE U.S. PHOTO BY JASON DUCHOW.

by Trish Gannon

HE 2019 CHAFE 150 GRAN FONDO IS SHAPING UP TO BE A RIDE FOR THE RECORD BOOKS. In part, that may be due to its promotion in Bicycling Magazine as the No. 3 top charity ride in the U.S. CHAFE—the acronym stands for “Cycle Hard for Education”—offers riders a chance to participate in a group ride through some of the most gorgeous scenery around while promoting early childhood literacy in the greater Sandpoint area. There are new routes and distances this year, along with a Family Fun Ride. Riders can choose to ride 150, 100, 80, 40, or 30 miles, or do the 4-mile fun ride. The ride takes place June 15, and riders can register up until race day. CHAFE is sponsored by the Sandpoint Rotary Club, and the new Family Fun Ride is being undertaken by the almost equally new Sandpoint Rotaract members—young adults who are community leaders. The fun ride is a four-mile jaunt that takes place mostly along the Dover Bay bike trail, with fun and games afterward at the Dover Barn. Registration is $10 for children 6 to 16; there is no charge for younger

children, or adult chaperones. The 30- and 40-mile rides wind through the beautiful Selle Valley, while the three longer rides all travel from Idaho into Montana, and then south down the Bull River Valley, before heading back to Sandpoint on Highway 200, with sections alongside Lake Pend Oreille. See the ride website for detailed route maps. While riders can opt into the shorter rides, it’s the 150-mile Gran Fondo that’s the signature ride of the event. “The 150 distinguishes us,” said Sandpoint CPA Brad Williams, a founder and chairman of CHAFE. “There are very few or no other rides of that distance anywhere in the Northwest.” Rides of a hundred miles are a standard of cycling events, “so we thought it would be nice to have that available as well,” he explained. All riders will see the same great support that CHAFE is known for: excellent break stops at reasonable distances, biker support, good signage. “Rotary is full of these really bright people, and they all have input into what we’re doing,” said Williams. “Our goal has always been to do the event in the very best way it can be done.” That reputation, the 150-mile

distance, and the gorgeous views are part of what is helping CHAFE 150 to grow so quickly. “We get very few locals (comparatively),” Williams said. The rest come not only from nearby states and Canada, but some riders even travel from the eastern half of the U.S. to take part in what’s becoming a “must-do” ride for cyclists. And because the CHAFE 150 is a fundraising ride, that means more money going to improve our local community. In fact, since its inception CHAFE has donated over half a million dollars to area charities and schools, and for this year Williams anticipates they will raise close to $100,000. Sandpoint Rotary is a long-time supporter of childhood literacy projects, and ride proceeds this year will go toward projects that help children improve their reading skills, primarily via an after-school program run by the Lake Pend Oreille School District. “We’re really excited about it,” said Williams. “These types of programs have demonstrable results that last into adulthood.” To register or learn more, visit www.chafe150.org.

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Hope’s Premier Full Service Marina Located in Ellisport Bay on beautiful Lake Pend Oreille in scenic Hope, Idaho. Hope’s premier full service marina offering accessory room, full service shop, and docking facilities. Our sales department represents Wooldridge Boats, Honda Motors and Volvo/Penta engines and we offer customer service like no other marina on the lake.

Other services include: showers, laundromat, boat rentals,

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HOPE MARINA | 208.264.5106 HOPE MARINE SERVICES | 208.264.5105 47392 Hwy 200 Hope, Idaho HopeMarina.com

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HOPE MARINE SERVICES Serving Lake Pend Oreille and beyond for 26 years. On site dock and ramp service erving Complete marine upholstery department Oreille Pend Lake Volvo Penta - Honda Marine - Indmar authorized and beyond for repair center – models beyond for – and • Servicing most makes and • • •

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At Hope Marina Join us at The Floating Restaurant For: Lunch, Dinner and Sunday Brunch

Completely Remodeled Dining Room, Lounge and Covered Patio

Spectacular Views

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www.HopeFloatingRestaurant.com 208.264.5311 | 47392 HWY 200 East Hope

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WELL-KNOWN LOCAL JEFF RICH, AKA ‘SPROUTS,’ WITH JASSIM HICKS, ENJOYING A DAY AT THE LAKE. PHOTO BY FIONA HICKS

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A look at some not-so-secret spots

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PADDLEBOARDING LPO Sand Creek (right) is known for smooth water, and quick and easy access while Green Bay (below) is harder to get adventurous ride.

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1 GO FOR A SWIM | Sandpoint City Beach

to, but promises a more

3 QUIET PADDLE | Clark Fork Delta through Johnson Creek, to the Green Monarchs PHOTOS CLOCKWISE: SAND CREEK BY DOUG MARSHALL; CITY BEACH STATUE OF LIBERTY BY DOUG MARSHALL; LOGS AT CITY BEACH BY FOSTER CLINE; CANOEING UNDER THE CLARK FORK BRIDGE BY WOODS WHEATCROFT; A NICE PADDLE THROUGH JOHNSON CREEK BY DOUG MARSHALL. GREEN BAY BY WOODS WHEATCROFT.

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L O C A L F AV E S O F T H E L A K E

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sk people why they live in Sandpoint, and “quality of life” ranks right at the top of the list. And when you’re talking quality of life, the summer season means you’re talking Lake Pend Oreille—all 110 gorgeous, shoreline-miles of it! The time is now for soaking in all that Lake Pend Oreille has to offer, and we went straight to the people, via an online poll, to discover a list of their favorite aspects of the lake. Here’s what they said:

TAKE A SWIM

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rom families to old-timers, summer is the time to stick your toes in the water, and we asked our readers for their favorite place to take a swim. The hands-down favorite was Sandpoint’s own City Beach (see related story on page 54), and it’s easy to see why. “Sandpoint City Beach is one of the best places to swim in the Inland Northwest,” said Mayor Shelby Rognstad. “It’s very accessible by boat, car or multimodal transportation. And it’s close to downtown with lots of parking and other amenities.” One major advantage—not lost on the parents of small children—is that City Beach is the only local beach with lifeguards. Other amenities at City Beach include ample parking, boat docks, restrooms, a summer food court, a covered pavilion, barbecues, kids’ play equipment, volleyball, tennis, a walking trail, and the most famous Statue of Liberty found west of the Mississippi! But City Beach is not the only place for a nice swim. Two close contenders are Sam Owen in Hope, and Garfield Bay in Sagle. Sam Owen campground and recreation area is a fee-based park managed under an agreement with the U.S. Forest Service. Set in a small forest of old western red cedar, ponderosa pine and Douglas fir, with a sandy/gravel beach, the park is open from May through September. Garfield Bay is located about 8 miles west of Sagle, and features a free, county-owned day use area. There are private marinas, fee-based campgrounds, stores, restaurants, and places to overnight as well. Other beaches worthy of mention include Fishermans Island, Dog Beach, Trestle Creek, Dover Bay, Riley Creek, Pend Oreille Shores, the “Pilings” in Hope (underneath the Bridge to Nowhere), Oden Bay, and Green Bay. Not to mention jumping off a boat just about anywhere!

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PADDLEBOARDING LPO

f you’ve always wanted to ‘surf the waves,’ you won’t get much of a chance to on Lake Pend Oreille. But for an all-body workout that’s close, you might want to choose paddleboarding. Standing on a board as you paddle your way through water might look easy, but practitioners say it’s not. Learning how to balance will take some time, so beginners will want to start in an area protected by the wind, where the water is calm. Sand Creek is a favored area for beginners to get their ‘sea’ legs. No, it’s technically not a part of Lake Pend Oreille but, like the Pend Oreille River, it does tend to get lumped in with it and for calm water, it can’t be beat. Meandering alongside the ADA accessible Sand Creek Multi Use Trail, other benefits include public art and the area’s status as a wetlands viewing area. Not to mention an up close look at various beautification efforts on the creek side of town not easily viewable from any other vantage point. Those with more advanced skills can try any area on the lake where access is easy; along the Sunnyside Peninsula or from various launching places in Hope. But for a unique spot favored by locals, head out to Green Bay. Managed by the U.S. Forest Service, Green Bay is a no-fee area with vault toilets, barbecues, and lots of nearby hiking. Known for its crystal clear water, smooth pebble beach, and spectacular lake views, Green Bay can be hard to get to (the access road is steep), but is considered well worth the effort. Just past Garfield Bay (south of Sandpoint and west of Sagle), take the Garfield Bay Cut-off Road for 0.2 miles, turn right on Green Bay Road and, 1.2 miles further, take the fork to the right which descends to the Green Bay parking area.

A QUIET PADDLE

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ou don’t have to camp if you don’t want to, but the area of the Green Monarchs is a top vote-getter as a favored spot for a quiet paddle by canoe or kayak. Most people put in at the Clark Fork Driftyard due to ease of access and from there can paddle east along the face of the Green Monarchs, stopping as inspired to visit the shoreline. Others prefer to head south, into Denton Slough. And those who want a lengthy paddle can begin the journey at Johnson Creek, a few miles from Clark Fork, and make their way through the Clark Fork Delta and out to the driftyard. Sandy Bessler and Susan Drinkard wrote about kayaking around the lake’s shoreline in the summer of 2017 (www.sptmag.com/kayak) and about this area Bessler said, “I love paddling in the Clark Fork Delta. I find a serenity and closeness with the sights and sounds of the natural world there that is calming and awe inspiring. I’ve seen deer along the

shoreline, opsrey diving to catch fish, eagles soaring while scanning the water for a meal, schools of minnows in the shallows, and was even lucky enough once to watch an otter, who was also very curious about me.” While saying she’d prefer to keep this paddle a ‘secret,’ she did offer, “If you really want to know the meaning of the word breathtaking, paddle on to the Monarchs. Being in that big water with such expansive views stops me short every time.” Anywhere you can reach the shoreline is likely a good place for a quiet paddle, but some area favorites include Hawkins Point to the Pack River Delta, Fishermans Island, Dog Beach, Ellisport Bay, Mineral Point, Bottle Bay, Pend d’Oreille Bay, Sunnyside, Morton Slough, and Trestle Creek, along with the longer paddle from Farragut to Lakeview. Though not on the lake itself, Sand Creek is another favorite, as is Dover, and the Pack River Flats. Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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TAKE A WALK

hether it’s a short walk on your lunch break or a longer ramble with the family, it’s hard to beat the Pend d’Oreille Bay Trail. A 1.5-mile trail (3 miles out and back), it’s located just north of City Beach. Less than a decade old (the official trail opening was in 2014) the trail—created through the efforts of interested volunteers along with the cities of Sandpoint and Ponderay—can be used by a couple hundred people on a nice day, and it still doesn’t feel crowded. Open to dogs (but put them on a leash and please, clean up their messes!), the trail meanders along the lakeshore, passing the picturesque ruins of the old Humbird Mill along the way. To get there, turn left at the Edgewater Hotel at City Beach and follow the road through the Seasons at Sandpoint condominiums. The trailhead is just beyond, and limited parking is available. On a nice day you might want to park at City Beach and hike in. Local Zumba instructor Kathy Chambers—a near neighbor to the trail—describes the trail’s benefits: “The Pend d’Oreille Bay Trail offers sanctuary and tranquility for me (and the dog!). I feel so far removed on this hidden path that is actually right under our noses. Walking past the ruins gives me a sense of connection with Sandpoint’s roots, and I can always count on running into a few friendly faces along the way.” Another favored walk in town is the path across the Long Bridge, an approximate 2 miles that begins at a parking lot on the north side of the bridge, and passes by Dog Beach (another dog-friendly place on the water). Asphalt covered and mostly level, this trail is suitable for any age, and any ability, and gives walkers an opportunity to soak in the view that brought many residents here to live. Other trails within Sandpoint include the paved, circular pathway around City Beach and the paved trail along Sand Creek. Just a little further out are the trails at Dover, Mineral Point, Hawkins Point, Oden Bay, Garfield Bay, and Green Bay. While not along the lake, the trail to the top of Gold Hill, and the strenuous Trail #65 to Scotchman Peak (the highest peak in Bonner County) provide stunning views of the lake. Further south you’ll find a beautiful (viewtiful?) trail system at Farragut. Finally, don’t forget that Sandpoint features an extensive system of bike paths that also make for enjoyable walking.

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VISIT THIS COMMUNITY

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lthough Sandpoint is the county seat, and the place where most of our money lives (think banks), Lake Pend Oreille is dotted with wonderful small communities that offer a variety of attractions. Hope is a big favorite for its access to the lake, great restaurants, and small town flavor and, depending on your perspective, Sandpoint itself is a pretty cool “small community.” But if you’re making a visit here, or live here but don’t get out much, one community you won’t want to miss is Bayview. Located about a half hour south of Sandpoint (it’s a big lake!) and on the southern tip of Lake Pend Oreille, Bayview is known for its floating village (houses built on the lake itself), as well as for the mountain goats often spotted on its steep hillsides. Bayview is just four miles from Farragut State Park, formerly

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Farragut Naval Training Station, and now is home to the U.S. Navy’s Acoustic Research Detachment, which, among other duties, tests submarines in the waters of Lake Pend Oreille. Many people know that mining played a huge role in the settlement of North Idaho, but lesser known is that limestone (the basis for concrete) was an important mining target—and many early limestone kilns can be found near Bayview. The first mining claim for limestone in the area was filed in 1881. Between restaurants, resorts, marinas, and the nearby state park, Bayview is well worth a day visit—or more! Other cool local communities on the lake include both Garfield Bay and Bottle Bay south of Sandpoint; Hope (and East Hope and Beyond Hope) to the east; and Dover and Laclede to the west along the river.

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GO CAMPING

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6 GO CAMPING | Sam Owen

lthough we live in an area that’s a tourist destination, that doesn’t mean we don’t like to get as up close and personal with it as we can, when we can. And that means a lot of people living here like to go camping—even if it’s in their own backyard. A clear favorite outside of the back yard is the campground at Sam Owen, on the Hope Peninsula. (Read more about it in “Take a Swim,” p. 97.) It’s such a popular spot, in fact, that reservations are highly recommended. While flush toilets are available in the campground, electric hook-ups are not. Another favored campsite on the lake is the Green Bay campground near Garfield Bay. A no-fee site maintained by Idaho Panhandle National Forest, there are 11 campsites with picnic tables and fire rings, plus vault toilets and a sandy beach. One of the highest vote-getters for camping is the Green Monarchs. Located on the east side of the lake, the Green Monarchs are a finger of the Coeur d’Alene Mountains and include the least-developed stretch of Lake Pend Oreille shoreline. The campground at Long Beach has been described as one of the wildest camping experiences on the lake, but it’s not easy to get to—in fact, you’ll have to paddle there. Despite living just down the road, this has been a favored spot for Corey Vogel and his son, Conorey. “There is nothing like waking up before daylight and listening to the waves hit the shore while the lake and mountains are slowly lit up by the sun. Even a cold day camping on the lake is better than a warm day at the house. My son Conorey and I always enjoyed gathering unique rocks, formed by the lake over thousands of years,” he said. The campground offers a small beach, fire rings, and a vault toilet. There are offshore mooring buoys if you come by boat. If you choose to paddle in, be aware the area is sometimes known for strong winds. Don’t tip over. Other favored camping spots are Garfield Bay, Riley Creek, Maiden Rock, Trestle Creek, Whiskey Rock, Farragut, Mineral Point, and Springy Point. One wag voted for City Beach but please note: overnight camping is not allowed there. PHOTOS CLOCKWISE BOTH PAGES: PEND D’OREILLE BAY TRAIL BY NATE BESSLER; GREEN MONARCHS BY DOUG MARSHALL; SAM OWEN BY COREY VOGEL; BAYVIEW’S FLOATING COMMUNITY BY PAULA JENSEN WILKINSON; THE LONG BRIDGE BY JASON DUCHOW.

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VISIT THIS COMMUNITY | Bayview

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CHECK OUT THAT VIEW

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CHECK OUT THAT VIEW | Top of Hope at Strong Creek

o visitor to the area (nor any local, for that matter) should miss the opportunity to see for themselves what is arguably the most iconic image of Sandpoint—the view of Lake Pend Oreille from atop Schweitzer Mountain. Another excellent view spot is from the top of Gold Hill; either hike your way there on the Gold Hill Trail #3, or take the easy way out and drive to the top. But a favorite overview of Lake Pend Oreille you might have missed is what you can see from the mountains above Hope. You get a hint of what’s to come simply driving along the highway through Hope, but a better vantage can be had by visiting Hope Cemetery (follow the signs in town). Go even higher by hiking Strong Creek Trail #44. From this spot, the lake stretches out in its magnificent glory all the way down to Bayview. The Monarchs spring from the lake to your left, while islands and peninsulas dot the foreground. And above all is the water—lots and lots of water. Lyndsie Kiebert, a reporter for the Sandpoint Reader, said, “I know a lot of people visit Hope and are astounded by the vastness and beauty of the lake.” A lifetime Hope resident, she added, “I grew up on these shores and I still haven’t found a view that takes my breath away like driving east on Highway 200 and hitting the bridge over the Hope boat basin.” With such a large and picturesque lake in our backyard, it’s not surprising that there’s lots of favored spots for taking in the view. Green Bay, Trail #120, Packsaddle Peak, the Green Monarchs (take the High Drive, but only in summer), Mineral Point, Ponder Point, Maiden Rock, Sunnyside, Johnson Point, and from the top of the Mickinnick Trail are just a few area favorites. And let’s not forget the view that convinced a lot of people to move here: coming up the highway from the south and driving on to the Long Bridge, the Pend Oreille River on the west and the lake itself stretching out to the east. When locals travel, this is the view that tells them, “You’re home.”

FISH FROM THE SHORE

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8 FISH FROM SHORE | Sunnyside

e’ll be honest. The overwhelming response when we asked for people’s favorite shoreline fishing spot was some variation of, “Ha, ha! Nice try!” Nonetheless, there are a number of places where people do fish from shore, from the rocks at the south end of the Long Bridge all the way east to Denton Slough, or further south to Bayview. But before you grab your pole to see what you can catch, please remember that if you’re over 14 years of age, all fishing in North Idaho requires a fishing license. (And if you’re under 14, you need to be fishing with someone who has a license.) When you get your license, you’ll also learn what rules regulate fishing in our area. A favorite spot for locals to fish is off the Sunnyside Peninsula. The Sunnyside Access Point provides a boat ramp along with a rocky beach where many like to toss a line in. A little further down the road, another public access at Hawkins Point has a good turnaround with parking, a concrete boat ramp and dock, plus a public restroom. Fishermans Island in Oden Bay is also in this area, and is important bird habitat. Birds, of course, are the area’s premiere fishermen, so where there’s a lot of birds, there’s also a lot of fish.

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L O C A L F AV E S O F T H E L A K E

LAKESIDE HISTORY | Farragut State Park

TAKE IN SOME HISTORY

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akeside historical sites include the remnants of the Humbird Mill off of the Pend d’Oreille Bay Trail, and the remains of an old fire tower on the Schafer Peak Trail #68. Kullyspell House, the first documented trading post between fur trappers and local tribes, was located on the Hope Peninsula, though the area is now private property. And a good dose of local history can be found at the Bonner County History Museum, just steps from the lake on Ella Street in Sandpoint. The museum is open for the summer from Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and on Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. (Don’t forget the first Saturday each month is free!) But for history you can walk through, head back south to Farragut State Park, the former home of Farragut Naval Training Station. Open year round, the 4,000 acre park was once a major training base for the U.S. Navy in World War II. Many residents can trace their local roots to the arrival of an ancestor who trained there and fell in love with the area; during its operation, almost 300,000 sailors trained at Farragut, which also housed almost 900 German prisoners of war. The Museum at the Brig—open daily from Memorial Day through Labor Day—offers films on local history and geology, along with exhibits. There are over 40 miles of hiking trails at Farrugut, along with 265 campsites, a beach, a picnic area, and five—really, five!—18-hole disc golf courses. Don’t forget that Lake Pend Oreille itself is the visible remnant of what was a truly significant event in history—the massive, repeated floods caused by Glacial Lake Missoula that shaped the entire landscape from the Clark Fork Delta to the Pacific Coast. A pullout just west of Hope on Hwy. 200 features interpretive plaques that explain the local significance. (Learn more at www.iafi.org)

SPOT SOME BIRDS

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10 WILDLIFE VIEWING | Dover Bay Wetlands

PHOTOS CLOCKWISE BOTH PAGES: FIREWORKS ATOP GOLD HILL BY TAMARA PORATH; FARRAGUT STATE PARK, COURTESY PHOTO; DOVER BAY WETLANDS BY RICH COWER; SHORELINE FISHING BY FIONA HICKS; ABOVE HOPE ON THE STRONG CREEK TRAIL BY BEN GARRISON.

andpoint is an area known for its wildlife—and that includes those with feathers! If you’re a bird watcher, then this is the place for you. North Idaho falls within the Pacific Flyway, one of the four major migratory paths birds follow in the U.S., so the birds are plentiful. For most visitors, it’s the bald eagle they want to see. Drive along Highway 200 going east and you’ll find plenty of opportunities, as they like to nest in the crags of dead trees along the shoreline, and Hope is home to Pearl Island, an eagle sanctuary. Autumn (when the kokanee spawn) is a great time for viewing eagles. But a local favorite of bird watchers is out at the Dover Bay Wetlands. Located within the Dover Bay Resort, there are over 12 miles of bike and pedestrian trails, a public beach, and more than 10 acres of day-use, no-fee public parks, including several protected wetland areas that are home to a huge variety of birds. “The best place to see birds in Dover are around the ponds near the sewage treatment plant,” said photographer Rich Cower. Because there’s no parking near the ponds, he says the “best place to park is near the City Hall building; it’s a short walk over to the ponds.” And as an added benefit? “I’ve seen people take some big fish from those ponds.” Anywhere there’s water—and that’s just about everywhere in North Idaho—is a good place for bird watching, but some other favorites on the list include spots along the Pack River, from Denton Slough to the Clark Fork Delta east of Hope, Black Rock, Chuck Slough, and Swan Shores. For an unforgettable experience, bird watch from your couch with Sandpoint Online’s osprey cam (www.sptmag.com/osprey) at Memorial Field, featuring some of the area’s most beloved birds. Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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Lake Pend Oreille Locals’ favorite spots

1. SANDPOINT CITY BEACH BY JERRY LUTHER 2. GREEN BAY BY WOODS WHEATCROFT 3. THE CLARK FORK DRIFTYARD BY WOODS WHEATCROFT 4. THE PEND D’OREILLE BAY TRAIL STAFF PHOTO 5. BAYVIEW BY TERRY SASSER 6. SAM OWEN PENINSULA BY LINDA LANTZY 7. ABOVE HOPE BY COREY VOGEL 8. SUNNYSIDE PENINSULA BY FIONA HICKS 9. FARRAGUT NAVAL TRAINING STATION BONNER COUNTY HISTORY MUSEUM 10. DOVER BAY WETLANDS BY RICH COWER

OUR GREAT BIG LAKE Get out and explore—you’ll find plenty of amazing places around Lake Pend Oreille. You can learn more about these areas at Sandpoint Online’s guide to the lake (www.sptmag.com/ lakeguide).

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LAKE PEND OREILLE IS HOME TO FIRST-CLASS FISHING by Ralph Bartholdt

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he steel fish welded to the balusters on Sandpoint’s Bridge Street languish in a soft breeze from the lake. The rusted cutouts of mountain and pygmy whitefish, cutthroat trout and char—better known as bull trout—appear poised to jump into the limpid Sand Creek and fin south into the great expanse of Lake Pend Oreille. They replicate the three native fish species that were the sole piscatorial inhabitants of the fifth deepest lake in the nation when the Kalispel alone plied its water more than a century ago. Since then, the introduction of more than a dozen species has greatly expanded fishing opportunities in the 84,000 acre lake, the state’s largest and deepest at 1,170 feet plus. Warm-water species such as large and smallmouth bass, crappie, bluegill, sunfish, and perch are sought after game fish, along with colder water fish like pike and walleye, but kokanee are an angling staple, and trout are king. “It’s an extremely popular trout fishery,” said Matt Corsi, Idaho Department of Fish and Game’s principal fishery research biologist. “Most of the angling effort on the lake is focused on trout and kokanee.” Since the first Gerrard rainbow, a 26-pounder, was legally caught in Pend Oreille in 1945 after years of attempting to successfully introduce and grow the Canadian stock from Gerrard, British Columbia, Idaho’s gem of sky blue water 200 miles to the south became known as a class-act American rainbow fishery. It still is thanks to the work of IDFG and hundreds of volunteers (see story on p. 108). Before Schweitzer lured visitors with the thrill of racing down lightly populated mountainsides, it was fishing that made the area a tourist destination. The lake’s introduced rainbow trout can grow to world record size. “We’re very unique because we have the largest rainbows in the world,” said Ken Hayes, who owns Seagull Charters. “That’s what makes us a destination fishery.” The state’s largest Gerrard rainbow weighed 37 pounds and was caught in Pend Oreille in 1947. Also known as Kamloops, the big rainbows are the focus of several derbies that have anglers trolling for the meat eaters using lures that mimic landlocked red salmon, or kokanee, the Kamloops’ favorite food. “It’s a pretty technical troll fishery,” Corsi said. Many anglers like downriggers and weights to keep lures at depth. Using planer boards on multiple rods to pull lines and lures—such as bucktail flies—perpendicular to the boat instead of behind it, is also a common trolling method. And traditional trolling— sometimes called long lining—with plugs such as Rapalas has been a staple technique since the 1940s. The Kamloops are pelagic, open water hunters that feed on the lake’s great schools of kokanee salmon—also an introduced fish, often referred to as silver salmon or blueback. Native char, or bull trout, still ply the depths of the lake and like Kamloops follow schools of kokanee, their primary food source. “Everything feeds on kokanee,” Corsi said. Kokanee’s popularity as a bait fish is one of the reasons the state closely monitors populations of the small salmon to ensure a healthy food base for the rest of the lake’s predators. And they are many. Anglers hunt for mackinaw or lake trout, another introduced pelagic predator, using the same methods that work for rainbows and bull trout. Spoons, large flies, or plugs imitating kokanee are trolled in open water at various depths, depending usually on water temperature, and where the kokanee are feeding.

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features

fishing

for $$$$

50

tagged

walleye

released into Lake Pend Oreille, Clark fork river and Pend Oreille River

PREVIOUS SPREAD: ANTICIPATING A

angler

GLORIOUS DAY OF FISHING. PHOTO BY

incentive

RICH LINDSEY. RIGHT: KEVIN SAWYER AND

$1k

DAUGHTER BECKY, BY AMY PETERSON BELOW: SHOWING OFF A NEW CATCH, BY WOODS WHEATCROFT

$1,000 dollars paid to anglers for every tagged walleye head turned in

NO limit +

The Mackinaw, a long-lived fish, so depleted the kokanee that it imperiled the continued existence of the lake’s beloved rainbow in years past, triggering multiple endeavors to save the fishery. Happily, those efforts have been largely successful, but as part of that ongoing work, this summer’s anglers can win cash rewards for harvesting walleye, a new apex predator that can potentially threaten kokanee populations. (See Fishing for $$$ at right.) Idaho Fish and Game aggressively monitors kokanee in an effort to keep anglers happy. “We had some tough years on the lake,” said Hayes of the times when kokanee populations crashed. “You could still catch fish, but they weren’t as big.” As a result, “We’ve had a lot of heart and effort put towards monitoring kokanee.” For more than 75 years Lake Pend Oreille anglers have sought out the small silver salmon—when they are big enough, 106

usually around 11 inches—for their smokers. The land-locked salmon generally stay in the open water, but they have been caught near shore in the fall when they are getting ready to spawn. Cutthroat trout, which can grow to 20 inches or more, stick closer to shore where they prefer to feed on bugs. Rich Lindsey, a long time fishing guide who takes anglers onto LPO in the spring and autumn when he isn’t chasing Priest Lake mackinaw, prefers Pend Oreille’s western shore, from Garfield Bay to Cape Horn, for cutthroat because it is insect rich. “From Garfield go south, or from Bayview, go north,” Lindsey said. “There’s a lot of territory, a lot of nice water, and a lot of fish.” Lindsey sometimes targets bull trout—a strictly catch and release fishery—on the lake’s darker, cooler eastern shore. “There are a lot of bull trout on the east

No bag limit in the lake

on walleye

pend oreille system

As part of IFG’s efforts to reduce the walleye population, 50 walleye in Lake Pend Oreille, the Clark Fork River, and the Pend Oreille River have been injected in the snout with a tiny, internal tag. These tags are invisible to anglers, but turning in heads from legally caught walleye offers a chance at two types of cash rewards. Anglers will receive $1,000 for a head turned in from a tagged walleye. Additionally, every walleye head turned in enters anglers in the monthly drawing for 10 cash prizes of $100 each. There is no bag limit on walleye in the Pend Oreille system. For rules and entry details visit Fish and Game’s Lake Pend Oreille Angler Incentive Program website.

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E ETSO OFFI STHHI N LK PO L O C AGLU IFD AV E GL A E

PHOTOS CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: KEN HAYES OF SEAGULL CHARTERS WITH A RAINBOW TROUT. COURTESY PHOTO; THE ELUSIVE KOKANEE SWIMMING. PHOTO BY PETE COMSTOCK; FISHING GUIDE RICH LINDSEY LOVES FISHING FOR WALLEYE. BY RALPH BARTHOLDT; MATT CORSI, IDFG RESEARCH BIOLOGIST, SHOWS OFF A RAINBOW. COURTESY PHOTO; CHAD LANDRUM OF GO FISH! CHARTERS, WITH A SMALL MOUTH BASS. BY RALPH BARTHOLDT.

side,” he said. The lake’s special regulation requires anglers stay 100 yards off shore from bull trout spawning tributaries such as Trestle and Granite creeks, he said. Anglers should be familiar with the state’s regulations. Lindsey regularly picks up brown trout in the lake’s north waters where fishing pressure is lower around Bottle Bay, he said. Over the past decade or more Lake Pend Oreille has become a popular bass, pike, and walleye destination. Chad Landrum, owner of Go Fish! Charters, is among a growing group of spiny ray enthusiasts who regularly target the lake’s northern points, islands, and shoals. He fishes where alluvial flats fall off into deeper water at the edge of bays and inlets, and looks for submerged structure wherever he can find it. For walleyes, Landrum fishes edges such as a sand bottom that transitions to a rocky bottom, or where the depth plunges “from shallow to deep.” He targets cuts and pools where water currents change course or speed. “It’s just a matter of finding them out there,” Landrum said. “There’s no fast approach to catching walleye.” “The walleye move around, and no one’s got a really good handle on them yet,” added Hayes. “You can get a great catch one day, and the next day they’re miles away.”

In spring, many anglers troll the mouth of the Clark Fork River as the sun warms the flats and the river pushes food into the lake. Although the channels change each season, the area is species rich. “It’s just one of those fishy places,” Corsi said. “You end up with bass, walleye, rainbows, and pike. It makes for interesting fishing.” Although Pend Oreille has seen a steady increase in angler pressure as its fishery diversifies, there is still a lot of room on the big lake. “There’s enough water to spread us all around,” Landrum said.

I’ve been fishing this lake for 30 years, running up to 270 trips per year,” added Hayes. “And right now the fishing is getting healthier and healthier. I see a lot of fish out there.”

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LPOIC PHOTO BY BILL SHAFER

lake pend oreille idaho club HAS WORKED TO “PROTECT AND ENHANCE” THE LAKE’S FISHERY SINCE THE 1940S

BILL SCHAUDT WITH A 27-POUNDER

by Lyndsie Kiebert

T

here’s a gourmet breakfast in the works as the sun rises. Music plays as the men sit down to play cards. The boat is rigged up, poised for hours on the lake. It’s Derby day, and Dave Ivy’s crew is ready. What keeps Ivy and his fellow fishermen chasing the monster fish in Lake Pend Oreille? “It’s the tradition,” Ivy said. “It’s the love of the lake.” That love of the lake is what drives the Lake Pend Oreille Idaho Club, of which Ivy is a part, to continue pursuing its mission: “To protect and enhance Lake Pend Oreille.” The club has accomplished this since the 1940s by hosting several derbies—including the famous K&K derbies—every year; volunteering to maintain spawning habitat; offering scholarships to local students; and, perhaps most prominently, advocating for the kokanee and Kamloops populations in the lake. Andy Dux, regional fishery manager for Idaho Fish and Game, said LPOIC has “actively participated in efforts to address fishery management issues and assisted Fish and Game with a variety of projects that have benefited the fishery. “The LPOIC brings anglers together who value the fishing opportunity that Lake Pend Oreille offers, particularly for trophy rainbow trout,” Dux said. “As a result, the LPOIC has played an important role in promoting this fishery.” Bill Schaudt, a previous LPOIC president and club member for 29 years, wrote an extensive history of the club in 1994, just short of LPOIC’s 50th birthday. In that history, available at their website, he details fishing stories decades old, illustrating the way giant fish lured people from all over the world to North Idaho. Famed singer Bing Crosby caught a 15.75-pound rainbow off Whiskey 108

Rock in 1946. Fish from Lake Pend Oreille graced the dinner table at the White House. World record fish were pulled from the lake frequently. As years went on and the fishery waxed and waned, LPOIC remained dedicated to the lake’s wellbeing. “We were told (in the ‘80s) we were just half a dozen guys in a bar throwing a derby once a year, and they weren’t going to listen to us,” Schaudt said. “So we rallied, and we came up with a plan and we executed it.” The club has seen its share of controversy. As of late, LPOIC has seen backlash for implementing challenge derbies, where participants are allowed to weigh just one fish, in an effort to keep more rainbows in the lake so they can grow to their full potential. Tom Anderson is a proponent of such a practice. He’s the only fisherman to win a derby and release the trophy fish back into the lake with the help of a cooler and aerator. “I went out to prove that they don’t need to kill these fish,” he said. “For the first 15 years of fishing here, I killed a lot. That’s what everybody did. But then I thought, “This is too valuable a resource.”” As the predator/prey balance in the lake shifts over time and the fishery needs tending to, LPOIC plans to be there. It’s all in an effort to secure the unique population of impressive rainbows for generations to come, and to preserve the beauty of a day of fishing on Lake Pend Oreille. “I’m just hoping that it carries on,” Ivy said. “Hopefully it’ll keep going on and my grandkids will get to still be doing this when they’re my age.” To get involved with LPOIC attend a general meeting, held the second Wednesday of the month at Jalapenos at 6:30 p.m. Learn more at www.lpoic. org or at lpoic on Facebook.

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C

LOCA L NF ’AV ES O DO T WA KF E THE LAKE

Don’t

wake the lake

THE MASSIVE WAVES CREATED BY WAKEBOARDING BOATS MAKE FOR A FUN RIDE— BUT CAUSE DAMAGE CLOSE TO SHORE. PHOTO BY WAI SIEW.

by Susan Drumheller

T

he waters are getting more turbulent on Lake Pend Oreille, especially on the Pend Oreille River, since wakeboarding boats entered the local scene. Wakeboarding boats are designed to create waves— big ones for surfing—but perhaps few people who purchased them realized they were entering rough waters of another kind. In the last two years, the rise of wakeboarding boats has provoked a cry for increased regulation. Large, disrupting wakes have unleashed a flood of complaints: from damaged docks and grandkids tossed off float pads, to eroding shorelines and seasickness. “The huge waves constantly smashing against the shore make floating and playing on our beach unbearable,” reported one homeowner in a survey Bonner County conducted last spring. “I literally get seasick when trying to float on my floatie.” Wakeboarding boats aren’t the only source of damaging wakes along the shorelines. Large cabin cruisers, violators of the 200-foot nowake zone, and windstorms have also been blamed for the problem. However, as one resident wryly observed in that 2018 survey, “I have never seen a storm that lasted 12 hours a day for three months.” In response, the Bonner County Waterways Advisory Board ini-

tiated an education campaign, “Avoid the Shore, Ride the Core,” to encourage boaters to stick to the middle of the lake and the river. The further they originate from shore, the more time wakes have to dissipate, and the less damage they cause. Still, the sheriff and shoreline property owners considered educational efforts were inadequate. They called for a ban on wakeboarding boats downstream from Dover, where the river narrows. While the Pend Oreille River is wide enough to allow boats to travel without violating the 200-foot no-wake zone, even 200 feet is not enough to prevent damaging wakes, property owners observed. The ban, along with another proposal to extend the no-wake zone to 300 feet, failed to win the support of the Bonner County commissioners. Instead, the commissioners chose to increase fines for violating the no-wake zone, from $75 per initial violation to $150. Subsequent infractions will cost $300 per violation. The county also purchased 10 roving buoys that will be installed in problem areas to demarcate the 200-foot no-wake zone and to remind boaters to “Ride the Core.” Summer will tell whether these measures are enough to calm our communal waters.

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Party Going On PHOTO BY TOM PUCKETT

There’s a

PONTOON BOATS GROWING IN POPULARITY by Cassandra Cridland

“T

he party goes wherever you go.” For Tom Puckett, owner of Realm Realty, that’s the number one reason to own a pontoon boat. “You can take them in shallow water, they’re stable, you can tie other boats to them... we become home base on the lake.” Puckett says the family pontoon boat “is the glue for our family to stick together.” While kids may take another boat to surf and ski, it’s the pontoon they come back to when it’s time to hit the fridge; and it’s the pontoon that other boaters come to tie up to when it’s time to socialize. There is some dispute as to who created the first recreational pontoon boat. In the early 1950s, a number of individuals and companies in the Midwest began fastening 55-gallon steel drums to sheets of plywood and adding a motor to create an updated version of Huck Finn’s raft. According to Geoff Smith of Sandpoint Marine and Motorsports, pontoon boats offer a number of advantages: “Space—you can get up and walk around, hold a barbecue while floating the lake, carry

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more people comfortably, and not get beat up from waves. They are simply the smoothest boat on the water.” In recent years, pontoon boat innovations have improved handling, speed, and creature comforts. A triple pontoon boat can travel up to 75 mph and carve corners with stability, which makes it great for pulling a skier. Smith describes pontoon boats: “… as the fastest growing (boat sales) segment since the recession.” Pam Auletta of Hope Marina concurs: “We have rented pontoon boats for over 25 years … they have become a big seller in the boat world. In our experience, families love them as they are very stable, can tow a tube … are handicap accessible, and super fuel efficient.” If you’re not sure if a pontoon boat is right for you, several of the local marinas offer four- and eight-hour rentals. So, pack the cooler, grab the grill, and invite a half-dozen of your favorite people—summer and Lake Pend Oreille are waiting.

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‘LEGENDARY’ LAKE BOOK RESURFACES

AUTHOR JANE FRITZ, WITH THE LEGENDARY LAKE IN THE BACKGROUND.

2018 SPUD CUP RACE. PHOTO BY MIKE JEWELL.

L O C A L F AV E S O F T H E L A K E

SANDPOINT SAILING ASSOCIATION HOSTS NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP

W

by Trish Gannon

T

wo book printings later, northern Idaho residents and visitors alike still clamor for “Legendary Lake Pend Oreille: Idaho’s Wilderness of Water.” Written in 2009 by Jane Fritz, along with a cadre of contributors, the book is touted as a “bible” for all things connected to our magnificent Lake Pend Oreille. After selling out the second printing of the books this past year, Keokee Books’ completely updated third printing arrives in late June, 2019. The book will be available at local retailers and online at www.KeokeeBooks.com for $26. In addition, Fritz makes regular appearances to sell and sign copies of the book at summertime events ‘round town—keep an eye out for her and say hello! A stout-sized book at more than 400 pages, Legendary Lake Pend Oreille includes a beautiful fold-out with panoramic photos, a map of the lake, plus boating resources, trails and history. And as a special plus, the photo sections include color shots and exclusive Ross Hall black-and-whites.

hat happens when Sandpoint is rated as one of the most beautiful locations in the U.S., and when our July weather is so often perfect? A national sailing race is what happens, and on July 21 to 26, the Sandpoint Sailing Association will host the 74th Thistle National Regatta right here on Lake Pend Oreille, in partnership with the Thistle Class Association. This is a major event, and the Sandpoint Sailing Association organizers of the race—Chris Chambers and Wayne Pignolet—are expecting between 50 and 70 sailors and their boats to show up to participate. The Thistle for which this race is named is a high performance racing sailboat that is generally sailed with a three-person crew. A little over 4,000 of these boats have been built, all to the same lines by authorized builders. Designed in 1945 by Sandy Douglass, the plan consists of a main, jib, and spinnaker—these boats are designed for speed, and perform extremely well in light wind. The Thistle Class Association is recognized as one of the largest and best one-design racing classes in the country. Sandpoint Sailing Association invites all interested to come down to the marina and watch the race. What’s more, the association hosts a number of regattas, sailing events, and learning opportunities all summer long to which it invites all sailors and want-to-be sailors. The opportunities are many for those with an interest in sailing. Learn more at www.sandpointsailing.com. Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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p hoto e s say

PREVIOUS PAGE: CITY BEACH SUNRISE PHOTOGRAPHED BY JOSH SMITH. THIS PAGE, TOP: A PEND OREILLE SUNRISE, PHOTOGRAPHED BY LELAND HOWARD. BOTTOM: A MYSTERIOUS HINT TO A BYGONE ERA, PHOTOGRAPHED BY LINDA LANTZY.

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TOP: THE CITY GLOWS AT THE EDGE OF THE BIG LAKE. PHOTOGRAPHED BY JOSH SMITH. BOTTOM: THE SUN SETS NEAR THE CLARK FORK DRIFT YARD. PHOTOGRAPHED BY BEN OLSON.

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real

estate

CHATEAU DE JACLIN

NOTABLE

features

A CIRCULAR BASEMENT GARAGE, STEEL-FRAMED CHATEAU WITH COPPER-ROOFED PARAPETS, AND AN IN-THE-ROUND DISTRESSED ALDER LIBRARY

FOR CENTURIES, CELEBRATED ARCHITECTURAL MASTERPIECES HAVE USED COPPER AS A ROOFING MATERIAL. IT NEVER CORRODES, LASTS CENTURIES, IS FIRE RESISTANT AND SURPRISINGLY LIGHTWEIGHTâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;PLUS IT AGES BEAUTIFULLY TO A WEATHERED, GREEN PATINA.

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R E A L E STAT E

Luxe HIGH END HOMES OFFER OPULENT LIVING by Beth Hawkins

T

he lifestyles of the rich and, perhaps, famous are now playing out in our little corner of the world as the number of extravagant real estate listings hits an alltime high here in Bonner County. At this writing, four, single-family residential properties on the Multiple Listing Service are priced for sale at a whopping $6 million and higher—a first for our region. The homes—let’s just call them what they really are, mega-mansions—are spectacular ... that is, if you’re partial to exceptional craftsmanship, high-end details, and breathtaking waterfront views. But those luxuries don’t come cheap. The highest priced single-family residence—Kullyspell House—with a listing price of $20 million (as of press time, May 10, 2019), is a 13,000-square-foot home that was newly built in Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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52 AM

l a k e f r o n t l u x u ry h o m e s

LOCH HAVEN Hope and has never been lived in, and also includes ownership of Memaloose Island. There’s also a stunning lakeside beauty in Oden Bay—Chateau de Jaclin— with castle-inspired architecture, marble floors, circular underground garage, copper roof, and in-the-round library. Opulent touches that, combined with a bonus residence next door, aim to fetch a cool $14.35 million. The third property—Loch Haven—is a $16.9 million estate that sits on 135 acres with lake frontage in the Garfield Bay area, and the fourth home—Cape of Art— is a 12,000-square-foot Hope Peninsula waterfront beauty for $6.9 million. Chris Chambers of Tomlinson Sotheby’s International Realty is the listing agent for the Oden Bay mansion. “It’s an outstanding home,” he said. “This property is seven minutes to shopping and restaurants downtown.” To market and find potential buyers for such a grand property, he doesn’t rely on a flier at the end of the driveway to drum up a sale. Chambers said,

NOTABLE for a property like this, he extends his efforts to reach buyers internationally. That means passengers flying Emirates Airline from Dubai to London are likely to catch the in-flight advertising for this lakeside home. In addition, he mentions an ever-increasing potential for real estate shoppers from markets including Seattle and San Francisco. But there’s no expectation of multiple offers piling up on a listing of this caliber, and Chambers is realistic when it comes to closing the deal on such a large investment. “It can take several years, and these sellers aren’t trying to sell tomorrow,” he said. “They have time.” Cindy Bond, also with Tomlinson Sotheby’s, is the listing agent for the other three homes. She agrees it takes time for potential buyers to decide not only what they want in a home, but also which of the spectacular lakes in North Idaho might appeal to them. “Coeur d’Alene is the gateway to North Idaho,” she said, adding that she becomes a bit of a tour guide when showing potential buyers why they would

features

135 ACRES OF MANICURED GROUNDS, BEAUTIFULLY DOUBLESKY-LIT SPIRAL STAIRCASES, AND HANDCRAFTED PLASTER WALLS

HORSE-LOGGED, SALVAGED, OLD-GROWTH LARCH WAS MILLED INTO THE WOODEN FLOOR BOARDS OF THIS HOME, AND CUSTOM WOODWORK THROUGHOUT WAS CRAFTED ON SITE IN THE PROPERTY'S WOODWORKING SHOP.

Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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estate

NOTABLE

features

A MODERN ELEVATOR TO THE HOME'S THREE LEVELS WITH AN ENTIRE PRIVATE ISLAND INCLUDED, AS WELL AS AN UNDERGROUND TUNNEL

MEMALOOSE ISLAND, INCLUDED WITH THIS PROPERTY, WAS A SITE SACRED TO LOCAL TRIBES. ON FRIDAY, 12 AUGUST 1825, INDEPENDENT FUR TRAPPER JOHN WORK CANOED PAST THE ISLAND (PER HIS DIARY) AND MAY HAVE CAMPED THERE.

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KULLYSPELL HOUSE want to live here. For those who decide on Lake Pend Oreille and Sandpoint, Bond acknowledges there's a limited supply. “There are very few of these heritage homes that come up for sale,” she said. “We take it for granted here, but it’s a pretty special place.” If this incredible selection of prime real estate does sell at listing price, or even relatively close to those numbers, it will likely be a first in Bonner County. Statistics provided by the Selkirk Association of Realtors Multiple Listing Service show there have only been 12 single-family homes sold in the previous five years that come anywhere close—from $2.3 million to a high of $5.3 million. The average number of days on the market was 349; nearly a year to get those higher-priced properties sold. “These properties range from beautiful waterfront estates from the Pend Oreille River to Hope, to ranch and farm parcels,” said Stephanie Rief, a SAR association executive. From a tax standpoint, do the sales

of these mega mansions help fill the county coffers at a faster pace? Not necessarily, explained Bonnie Berscheid with the Bonner County Assessor's Office. “The assessment of the property is what affects levy rates and taxes, not necessarily the sale price,” she said. “However, if these properties sell for more than our current assessed value, we analyze the transaction to ensure a correct assessment.” This could result in a higher assessed value for the newly sold property and any similar or comparable properties. “Because the number of these extreme high value properties is very limited, even if all four sold, it would have a minimal impact on the almost $8 billion in assessed values countywide,” Berscheid said. After years of being in the real estate business, Chambers believes the trend of building these larger, pricier properties will continue. We live in a desirable place, and as we all can surmise, Lake Pend Oreille isn’t going away anytime soon.

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THIS BEAUTIFUL, EUROPEANINSPIRED LOG HOME ON THE LAKE BOASTS A BEACH PAVILION WITH FITNESS AREA AND SPA, AS WELL AS NINE BEDROOM SUITES

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l a k e f r o n t l u x u ry h o m e s

We’re definitely seeing more and more expensive houses being built in Bonner County, absolutely,” Chambers said. “Life happens. Someone sold their company; someone won the lottery; they have discretionary income.”

He sees advantages for our area with the addition of these luxurious homes, saying they are high quality, pleasing to the eye, and add a lot to Bonner County. “It’s great to see that, when you get a talented architect and a talented builder, you end up with some stunning properties.”

In addition, they keep the dollars pumping into our local economy. “They hire a lot of labor in the area: electricians, roofers, engineers, the ongoing maintenance of the homes. A lot of our local economy is driven by real estate,” Chambers said.

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f u t u r e o f sag l e

KEEPING IT

Rural

SAGLE HOPES TO KEEP CHANGES AT BAY by Cate Huisman

C

hange is the only constant, as the saying goes, but that doesn’t seem to have made change very popular. Many people move to northern Idaho because they like it the way it is. The problem, of course, is that many more people continue to move here because they like it the way it is, and then it isn’t the way it was any more. The residents of Sagle—that much forested, mostly rural, unincorporated area just south of the Long Bridge—like things just the way

they are as much as anyone. But they have noticed that new arrivals to the increasingly fashionable Sandpoint to the north are pushing outward, looking for places to live with lower-than-Sandpoint prices. And to the south, they see development around Coeur d’Alene creeping ever closer, as farmland they’ve driven by all their lives has suddenly sprouted subdivisions. “People would like to avoid Sagle becoming like Hayden,” said Doug Gunter, a third-generation resident, naming a Coeur d’Alene Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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PREVIOUS PAGE: SAGLE OFFERS BEAUTIFUL RURAL SCENERY. PHOTO BY LINDA LANTZY. ABOVE, TOP: MONICA AND DOUG GUNTER WANT TO SEE SAGLE MAINTAIN ITS RURAL CHARACTER. COURTESY PHOTO. ABOVE: RAPID GROWTH IN KOOTENAI COUNTY CONTINUES TO PUSH NORTHWARD, BRINGING A LEVEL OF DEVELOPMENT FEW ARE ANXIOUS TO SEE IN SAGLE. PHOTO BY MIKE MOORE.

suburb that seems to embody all that Sagle doesn’t aspire to be. County zoning has been in place for decades that prevents that type of development in this area, so some long-time residents wonder why the issue isn’t settled and they continue having to address it. Perhaps it never seems to be settled because state law requires periodic review of land use plans. The current round of review has involved the development of subarea plans for unincorporated areas of the county, and initial efforts to develop such a plan for Sagle did not go well. The specter of Hayden loomed large as more than 50 people showed up at the first workshop at Sagle Elementary School in January of 2017. Meetings continued monthly for more than a year. Different people came to different meetings, and different tangents were explored. No one seems to have been very happy with the process. “It wasn’t efficient; it wasn’t allowing us to pursue the requirements of the state law,” said County Planner Sam Ross. So to help focus the discussions and bring a consistent group of community representatives to the table, in June of 2018 a committee of Sagle residents was identified to address the specific aspects of planning required by law. The committee will work to ensure that Sagle “is developed in a way they want to see, or that it will remain the same,” said Ross. Odds are good that these two are the same thing. Almost all of the land in Sagle is zoned by the county for lots of at least 5 acres. Small portions near the highway are zoned for commercial use, but as distance east or west of the highway increases, lots are bigger, with 20-acre minimums in areas zoned mostly for forestry or agricultural uses. On the eastern and northern edges, on the lakeshore, several established areas are zoned for recreation, and denser housing has been in place along the

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water for many years. A center of present concern is a swath of land at the northern end of the Sagle subarea, just south of the Long Bridge and along the highway, that is zoned suburban. It has had this designation since 2008, according to Milton Ollerton, the county's planning director. But the current planning process has put it in the spotlight. Suburban zoning allows for smaller lots. “Ten-thousand-square-foot lots is what Hayden looks like; that’s what we don’t want; that’s what suburban zoning would allow,” said Gunter. Despite this zoning having been in place for a while, nothing remotely Hayden-like has been proposed for this northern bit of Sagle. That may be because smaller lots must be connected to a sewer and water system. The Southside Sewer and Water District was formed in the 1970s to serve homes along the lakeshore, and while it continues to add connections to homes built within its limits, its board has no intention of expanding those limits to serve other parts of Sagle. To build Hayden-like housing would require the installation of a whole new system. That would be expensive. “There have been lots of studies, but no plans,” said SWSD’s Jim Haynes, who chairs the board. But perhaps the subarea planning process will be sufficient to prevent over-development instead. Now that the committee is in place and is addressing the requirements of state law, Gunter—who is its chair—is optimistic. “I feel good about it; I feel that we’re headed in the right direction,” he said. The committee will work on a plan that more or less keeps Sagle the way it is, and submit the plan to members of the Sagle community for approval. “The hope is that the county will simply listen to residents,” said one long-time denizen. “Sometimes it’s questionable whether they’re willing to do that.” But the committee is proceeding in good faith. Ollerton, the planning director, said he hopes the process can be completed sometime toward the end of the year. “We all know Idaho is growing extremely fast, and our little slice of heaven is becoming more populated,” said Gunter. “We don’t want to shut down growth, but we want responsible growth that protects the rural character.” Residents of other subareas will be watching, looking for a model that will help them keep change at bay as well.

john@knipeland.com • 208-345-3163 • www.knipeland.com 126

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first time buyers

BUYING YOUR

First Home

TIPS AND TRICKS FOR THE BUYING NOVICE

REALTOR FORREST SCHUCK SHOWS WRITER BEN OLSEN A HOME FOR SALE. PHOTO BY FIONA HICKS.

by Ben Olson

I

n a resort town like Sandpoint, with median home prices averaging well over $300,000, it’s often difficult for locals and first-time home buyers to get a foot in the door. But there are a few tips and tricks that can help you successfully navigate the process. First, determine if you would be better off renting or owning. Local rentals are hard to get, and are often priced higher than a mortgage payment. “Overall, you’re better off owning, even with a crummy little house you improve and fix,” said Forrest Schuck, a Realtor with Century 21 Riverstone. Schuck said it helps to look at your first home purchase not as the last home you’ll ever buy, but as a stepping stone. “Get into something you can own, build value, improve it, maintain it and, in five years, maybe you’ll be in a better position to sell that one off and get into a bigger one,” Schuck said. There are free calculators available online that help determine where the meeting point is to see if you’d benefit more from renting or purchasing a home. Before you begin looking for a home, check your credit score to see where you stand. By law, each year you can request a free copy of your report from each of the three reporting agencies at www.AnnualCreditReport.com.

“Several things go into the making of a credit score,” said Cathy Pizzini, a senior lending manager at Evergreen Home Loans in Sandpoint. “Clean up derogatories and stop making late payments. Credit usage is also important. If you have a credit card with a limit of $1,000 and you always have a balance of $999, that’s a negative.” Pizzini pointed out a low credit score can drive interest rates up for a mortgage, which can add up substantially over time. If your credit needs work, meet with a lender for tips on how to improve it. The next step is to pay attention to the market. The best way to do this is to find a real estate agent. “Get a good, seasoned agent who knows the surprises and pitfalls,” said Raphael Barta, associate real estate broker for Century 21 Riverstone. “You need a guide to walk you through the system.” Barta suggests driving around and familiarizing yourself with the neighborhoods and paying attention to comparable home prices. The time of year you’re looking also makes a difference. The market usually hits a lull in February, but picks up in spring/summer as more inventory is added to the MLS. If you’ve found a few homes that appeal to you, set up a viewing. Ask Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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real

estate your agent for a checklist of important items to look out for and be meticulous. “Don’t be afraid to ask questions and re-ask until you get it,” said Barta. One hurdle for first-time buyers is a median home price that continues to rise in Bonner County. The average three-bedroom home sold in 2011 for over $217,000, while in 2019 it sold for around $345,000. Traditionally, down payments of 20 percent or more have been preferred to avoid having to pay mortgage insurance, which can add upwards of $200 to your monthly payment. “You can’t really expect a first-time home buyer to pop in with a $40,000 down payment on a $200,000 home,” said Pizzini. The good news, she added, is that there are programs to help, even if you have a low credit score or can’t come up with 20 percent. If a down payment is out of your reach, the Bonner Community Housing Agency has a program to help. Qualified buyers can be eligible for a no-interest, no-payment loan (it’s repaid when you sell your home) to cover up to $40,000 of the down payment and closing costs. This support is available to those who qualify for a loan via an Idaho Housing and Finance Association approved lender, and whose income is less than 80 percent of the area median. Applicants must also take the Homebuyer Education Class offered monthly through BCHA for a $20 fee. The VA home loan program supplies financing to help eligible veterans purchase a property for no down payment, while Federal Housing Administration loans use federal assistance to help lower income Americans to qualify for a mortgage with only 3.5 percent down, if they have a credit score of 580 or higher. If you have a secure job and want to transition from renting to owning your own home, there are many ways to do it, even with a lower credit score and less than 20 percent down. Listen to your agent and watch the market, because lower home prices could be around the corner. “I’m a firm believer in the law of physics: What goes up must come down,” Barta said. “What we have here in Sandpoint now is not sustainable. You cannot build a community on $400,000 homes. And if you don’t do your homework, you’re not going to make a good buy. So do your homework!”

Award-winning

ALL THE

Stars

Aligned ONE NEW HOMEOWNER’S STORY

Dalton Hawkins is an unlikely homeowner. Just 28 years old, he’s a math/ science/computer science teacher at Sandpoint High School with only a year’s tenure, and a salary several thousand dollars under the area’s mean. But in August of 2018, he signed papers on a house on the Sunnyside Peninsula, and joined the ranks of the area’s homeowners. “All the stars aligned,” he laughed, when asked how it all came to be. A graduate of SHS, and then of the University of Idaho, he spent his first year after graduation working as a substitute in the school district. Then a teaching job became available in Alaska; not just in Alaska, but in the Alaskan bush. “There was nothing to spend my money on,” he said. “I stayed at home and watched movies on the TV.” His savings account had grown when a job for a math teacher opened up in Sandpoint, and Hawkins was hired. “I always wanted to come back to Sandpoint, but I didn’t expect it to happen for a long time. I was on that like a shot!” he said. Back in Sandpoint, he encountered his first setback—the price of rentals. “I moved back in with my mom and dad.” Hawkins, however, is a math teacher— he understands numbers and how they work. And he quickly realized that a home mortgage payment wasn’t going to cost much more than rent, while offering more flexibility. Still, the market is high. “Everything I saw (in my price range) was in pretty bad shape,” he said. “They were real fixeruppers.” When his mom spotted a house Cont'd on page 132

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real

estate

Cont'd from page 130

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on the market with a substantial price drop, he jumped on it. “It was still way at the top of my budget,” he said, “but the views were amazing and the house didn’t need a lot of work.” A day after he learned about the house, he was writing an offer on it. “It’s funny,” he said. “It didn’t have the one thing I had told my Realtor was a must-have—high speed internet. In fact, it doesn’t have any internet at all; only what I can get on my phone.” That’s his first piece of advice to would-be homeowners: be flexible about your must-haves. He had a lot to learn about buying a house, but said his agent (a person he worked with at Schweitzer during high school) and his mortgage lender (a friend of the family) walked him through the process. That’s a second piece of advice: Work with people you can trust to steer you in the right direction. “I had pretty good credit,” he said. He paid his student loans on time every month and, before going to Alaska, had gotten a credit card for Cabela’s, which he also paid on time. “I treat my credit card like a debit card,” he said, an action that looks good to a lender. Then he took the next step: he got a roommate. While a new homeowner might prefer going it alone, additional income can be more important. Hawkins also rents his basement (“It’s fairly nice,” he said) through the summer on Airbnb. “If things come up, I might have to eat Ramen for a while,” he said, “but I have a cushion here that makes a difference.” Multiple ways to reach a goal is his third piece of advice. And if things don’t work out? Hawkins is a new teacher in a district that relies on supplemental levies to pay a lot of staff. He’s a low man on the totem pole for any reduction in force. But he has an exit plan. “I have a house that’s not likely to depreciate much in value, even if the market bubble bursts,” he said. It’s also a house he could rent, if worst came to worst, and cover his expenses. That might be his most important advice to those looking to purchase a home: know what your options are if your situation changes. And don't forget to pay attention when the stars align.

-Trish Gannon

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE | SUMMER 2019

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d ow n t ow n p a r k i n g

PARKING CHANGES

SPUR DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT

THE CITY IS NOW UTILIZING A MIX OF PARALLEL AND ANGLED PARKING IN ORDER TO INCREASE PARKING SPACES IN AREAS OF INTENSIVE PARKING USE. STAFF PHOTO.

by Cate Huisman

R

emember Farmin School? Probably not. It was one of many buildings that have been demolished in Sandpoint to make room for off-street parking. The historic school, built in 1906, disappeared a half century ago and was replaced with the city parking lot, between Church and Main streets downtown. The advance of the automobile generated many such changes in American downtowns. Sandpoint, like many cities, passed ordinances that required new or expanding businesses to provide off-street parking for their customers’ new forms of arrival. “If you think about our downtown area, off-street parking requirements would prohibit downtown from existing as it does today,” said Aaron Qualls, director of Sandpoint’s Planning and Community Development. “Arguably, no city ordinance is more underestimated for its long-term impacts.” But as the value of downtown real estate has increased, the price of parking lots has become prohibitive. In hopes of encouraging downtown investment, Sandpoint changed its approach 10 years ago: It abolished the parking requirement for businesses in the downtown core. And the change has worked as hoped: Popular venues such as Joel’s, the Hive, and the Pend d’Oreille Winery have expanded, and Kochava, a major employer, has been able to remain

downtown. “These projects represent several million dollars of investments within the downtown core,” said Qualls. With this success, the city council has now decided to expand this exempted area. It has been enlarged by just a block or two in each direction (except into the creek), but now, according to Qualls, “There’s a lot more development potential on several parcels.” The parking code has been revised for the rest of the city as well. The required number of spaces has been reduced in residential areas and for many types of businesses. The number can be further reduced if a business provides bike racks, motorcycle parking, or other amenities. There’s even a new option to be exempted from the requirements if a business can provide an engineering study that shows it doesn’t need as much parking as the new code requires. Even with the changes, it’s still usually possible to find a parking space within a few blocks of your destination downtown, if not always directly in front of it. This may be cold comfort when you’re late for a show at the Panida and the closest spot you can find is up on Fourth Avenue. But there’s even a fix for that: The current overhaul of downtown streets, with its switch from parallel to angled parking in some areas, means more spaces in areas of intensive parking use, such as along Cedar Street and First Avenue. Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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estate

Four

Success Stories

Abolishing one single line of code—getting rid of off-street parking minimums downtown—has, according to Sandpoint's Director of Planning and Economic Development Aaron Qualls, enabled four distinct projects in Sandpoint that would have been otherwise impractical. He shared these stories in an article for Strongtowns early this year. "The first," he explained, "was an expansion of a popular taqueria. A modest increase of seating area prior to the code change would have required seven additional parking spaces, or $70,000 in fees. That’s just too many tacos." Qualls said that for small businesses, particularly restaurants, "this would have ended the project before it began." Pend d’Oreille Winery was another business that benefitted from this change, when they purchased the old Belwood's building, remodeling it into a mix of retail and office space now home to the beloved winery. They received a Grow Smart Award from Idaho Smart Growth in 2015 for the work. Qualls wrote, "Had there been off-street parking requirements in place, it never could have happened." Recognition was also given to the Hive, which Qualls described as "Sandpoint’s premier music venue downtown, which now brings

in world renowned musicians consistently and is attended by music lovers regularly—some of whom travel considerable distances from Washington, Montana, and even Canada." Located on Sandpoint's First Avenue, the venture would have been unlikely under previous parking requirements. Finally, there's Kochava, a leader in mobile app analytics. Qualls wrote that this "small local tech startup started to feel extreme growing pains once their platform became recognized for its innovation. Rather than relocating, they renovated an old, dilapidated steel-frame building downtown. It is now a modern tech campus, housing close to 100 full time employees. Despite having a sizable surface parking lot, the owners would have needed to roughly double the amount of parking (or pay exorbitant fees)." Each one of these projects, as Qualls explained, "has enriched Sandpoint by contributing vibrancy, economic productivity, and an increase in our tax base," and he expects further such success stories as the city works on improving their parking plan. Read Qualls' full story at www.sptmag.com/strongtown.

-Trish Gannon

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c e da r st r e e t b r i d g e

THE BRIDGE IS FULL of tenants, of life, of fun RETAIL ICON IS PACKED WITH FAMILY-FRIENDLY FUN by David Keyes

T

he Cedar Street Bridge Public Market is filled to the brim with shops and is enjoying new-found attention. This is partially a result of new ownership, and also due to exposure from the Sand Creek byway. With negotiations underway at press time on its last open retail space, Manager Scott Meekings expects the Bridge to be full by summer. The iconic, 400-foot market, constructed of massive tamarack logs and glass, spans Sand Creek and has been featured in the foreground of nearly every tourism-related photo of downtown Sandpoint. Jeff Bond, owner of Tomlinson Sotheby’s International Realty in Sandpoint, sold the Bridge to a Florida developer, Jim Gissey, in December 2018. Meekings and his wife, Shery, who own both Creations and the Carousel Emporium on the Bridge, say the new owner has already made improvements and there are more on the way. “We want it to be even more warm, friendly, and inviting,” said Meekings. “Sandpoint has the right owner and he is onboard to make improvements.” Interior painting is completed, as is new carpeting. This summer there will be a new street entrance to the Bridge that will feature a seating area and a fire pit. Team Meekings is collaborating with the Greater Sandpoint Chamber to act as a downtown satellite office to distribute visitor information. Look for better signage near the byway, as well as unique lighting this summer, Meekings said. Business at the Bridge has been up 30 to 35 percent year over year, and they attribute the increase to the better exposure the Bridge receives

from traffic along the byway. “We wanted to start advertising to fill up some of our retail spaces but before TOP: CEDAR STREET BRIDGE PUBLIC the printers could even get MARKET SPANS SAND CREEK. STAFF PHOTO. ABOVE: SCOTT AND SHERY out the red “For Rent” signs MEEKINGS. PHOTO BY DAVID KEYES. we were full,” said Meekings. “That is a good sign for all of us.” The eat-shop-dine ethos of the Bridge is now supported by almost two dozen businesses, many of them appearing in the past few months. Hotly anticipated by both families and the young-at-heart, the Coin Arcade is open upstairs, where the wine bar was once located. Offering beer, wine, and a limited food menu, the arcade features games, air hockey, virtual golf, and, “all kinds of stuff,” said Meekings. “It really fits the family-friendly vibe of the Bridge.” Other new businesses include Zwazo Nich Fair Trade Gifts, with offerings from Kenya and Haiti; Naked is Responsible, offering natural, homemade products that are ethically sourced; Essential Vibes, a crystal rock shop with essential oils; and Sandpoint CBD; offering the nation’s hottest new ingredient in medicinal oils and lotions. (Yes, it’s legal.) Other new retailers provide pickled foods, fresh roasted candied nuts, wine, jewelry, cosmetics, and hand-crafted leather. There’s a Christmas store, a new salon and “the only over-water tattoo parlor in the United States” to help round out the offerings.

Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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estate

REAL ESTATE MARKET AT 'record

by Beth Hawkins

W

e’ve got the lake, the mountains, the charm of a small town … and those are the desirable traits that keep the greater Sandpoint area’s red-hot real estate market on fire. The average sales price of a home now teeters just above the $409,000 mark, and there are no signs that it will be slowing anytime soon. “We’re at record highs,” said Teague Mullen, owner of Realm Partners and president of the Multiple Listing Service. “It’s a seller’s market and there’s a lack of inventory, which is driving the prices up. And we have an influx of buyers looking to retire here.” The lack of homes available for sale in the Sandpoint area is a big factor. Mullen cites the recent Seven Sisters development in Kootenai, where more than 40 homes were sold in record time. “They were selling as fast as they were being built,” he said. Even in the outlying towns of Bonners Ferry and Priest River, sales are up and prices are up. In comparison to Sandpoint, however, Bonners Ferry still presents the most affordable option to

highs'

shoppers in our region with an average sales price of a home at just above $263,000. Shoppers are advised to act quickly if they find something they like. “Don’t hesitate,” Mullen said. “It’s going to take patience to find the right property.” Another strategy shoppers appear to be taking—at least those who aren’t in a hurry to move into a new home—is by buying vacant land in Bonner County. Sales have increased 31 percent over the same period last year, with an average sales price of vacant land at just over $143,000. The idea of “buy now, build later” is appealing for folks who plan to move here at some point, but want to stake their claim now. Mullen forecasts this frenetic pace in Sandpoint will continue for at least the next year, but perhaps there’s a bit of breathing room on the horizon. “The market as a whole, across the U.S., is starting to trend down a little bit. We see it affecting us a year or two later.”

“ We love where we live... and you will too, as a North Idaho property owner!” 116 N. First Ave., Sandpoint, Idaho 83864 • 208.263.3166 • www.LakeShoreRealtyNorth.com 136

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m a r k e t wat c h

Selkirk Multiple Listing Service Real Estate Market Trends Vacant Land—Bonner County

residential sales—All Areas Sold Listings

2018

2019

2018

2019

603

631

5

Sold Listings

203

208

% Inc/Decr

% Inc/Decr 2

Volume - Sold Listings

$199,318,568

$236,937,039

19

Volume - Sold Listings

$22,780,949

$29,813,050

31

Median Price

$280,000

$305,500

9

Median Price

$74,500

$89,400

20

Average Sales Price

$330,544

$375,494

14

Average Sales Price

$112,221

$143,331

28

0

Average Days on Market

251

185

-26

Average Days on Market

131

131

Residential Sales—Schweitzer

Sandpoint City 2018

2019

2018

2019

Sold Listings

91

100

10

Sold Listings

35

26

-26

Volume - Sold Listings

$26,265,931

$35,170,628

34

Volume - Sold Listings

$11,497,921

$8,362,300

-27

$287,175

17

Median Price

$275,000

$297,500

8

Median Price

$245,000

% Inc/Decr

% Inc/Decr

Average Sales Price

$288,636

$351,706

22

Average Sales Price

$328,512

$321,626

-2

Average Days on Market

118

122

3

Average Days on Market

112

115

3

2018

2019

Residential Sales—All Lakefront

Sandpoint Area % Inc/Decr

2018

2019

81

100

% Inc/Decr 23 60

338

-5

Sold Listings

$126,171,639

$138,424,130

10

Volume - Sold Listings

$41,744,127

$66,740,289

$290,000

$325,000

12

Median Price

$487,000

$520,500

7

$515,359

$667,402

30

116

134

16

Sold Listings

356

Volume - Sold Listings Median Price Average Sales Price

$354,414

$409,538

16

Average Sales Price

Average Days on Market

135

141

4

Average Days on Market

Residential sales by area based on information from the Selkirk MLS for the period of September 10, 2018 to April 20, 2019 versus September 20, 2017 to April 20, 2018. Real estate stats for Bonner and Boundary counties. Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. ©

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BUILDING SERVICES www.collinbeggs.com Sandpoint, idaho 208.290.8120

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Y

CM

MY

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208-610-1200

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Q & A W I T H LO CA L S

NATIVES & Newcomers

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story and photos by Marianne Love

HETHER THEY’VE RECENTLY MOVED HERE OR HAVE DEEP LOCAL ROOTS, THIS ISSUE’S NATIVES AND NEWCOMERS ARE FULLY ENGAGED IN MAKING THE SANDPOINT COMMUNITY A DESIRABLE PLACE TO CALL HOME. WITH CAREERS DEVOTED TO CHRONICLING LOCAL SPORTS, SERVING AGRICULTURAL CUSTOMERS, MAINTAINING FOREST LAND AND TEACHING THE CHILDREN, OUR PARTICIPANTS DO THEIR PART TO KEEP THE SANDPOINT STORY THRIVING.

Newcomer Ariel Linn Sanford Moving to the Selle Valley in 2018 with her parents turned into a homecoming of sorts for Ariel Linn Sanford, Wood’s Hay and Grain operations manager. The family purchased property where they could all live together and continue their rural lifestyle close to Ariel’s workplace. “It feels like home,” she said. “That’s saying a lot for a gal who has moved around searching for ‘home.’ ” Born in California, Sanford, 57, has lived most of her life in Coeur d’Alene where she grew up, married, co-owned a business, and raised three sons. She also earned a special education degree from Gonzaga University, graduating magna cum laude. After teaching a few years, she decided to devote more time to her children. A 4-H background, learning the value of an honest day’s work, and ranching experience influenced Ariel’s

love for the rural lifestyle and people in the livestock industry. “I have a passion for raising livestock, training horses, sewing, and cooking,” she said, adding that family and Jesus are most important. She views herself as a “happy, caring, and strong person who almost always has a smile.” Reason for moving here: To continue my passion for raising animals in a beautiful rural setting, close to the job I love.

What you tell the folks back home about the area: I have found my little slice

of heaven on earth, and I don’t mind sharing it with them.

Hangouts and activities you most enjoy here: I try to visit stores and restaurants downtown, especially when entertaining guests. I’ve met some people who enjoy exploring the many trails around our area on horseback. I’m also looking forward to hiking a lot more this summer.

What impresses you most about this area? I feel so welcome here, like I’ve always been part of this community.

What makes Sandpoint unique?

Even with the wonderful diversity of people, landscape, and activities, it still feels like a tight-knit community.

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Newcomer Kyle Cajero Living as a confirmed night owl suits new Bonner County Daily Bee sports editor Kyle Cajero just fine. After all, he covers evening high school athletic events, and files stories for morning editions. Graduating in 2014 from Pusch Ridge Christian Academy in Tucson, Arizona with two state track championships, Cajero attended Pepperdine University. As Pepperdine graphic sports editor, he covered West Coast Conference basketball championships and the Big West Tournament, among others. Earning his Bachelor of Arts from Pepperdine last April, he sent out 200 applications, seeking a sports journalism position. The Daily Bee offered first. “Despite no prior associations or familiarity with Sandpoint, I took a chance and moved here on a whim November 1,” Cajero, 22, said. He brought with him his extensive vinyl record collection. “I like to end the day going out for a nice meal, then retiring to my living room and listening to records [modern Indie to rock, New Wave and even soul and funk] for the rest of the night,” he says. Cajero has already pinpointed some favorite eating places [Spuds/Fat Pig] as well as a favorite outdoor spot, Memorial Field boat landing.

“The view of the lake is incredible,” he says, “especially walking out on the beach in the middle of the night.” Reason for moving here: It’s where the job hunt took me. Unemployment and living at my parents’ wore thin. I was ready to dive into a new career in a new town. What you tell folks back home about the area: I tell my Southern California roommates about snow, picturesque drives to cover sporting events, and about the low cost of living. Sometimes I tell them about the lack of In-N-Out, authentic Mexican food, steady concert venues, sun, and places that don’t close before 8 p.m. Hangouts and activities you most enjoy here: I’m an introverted homebody, so the comfort of my own home. Thankfully, the two best thrift stores in town—Goodwill and Panhandle Animal Shelter Thrift Shop—are walking distance from my apartment. I also like spending time around City Beach or the shoreline by Memorial Field. What impresses you most about this area? Natural beauty. Every drive, for work or fun, has blown me away. Being accustomed to the same drab, tan scenery from either the desert or freeways, a verdant, picturesque area like Sandpoint has kept me grounded. What makes Sandpoint unique? Sandpoint is the most close-knit community I’ve experienced. Seemingly, everyone knows everyone. Families have deep, historical ties to the town. People look out for each other and have a ton of local pride.

Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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newcomers Native shirley parker Shirley Parker, the daughter of Swedish immigrants Fred and Hilda Hendriksson, grew up in Kootenai, where Humbird Mill employment sustained many families in the early 1900s. Her childhood involved playing outdoors, swimming in the lake during summers, and building snowmen or skating in winter. At Sandpoint High School, she participated as a majorette, performing with the band at sporting events and area parades. An active lifestyle and commitment to civic involvement/education have followed this Sandpoint Woman of Wisdom honoree into her 80s. “I love being outdoors,” said Parker. “I’ve spent many days skiing Schweitzer, hiking and walking local trails, and raking leaves in the fall.” She also loves spending time with loved ones and friends. Parker,

81, and Jack, her husband of 60 years, have four children: Jackie, David, Gregory, and Anne Marie. Besides motherhood, she worked as a business and English educator at Sandpoint High School, retiring in 1999, but hardly slowing down. Her community involvement includes P.E.O., stewarding the Louise Senft Memorial Scholarship, church, and homeless/poverty issues. “I prefer to listen before I speak,” she said. “I consider myself to be courteous, fair, friendly, and willing to help others.” Stories about the past you often tell: In the 1940s, North Idaho had three to four feet of snow in the winter. Summer recreation involved swimming, boating, and fishing. Hunters usually shot a deer to feed their families. Ice fishermen brought home large whitefish, perch, or bass. Lake fishing produced fresh trout, kokanee, and trophysized Kamloops.

How family members contributed to this community?

My father, a talented woodworker, made beautiful bowls, trays, and lamp tables. His birdhouses were purchased by bird lovers throughout the county. My husband Jack, a local businessman and Sandpoint Motor Company owner, volunteered for community organizations and held leadership positions on business, medical, and bank boards. Our children participated and received honors in athletic and academic programs. Hangouts while growing up: My favorite spot was Kootenai Bay for swimming and ice skating. We loved Panida Theater movies, eating at the Sandpoint Cafe (Greasy Spoon), and the Pastime Café. The Whatnot Shop next to the high school, City Beach and, of course, driving

Sandpoint • Ponderay • Sagle • Priest River • Newport • Clark Fork • Hope

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through town were very popular. Advice to newcomers: In the winter, dress in layers: warm hats, gloves, and boots with soles for icy conditions. Be patient. Spring with beautiful, flowering trees, summer with hot temperatures (no smoke, we hope), and fall with gorgeous leaves will arrive. Enjoy the change of seasons and friendly, helpful people.

Where you see the most locals:

Grocery stores, churches, funerals, family celebrations, organizations, luncheons, dinners, or the streets.

Native Doug Bradetich Lyla Jo Gunter holds a special place in her grandpa Doug Bradetich’s heart. She’s his first granddaughter and the sixth generation of his family to live in Bonner County. Doug’s ancestors on both sides, Bradetiches (from Croatia) and Tuckers (from southern Idaho) arrived more than 100 years ago, settling in Algoma and Lower Pack River, respectively. Bradetich, 60, and his wife, Mindi, live in Algoma. “It’s part of land my great-grandfather homesteaded,” he says. “It pleases me to own a part of that legacy.”

MtnMotoX Endurocross Event June 1 PRCA Rodeo Aug 2 - 3 Culpepper & Merriweather Circus June 13 RedHead Express Concert August 22 Challenge of Champions Bull Riding Tour June 15 Challenge of Champions Bull Riding Tour August 23 4-H Horse Show July 20-22 4-H Market Animal Livestock Sale August 24 International Fjord Horse Show July 26-28 & Demolition Derby

August 21-24 BONNER COUNTY FAIR Get ready for... Bull Riding Live Music Demolition Derby Wild West Fun Zone Inflatables

Petting Zoo Messy Mania Kid’s Area Giant Mural Coloring Antique Tractor Displays Magic Shows

Clown Visits agricultural displays commercial & non-profit vendors amazing fair food vendors

and SO MUCH MORE!

Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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A University of Idaho trained forester, Bradetich first worked summers for Pack River Lumber Co. After the company sold, becoming W-I Forest Products and later, Crown Pacific, his job titles included log buyer, timber-needs manager, governmental affairs specialist, and resource manager. When Crown Pacific closed its area mills, he joined the timber department of Riley Creek Lumber Co. “I have stayed with them through the current ownership of Idaho Forest Group,” Bradetich said. He also volunteers for forestry activities. On weekends, this one-time competitive sharpshooter and occasional musician sticks around home, cutting firewood and fulfilling other “assigned” duties. Besides college and briefly working in Wenatchee, Bradetich has spent his life in Sandpoint, where he and Mindi raised three daughters, Stacey, Amy, and Erin. Two historic events stand out: 1967’s Sundance Fire with its “glow at night along the ridgetop north of us” and during the winter of 1968-69, snowshoeing “right over the top of the house” and reaching down to get mail while standing on snow above the mailboxes. Stories about the past you often tell: My favorites are those my parents and grandparents have told me about the early days here... how life was when we were far from the beaten path, largely “undiscovered.” I was fortunate to get in on some of those times. I treasure every memory.

How family members contributed to this community: My father operated a crane on Cabinet Gorge Dam and on the Long Bridge, where we now walk and bike. Relatives also worked in the woods, built roads, and helped manage thousands of acres of timberland. Uncle John, a grocer, built the buildings where the Super Drug and Co-Op are now. Uncle Frank Bradetich is listed on the Memorial Field plaque. He died in the Normandy D-Day invasion. Hangouts while growing up: Dub’s, formerly Dari Delite or Don’s Drive-In (car hops). On date night at the Panida, you could go the extra 50 cents to take your baby to the balcony. The Pastime had it all: sporting goods on one side, huge, oval lunch counter on the other, and endless stories of “the one that got away.” My favorite: simply “dragging the gut” from Connie’s to the beach and back again. Advice to newcomers: Seems like half the folks moving here immediately try changing it into where they came from. The other half join groups to stop anything from changing. Granted, they just want to keep a pretty place looking pretty, but it might be better to slow down, take a deep breath, and get to know us first. Where you see the most locals: Fourth of July parade. The county fair is another place to find oldtimers, especially at the livestock auction. Other than that, it’s like trolling for Kamloops on the big lake. If you spend enough hours, eventually you’ll come across a keeper.

New Fresh Express Start™ Breakfast Newest Hotel in Sandpoint Indoor Pool/Hot Tub Fitness Center

Next to Sweet Lou’s

477326 Hwy 95 N Ponderay, Idaho 83852 208-255-4500

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B O O K N OW F O R S A N D P O I N T S U M M E R E V E N T S !

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Lodging guide A Daugherty Management vacation rental home Restaurant

Bar or Lounge

x

x

x

x

Daugherty Management 208-263-1212

21

x

x

Dover Bay Bungalows 208-263-5493

19

x

x

FairBridge Inn & Suites 208-263-2210

60

x

Holiday Inn Express 208-255-4500 / Fax 208-255-4502

83

x

x

Hotel Ruby 208-263-5383

68

x

x

K2 Inn 208-265-5896 or 208-265-KTWO

La Quinta Inn 208-263-9581 or 800-282-0660

Lodge at Sandpoint 208-263-2211

Northern Quest Casino 877-871-6772

Pend Oreille Shores Resort 208-264-5828

R&L Property Management 208-263-4033

Sand Creek Lofts 208-265-1597

x

x

Downtown Sandpoint on the lake. Indoor pool, sauna, fitness room, hot tub. All rooms with lake view. Dine at Trinity at City Beach. Also 22-site RV park. www. BestWesternEdgewater.com

x

Sandpoint’s luxury vacation home rentals, with properties on the lake and the mountain. See ad, page 5. www.DM-Vacations.com

x

Waterfront bungalows at Dover Bay in Marina Village. Fully furnished, lake and mountain views. Fitness center, marina, hiking/biking trails. See ad, page 41. www. DoverBayBungalows.com Free breakfast with waffles, 24-hour hot tub, free wireless internet. Family suites. Schweitzer ski packages. At the base of Schweitzer Mountain, two miles from Lake Pend Oreille.

x

x

x

The newest hotel in Greater Sandpoint. 100 percent smoke free. The Ponderay location is at the base of Schweitzer Mountain next to Sweet Lou’s. See ad, page 144. www.HIExpress.com

x

New pool, hot tubs, pet-friendly, free breakfast, bicycles, BlueRay players/movies & WiFi, hot tub rooms, athletic center. www.hotelrubyponderay.com

x

68

x

25

x

250

x

x

50

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

The K2 offers clean, comfortable, downtown rooms at affordable rates . All rooms are non-smoking and include wi-fi, refrigerator, microwave, HDTV and continental breakfast. www.k2innsandpoint.com x

Downtown location, high-speed internet. Free breakfast, themed spa suites. Silverwood, ski and golf packages. Kids stay free. See ad, page 18. www.LQ.com

x

Accommodations for weddings, retreats and banquets. Lakeside with swimming and docks. Views of lake and mountains for an unforgettable Idaho vacation. www. LodgeAtSandpoint.com

x

x

Northern Quest Resort and Casino is the Inland Nortwest’s only AAA-Rated 4-Diamond Casino Resort. Complimentary Wifi, valet and overnight parking. See ad page 169. www.NorthernQuest.com

x

x

Fully furnished condos and on-site athletic club on Lake Pend Oreille. Stay and play packages. See ad, page 36. www.POSResort.com

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Full service residential and commercial property management, serving Tenants and Clients, since 1979. See ad in Marketplace. www.rlpropertymanagement.com

13

x

70

x

Twin Cedars Camping and Vacation Rentals 208-920-1910

8

x

White Pine Lodge

26

x

208-265-0257 or 877-487-4643

x

18

Selkirk Lodge

208-265-0257 or 877-487-4643

x

Dover Bay Parkside Bungalows

Meeting Rooms

Pool on site

208-263-3194 or 800-635-2534

Kitchen

Spa or Sauna

54

No. of Units

Best Western Edgewater Resort

Schweitzer’s Selkirk Lodge

x

x

x

x

Offering the ultimate in waterfront condominium comforts and convenience for your vacation home or even year-round living. See ad, page 88. www.SandCreekLofts.com x

x

x

x

x

x

Mountain accommodations, stay-and-play packages. Spectacular mountain and lake views. Outdoor heated pool and hot tubs. See ad on back cover. www. Schweitzer.com Owner-managed vacation rental homes and camping cabin; RV sites on Lake Pend Oreille and Selle Valley; tipi on beach (seasonal). Horse/dog friendly. www. TwinCedarsSandpoint.com

x

New accommodations, stay-and-play packages. Spectacular mountain & lake views. Outdoor hot tubs, access to heated pool. www.Schweitzer.com

Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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IVANOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MIXOLOGIST JAMES BARTKIEWICZ IS ALWAYS WILLING TO EXPLORE VARIOUS FLAVOR COMBINATIONS. PHOTO BY FIONA HICKS.

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CRAFT COCKTAIL IN SEARCH OF THE PERFECT

Sandpoint’s own mixologist twist by Cameron Rasmusson

A

NYONE CAN TOSS INGREDIENTS IN A SHAKER AND SERVE IT IN A GLASS WITH THE APPROPRIATE GARNISHES, BUT THE BRAINS BEHIND A CRAFT COCKTAIL ARE DIFFERENT: FOCUSED, THOUGHTFUL, AND MOST IMPORTANTLY, PASSIONATE. THERE’S A PHILOSOPHY BEHIND THE INGREDIENTS, A MIXOLOGIST ETHOS THAT DETERMINES THE FLAVOR BALANCE, INGREDIENT CHOICE, AND AESTHETICS OF THE DRINK. AND THE SANDPOINT AREA IS A FERTILE AREA FOR CULTIVATING COCKTAIL CREATIVITY.

mix it up

try all of sandpoint’s

flavorful cocktails

It’s a trend Justin Dick, owner of Trinity at City Beach, has noticed over his long career in the restaurant business. He first saw the artisanal spirit manifest years ago in wine, with small-scale wineries fueled by pure passion springing up around the country. Then came the rapid growth of craft breweries, many of which continue to operate independent from the massive corporations that dominate the beer industry. But it’s only in recent years, Dick said, that he’s seen this much creative energy fueling the invention of new, innovative cocktails. “(People) go back to ancient history and start revitalizing things that were popular 20 or 30 years ago,” he said. Sometimes necessity is the mother of invention, as was the case at Trinity when bartenders produced what would become one of its most popular cocktails: the Bacon Bloody Mary. It began with a simple question: What the heck does one do with a bottle of bacon-flavored vodka? The answer: Combine it with a carefully-chosen Bloody Mary mix and tomato juice, then garnish with olives, pickled asparagus, lemon and lime slices, and a slice of Trinity’s exceptional bacon. The result is the perfect complement to a weekend brunch, a spicy, savory classic made all the better by the meaty twist of bacon flavor. An establishment’s approach to its cocktail menu is a reflection of its identity. And no bar or restaurant in Sandpoint has gone through a greater identity shift in recent years than Sandpoint’s iconic 219 Lounge. The fivestar dive bar still has its down-home atmosphere, but it’s also cleaned up its act, prohibiting smoking and undergoing a dramatic remodel in 2016. Likewise, the 219’s cocktail menu has undergone a transformation, reflecting the bar’s new values: simplicity, elegance, quality. To that end, 219 bar manager Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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Mark Terry and bartender Racheal Baker said they designed a cocktail menu condensed to under 10 drinks. There are the refreshing, classic flavors of their signature Old Fashioned or the bold flavor balance in their margarita. Or

148

try their Up In the Air, which mixes Great Grey gin (a handcrafted, ultra small batch spirit, distilled from Wyoming farmed grains), Domaine De Canton ginger liqueur, agave, and lemon with Upside Kombucha (brewed in Sandpoint

and fermented in small barrel batches) for a light, airy drink that could really take the heat off a summer night. Competition is often the source of inspiration, and that’s exactly what occurred at Schweitzer Village’s Chimney Rock last winter. Three servers—Justin, Ciara, and Jackie—went head-to-head with their own custom cocktails based around High West Double-Rye whiskey. Justin’s Maple-Nut Old Fashioned balanced the sweetness of maple syrup with walnut muddled orange flavors. Ciara’s Cranberry Rye Crush was sweet and fruity with lime juice, muddled cranberries, sage leaves, ginger syrup, and cranberry bitters, all served over an ice ball encasing whole cranberries. And Jackie’s Thyme Will Tell was deep, subtle, and earthy, a maple and thyme syrup offering muted sweetness against black walnut bitters, lemon juice, and a splash of soda. As a member of the Eatgood Group, which emphasizes hearty, authentic food made from locally-sourced ingredients, Farmhouse Kitchen and Silo Bar in Ponderay is built upon an entire culinary philosophy. And that extends to its drink menu, perhaps most prominently with its interpretation of the classic Old Fashioned. The cocktail is built atop bourbon and liqueur, which the Silo team ages in its own barrels for weeks before serving. A slice of orange is coated in sugar and blasted with a chef’s torch to create a sweet crust. A cherry, soaked for months in bourbon, offers a sweet, tart complement to the entire drink, which is served over an ice ball to prevent melt-off. Over at Ivano’s Ristorante, they’ve captured a little bit of history in their acclaimed martini menu. According to bar manager Nolan Smith, these drinks were developed years ago for Enoteca La Stanza, a small space within the restaurant that specialized in wine and mixed drinks. That business later expanded to La Rosa Club. But when it was time for the Lippi family to consolidate its prolific restaurant offerings, La Rosa closed, and its martini list was absorbed into Ivano’s. These are drinks more than worthy of preservation, and two of the most popular, the Blood Orange and the Basil Lemon Drop, are

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holdovers from the earliest era. The Blood Orange is a bold drink, strong and tart, while the Basil Lemon Drop is more understated but no less delicious. What Sandpoint’s many craft cocktails have most in common, however, isn’t an ingredient in the drinks themselves, but is found in the personalities of the

people who make them. Their eyes shine when they talk about their creations, and their words are strong with pride. It’s an excitement in sharing their work that drives them, and that, more than anything else, underlines the craft cocktail experience.

FROM PREVIOUS PAGE, LEFT: CHIMNEY ROCK SERVER CIARA’S CRANBERRY RYE CRUSH IS SWEET AND FRUITY. COURTESY PHOTO; 219’S UP IN THE AIR, WITH GIN, GINGER LIQUEUR AND UPSIDE KOMBUCHA. COURTESY PHOTO; CLAY AND RENO HUTCHISON ENJOY IVANO’S BLOOD ORANGE AND BASIL LEMON DROP. PHOTO BY FIONA HICKS; DELAINA HAWKINS PREPARES TO DRINK (EAT?) TRINITY’S BACON BLOODY MARY. STAFF PHOTO.

www.sweetlousidaho.com

serving you 7 days a week at two locations! wild salmon * smoked ribs * hand-cut Steaks

OPEN 7 days a week * family friendly Sweet lou’s restaurant & BaR Ponderay, Idaho 208.263.1381 Next to Holiday Inn Express

- sweet Lou sayS -

Come hungry, Stay late, Eat well!

Sweet lou’s restaurant & tap house 601 fRONT AVe. 208.667.1170 DOWNTOWN COEUR D’ALENe

Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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They’re stores + more

T

UCKED INTO THE NOOKS AND CRANNIES OF BONNER COUNTY, A HANDFUL OF STORES ARE FILLING A NEED FOR PROVIDING NOT ONLY THE NECESSITIES ON A SHOPPING LIST, BUT ALSO THE FANCY EXTRAS THAT MAKE THEM WORTHY OF A SPECIAL VISIT. NORTH OF TOWN, SOUTH OF TOWN, THEY’RE DOTTED HERE AND THERE—OFFERING VISITORS DELICIOUS REWARDS WHEN THEY ARRIVE. Perhaps the most well-known among longtime locals, and in-theknow visitors, is the iconic Pack River Store, 1587 Rapid Lightning Rd.—a 15-minute drive from Sandpoint through the pastoral Selle Valley. Owners Alex and Brittany Jacobson took over the business from Alex’s mom, Arlene, a year ago. “My mom wanted to retire, and I always thought it should stay in the family,” Alex said. The couple has maintained the store’s quirky blend of country charm and gourmet fare, and are mixing things up with a few additions. As a trained chef, Alex showcases his passion and talent for food with twice-monthly “P.R.S. Tastings”—five-course meal events that’d dazzle big-city foodies and are selling out in record time. As an example, the menu for early May’s tasting event begins with an amuse-bouche (complimentary appetizer) of bacon cooked three ways along with a malt vinegar and cumin potato chip; followed by a first

course of burrata, a house-made spicy coppa along with grilled bread; a second course of scallop tostada; a third course of smoked shrimp salad; an intermezzo of cilantro and lime ice; a fourth course featuring roasted New York strip loin with potato and jalapeno croquette; and a fifth course of Mexican hot chocolate with wedding cookie, raspberry coulis, and mint syrup. More P.R.S. Tasting events are scheduled through the summer, but a word to the wise—get your reservations in early! The Jacobsons have future goals of opening more restaurants, but in the meantime there’s plenty to enjoy at the store. Dash in for a quick breakfast burrito to go, and check out their extensive lunch and dinner menu including burgers, deli sandwiches, and weekly specials, as well as an impressive craft beer and wine selection. In Hope, Davis Grocery & Mercantile, 620 Wellington Pl., now

Just Old Fashioned Goodness!

Cafe • Grocery • Beer & Wine THERE'S NO PLACE LIKE Hope

Come on out for great food, amazing views and a community vibe.

OPEN 7 DAYS

Mon-Sat 8am-8pm Sun 11am-6pm

208.264.0539

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Swartzendruber’s Bake Haus & Deli

An Old-Fashioned Bakery Old World Recipes Pacific Northwestern Flavors

Corner of Hwy 95 & Sagle Road

208.265.9110

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FROM LEFT: WINTER RIDGE IS READY TO TAKE YOUR DELI ORDER; SWARTZENDRUBER’S OFFERS CHOICES FROM MEATS TO PASTRY, PLUS SANDWICHES AND SOUPS ON ORDER; THE EXPERIENCE OF MILLER’S COUNTRY STORE IS NOT TO BE MISSED. COURTESY PHOTOS.

carries all the staple products one would need to stock the pantry and fridge—dairy, meat, produce, and more. “We’re still introducing ourselves to the area,” said Ross Davis, who owns the store with his wife Jamie, a doctor of acupuncture and Chinese medicine who sees clients in a cabin behind the store. “We’ll be growing some more this summer, as more people are coming back.” Beyond the typical grocery items, Davis Grocery is making itself a destination spot by growing their boutique wine section—“wines that you can’t find in town, so it’s worth the trip out,” Ross said. The grocery also offers organic products, local items including raw goat milk and cheese from Sagle, soaps from Clark Fork, and area produce. The cafe inside the store offers homemade sandwiches, soups, and an expanding breakfast menu that will include fresh fruit and yogurt. Make some space on your calendar for the cafe’s weekly specials: Wednesdays buy two tacos for $4, along with a happy hour from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. on craft beers and glasses of wine. And Sundays, the deli serves spaghetti pie made with noodles, Parmesan, sausage, and marinara, baked and served in big slices for just $5.99, which includes homemade garlic Parmesan bread. On Fridays, the wine club gathers from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.; everyone’s welcome to join, and enjoy tastings and hors d’oeuvres. For firsttimers, it’s $12; and once you’ve joined, it’s $10 each time. And don’t forget about the store’s bakery. “We’re becoming famous for our cinnamon rolls,” Ross said. “Some other big players are the cherry and apple turnovers, but the cinnamon rolls are the star of the scene.” Worth every minute of the drive, right there.

Local Natural Delicious

Winter Ridge Natural Foods is your onestop-shop to support your healthy lifestyle. Organic Produce Salad Bar Deli Hot Food Bar Local Grass-Fed Meats and Dairy Extensive Wellness and Beauty Departments Exclusive Wines and Cheeses Beer and Kombucha on Tap Robust Bulk Items Healthy On-The-Go Foods And So Much More.

703 Lake Street at Boyer St Sandpoint, ID

(208) 265-8135 www.WinterRidgeFoods.com

Handcrafted, Locally-Sourced Gourmet Burgers! Easily accessible from the dock, downtown and the mountain, the Burger Dock is excited to offer in-store, delivery, and catering options to the Sandpoint community!

208.597.7027

theburgerdock.com • 116 N. First Ave, Sandpoint,ID Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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drinks South of the Long Bridge in Sagle, Swartzendruber’s Bake Haus, 15 Sagle Rd., is also a go-to for fresh-baked cinnamon rolls. “They’re our most popular item in the bakery,” said owner Valerie Glenn. The rolls are offered in a variety of flavors that are all made from scratch, including a brown butter frosting, an orange cream, a marionberry cream, and a honey cream. Glenn started the store two years ago, explaining that her mom had owned a bakery and “it was just a way of life.” Swartzendruber’s is only open Thursdays through Saturdays each week, ensuring that while the business provides a service south of the bridge, it doesn’t overshadow her priority of family time. Along with the rolls, the bakery sells homemade breads, pastries, pies and cookies. In the deli, customers can order fresh-made sandwiches and homemade soups. Plus there are “odds and ends” for sale as gifts including jams. “We’ll be adding a little bit more of that,” Glenn said. Shop right in town for an assortment of bulk foods, in addition to a bakery and deli, at Miller’s Country Store, 1326 Baldy Mountain Rd. Now owned by Lane and Marci Riffey (Lane was the store’s manager before buying the business this past year), the store has a selection of items that always surprises first-time customers. “A lot of people who come in don’t realize we have an assortment of different things. We’re not your average market, we have a unique set of items.” That includes bulk bins of nuts, flour, baking items, seeds, snack items, candy, noodles, spices, and more. “That’s the majority of our business,” Riffey said. In addition, Miller’s deli and bakery serves up fresh sandwiches,

Restaurant & Catering serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 150+ bottles of wine dine in or carry out 100 different beers dine in or carry out Gas • propane • showers • ice • convenience store 1587 Rapid Lightning Rd, Sandpoint, ID • (208) 263-2409 • www.packriverstore.com 152

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LEFT: ALEX AND BRITTANY JACOBSON BRING UP THE NEXT GENERATION WHILE PROVIDING FINE GOURMET FARE AT THE PACK RIVER STORE. COURTESY PHOTO. ABOVE: THE BUILDING HAS AN UNASSUMING EXTERIOR, WHILE THE FOOD INSIDE PACKS AN UNFORGETTABLE PUNCH. PHOTO BY MARIANNE LOVE.

breads, and more. “We also do a lot of takeand-bake meals in several varieties, pies, plus we have cookie dough that makes your home smell like a bakery,” Riffey said. Miller’s is known for their daily scones, and their popular Stollen, a cream cheese and fruit-filled pastry, available Wednesdays and Thursdays. Another in-town store with more is Winter Ridge Natural Foods, 703 Lake St., where shoppers in search of organic groceries including meats, cheeses, and more can find their fill. The deli’s hot bar has a tempting array of meat and vegetarian options, including ethnic favorites such as the enchilada bakes and Italian lasagna, alongside down-home comfort foods such as mac and cheese. A hot sandwich menu offers made-toorder meals including the popular Ranger Burger, plus a tempting bakery department that’s loaded with fresh breads, pastries, rolls, muffins, and cookies. For a fun excuse to sample new libations and products, check out Winter Ridge’s Tasteful Thursdays events, held weekly from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.

coffee with your pastry purchase!

Breads Scones Pastries Cookies Pies Cinnamon Rolls Coffee Teas Canned Goods Spices Beans Rice Pasta Flour Nuts Dried Fruit Christian Books Housewares

Hours:

M-F 8:30-5:30 Join us on

208-263-9446

1326 Baldy Mtn. Rd. Sandpoint, ID 83864 . www.millerscountrystoresandpoint.com Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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serving Sandpoint CHEF Q&A WITH ALEX JACOBSON & KODY BROWN PACK RIVER STORE Alex Jacobson, Pack River Store chef It’s all about family for another 32-year-old and Sandpoint High School graduate, Alex Jacobson, who now owns the Pack River Store. Jacobson and his wife, Brittany, took over the reins of the family business one year ago from his mother, Arlene, and is now infusing his own passion for handcrafted food and innovative menus into the iconic store and restaurant. He’s happy to be back home raising his family in Sandpoint.

ARLO’S Kody Brown, Arlo’s chef Born and raised in Sandpoint, Arlo’s Ristorante chef Kody Brown, 32, is the only person in his family who made a career out of cooking. But he did have a familial influence from his grandpa: “He was an awesome cook, he would go all out.” Brown’s own passion for cooking coupled with admirable persistence has served him well—over the past 12 years working at Arlo’s, Brown has worked his way from dishwasher to head chef.

alex jacobson

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kody brown

What influenced your love of cooking?

My mom, Arlene. In the beginning it was her, and then I went off to culinary school in California, where I stayed for 10 years working in restaurants and earning my chops. Then I worked in Coeur d’Alene before coming back to Sandpoint.

I just started working in restaurants, and my first job was fast food. From there I went to the Beach House, and then moved to Coeur d’Alene before coming back to Sandpoint with Arlo’s 12 years ago washing dishes.

What’s your favorite ingredient and why?

That’s a tough one, to say that there’s a favorite is hard because we hit a lot of spectrums. Our food is very exciting because we don’t just concentrate on sweet or salt. Stylistically, we do a lot of meat.

Garlic. It’s a staple in Italian cooking, and it makes everything taste good. We put it in pretty much everything we make. There are big whole chunks of garlic cloves in our marinara.

What’s your favorite dish you serve?

The chicken club sandwich from our daily menu, layered with ham, bacon, grilled chicken, smoked gouda, lettuce and tomatoes, apples and sun-dried tomato aioli, on three pieces of toasted sourdough.

The chicken saltimbocca. It’s a prosciutto-wrapped chicken breast with a white wine lemon sauce, and served over fettuccine. The lemon gives it a fresh, crisp flavor and the sauce is nice and light.

What food trends do you follow?

We’re spending a lot of time on our five-course tasting menus; we’re bringing a little bit of fine dining to the Pack River Store. We cure our own meats, which is an idea that’s really old but new.

We do specials every night, but really I go for more of a seasonal approach. I also develop dishes around the holidays that are coming up. For St. Patrick’s we did a cabbage stew that had an Italian spin to it.

What are your hobbies and interests?

Cooking is my life. Spending time with my two little girls. I love to snowboard and wish I had more time to do that. I like hunting, the North Idaho lifestyle … it’s awesome here.

I skateboard and snowboard. Summer is my favorite season; going to City Beach. In the past it’s been difficult to get away in the summer because that’s our busiest time, but we have a good staff here now.

What advice would you give to future chefs?

It’s hard work, so be ready for it. Expectations are high: people come in and they spend $15 on a burger, have some beers and it’s $30; you better have a damn good experience. That’s what brings people back.

Get hands-on experience, that’s the best way to learn about the kitchen. Try working at different restaurants and also try different cuisines; it will help you become wellrounded.

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Home-cooked goodness with a ‘View’

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AT LEFT AND ABOVE: VIVIAN GLENN, KERRI NEWSOME AND NICHOLE WELCH (FROM LEFT IN FIRST PHOTO) ARE READY TO WELCOME NEW DINERS TO THE NEW VIEW. STAFF PHOTOS.

EARLY THREE YEARS INTO OWNING THE VIEW CAFE IN COCOLALLA, KERRI NEWSOME SAW HER DREAMS OF RUNNING A BUSINESS LITERALLY GO UP IN SMOKE WHEN A FIRE GUTTED THE BUILDING IN 2018. “MY FIRST THOUGHT WAS THAT IT WAS A COMMUNITY PLACE, AND OFFERED A WAY FOR MY EMPLOYEES TO MAKE A LIVING,” SHE RECALLS.

Determined not to let this end her own aspiration of owning the countryside eatery, and with a deep concern for her employees and customers, Newsome worked hand-in-hand with the building’s owner throughout the rebuilding process to get the cafe up and running again. She was able to have a say in the design of the new kitchen and dining room, and she re-opened her cafe doors just this spring. Newsome is pleased with the results, and says the new cafe, with its modern farmhouse décor, is bright and cheery. Her clientele, especially the neat freaks, are also delighted. “The number one thing customers say when they come in now is “Oh, it’s so clean.” We always had it clean before,” she laughs, “but it’s just the feel of it now; we wanted to make it bright and open.” Located 10 miles south of Sandpoint and directly across Highway 95 from Lake Cocolalla—with those namesake views, of course!—The View Cafe draws its share of locals, as well as travelers from across the country who are just passing through, plus Spokane and Coeur d’Alene residents who make the cafe their destination point for a day’s leisurely drive. And the drive is worth it from any direction if you’re looking for old-fashioned breakfast and lunch fare. “It’s North Idaho food,” Newsome said. “It’s the type of food we grew up on: biscuits and gravy, hamburgers. I’ve traveled throughout the U.S. a lot, and that also reflects on my food quite a bit. But the basis is standard American food that your grandma would make.”

Purveyors of Homemade Dining

In fact, her grandma once cooked at The View Cafe. Growing up in the community, Newsome remembers eating there often with her family, and her dad still lives just up the hill behind the restaurant. “So when this place became available, I wanted to own it. I wanted it to be like when I was a kid, with home-cooked food and a comfortable atmosphere,” she said. “I felt that I knew what it took to make it work, but I’m still learning a lot from my employees. Everyone has something to contribute.” Her quest for improvement applies not only to running a business, but finding great recipes, as well. She did a lot of research, for example, on how to make the best biscuits. “I feel like I got those down pretty good,” Newsome said. “Every recipe for biscuits is basically the same, it’s just the technique of how you put it together.” She said the chicken-fried steak receives the most raves from customers, along with those biscuits. And another big hit is the Cocolalla popper burger, featuring a hamburger smothered with grilled onions, jalapeños, and huckleberries, plus cream cheese and more huckleberry sauce on top. It’s definitely a dish that’s worth checking out ... and worth the drive! The View Cafe is open seven days a week, 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Check back this summer via the new website, www.TheView.cafe.com or call 208-2635195, as Newsome considers plans for adding a dinner menu.

Natural beer, food & fun!

FREE Wi-Fi • Serving Breakfast All Day Come visit us today at one of our two locations: Family Friendly Brewpub

208.263.5195 Hwy. 95, Cocolalla, ID

312 N First Ave.

Beer Hall & Brewery

220 Cedar St.

MickDuffs.com Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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A Comfortable Pub

Eichardt’s turns 25 by Trish Gannon

by the Numbers 1,200

MONDAY NIGHT BLUES JAMS HOSTED BY TRUCK MILLS

30,000 275,000 750ish 1,000 250,000 1,100 156

LBS OF WILD SALMON SOLD

GALLONS OF BEER SOLD

TAPS ON THE CEILING

EVENTS & CHARITIES HELPED

LBS OF GARLIC FRIES SOLD

KEGS OF WINE SOLD

EMPLOYEES OVER THE YEARS

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HEN JEFF NIZZOLI AND HIS FRIEND, DAVID MARX, DECIDED TO OPEN AN ENGLISH-STYLE PUB IN SANDPOINT, NIZZOLI WASN’T LOOKING AT THE LONG-TERM. “I WAS GONNA GIVE IT FIVE YEARS,” HE SAID. “BEFORE THIS, I NEVER HAD THE SAME JOB FOR MORE THAN SIX MONTHS.”

Yet April of 2019 marked the 25th anniversary of Eichardt’s Pub, Grill and Coffee House and for Nizzoli, the time has flown by. “I like it,” he said. “Once you work for yourself, there’s no going back.” Although a quarter century has passed, not a lot has changed. The upstairs coffee house was replaced with a game room within the first seven months. “We were a little progressive in 1994,” laughed Nizzoli. “Coffee, in Sandpoint, was still Folgers.” But everything else was exactly what Sandpoint wanted. “We were always about craft beer,” he said, and Eichardt’s is still about craft beer, offering a number of choices, including 16 on tap. “And we always served food,” Nizzoli added. Some of Eichardt’s most

popular dishes were on the menu “from day one.” The Quesadilla from Hell; blackened salmon; even the pub’s signature garlic fries. “A friend and I used to clean his father’s restaurant after midnight on the weekends,” Nizzoli explained, “and we always made garlic fries to fuel us for the work.” Today’s version of his teenage, late-night favorite is “a little more refined,” thanks to Tracy Hurlow, who helped open the kitchen. “She added the herbs and the fresh (not powdered) garlic.” There was also always music. “Truck Mills was here before we were,” Nizzoli laughed. “He was playing the Monday Night Blues Jam the first time I walked in here.” And he’s done so ever since. In fact, a time traveler from 1974 could walk into Eichardt’s today and

immediately feel at home. There have been a few changes— Nizzoli, for one, is now the sole owner, and the pub was the first in the area to offer draft wine—but most have to do with more food, more music, and more beer. “We were young enough that we wanted more music, so we started reaching out to regional bands,” Nizzoli said. Dark beer grew in popularity about a decade ago, and the pub has a large variety available. But IPAs (India pale ales) still dominate the order tickets. Ask for a Budweiser and you’ll get a coaster that reads “We don’t serve wussy yellow beer.” (If you have to, you can order a Kokanee hidden in the back of the refrigerator.) The food became better and better: addictive Caesar salads; gourmet

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EICHARDT’S ALUMNI CELEBRATES THE ANNIVERSARY. SHAWN DICKENSHEETS, THE PUB’S SECOND CHEF, NOW LIVES IN

Serving dinner 7 nights a week

CONNECTICUT BUT SENT A PHOTO SO HE COULD TAKE PART. IT WAS BLOWN UP INTO A LIFE-SIZED MODEL. INSET: PUBLICAN JEFF NIZZOLI; SOME OF THE AROUND 750 BEER

Reservations Recommended

TAPS THAT HANG FROM THE CEILING. ALL PHOTOS BY KIRK MILLER.

burgers (elk, tofu, and veggie options available); Cajun mac and cheese; the Guinness chocolate torte. “People like good food,” Nizzoli said. “We give them what they want.” Like the English pubs it’s modeled after, Eichardt’s is a place for locals. If you can put names to the unclad posteriors in the photograph in the men’s restroom, you’ve been around for a while. But it’s also welcoming to new visitors. “Every single day someone comes in who I don’t know,” said Nizzoli. Once there, they find a typical pub atmosphere. “Pubs are a place where you sit down and talk to people. This is a comfortable pub where you can relax and converse.” There are no big screen (or small screen) televisions at Eichardt’s. “TVs are for home,” said Nizzoli. Kids are welcome while the kitchen’s open, and many locals have ‘raised’ their children with Eichardt’s as their neighborhood pub. “I can have three generations of family in the bar on a single day,” Nizzoli said. “Grandma’s here at lunch, mom and dad come in for dinner, the grandkids come in for the game room, or music at night.” Running a small business in a small town is not always easy, but Nizzoli feels lucky. “There have been challenges at times, but it’s a consistent business, all 12 months of the year.” He also credits a good mentor in Jim Lippi, who owned Ivano’s Ristorante. “Jim taught me a lot; the importance of family and of giving to the community.” Those are lessons he’s taken to heart. Eichardt’s is always ready to support a good cause; the K-9 keg pull, for example, has become a favored staple of Winter Carnival, and they are always involved in the Summerfest music festival (see story on page 67), plus events that promote Pend Oreille Arts Council, Friends of Scotchman Peaks, Angels Over Sandpoint, and the Full Moon Bike Club. Will Eichardt’s be around 25 years from now? If it is, then it probably will look and feel much the same as it does today. “Everyone’s always happy when they come in here,” Nizzoli said. “The energy and the atmosphere are what keep me here,” 20 years longer than he expected.

208.265.2000

41 Lakeshore Drive, Sagle www.41SouthSandpoint.com

Catering& TakeOut

124 S.2nd Ave.

208.255.4186 arlosristorante.com

Sandpoint, ID

Corner of 2nd & LakeSt.

NEw Location!

Family Owned for 35 years! SINCE 1994

208.263.0211

102 S. First Avenue, Sandpoint, ID

Open Nightly@ 4:30pm

ivanosrestaurant.com

Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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The local dish

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OOD TRUCKS AND MUSIC FESTIVALS GO TOGETHER LIKE PEANUT BUTTER AND JELLY—AND WHEN THE OLD TIN CAN WHEELS UP TO SCHWEITZER’S FALL FEST OR PARKS DOWNTOWN OUTSIDE THE BARS ON WEEKEND NIGHTS, HUNGRY FANS QUEUE UP OUTSIDE THE WINDOW, LICKING THEIR CHOPS FOR THOSE OH-SO-GOOD HAMBURGERS. SERIOUSLY, IF YOU’VE TRIED AN OLD TIN CAN BURGER, YOU WON’T FORGET IT.

Well, the folks behind the Old Tin Can are bringing their delicious fare to downtown Sandpoint not just for a night, but in permanent bliss, refurbishing the former Pita Pit at the corner of Bridge Street and First Avenue into the all-new The Burger Dock, 116 N. First Ave., a sit-down eatery. Lots of work went into repurposing the space with large slide-out doors to the patio; indoors, there’s a rustic urban vibe featuring elements of old-school boating along with modern touches. And if you’re wondering about the fate of the food truck, don’t despair—it’ll still be up and running this summer as well … it’s just renamed the Burger Dock, as well. All this news makes hamburger fans want to shout from the mountaintops! So what’s the trick that makes their burgers so special?

“We have our secrets,” said Claire Anderson, whose family joined forces with the food truck’s owners, Savannah and Brad Clark, to open the new location. “It’s a combination of quality ingredients—we buy our meat locally from Wood’s—plus the diligence, care and love we put into our burgers.” Be warned, these are not delicate burgers ... keep some napkins handy, because spills are gonna happen. The new Burger Dock will also have milkshakes (vanilla, chocolate, strawberry, plus some seasonal flavors), fries, and a few salads, in addition to beer and wine. Another former food truck business that found permanent digs nearly two years ago is Beet & Basil, 105 S. First Ave. The self-described global street food restaurant focuses on fresh and seasonal ingredients

T WO G R E AT BU S I N E S S E S

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Skis, Bikes & Beer collide Located in Ponderay next to Taco Bell 476930 Hwy 95 • (208) 265-6163

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NEWLY REMODELED FRESH SEAFOOD • AGED BEEF LOCAL FRESH INGREDIENTS

208 264-5311

HOPEFLOATINGRESTAURANT.COM

Baxters on Cedar home of the Maine Lobster Roll

SERVING LUNCH & DINNER phone208.229.8377 webBaxtersOnCedar.com 109 Cedar St. Sandpoint, ID 83864

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PHOTOS ABOVE, LEFT TO RIGHT: THE BURGER DOCK FOOD TRUCK SPORTS ITS NEW LOGO; DI LUNA’S NEW ANCHO SMOKED STEAK SALAD; BEET & BASIL’S FRESH BEET HUMMUS PLATTER IS A PERFECT SUMMERTIME APPETIZER; ONE OF THE DISH AT DOVER BAY’S DAILY FRESH SEAFOOD SPECIALS.

in planning their menu. “We work with ten different local farms,” said general manager Jeremy Holzapfel. “The menu changes monthly, depending on what’s in season.” Beet & Basil’s three most popular dishes remain on the menu year-round. Those include the pho, a Vietnamese noodle soup that’s been served since the first day they opened the restaurant. Another popular favorite is the chicken vindaloo, a spiced Indian chicken stew served over lemon

coconut rice, with a fresh-tossed slaw salad over the top that’s accompanied by a mint chutney. And finally, the Moroccan-spiced roasted root salad with over 10 different kinds of roots that are chopped small and roasted with spices, then served on a salad with couscous, almonds, sliced grapes, and more. “The root salad is an original from the food truck days, too,” said Holzapfel. Indoor and outdoor seating is available through the summer, and while the pleasant

view from the patio overlooking Sand Creek is a big draw, Holzapfel said the air conditioned interior with its lofty urban vibe is a nice option on those warmer days. Hyped up for its first summer in the hip Belwood 301 Building, Uptown Bagels, 313 N. Third Ave., has found a niche with bagel sandwich fans near and far. The eatery serves authentic New York bagels, and now has five frischkäse (German for cream cheese) varieties on hand for those who like

• Bar and Grill serving burgers, steaks, tacos fresh fish and crisp salads • The Best Happy Hour on the lake from 4-6 daily • Full Liquor bar

46624 HWY 200 at Holiday Shores Marina in Beautiful Hope ID.

208.264.0443

www.ChopWaterFrontBarandGrill.com Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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options: blueberry-walnut, herb, honey, house plain, and roasted red pepper. Customers can mix ‘n’ match cheeses, meats and veggies, or just select from the posted menu including a knockout of a sandwich, The Stallone—a garlic bagel topped with salami, ham, roast beef, provolone, red onion, lettuce, banana peppers, and the roasted red pepper frischkäse. Look for the addition of fruit smoothies this summer and patio seating overlooking the water fountain at Jeff Jones Town Square. The good times keep rollin’ at Sandpoint’s favorite Mexican restaurant, Jalapenos, 314 N. Second Ave., with Margarita Mondays, Taco Tuesdays, Magic Wednesdays … you get the drift! And with festive outdoor seating on the patio, this is the perfect downtown locale for a leisurely summer lunch and perhaps a siesta! In addi-

tion to a wide selection of menu items, a new avocado appetizer kicks off your meal with a delicious twist: it features wedges of avocado that are dipped in a Dos XX amber beer batter and deep fried, served with a zesty house-made tapatio ranch dipping sauce. A must-try if you love avocados! We could go on and on about Jalapenos’ other offerings, but we had you at Margarita Mondays. Known for utilizing locally-sourced ingredients for their breakfasts and lunches, Di Luna’s Cafe, 207 Cedar St., now has eclectic gifts available for sale featuring sustainable product lines that are made locally. Shop for hemp backpacks, cutting boards made out of recycled materials, bamboo cutlery, whiskey barrel-aged maple syrup, plus lots of kids’ old-fashioned toys and more. There’s even a great line of cast iron pulls, door knockers, and rain chains! Who knew?!

Rice crusts & soy cheese now available

•Delivery •Sandwiches •Calzones •Specialty Salads •Homemade Dough •Beer/Wine •Take & Bakes

Open 11am- 8pm Daily Locally Made Wine Cheese Boards • Pizza Live Music Refillable Wine Bottles - 10th Refill Free!

The Carolyn

215 S. 2nd Ave.

263-9321

301 Cedar St., Suite 105 (access from Third Ave.)

Locally sourced ingredients for a twist on classic fare!

PATIORIES SE MUSIC y Nights

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www.sandpointfatpig.com

esda Wedn ne, July J in u gust! u and A 0pm :3 6:30-9

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SEAFOOD ON THE CHOP DECK AT HOPE; UPTOWN BAGEL’S LIGHT AND DELICIOUS ‘INCONCEIVABLE’ BAGELWICH; DISH AT DOVER BAY’S NEW VEGGIE BURGER; JALAPENOS SERVES UP A TRIO OF TACOS.

The cafe has added a few new items to the lunch menu, as well, including an ancho smoked steak salad with amaretto cherries and burrata, and a Thai kale salad topped with cashews and drizzled with a peanut sauce. And for a burst of summertime flavor, try the new Caprese panini sandwich with mozzarella, tomato, pesto, and a balsamic glaze on sourdough. Lakeside dining at the DISH at Dover Bay, 651 Lakeshore Ave., is always a delight with its close-to-town convenience and yet a feeling that you’re dining away from the hubbub of Sandpoint. Owner Gary Peitz and chef Eddie Sneva have introduced several new tempting dishes to the menu, including a Wasabi tempura ahi featuring an eel sauce, sweet chili aioli and pickled ginger, served with cilantro scented jasmine rice and a seasonal vegetable. And meat

lovers and vegetarians alike will want to get their hands on the new black bean and roasted corn veggie burger that’s topped with a cilantro chutney and roasted red pepper cream cheese. New items have also been added to the menu at CHOP Steak + Seafood at 46624 Highway 200 in Hope. Several to try are the prime rib sandwich served open-face with provolone, grilled onions, and A1 horseradish aioli, and the rotisserie pork loin that’s slowroasted in the rotisserie and served with chipotle barbecue sauce and peach salsa. Combined with the exceptional location—right on Lake Pend Oreille—it’s definitely time to dig in!

Serving Breakfast and Lunch Daily.

FAMILY FRIENDLY • OUTDOOR SEATING FULL BAR

(208) 263-2995

www.sandpointjalapenos.com 314 N. Second Ave. 102 N 1st Ave, Sandpoint 208-265-4311 Spudsonline.com

SANDPOINT’S PREMIER

CRAFT BEER STORE sushi & Japanese cuisine open wed-sun

shogasushi.com//208 //208 265 2001 //

41 Lakeshore Drive, Sagle, Idaho 83860

OVER 300 BEERS IN STOCK 12 ROTATING BEER TAPS MEATS & ARTISANAL CHEESE 208-597-7096 IDAHOPOURAUTHORITY.COM • 203 CEDAR STREET DOWNTOWN SANDPOINT, ID Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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Downtown sandpoint dining map eats + drinks

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36

Fir Bonner General Health

Poplar Alder

Main

Cedar

Division St.

34 28 35

Main

Cedar St.

17 15 32 Town 7 Square

31 10 25

29 1

Pine St.

Panida Theater

Bridge St.

12

20

City Beach

22

11

Lake St. 9

8

To Dover & Priest River

Cedar St. Bridge

30

Farmin Park

Oak

N

S

K

Healing Garden

Pine

E

CR

EE

Church

W

D

LAKE PEND OREILLE

21

N

Pend d’Oreille Bay Trail

20

SA

First Ave.

19

Visitor Center

Larch

Second Ave.

17 18

Elks Golf Course

Sand Creek Byway

S. Second Ave.

15 16

PARKING

13 14

18

33 Bonner Mall

4 Baldy Mountain Rd.

Third Ave.

11 12

14

Kootenai Cut-off Rd. 36

Fourth Ave.

9 10

Schweitzer Cut-off Rd.

5

To Hope & Clark Fork

23

S. Fourth Ave.

7 8

To Schweitzer Mtn. Resort

Fifth Ave.

5 6

2 13 21

Boyer Ave.

3 4

3

To Bonners Ferry & Canada

Boyer Ave.

2

Evans Brothers Coffee Mojo Coyote at Schweitzer Davis Grocery & Mercantile Miller’s Country Store & Deli Pack River Store Swartzendruber’s Bake Haus & Deli Uptown Bagel Winter Ridge Natural Foods Arlo’s Ristorante Baxters on Cedar Beet & Basil The Burger Dock Chimney Rock at Schweitzer CHOP Waterfront Bar and Grill Di Luna’s Cafe DISH at Dover Bay The Fat Pig The Floating Restaurant Forty-One South Ivano’s Ristorante Sky House at Schweitzer Spuds Waterfront Grill Sweet Lou’s The View Cafe Jalapenos Restaurant Second Avenue Pizza Shoga @ Forty-One South Eichardt’s Pub & Grill Matchwood Brewing Co. MickDuff’s Brewing Co. Brewpub The Back Door Idaho Pour Authority Laughing Dog Brewing MickDuff’s Brewing Co. Beer Hall & Brewery Pend d’Oreille Winery Skal Taproom

Division St.

1

26

Marina

6 24 19 27 To Sagle &

Coeur d’Alene

16

Map not to scale! 162

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D I N I N G G U I DE

The

COFFEE & CAFES 1

EVANS BROTHERS COFFEE

524 Church St. Located in downtown Sandpoint’s historic Granary Arts District. Enjoy exceptional coffees and espresso, including the popular Headwall Espresso Blend. Locally baked pastries, breakfast burritos and more. 208-265-5553 www.evansbrotherscoffee.com

2

PHOTOS ABOVE FROM LEFT: FISH TACOS AT JALAPENOS, POKE AT SWEET LOU’S AND FORTY-ONE SOUTH BURGER

5

1587 Rapid Lightning Rd. A country store with gourmet fare, serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Grab ‘n’ go burritos and salads, grocery necessities, plus a chef’s menu featuring weekly specials and more. 208-263-2409 www.packriverstore.com

Mojo Coyote at Schweitzer

10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. Enjoy a fresh Evans Brothers espresso and treat your sweet tooth to a warm scone. Fresh-baked pastries, breakfast burritos and lunch specials. Fine selection of beer and wine. 208-255-3037 www.schweitzer.com

6

www.facebook.com/SwartzendrubersBakeHaus

Davis Grocery & Mercantile

7

Miller’s Country Store & Deli

8

620 Wellington Pl., Hope. Cafe and coffee shop with fresh-made pastries, sandwiches, and gluten-free options. Full-service grocery supplies local produce, meats, wine and beer, and handcrafted goods to Hope community. 208-264-0539 www.davisgroceryinhope.com

4

1326 Baldy Mountain Rd. A large selection of fine deli meats and cheeses, bulk food items, pie fillings, and delicious fresh-baked pies, breads and pastries plus soup and sandwiches, take-home dinners, and soft-serve ice cream. 208-263-9446 www.millerscountrystoresandpoint.com

Swartzendruber’s Bake Haus & Deli

15 Sagle Rd. Taste the fusion of the Old World and the Northwest in scrumptious baked goodies. Amish meats and cheeses. Variety of local, homemade goods and gifts. Come in and relax with a cup of Swartzendruber’s Blend by Careywood Coffee. 208-265-9110

DELICATESSENS & MARKETS 3

Pack River Store

Uptown Bagel

313 N. Third Ave. Fresh-made breakfast and lunch bagelwiches made with authentic New York bagels. Plus, there are side salads and desserts to round out a delicious meal. “Choose happy!” 208-263-9276 www.uptownbagels.com

Winter Ridge Natural Foods

703 Lake St. A natural foods grocery store with in-house deli, bakery, meat department, organic produce and hot food bar with indoor seating. 208-265-8135 www.winterridgefoods.com

Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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eats

+

drinks

Eclectic/fine dining 9

Arlo’s Ristorante

16

Baxters on Cedar

17

Beet & Basil

18

124 S. Second Ave. New location! New York-style Italian cuisine. Great food, great service, outdoor seating and live music on the weekends. Nightly dinner specials. Catering also available. 208-255-4186 www.arlosristorante.com

10

Located one mile outside of Sandpoint in Dover Bay Resort. Casual dining on the water’s edge of Lake Pend Oreille featuring spectacular sunsets. An American grill menu with Pacific Rim influences. Full liquor bar. www.DishatDoverBay.com 208-265-6467

109 Cedar St. Daily specials, fresh local products. From steaks and chops to half-pound burgers, great salads, Maine lobster rolls, and Baxters’ signature Key Lime pie. 208-229-8377 www.baxtersoncedar.com

11

12

105 S. First Ave. Specializing in global street food with a local flair, Beet & Basil serves delicious unique options for vegetarians, vegans, meat lovers and those with dietary restrictions. Waterfront patio seating. 208-920-6144 www.beetandbasil.net

Forty-One South

Chimney Rock at Schweitzer

20

Ivano’s Ristorante

CHOP Waterfront Bar and Grill

21

Di Luna’s Café

22

207 Cedar St. American bistro cafe offering regional, sustainable foods including hand-cut steaks, homemade soups and vegetarian cuisine, plus eclectic gifts available for sale. Check out the dinner concerts. 208-263-0846 www.DiLunas.com

164

The Floating Restaurant

19

41 Lakeshore Dr., Sagle. South end of the Long Bridge. Waterfront dining in an elegant lodge setting; exquisite service paired with innovative cuisine make for one of North Idaho’s premier dining experiences. 208-265-2000 www.41southsandpoint.com 102 S. First Ave. Family-owned trattoria serves refined Italian dishes & fine wines. Garden patio dining, full bar, and glutenfree options. Convenient take-out, hot or take-and-bake. Catering available for large and small parties. 208-263-0211 www.ivanosrestaurant.com

46624 Highway 200 at Holiday Shores Marina in Hope. A casual water's-edge bar and grill serving burgers, steaks, tacos, fresh fish and crisp salads. Full liquor bar. Hope’s best sunset view of Lake Pend Oreille. 208-264-0443 www.chopwaterfrontbarandgrill.com

15

301 Cedar St. Suite 102. A large draft beer selection in a warm pub environment with a rotating wine list. Refreshing twists on classic pub fare with a complete vegetarian menu offered for lunch and dinner. Call for reservations. 208-265-PORK (7675) www.sandpointfatpig.com 47392 Highway 200 in Hope, at Hope Marina. Dine indoors in the beautiful dining room, or outdoors on the covered and open patios. Regional fare, fresh seafood, and local products. Enjoy the views and that “on the lake” experience. 208-264-5311 www.hopefloatingrestaurant.com

10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. Enjoy an extensive menu including high-quality steaks, hearty pasta, scrumptious salads and exquisite seafood. Inside the Selkirk Lodge at Schweitzer. 208-255-3071 www.schweitzer.com

14

The Fat Pig

The Burger Dock

116 N. First Ave. Handcrafted, locally sourced gourmet burgers from the owners of former Old Tin Can Burgers food truck. Patio seating overlooking the water, easily accessible from the dock with delivery and catering available. 208-597-7027 www.theburgerdock.com

13

DISH at Dover Bay

Sky House at Schweitzer

10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. Ride the chairlift or hike your way up to the Sky House for a lunch experience unlike any other. Featuring a chef-inspired menu from locally sourced, farm-fresh ingredients. 208-263-9555 www.schweitzer.com

Spuds WATERFRONT GRILL

102 S. First Ave. On Sand Creek overlooking the marina. Spuds creates everything from scratch; from every dressing, sauce and soup, to elaborate baked potatoes, loaded salads, unique sandwiches and desserts. 208-265-4311 www.spudsonline.com

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D I N I N G G U I DE 23

24

Sweet Lou’s

477272 U.S. Highway 95 in Ponderay. Terrific traditional and regional fare. Serving hand-cut steaks, freshly ground burgers, wild salmon and smoked ribs. Family-friendly environment. Full bar. A second location is open in Coeur d’Alene. 208-263-1381 www.sweetlousidaho.com

30

The View Cafe

462109 Highway 95. Overlooking scenic Lake Cocolalla, between Sandpoint and Coeur d’Alene. The View Cafe is a purveyor of homemade dining. Serving breakfast all day, free wi-fi. Soon to be open for dinner. 208-263-5195 www.theview.cafe

31

26

27

32

33

34 MickDuff’s Brewing Co. Beer Hall & Brewery 220 Cedar St. Family-friendly brewery tasting room boasts 16 taps and weekly entertainment. Beer Hall is BYOF (Bring Your Own Food)-friendly and has a beer for every taste. 21 years or older for live music on Friday and Saturday nights. 208-209-6700 www.mickduffs.com

pub style 28

Eichardt’s Pub & Grill

35

Matchwood Brewing Co.

36

212 Cedar St. Relaxing pub and grill mixes casual dining with seriously good food. Completely family friendly. More than a dozen beers on tap, good wines and live music. Locally supported and nationally recognized since 1994. 208-263-4005 www.eichardtspub.com

29

513 Oak St. in the Granary District. Experience Sandpoint’s newest brewery. Beer on tap, fresh-made pasties, appetizers, burgers, and more. Indoor and outdoor seating; community room upstairs is great for large gatherings. 208-718-2739 www.matchwoodbrewing.com

Laughing Dog Brewing

805 Schweitzer Plaza Dr., Ponderay. The dog-friendly taproom is open and offers a variety of beers. Stop by and taste the delicious huckleberry cream ale, and a wide selection of beers on tap. 208-263-9222 www.laughingdogbrewing.com

Shoga @ Forty-One South

41 Lakeshore Dr., Sagle. Premier sushi restaurant adjacent to Forty-One South. Sushi bar and magnificent sunset views overlooking Lake Pend Oreille. Plenty of non-sushi entrees as well. 208-265-2001 www.shogasushi.com

Idaho Pour Authority

203 Cedar St. Sandpoint’s premium craft beer store, with 12 taps and 300 bottled beers in stock. Also serving hard ciders, wine by-the-glass, gourmet cheeses and meats. Glassware, T-shirts, growlers, and other gift ideas available. 208-596-7096 www.idahopourauthority.com

Second Avenue Pizza

215 S. Second Ave. Specialty pizzas loaded with fresh ingredients on homemade dough, or calzones, specialty salads and sandwiches. Gluten-free choices. Beer and wine, take-and-bake pizzas available. Free delivery. 208-263-9321 www.secondavenuepizza.com

The Back Door

The Back Door, located downstairs at 111 Cedar St. It feels like you’re going into a speakeasy from the prohibition years; a warm and intimate space featuring wines and craft beers along with a great tapas menu. 208-610-7359 www.BaxtersBackDoor.com

Jalapeños Restaurant

314 N. Second Ave. A Sandpoint favorite for over 20 years offering both traditional and Americanized Mexican dishes in a fun, family-friendly atmosphere. Full bar, patio seating, banquet facilities, glutenfree menu, quick to-go menu. 208-263-2995 www.sandpointjalapenos.com

312 N. First Ave. Handcrafted ales in a family-friendly downtown atmosphere, brewing natural ales and root beer. Menu includes traditional and updated pub fare, gourmet hamburgers, sandwiches and handcrafted soups. 208-255-4351 www.mickduffs.com

taverns, brewpubs and wineries

Ethnic 25

MickDuff’s Brewing Co. Brewpub

Pend d’Oreille Winery

301 Cedar St. Locally made wines, tasting room, house-made appetizers, live music, local art installations, and refillable wine growlers, located in the renovated and historic Belwood 301 Building. 208-265-8545 www.powine.com

Skal Taproom

476930 Highway 95, Ponderay. Six beers on tap, wine, cider, hard kombucha and water spirits. Occasional live music. 208-265-6163 www.SandpointSports-SkalTaproom.com

Sa n dp oi n tMa g a z i n e.com | S A N D P O I N T M A G A Z I N E

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advertiser INDEX 7B T.V. - Hesstronics 128 A Glass Act 138 All Seasons Garden & Floral 58 Alpine Shop 17, 47 Ameriprise Financial 115 Artists’ Studio Tour 58 ArtWorks Gallery 59 Base Camp Design 77 BNSF 50 Barry Fisher Custom Homes 52 Beyond Hope 46 Big Lake Recreation 70 Bird Aviation Museum 28 Boden Architecture 130 Bonner County Fair 143 Bonner General Health 65 Bridge Assisted Living, The 64 Cedar Creek Custom Homes 2 Cedar Street Bridge 55 Century 21/Riverstone Company 33 Connie Scherr, Artist 58 Co-Op Country Store 26 Community Assistance League/Bizarre Bazaar 24 Dana Construction 118 Dan Fogarty Construction 123, 138 DM Vacation Rentals 5 Dover Bay 41, 88 Elks Golf Course 76 ELTC 16

Eve’s Leaves 23 Evergreen Realty 6 Evergreen Realty Charesse Moore 132 Feelin Groovy VW Bus Tours 54 Festival at Sandpoint 140 Finan McDonald 19, 23, 37 Friends of Scotchman Peak 37 Guaranteed Rate 44 Greasy Fingers Bikes 36 Guardian Transportation 115 Hallans Gallery 58.59 Heartwood Center 24 Hen’s Tooth Studio 59 Holiday Inn Express 144 Hope Marine 92, 93 Idagon 121 International Selkirk Loop 89 JEP Designs 58 Kaniksu Health 82 Keokee Books 166 Keokee Media & Marketing 115 Knipe Land Company 126 KPND Radio 115 KRFY Radio 64 Lake Pend Oreille Cruises 37 Lakeside Medicine 68 Lakeshore Realty 136 LaQuinta Inn 18 Laughing Dog Brewing 19 Lauren Adair 124 Lewis and Hawn 53, 63 Litehouse 74

Local Pages, The 142 Monarch Marble & Granite 122 Mountain West Bank 83 Music Conservatory 48 North 40 Outfitters 3 Northern Lights 56 Northern Quest Resort Casino Inside back cover Northwest Autobody 64 Northwest Handmade 14 Northwest Self Storage 141 On Track Lawn and Landscaping 138 Panhandle Special Needs 89 Paws Pet Pantry 115 Pend Oreille Shores Resort 36 Queen of Clean 138 Reader, The 142 Realty Plus 127 Realm Realty 11, 131 Realm Realty Jeremy Brown 24 Remax in Action 9 ReStore Habitat For Humanity 132 Rock Creek Alliance 66 Sandpoint Building Supply 137 Sandpoint Marine & Motorsports 43 Sandpoint Movers 62 Sandpoint Online 167 Sandpoint Shopping District 60 Sandpoint Super Drug 25

Sandpoint Waldorf School 82 Schweitzer Mountain Resort Back cover Selkirk Craftsman Furniture 132 Selkirk Glass & Cabinets 85 Selle Valley Construction 4 Seven Bee Interiors 115 Shakapaw 82 Silverwood 71 Skeleton Key Art 59 Skywalker Tree Care 18 Sleeps Cabin 20 Steger Studio 59 Sunshine Goldmine 87 Super 1 Foods 86 Taylor Insurance 21 Timberframes by Collin Beggs 134, 138 Ting 90 Tomlinson Sandpoint Sotheby’s 72,73 Tomlinson Sotheby’s - Cindy Bond Inside front covers Tomlinson Sotheby’s Chris Chambers 1 Tomlinson Sotheby’s Rich Curtis 78,79 Wildflower Day Spa 29 Wrenco Arms 83

Go Exploring with Keokee Guide Books www.KeokeeBooks.com NEW EDITION

$26

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market PLACE Your Buick, GMC truck dealer. New and used sales and leasing. Full service, parts and body shop. Highway 95 N., Ponderay, 208-263-2118, 1-800-430-5050. www.AlpineMotors.net CB Tans & Lashes is your premier source for sunless tanning and eyelash extensions. NEW location at 204 E. Superior Ste. 8 (across from Verizon before the Long Bridge) 208.610.7612

House blends roasted in small batches. Serving breakfast all day plus homemade soups, sandwiches & salads. Kokanee Ironworks art for admiration and sale inside. 509 N. Fifth Ave., 208-597-7831, kokaneecoffee.com. �

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Sandpoint Community Resource Center provides an extensive website offering information about how to receive help in areas as diverse as healthcare, housing, utilities, and clothing, while also connecting those who want to help with groups in need of volunteers. There is even an option to register your organization’s need for volunteer support. Learn more about it at www.sandpointcommunityresource.com 208-920-1840. 9 of 155

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Elite Tire & Suspension in Ponderay is your locally owned and trusted shop for tires, suspension work, and alignment. 800 Kootenai Cutoff Rd. Ponderay, ID 83852 Call Bill at 208-265-3603 or online at www.elitetireandsuspension.com or follow us on Facebook. A marketing communications firm providing web design and hosting, search engine optimization and marketing, graphic design, public relations, editorial and media consultation. 405 Church St., 208-2633573. www.keokee.com R&L Property Management Rental management experience since 1979. Tenant screening, rent collection, accounting, maintenance, and marketing. Residential and commercial. 1205 US-2 Suite 202A, 208-263-4033, rlpropertymanagement.com

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Shop Sandpoint Go to www.shopsandpoint. com, for local web links to trusted services, merchants, artists, craftspeople, farmers and green building. Write your own reviews in the new SandpointBlog. Fun reading, recycling, and more! Please us artwork on server Star Alexander, Magician Resident & Motivational Magician, Star Alexander. Featured close-up tableside performer at Jalapenos Mexican Restaurant in Sandpoint, Id. - Magic Wednesdays (ongoing, 6 to 8pm). Star is available for private events, birthday parties, street fairs, family reunions, Fundraisers and more! Call for info. or to book: (208) 610-8656 Offering the latest books and novels, office supplies, machine supplies and free delivery in Sandpoint. Order online. 201 Cedar St., 208-263-2417. www.Vanderfords.com

Sandpoint FREE classified ads

Got something to sell? Looking for good deals, a place to rent, a job, a ride share ... or even looking for love? Post for free, or browse hundreds of ads in Sandpoint’s own version of Craigslist. Go to www.SandpointClassifieds.com.

The Center for Functional Nutrition offers a full line of clinical nutrition products including Klaire, Thorne, Pure, Ortho Molecular, and Apex. 604 N. 5th Avenue.

ADVERTISING INFORMATION

Get current rate sheet at www. SandpointMagazine.com or call 208-263-3573 and talk to Sales Director Clint Nicholson (ext. 123; email clint@keokee.com) or sales assistant Miriam Robinson (ext. 115, email miriam@keokee.com).

SUMMER 2019

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sandpoint of view

THE CROSSING

L

CLOCKWISE: ANOTHER STUNNING SUNSET, 1,000 MILES FROM LAND; THE TYGA, AT DOCK IN MADEIRA, PORTUGAL ; OLSON WATCHES THE HEADSAILS AND JURYRIGGED WHISKER POLE. PHOTOS BY BEN OLSON.

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ast winter, my girlfriend Cadie and I were invited to crew on a 39-foot catamaran crossing the Atlantic Ocean. Cadie and I joined former teacher, engineer, and all-around-badass Gary Quinn, along with our esteemed captain and owner of the Tyga, Chris White. If you’ve eaten salmon in a Sandpoint restaurant in the past 30 years, Chris probably caught it in the wilds of Bristol Bay, Alaska. During 25 days at sea we covered more than 3,000 miles, most of it at a jogger’s pace. We served two-hour watches, followed by six hours of free time, 24 hours a day. No phones. No internet. No news. Just four people from Sandpoint with the single determination to cross an ocean. In other words—total bliss. From the moment we left Madeira, Portugal, I realized that existence at sea was different from existence on land. It was better, somehow. The small wonders of life emerged un-suffocated from all those trivial workaday matters that weigh us down on land. There were night watches so dark and beautiful, the stars so close you could reach up and grab them. Days when we danced across 20-foot swells, the rigging roaring with the sound of the trades after a week of no wind. Flying

our headsails wing-and-wing like an angel come down to kiss the sea. We read, we talked, we told stories of our lives, unencumbered by time. Without all the noise, each day became something special. We celebrated insignificant milestones with gusto. We planned elaborate dinners and never missed daily beer rations. Sunsets we’d gather on the bow and watch for the green flash, a rare phenomenon that occurs when the sun dips whole into the drink. We didn’t see the flash, but we all agreed to seeing a green hue (probably retinal blindness). We played endless card games and rolled dice on the pitching afterdeck. We watched dolphins surface beneath our outstretched hands. There were moments of drama. Squalls that came roaring out of the night like angry ghosts. Broken toes and hatches left open during big seas. Once on a night watch a flying fish actually leapt out of the rising swell and flew smack into my face. He looked as surprised as I did when I tossed him overboard. But we dug deep into this stripped down, purposeful life, and it felt damn good. When we reached sight of land, our captain hoisted a special pennant denoting a successful crossing and announced

by Ben Olson this, his third, would be his final. I felt honored that I was there to spend it with him. You’d think I’d have felt joy sighting land for the first time when we reached Antigua. Instead there were tears in my eyes at the thought of having to return, having to give up this perfect existence. This balance. Then I remembered. I live in Sandpoint. People come here to get away from their lives. And we live here. You don’t have to cross an ocean to find that bliss. We carry it inside of us. Those pure moments are always there. Sometimes you just have to whittle the noise away to find them. Think of the lonesome sound of a train whistle blowing across Sandpoint at night. Or the hush of a powder run at Schweitzer. The sound of the lake lapping against Green Bay with a crackling campfire nearby. The laughter of friends and loved ones sharing a beer in the twilight of the backyard. All these experiences are similar to what I felt at sea. Think of all those small moments that make this place special to every one of us. We lose ourselves in these ruts and forget to allow those moments to breathe. Let. Them. Breathe. We are all at sea here, surrounded by mountains and water, trees and sky. Don’t forget to take a minute and look around. And watch for flying fish.

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Anytime Info

www.KullyspellLuxuryEstate.com 15,809SF, 21.18AC. Gated Entry Sophisticated Security System Includes Memaloose Island ATI #1158 $20,000,000 Hope, Idaho

www.LochHavenEstate.com 6617SF – Main Home, 135 AC Multiple Guest Houses, Large Shop, 2200’ Lake Front, Surrounded by Nat. Forest ATI #1564 $16,900,000 Sagle, Idaho

For recorded information or to speak to the listing agent, call 208.449.0071 and use the 4-digit property code.

www.PonderPointLakesideHome.com ATI #1447 $2,575,000 Sandpoint, Idaho

www.MeadowviewRanchAtPackRiver.com ATI #1431 $2,295,000 Sandpoint, Idaho

www.WaterfrontAtCrookedEar.com ATI #1242, $1,670,000 Sandpoint, Idaho

www.ScenicBottleBayHome.com ATI #1338 $1,595,000 Sagle, Idaho

www.RanchAtHiddenValley.com ATI #1374 $1,545,000 Sandpoint, Idaho

www.WarrenIslandShore.com ATI #1577 $1,195,000 Hope, Idaho

BRING ON THE SUMMER!

TRAIN & THE GOO GOO DOLLS JUN 9

TOBY KEITH WITH MATT STELL AUG 6

JUDAS PRIEST WITH URIAH HEEP JUN 19

TRAVIS TRITT & THE CHARLIE DANIELS BAND AUG 13

MICHAEL FRANTI & SPEARHEAD AND ZIGGY MARLEY JUN 23 www.GarfieldBayCabin.com ATI #1471 $525,000 Sagle, Idaho

www.HolidayShoresMarinaCondo.com ATI #1588 $368,900 Hope, Idaho

www.KootenaiBayWaterfront.com ATI #1487 $759,000 Sandpoint, Idaho

PITBULL JUN 24 BRETT ELDREDGE WITH EASTON CORBIN JUN 27 TWO SHOWS

SNOOP DOGG WITH WARREN G JUL 18 & 19

STEVE MARTIN & MARTIN SHORT JUL 21

WITH DELLA MAE AND ALISON BROWN

MICHAEL MCDONALD & CHAKA KHAN JUL 23 PAT BENATAR & NEIL GIRALDO AND MELISSA ETHERIDGE JUL 28 www.28AcresGypsyBayRd.com ATI #1443 $699,000 Sagle, Idaho

www.LakesideEstateAtCapeOfArt.com 235’ of shoreline w/patios & 2 docks On 2.53 AC w/ 30AC common area 12,000SF Home & a beachside pavilion ATI #1538 $6,995,000 Hope, Idaho

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www.WestshoreWayLots.com ATI #1156 $349,000 Laclede, Idaho

WITH LOVE AND THEFT

ZZ TOP AUG 17 “WEIRD AL” YANKOVIC AUG 18 STYX WITH LOVERBOY AUG 22 SAMMY HAGAR & THE CIRCLE AUG 24 STEVE MILLER BAND & MARTY STUART AUG 28 JEFF DUNHAM SEP 7 OLD DOMINION SEP 15

www.IdahoClubLot.com ATI #1095 $139,000 Sandpoint, Idaho

C ommitted to providing a luxury experience. Dedicated to achieving results!

Cindy Bond, Associate Broker, Owner, GRI, CRS

www.CindyBond.com cindy.bond@sothebysrealty.com 208.255.8360

TICKETS, INFO & INDOOR SHOWS AT NORTHERNQUEST.COM 877.871.6772 | SPOKANE, WA

© MMVII Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Claude Monet’s “Marine View With a Sunset,” used with permission. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated, Except Offices Owned And Operated By NRT Incorporated. Sandpoint office: 208-263-5101, 200 Main Street, Sandpoint, ID 83864.

5/1/19 9:15 AM


HIKING THE SELKIRK CREST A 10-day journey over 16 peaks

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A CAROUSEL OF SMILES Local artists restore vintage ride

WOMEN OF CHANGE Five who make a difference

5/3/19 9:26 AM

Profile for Keokee :: media + marketing

Sandpoint Magazine Summer 2019  

Lake Pend Oreille, Hiking the Selkirk Crest, A Traveling Time Machine, Seven Decades of Growth; Bonner General Health, Helanders Pass the Ra...

Sandpoint Magazine Summer 2019  

Lake Pend Oreille, Hiking the Selkirk Crest, A Traveling Time Machine, Seven Decades of Growth; Bonner General Health, Helanders Pass the Ra...

Profile for keokee