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WINTER 2021

wide open new territory schweitzer soars with new terrain

INSIDE:

Schweitzer

Magazine winter 2021

GOING THE DISTANCE

Two winter treks from Schweitzer to Canada

THE RACE IS ON

Priest Lakers create sensation with vintage snowmobile races

WARMING HEARTS & SOULS Local group provides firewood for those in need


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Jeff Bond, Associate Broker, GRI, CRS jeff.bond@sothebysrealty.com 208.255.8270

MMVII Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Claude Monet’s “Marine View With a Sunset” used with permission. Sotheby’s International Realty is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office independently Owned and Operated, Except Offices Owned and Operated by NRT Incorporated. Sandpoint office: 208-263-5101, 200 Main Street, Sandpoint ID 83864

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Dedicated to the extraordinary the exceptional and the unique.

Chris Chambers www.ExtraordinaryIdaho.com 208-290-2500 chris.chambers@sothebysrealty.com 200 Main, Sandpoint, Idaho

© MMVII Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Claude Monet’s “Marine View With a Sunset,” used with permission. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated, Except Offices Owned And Operated By NRT Incorporated. Sandpoint office: 208-263-5101, 200 Main Street, Sandpoint, ID 83864.

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“Top producing Independent Real Estate firm for the past 36 years!” www.Evergreen-Realty.com // www.SchweitzerMountain.com 321 North First Avenue, Sandpoint, ID Toll Free 800.829.6370 // Office 208.263.6370 // Fax 208.263.3959 Evergreen Realty is pleased to sponsor our local Habitat for Humanity Charlie Parrish 208-290-1501

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departments

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features 37

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mixed media maker

The evolving repertoire of artist Ann Porter

Tending tHe Seeds of Greatness Jack Parnell’s second book tells story of agriculture

brosh is back!

Long-awaited second book now released

I had a story to tell

Sandpoint’s Mindy Cameron pens memoir

All things in moderation

Three men share their experiences moderating social media sites

Firewood REscue

Weekend warriors warm hearts

a mighty fighter

Daring eagle rescue at wildlife refuge

Prepared to play

Snow and cold offer a winter take on outdoor activities

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holy snow!

There’s a new mountain to ski at Schweitzer

Schweitzer to canada

Going the distance on the Selkirk Crest

The Race is on

Vintage snowmobile racing at Priest Lake

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE W I N T E R 2021, VOL. 31, NO. 1

On the cover:

Miles Wheatcroft soars off a snowy jump at Schweitzer. Photo by Woods Wheatcroft

SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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departments 10

almanac

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calendar

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interview: four writers from sandpoint magazine’s beginning

35 Pictured in History: Homestead cabins THE PUBLISHER IN HIS NATURAL ELEMENT.

Publisher’s note

Between a global pandemic, a raucous election, civil unrest, an unprecedented economic downturn ...yeah, 2020 has been a tough one. But as we find our way back to normality, maybe this issue of Sandpoint Magazine will provide some respite and a bit of hope. I think most who live here–in this town loaded with community compassion, surrounded by natural splendor–would tell you this place offers a lot of good in uncertain times. So here’s to the good things 2020 gave us. Like changes up on Schweitzer that bring outstanding new skiing. Or like people who will ride a bike across the country and raise money for local causes; or rally a bunch of hard workers to cut firewood for those in need; or rescue a baby eagle in trouble. Something else good: How about this magazine’s 30th birthday? We mark the occasion in our “Turning 30” interview with some of the original contributors that brought it to life, way back in 1990. Here’s a heartfelt THANK YOU to them, and the 100-plus others who have contributed over the past three decades. And finally, from where I sit, the best thing 2020 brought? It’s Wren Alexis, born October 8 to Brooke and Nate Bessler. If you really want to restore hope and optimism, just hold a tiny baby and ponder, oh, the places she’ll go. Wren’s about to have the best winter of her life. Here’s hoping we all find plenty of good in Winter ‘21. - CB

Publisher Chris Bessler COO Jeff Lagges Editor Trish Gannon Assistant Editor Beth Hawkins Advertising Director Clint Nicholson Art Director Pamela Larson Design Team Nicole Rios, Robin Levy Social Media Laura Walsh, Jenifer Caudle Office Manager Susan Otis IT Manager Ethan Roberts Printed in USA by Century Publishing, Post Falls, Idaho.

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Infographic: the glorious tamarack

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Photo Essay: trees of winter

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marketwatch

99 natives and newcomers 105 winter guide 122 Dining guide 128 Sandpoint of view

REAL ESTATE 80

Stay or play

84

Before the first snowflake falls

Resort offers options for those who want to live on the slopes

Homeowners’ tips to prepare for winter’s snow

90 Our Winter Love

Fireplaces are a ‘must have’ winter accoutrement

94 Sandpoint’s store of endless stories Corner Bookstore is local used book hub

EATS & DRINKS 110 Living up to our ‘Ski town’ name 114 Country Store gourmet 116 Schweitzer is heating up the drinks 118 Ten years of ‘doing our best’

Contributors:Brian Baxter, Richie Carey, Jenifer Caudle,Tyler Cochran, Sandy Compton, Carol Curtis, Gary Davis, Kevin Davis, Mel Dick, Brenda Haase, Cate Huisman, David Keyes, Lyndsie Kiebert, Paul Krames, Jennifer Lamont-Leo, Gwen LeTutor, Marianne Love, Doug Marshall, Annie Pflueger, Cameron Rasmusson, Ed Robinson, Carrie Scozzaro, SOK Designs, Elle Susnis, Tessier family, Chase Urquhart, Woods Wheatcroft

Sandpoint Magazine is published twice yearly, in May and November, by: Keokee Co. Publishing, Inc. 405 Church St., Sandpoint, ID 83864 208-263-3573 • www.keokee.com ©2021 by Keokee Co. Publishing Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Subscriptions: $12 per year, payable in advance. Subscribe at www. SandpointMagazine.com. Send address changes to the address above.

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ONE CALL, THAT’S ALL! WE TAKE CARE OF THE REST...

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Mel Dick’s Wild Ride Local cyclist crosses U.S. amid pandemic, hurricane, strife

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or nine weeks—August 1 through September 24, 2020—Sandpoint Rotary member and business owner Mel Dick practiced social distancing … with an emphasis on the “distancing” part. While many of us continue to hunker down at home while we ride out a global health pandemic, the 67-year-old completed a solo bicycling trek some 4,000 miles from Sandpoint to Key West, Florida. If his name sounds familiar, it’s because this isn’t the first time Dick has bicycled across the country. In 2008, he made a solo trip following his retirement from the corporate world. He was also involved for several years with Team Laughing Dog’s endurance team as part of the Race Across America, and

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participated in rides from Sandpoint to the Midwest. This year’s ride was similar to the 2008 trip—he was all alone and on his own schedule. “Every day is a new adventure,” he said afterwards. “You don’t know if your bike is going to break down, or you don’t know if you’re going to find water.” On average, he logged between 75 and 80 miles per day; the longest day was about 120 miles. But he finished the ride earlier than he had planned to avoid the path of hurricanes. “During the first six weeks, I rode extra miles most days just because I was concerned about getting caught in the hurricane,” he said. “I didn’t think I would be in the thick of hurricane season, I didn’t do enough research.” In the end, though, he avoided any big storms, but he did encounter lots of heat and humidity. “I probably only had half a dozen days where the temperature didn’t get into the 90s.” The trek was not only a remarkable athletic feat, it also helped raise money for the Sandpoint Rotary’s youth programs—something Dick is passionate about. “My ride was simply going to be a ride,” he said, but he changed his mind after the Rotary’s major fundraisers were canceled due to Covid-19. He asked folks to donate a penny per mile, or $50 total, and estimates his ride raised about $10,000 for Rotary. The public was

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PHOTOS, CLOCKWISE FROM FACING PAGE: MEL DICK REACHED THE CONTINENTAL DIVIDE AFTER A 10-MILE CLIMB ON DAY 17 OF HIS RIDE. THIS PAGE: DICK AT GRAND TETON PARK. WITH HIS RIG ON DAY ONE BEFORE HEADING OUT. HE MEETS NEW FRIENDS DURING A ROADSIDE BREAKDOWN NEAR BIRMINGHAM, MISSISSIPPI. FOREST FIRES WERE ON ALMOST CONSTANT VIEW IN THE WEST. ONCE IN FLORIDA, THE END WAS IN SIGHT. ALL PHOTOS BY MEL DICK

also encouraged to follow along on his travels via his blog, Dick paid for the ride expenses out of his own pocket, and kept costs down by camping, and staying in hostels and cheap motels. He also pulled camping and cooking equipment, plus spare bicycle parts, behind him in a trailer he named Bob. “The trailer is made by BOB Gear, so the first few weeks I didn’t tell people on my blog who Bob was. Finally I told them the Bob I was arguing with was my trailer.” Even though he’s a seasoned cross-country bicyclist, Dick said there were some changes he noticed this go-round because of the Covid crisis. “Typically I would stop mid-morning for breakfast, but that was not so easy to do.” Because many restaurants in rural areas were not open, opportunities to find a good meal were few and far between. “I spent a lot of time at convenience stores,” he said, admitting his diet wasn’t the healthiest. “There were a lot of early mornings at gas stations that have food, when ‘working America’ is stocking up for the day with ice and fried chicken.” And it was during those encounters at the gas stations, convenience stores, and occasional roadside breakdowns, when Dick found himself on the receiving end of strangers’ well wishes. “People were so interested in where I was from, and

where I was going. They would all say ‘Be safe, and be careful.’ ” And as the nation grappled with the divisiveness stemming from the movement opposing racial injustice, which reached its height late this past summer, Dick gained a refreshing and perhaps very different perspective from what most North Idahoans—and Americans, for that matter—were observing from home on computer and TV screens. “One of my biggest observations of the ride, no matter where I was at, was that people were extremely friendly and helpful,” he said. “What I noticed was that people were getting along—it didn’t matter what race they were, or where they were from,” he said. “You go to these rural communities, and you get a real sense of Americana. You see people joking and laughing, talking to each other,” Mel said. “The country seems like we’re so divided, but at the end of the day everybody just seemed to get along. My faith in the people of the U.S. was renewed.”

-Beth Hawkins Learn more at www.RideWithMel.com and to make a donation to the Sandpoint Rotary youth services programs.

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Almanac

THE NEW MURAL AT CLARK FORK JR./SR. HIGH SCHOOL OFFERS SCENES FROM THE AREA’S HISTORY, WITH THE LEGENDARY WAMPUS CAT LOOKING OVER IT ALL. PHOTO TOP RIGHT BY BRENDA HAASE, OTHER PHOTOS BY LYNDSIE KIEBERT

Schweitzer Mountain in the Village 208.255.1660 Downtown Sandpoint 213 Church St 208.263.5157

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M U R A L T E L L S S TO R Y O F A R E A H I S TO R Y Clark Fork High School’s newest art project

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nyone who knows the Clark Fork High School gym knows its unique old-school smell, the glossy floor, and the more modern additions from the past decade: blue and gold bleachers, a new scoreboard, banners representing each school in the North Star League. Each upgrade has brought a new sense of pride to the school, but none like the massive mural painted on the gym’s back wall over the summer by Coeur d’Alene-based design company ArtCoLab. CFHS sophomore Emily Myers pursued the idea after seeing an ArtCoLab creation at Wallace High School during the 2019 volleyball season. The school’s Leadership class did research on the history of the area and came up with “important things that should be on the mural,” she said, including potato farmers, loggers, a Native American tipi, and—of course—a Wampus Cat. The cat is perched on a mountaintop looking over the valley, spiked-ball tail poised beneath the moon. Several elements—including the moon, cat eyes, and stars—glow in the dark. ArtCoLab owner and art director Scott Lakey said he’s loved graffiti and street art since childhood, and began creat-

ing murals in North Idaho while attending high school at Lake City. Every mural is different, he said, and the CFHS mural took a few months of planning before three days of painting with a fellow artist. “Mural work is really gratifying—one, because of the sheer scale, but also to see a sketch and illustration turned into a massive painting with little details and paint imperfections and vibrant colors is something that we have to step back from and revisit to feel the impact,” Lakey said. “I’ve always been a fan of muralist and street artists, so to do this large scale work for others to enjoy and discover new things each time they view it is rewarding.” CFHS Principal Phil Kemink said he is proud of the new addition to the school. “It continues the tradition of connectedness in our community, and the pride that all have who are a part of this school and greater community,” he said. “I love to show it to people. The feedback has been amazing.”

-Lyndsie Kiebert Learn more at www.cf.lposd.org

First in Fashion

Visit us downtown and pamper yourself with unique, carefully chosen apparel collections and accessories to complement you and your contemporary lifestyle.

326 North First Avenue, Sandpoint a 208.263.0712 www.EvesLeaves.com SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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Almanac

A New Challenge for Nordic Ski Racers: Biathlon

S INTEREST IN THE SPORT OF BIATHLON CATCHES ON IN SANDPOINT. PHOTOS BY WHISKEY ROCK PLANNING & CONSULTING

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andpoint’s young Nordic ski racers had an opportunity last winter to liven up their training in a new way—by learning to shoot .22 caliber rifles while on skis. Although this may sound like an unlikely pairing of competitive skiing with the traditional family hunting trip, it’s actually an Olympic sport: biathlon. Biathlon has been a popular sport abroad for decades, but here in the U.S. it’s so unknown that Sandpoint’s biathletes are unlikely ever to be famous. They learned about it at a race last winter in Libby, Montana, where a former college competitor coaches youngsters in the sport. Mixing skiing and shooting involves intense periods of moving as fast as you can (while skiing) with equally intense but shorter stretches of holding as still as you can (while shooting). As 14-year-old team member Kasten Grimm describes it, “You’re skiing and you’re going really hard, and then you need to calm down and control your

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breathing and your heart rate to shoot an accurate shot. It brings something totally different into Nordic skiing.” Racers alternate laps skiing around a course (usually 5 km) with shooting five shots at a target while either standing or lying prone. (Skis are not removed in either case.) For any shot that doesn’t hit the target, skiers must ski a short penalty lap. So accuracy is important, and Kasten practices at the city’s outdoor range west of town with his dad. But he says teammate Fletcher Barrett is the best shot on the team, since Fletcher has had plenty of practice hunting with his family. While accurate shooting is the biggest part of the challenge added to skiing, good rifle handling and positioning are also essential. Skiers wear their unloaded rifles on their backs when they are racing, and the time it takes to remove the rifle, load it, get in position, and shoot all add to the racer’s time. So Kasten and Fletcher as well as teammates Jett Longanecker and Callahan Waters must practice these maneuvers as well. Skiers in Pine Street Woods might notice them at it this winter. There are few officially sanctioned biathlon competitions nearby, but the four teammates did get to compete on a course at West Yellowstone last year. On the first day, Kasten made all his shots and won his event. The second day, things were different: “The first round on my second day, I shot all five; the second round I shot two, and I missed the next three, so I had to do three penalty laps,” Kasten recalled. Although he said he enjoyed dealing with the pressure, “It got in my head. But I wanted to make up the time that I lost, so I probably pushed myself harder.” That must have worked, since he ended up winning again despite the missed shots. Covid-19 has left plans for this winter’s competitions up in the air. But Kasten is happy to continue with it. Although being a biathlete provides the possibility of a college scholarship or even Olympic glory (if not fame), right now he’s doing it for the best of all possible reasons: It’s fun.

-Cate Huisman

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(208) 264-5828 | posresort.com 47390 Hwy 200 | Hope, ID | 83836

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On Frozen Pond Couple creates curling rink each winter

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THE FIRST HICKS CURLING BONSPIEL WAS HELD ON SAGLE’S COMEBACK BAY FOR ENTHUSIASTIC NEIGHBORS AND FRIENDS. PHOTOS COURTESY HICKS FAMILY

ou can take the Canadian out of curling, but you can’t take the curling out of the transplanted Canadian. Since 1998, the Jason and Jill Hicks family has lived in their home nestled up next to Comeback Bay in Sagle. While most of their neighbors store their toys when the weather turns cold, Team Hicks hits the ice. It’s in their blood. The Hickses decided to make the most of their self-imposed banishment from the curling universe by hosting socials on the ice behind their home. Instead of 44-pound stones, guests brought ice cream pails. Jason would clear the ice and everyone would have a great time... but something was missing. “I have been asking my family and friends for 20 years to be on the lookout for a complete set of stones,” he said. By tradition, the real curling stones (or rocks) are carved from pure granite from the Scottish isle of Ailsa Craig, an island off the Ayrshire coast of Scotland. A new set costs $10,000. Jason’s brother found a set on the Canadian equivalent of Craigslist last October, and the first Hicks Curling Bonspiel (what a curling tournament is called) was on. Once the ice was frozen enough “to hold people,” Jason got to work. He carefully added droplets of water that froze into pebbles on the playing surface. The pebbling and the concave bottom of the stones decrease the friction and allows the stones to travel farther. He carved out concentric circles with a nail in the one sheet he constructed, but skipped coloring the ice, believing food coloring wouldn’t mix well with wildlife. The day of their first event turned out to be a great one for the only curling venue in the region. Eight teams took the ice on a 30-degree day that followed a 15-degree night. Each of the contestants brought chili and other winter fare, and after the ice chips settled, a team of U.S. teens defeated Jason and a few of his ringers. The Hicks’ Bonspiel is on again this year and has all of the makings of an annual tradition.

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OUR COMMUNITY 7BTV is a proud supporter of the Panida Theater. We’re in this together, Sandpoint. The beautiful historic Panida Theater has served as an anchor of stability and a beacon of hope throughout Bonner County history, providing a gathering place that enriches the community - both culturally and economically. While we are practicing social distancing guidelines to curb the spread of the virus, it’s important to remember the uphill battle for our nonprofit organizations. As our community comes together, the Panida Theater also needs our help to keep the heart of our community beating and stable during this dark time. Please show your love and support for the Panida through gift certificates, financial contributions, and memberships. These are a few ways we can help. Please visit www.panida.org/support for more information. 7BTV 208-263-7288 105 S. 3rd Ave., Sandpoint, ID 83864

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Almanac

PHOTO AT LEFT: THE STAFF AND STUDENT BODY OF THE SCHOOL IN 2019. PHOTO BY DO VERDIER ABOVE: CAROL STREET, THE SCHOOL’S FIRST KINDERGARTEN TEACHER, WITH HER CLASS IN 1992. COURTESY PHOTO

We never know what

Injuries will come through our door... But, take comfort in knowing we are here for you. Don’t miss out on recreation … or great healthcare while you’re visiting, because people don’t plan for accidents. Good thing we do. For a comprehensive list of our services please visit BonnerGeneral.org 520 N. Third Avenue, Sandpoint, ID 208.263.1441 18

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Sandpoint Waldorf School a Small-Town Success

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andpoint attracts tourists all across the country with natural beauty, outdoor recreation, and small-town charm. But when it comes to moving here, a lesser-known motivator is the Sandpoint Waldorf School. SWS was founded in 1992 and has since grown to a Nursery through Grade 8 school with over 165 students. Because Waldorf schools are typically located in bigger cities, SWS serves as a key selling point for relocating families who value the Waldorf education but desire a smaller community. According to the official Waldorf Education website: “Waldorf students cultivate their intellectual, emotional, physical, and spiritual capacities to be individuals certain of their paths and to be certain of the world.” Experiential learning is a large focus of the curriculum, including the integration of the arts in all academic disciplines. SWS teacher Michael Seifert, a former Silicon Valley computer programmer, joined SWS in 2005. Seifert says SWS has been fortunate to attract very well-trained teachers, noting that there’s a shortage nationwide of Waldorf teachers. He believes this, and the school’s focus on fostering deep relationships with students, are key reasons why the school has grown over the last two decades. Students stay with the same classmates and teachers as they journey through their Waldorf education. Seifert and fellow teacher Yvette McGowan believe this allows a much needed, full understanding of each child’s needs. Both point out that it can take multiple months to understand a child’s strengths, challenges, and personal needs. Working with each child for multiple years allows teachers to apply this insight throughout their time at SWS, helping students reach their full potential. Pedagogical Administrator Julie McCallan said the next step for SWS is finding the right home that gives them the space they need. The new location would ideally have a small farm so children can interact with animals and have more opportunities to engage with nature. SWS has also discussed adding a high school, but more students would be needed to sustain the school.

-Chase Urquhart Learn more at www.sandpointwaldorf.org

Snoring and Sleep Apnea Therapies

Sleep like a baby...

S TO P S N O R I N G | S L E E P S O U N D LY Dr. Lewis & Dr. Hawn have undergone extensive training in offering a dental solution for various sleep breathing disorders. Set up an appointment today! 2025 W. Pine St . | Sandpoint, ID 83864 | 208.265.4558 | www.sleepsnw.com

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Almanac

avalanche center continues to expand

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he Idaho Panhandle Avalanche Center, which has provided weekly avalanche forecasts and avalanche safety classes for regional backcountry enthusiasts for over 20 years, has made some significant changes lately. IPAC is working with a dedicated 501c3, the Friends of IPAC, to increase avalanche class offerings, improve the website, and raise money for operations. They have partnered with PanhandleBackcountry, which is an online community of backcountry enthusiasts, and welcomed Ben Bernall from Troy, Montana to provide avalanche forecasts from the East Cabinets and the Purcells on IPAC’s website. The information was a great addition and Ben has a lot of experience in the mountains. The National Avalanche Center is working on consistency, so is looking at a new format for their website this year that will be consistent with other smaller avalanche centers across the West. Melissa Hendrickson has accepted a new position with the Forest Service on the Coeur d’Alene River Ranger District which will allow her to transition into a larger role with the center. Melissa has taught classes, posted avalanche forecasts, posted to Facebook, and has been a constant smiling face in the backcountry. This past winter, level 1 avalanche classes were awarded to the two Doug Abromeit Avalanche Scholarship Winners, Neva Reseska and Emma Hall. They’ll both attend their first avalanche class this year.

-Kevin Davis PHOTO BY KEVIN DAVIS

Learn more on Facebook @friendsofipac, on Instagram @idahopanhandleavy, or online at www.idahopanhandleavalanche.org.

It’s not

what

to think. It’s

how

to think.

Now Enrolling Nursery - 8th Grade Call for your guided tour! 208-265-2683 www.sandpointwaldorf.org 20

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A l m a n ac

7B Grooves keeps the music alive for record lovers

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here’s something special about records—something that new technology just can’t replace. Just ask Kris Kurrus of 7B Grooves. According to the English teacher and music lover, turntables aren’t just a playback device. They’re an instrument in their own right. Every record player brings its own character to the music it plays, its own warmth, its own clicks and pops. “It really is irreplaceable,” Kurrus said. “And [music stores,] that’s where you find those social experiences.” That’s why he started 7B Grooves, located at 502 Cedar St. It’s a way to share his love of vinyl and 45 records with the community. He also offers repair services for record players, turntables, and other equipment. There’s a focus on local music at 7B Grooves. Many of the legacy artists and local bands have their CDs in stock, so if you’re looking for a sampling of the Sandpoint Sound, look no further. A native Sandpointian, Kurrus returned to town to be closer to his family. When he heard from his friends that the town hadn’t had a record store for a while, he knew precisely how he’d spend his time. He plans to resume teaching English at some point, but for now, it’s all about the music. “The first year of any business is not a time when you have a lot of time for other activities,” he said. 7B Grooves uses both online and in-store sales to spread the musical love, and will service customers online only when Covid-19 rates in the community are high.

-Cameron Rasmusson Learn more at www.7Bgrooves.com or call 208-263-2544

KRIS KURRUS OF 7B GROOVES. PHOTO BY RICHIE CAREY

®

Free Estimates Master Arborist 208.610.4858

www.skywalkertreecare.com

208.263.3622 · FinanMcDonald@gmail.com 301 N First Avenue SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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Almanac

NOTEWORTHY Utility box wraps

The Sandpoint Arts Commission began unveiling this summer art wraps for area utility boxes created by various local artists. STCU is a major sponsor of this city project, while Busy Beaver Graphics printed and installed the wraps. The wrapped boxes pictured above were created by artist Maggie Dawson.

Panida’s new push

An energetic bunch of new board members were elected at the Panida’s annual meeting in October, and they are charting the way forward for our treasured community-owned theater. With Covid-19 putting the kibosh on most events at the Panida (and all venues) it has had almost no revenue coming in for much of the year.

The Center for

PHOTOS FROM LEFT: PAIGE BELFREY RESCUES A CAT. COURTESY PHOTO. UTILITY BOX WRAPS DOWNTOWN. PHOTO BY ELLE SUSNIS. A SNEAK PEEK OF THE MICKDUFF’S REMODEL. COURTESY PHOTO. PINE ST. WOODS. COURTESY PHOTO

Expect to see an enlarged role for more live performances of music, dance, theater, and the Panida Playhouse Players. Also, the Panida is setting up new, supporting member categories for residents to make donations. The Panida is major economic driver for downtown and the theater is going to be pursuing underwriting from the business community. Look for more in our Summer 2021 issue, and visit www.Panida.org.

MickDuff’s

Although a date for opening was not set by press time, MickDuff’s Brewing Co. has made significant progress on their remodel of what was originally Sandpoint’s federal building and post office, built in 1928. Once open, the building will feature a kitchen, restaurant, and bar on the first level, with a

ition r t u N & e n i c i d e nal M sa ge s

FunctadieoSupplements • Pure Ingredients • Effective Do Cl in ic al Gr

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small brewery in the basement.

Season pass holders prioritized

If Covid-19 precautions require fewer people on the mountain this winter, Schweitzer has announced it will control the number of day tickets sold to ensure social distancing can be accomplished, giving pass holders first priority. The commitment is for a fun and safe winter season that keeps everyone skiing and riding, while protecting guests and employees alike.

Winter at Pine Street Woods

With more trail construction and improvements through the summer, Pine Street Woods is ready for a wide range of winter activities. Bikes must have at least 4-inch tires in order

A l m a n ac

to be ridden on groomed trails, and skiiers are asked to stay off of the narrow trails, which are maintained for fat bikers, snow shoers, and hikers. Also, the trails of the adjacent Sherwood Forest are neither groomed nor maintained through the winter, so hike or bike at your own risk. Visit www.PendOreillePedalers.org to find regular grooming reports.

Up a Tree

Ooh La La Aboriculture and Fine Pruning, a local tree cutting service, is offering Sandpoint residents a free “rescue” if their cat is stuck in a tree. Owners Paige and Nick Belfrey said, “We love trees, but we love our furry friends just as much!” To reach them, call 253-820-9119

SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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Proven Track Record at Keeping Propane Prices Low

CO-OP Gas & Supply Company has been your locally owned and operated propane company since 2000. Our outstanding customer service and attention to reasonable pricing has set us apart from all other propane companies in the area. If you are looking for a new propane company to supply all your propane needs at home, the office or on the farm now is the time to give us a call! CO-OP Gas & Supply Company provides propane service to all of Bonner and Boundary Counties.

1201 Fontaine Drive Ponderay, Idaho

208.263.3338 www.coopgasandsupply.org

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winter 2021

EVENTS

calendar of

IN THE MIDST OF A GLOBAL PANDEMIC, SANDPOINT’S WINTER EVENTS CALENDAR REMAINS AN EDUCATED GUESS. WE’VE COMPILED A LOOSE SYNOPSIS HERE OF REGULAR WINTERTIME EVENTS—SOME WITH SET DATES, MANY WITHOUT. EVENTS NOT SCHEDULED AT PRESS TIME ARE LISTED AT THE END OF EACH MONTH. WE’RE HOPING FOR A SEASON OF FUN AND ENJOYMENT FOR ALL! CHECK WWW.SANDPOINTONLINE.COM FOR AN UPDATED CALENDAR

NOVEMBER

21-22 Bonner County Fairgrounds Christmas Fair. A holiday tradition with handmade gifts, unique and local artisans, treats and drinks, Santa’s workshop, and Christmas fun at the Bonner County Fairgrounds. Free and open to the public. www.BonnerCountyFair.com 21-25, 27-29 K&K Thanksgiving Fishing Derby. Lake Pend Oreille Idaho Club’s annual fall fishing contest. Put on your long johns and come join this exciting event! www.LPOIC.org SARS Ski Swap. Shop deals on snow gear or sell stuff. Proceeds benefit Schweitzer Alpine Racing School. Downtown Tree Lighting and Santa’s Arrival. Festive family fun at Jeff Jones Town Square. Shook Twins ‘Giving Thanks’ Concert. In the Panida, featuring Sandpoint natives Katie and Laurie Shook.

DECEMBER

4 Backcountry Film Festival. Selkirk Outdoor Leadership & Education hosts the Winter Wildlands Alliance film festival at the Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. Proceeds help fund SOLE’s SnowSchool Experience program. www.SoleExperiences.org 6-12 Kinderhaven’s Tour of Trees This year bidding on a variety of fantastic Christmas trees will take place online beginning on Dec. 9. Bids may also be placed for table top trees, gift baskets, and wreaths starting Dec. 6. Online bidding for all items will end Dec. 12. As always, trees will be wrapped and delivered to the winning bidder. The trees will be displayed at various local business locations, where the public can view them on Dec.12. This is Kinderhaven’s major fundraiser for the year. www.KinderhavenSandpoint.org Schweitzer Community Day. Schweitzer Mountain Resort benefit for local charities.

www.Schweitzer.com Santa Skis. Santa and Mrs. Claus ski the slopes at Schweitzer Mountain Resort. www.Schweitzer.com New Year’s Eve Parties. At Schweitzer Resort and in town.

JANUARY

22 Banff Mountain Film Festival. From the Banff Film Festival’s local organizer, Michael Boge: “With the Covid fun it has made a mess of the Banff program for this coming year. There will be two nights of online shows, different films that folks can access from http://www.mountainfever. us. (website will be updated by Nov. 15). There will be also one night of completely different films that will be shown at the Panida Theater on Jan. 22, 2021. Showtime is 7 p.m., doors at 6 p.m. All tickets will be online through the Panida website, and any tickets left will be sold at the door. (The Panida has restrictions on attendance; at this time it is 200 patrons.) MLK Weekend. Special activities over the holiday weekend. www.Schweitzer.com Winter Trails Day. Snowshoe and Nordic ski event at Schweitzer Mountain Resort. www.Schweitzer.com

FEBRUARY

19 Okaidja Aforso. Pend Oreille Arts Council’s Performance Arts Series presentation in the Panida. All tickets $20. www. ArtInSandpoint.org Starlight Racing on NASTAR. Friday night racing at Schweitzer. www.Schweitzer.com Sandpoint Winter Carnival. Sandpoint celebrates the season that brings recreation and family fun to our area. Downtown parade tentatively scheduled for Feb. 12. www.SandpointWinterCarnival.com President’s Weekend Celebration. Schweitzer is the place to be for the holiday weekend. www.Schweitzer.com

PAFE Mega Demo Day. Schweitzer hosts fundraiser for Panhandle Alliance For Education. www.Schweitzer.com

MARCH

The Follies. Angels Over Sandpoint’s wild and crazy fundraiser at the Panida; this year’s event is scheduled over two weekends. Find the latest info at www. AngelsOverSandpoint.org 2,400 Feet of Schweitzer. Top-to-bottom giant slalom fundraiser at Schweitzer Mountain Resort benefits cystinosis research. www.Schweitzer.com Living Voices “Within the Silence.” Pend Oreille Arts Council’s Performance Arts Series presentation in the Panida. All tickets $15. www.ArtInSandpoint.org

APRIL

24-May 2 K&K Spring Fishing Derby. Lake Pend Oreille Idaho Club holds their annual fishing derby on Lake Pend Oreille. www. LPOIC.org 24 Missoula Children’s Theatre “The Emperor’s New Clothes.” Pend Oreille Arts Council’s Performance Arts Series presentation featuring local students in the Panida. Adults $15, youth $5. Find updated information on the event at www.ArtInSandpoint.org Schpring Finale and Rotary Ducky Derby. Celebrate the end of a great season at Schweitzer Mountain Resort. www. Schweitzer.com

MAY

20 Barrio Manouche. Pend Oreille Arts Council’s Performance Arts Series presentation in the Panida. All tickets $20. www. ArtInSandpoint.org. Lost in the ‘50s. Retro celebration with parades, car displays, dances, and concerts. www.Sandpoint.org/Lostin50s or Lost50s@Facebook.

SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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www.TSSIR.com IdahoClubProperties.com

This is your opportunity to own a New Idagon Built Custom Craftsman Home inside the gated community of “The Idaho Club”. This craftsman style 4 bed, 3 bath home is situated overlooking a pond,12th fairway & green, accented with beautiful views of the Mountains. Open floor plan showcases a gourmet chef ’s kitchen with white Pental quartz counters, stainless steel appliances, island with breakfast bar & formal dining area. Great room offers a tiled natural gas fireplace, LVP flooring, Hemlock baseboard & window trim finishes & sliding door out to a private covered patio. Home has a main floor Master suite with double sinks, tiled shower & large walk-in closet. Covered porch to front entry with field stone accents and stained cedar siding. Interior photos are of similar finishes by this builder. $779,000. Additional home available for $689,000. Call Rich @ 208-290-2895

IdahoClubProperties.com

BEST VALUE WATER VIEW HOME SITE ON MOOSE MOUNTAIN! Rare opportunity to purchase this estate parcel overlooking the largest lake in Idaho. This building site has amazing views of the Green Monarch Mountains to the east and Lake Pend Oreille to the west. The home site has been parked out and the driveway and building pad are in just waiting for you to build your dream home. This is a great price for this lot which has all underground utilities including natural gas to the property road. The Idaho Club is a gated community which features the only Jack Nicklaus Signature Golf Course in the state of Idaho. This property is centrally located and it’s only 15 minutes from downtown Sandpoint, 30 minutes to Schweitzer Mountain Ski Resort and 10 minutes to Lake Pend Oreille. Seller financing available! $379,000 Call Rich @ 208-290-2895

This Moose Mountain home site has great western exposure with views of Lake Pend Oreille, Schweitzer Ski Resort and incredible sunsets! This 1.1 acre parcel is easily accessed from the up hill side off of S Idaho Club Drive with a nice level benched area for easy building. The power, water, sewer, and natural gas lines are in the street and border this home site. The new club house is now complete and this is a great opportunity to be part of The Idaho Club with the only Jack Nicklaus Signature Golf course in Idaho. Also you are just minutes to Sandpoint, Lake Pend Oreille, Schweitzer Ski Resort and thousands of acres of public lands! $249,000. Call Rich @ 208-290-2895

Sandy Beach Estates

Level waterfront building home sites with your own private sandy beach on Lake Cocolalla. These lots come with community water and sewer along with underground power to all the lots. For those who are looking for the benefits of a smaller lake, this body of water is great for all water sports and fishing. This 9 lot waterfront community comes with its own common area and green space for additional recreational activities. Just a short scenic drive to Schweitzer Mountain Ski Resort and minutes from downtown Sandpoint and Lake Pend Oreille. Owner financing available for qualified buyers. Lots prices starting at $399,000 and only 5 lots remaining! Call Rich @ 208-290-2895 for details.

Salishan Point

Ledges Over Pend Oreille

Now Offering this secondary lot for sale in this Premier Gated Waterfront community on the Pend O’reille River! Just through the gated entry, this parcel is ready for your new home! Nestled in the exquisite neighborhood of Salishan Point where residents enjoy one of the finest private waterfront communities in North Idaho. Complete with marina, beach, pavilion, playground, and bathrooms on over 2.8 acres of common area. This lot has paved roads, power, and a community water & sewer system already in place. Each owner will be assigned a boat slip by the HOA after closing. $129,000. Call Rich @ 208-290-2895 for details.

One of the rare large acreage parcels available with spectacular water views of Pend Oreille River, 15 minutes from Sandpoint & 30 minutes from Schweitzer ski resort. This 287 acre parcel has total seclusion for private living yet still close to town. Property faces westerly giving the best exposure to the majestic sunsets of the Northwest. Additionally, this piece borders 160 acres of State Land & the 287 acres are made up of five contiguous separate parcels. Thousands of acres of state and public land close by and the public boat launch is just 2 miles away. $3,400,000 Call Rich @ 208-290-2895 for details.

Rich Curtis, associate broker, REALTOR® Luz Ossa, REALTOR® 208.290.2895 208.610.9977 richard.curtis@sothebysrealty.com luz.ossa@sothebysrealty.com © MMVII Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Claude Monet’s “Marine View With a Sunset,” used with permission. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated, Except Offices Owned And Operated By NRT Incorporated. Sandpoint office: 208-263-5101, 200 Main Street, Sandpoint, ID 83864.

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30

turning

To mark Sandpoint Magazine’s third decade, an interview with its founding contributors

This edition of Sandpoint Magazine marks the 30th year since the inaugural Winter 1991 edition was published in November 1990. It was a first for Sandpoint: A color glossy magazine, striving to produce excellent journalism with the singular mission “to help you get more out of being in Sandpoint,” as we wrote then. A lot has changed since 1990—for both our town and this magazine—but somewhat amazingly, a small cadre of the original contributors who helped give birth to Sandpoint Magazine still call this town home. And for our 30th birthday, we invited four of the writers who contributed to Sandpoint Magazine in its first year to tell us about some of their favorite stories from the decades. After all, who could be better suited to spill the beans on Sandpoint Magazine itself? Joining publisher Chris Bessler for a roundtable interview via Zoom were Sandy Compton, our first columnist as well as the inaugural issue’s ad sales director; Susan Drinkard, past and sometimes present Daily Bee journalist; Billie Jean Gerke, the magazine’s first editorial staffer and subsequently its editor through 2016; and David Gunter, freelancer, musician and man of assorted talents. Following are outtakes from the conversation.

Sandy Compton Chris Bessler: Sandy Compton, you were in that very first issue, with a couple pieces. And you’re still writing. What are some of the stories that stick out for you? Sandy Compton: It’s funny. Between 107 stories for you and writing 250 columns for the River Journal, they all start running together. But the first one I’d have a little comment on is “All Ahead Slow,” (Winter 1992) about the photographer Ross Hall. That one has produced a lot of positive comments for me. His son Dann Hall is still using it to put on the back of the pictures he sells out of the Hallans Gallery. I also wrote a piece about Dann’s mom Hazel Hall later on (“Hazel Hall, that’s all,” Winter

2010). Ross and Hazel were both such extraordinary people. CB: I well remember the piece on Hazel. You wrote that you had a crush on an older woman. SC: Oh man. I saw a picture of Hazel as a young woman … well we won’t go there. David Gunter: Don’t start on the early Hazel Hall pictures. What a cutie. SC: Actually I saw a picture of Hazel in Dann’s studio when he had that little studio over there by the Hydra. He had this picture of this really beautiful young woman hanging on the wall, and I said, “Dann, who’s the babe?” And he said, “That’s my mom.” I went “oops.” (laughs) Another story was “Who We Are,” SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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i n ta er iew al am nv ac local feature

EXCERPT

“Is Sandpoint an ‘arts community’ ... really?” Winter 2009 • by David Gunter

But behind the scenes, beyond the quantifiable benefits, lies the true secret to our success: Art resides here. We only manifest her presence and celebrate her decision to live in our midst... In that sense, we are not so much an “arts community” as “Art’s community.” May we serve her humbly and well.

Susan drinkard CB: Okay. Next, Susan, you’re up. Susan Drinkard: My stories are so inappropriate... But the most memorable would have to be the Kienholzes. CB: The interview with the artists Ed and Nancy Kienholz (Winter 1992). I’ve heard this one before but please, go on. SD: You remember, I told you. Well, when I got to their house Nancy was taking a shower and Ed had just come from a shower and he just had on these little shorts. So I started asking him questions and he took his weenie out and he just thought it was hilarious. Because of the way I reacted, trying to ignore it. I couldn’t believe it, you know, that a human would do that. Kienholz, he was a rascal, he was such a rapscallion. So he just showed it to me and then he giggled and then his wife came down and of course it was gone. And I kept thinking, did that really happen? Maybe it didn’t happen? But it did. SC: This is going in the magazine, right Bessler? CB: Geez. I don’t know. SD: You know he was so into shock value. He loved that. And it was reflected in his art, you know. But it was also just such a memorable experience because they let me see all the work they had in the old school in Hope there. One piece, I’ll never forget it. They had made a bedroom, an entire bedroom, bed, dresser, the whole

EXCERPT

Feature Interview: “Marilynne Robinson” Winter 2006 • by Susan Drinkard

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shebang, out of adding machine tape that had been used. Adding machine tape. It was just amazing and interesting. That was memorable. Plus the fame factor. You know, he’s in encyclopedias. CB: They were very influential artists internationally, although most people here had no clue, basically. DG: And now he’s part of the #MeToo movement. CB: Yeah, you just made him part of the #MeToo movement Susan. SC: Way to go. CB: Way to go. Way to ruin a legacy. SD: No I really respected those guys … (sighs). He just wanted to throw me. CB: Okay. Moving on. SD: Another one was, the musician Charley Packard... I got to interview him in 2014 (Feature Interview, Summer 2014). I just really liked his music. I think some of his songs, like that song “Gimme an Ol’ Gal,” somebody should have picked that up like Willie Nelson or somebody of that caliber. Charley didn’t live a lot longer after that. He was very sick when I interviewed him. I was just happy to have that opportunity. The interview that impressed me the most was the one with the author (Sandpoint native and Pulitzer Prize winner) Marilynne Robinson (Feature Interview, Winter 2006). I had just read her book “Gilead” while I was in Costa Rica, where I

had no distractions, no TV, and I was in the jungle so I read every sentence carefully. I just thought she was the best writer in the world. And I had the ability to focus because it’s not a very easy book. Then I just called her and she answered her phone. I thought Marilynne would be hard to reach. But I just called her at home, and she answered. She was studying Calvinist theology... for fun.

Q. Have you seen or heard of the recent booming growth in this area? A. My family has left the area, drawn away by college as my brother and I were, and then by work and family. It is the growth that makes me feel that for me, Sandpoint is more a time than a place. It is terrible to say that an environment changes when it is commodified. So we’ll pretend I didn’t say that.

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With over 50 Agents & 5 Locations to Serve YOU!

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Schweitzer Office In the Lazier Building Sandpoint, Idaho 83864 (208) 263-0427 Fax (208) 265-5192 Toll Free (800) 205-8771

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10/27/20 12:50 PM


IN

nt e iew aliam arnv ac feature local

what’s CHANGED

CB: I’m saving Billie Jean for last so I’m going to mention a few stories I did that were memorable. The very first issue, the “Mountain of Change” (Winter 1991) was about Schweitzer just after they had done the big upgrades there and built the Green Gables Lodge, and they’d torn down the old original Bierstube— actually, they burned it. SC: They burned it. They tried to tear it down and it wouldn’t come down so they burned it. CB: And people in town were kind of shocked by that. But that was really the transformation of Schweitzer and it’s so unfortunate the Brown family ended up losing the property. That one sticks out because I was trying to imagine how the mountain would change after they put in the first high-speed quad, and how that would change skiing the mountain. And now, Schweitzer just put in some new chairlifts on the backside and Mr. Compton is writing in this issue about how it’s changed skiing on the mountain. Another one I wrote was “Back to the Continental Mine” (Summer 1994). That was just kind of fun, because the first book our company published was “The Klockmann Diary,” by A.K. Klockmann, who founded the Continental Mine up in the Selkirks. For the story I was retracing his steps by the route he first went up there in the 1890s, by way of Priest River and Priest Lake. I canoed up the Upper Priest Lake and then I hiked up the Cedar Creek drainage and ran into bears... anyway that one sticks out. Finally, the interview with the Soviet spy and bank robber Christopher Boyce (Winter 2014) was memorable because I’m sure I probably had a beer with Boyce when I lived in Bonners Ferry in the 1970s and he was hiding out from the FBI up there. I was working at the Bonners Ferry Herald and my boss and I would go drink at the Mint Club after deadline, and Boyce said he would drink at the Mint Club, and who knows? But it’s interesting, we chased him, Billie

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30YEARS? CONTEST

HERE’S A LOCAL HISTORY CHALLENGE THAT COULD PAY OFF, WITH A TERRIFIC GRAND PRIZE: A SUBSCRIPTION TO THE NEXT 30 YEARS OF SANDPOINT MAGAZINE, PLUS 30 YEARS X 10 U.S. DOLLARS. BY WHICH WE MEAN $300 IN COLD HARD CASH! OUR ONLINE QUIZ WILL TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE ABOUT CHANGES IN SANDPOINT OVER THE LAST 30 YEARS. EACH CORRECT ANSWER EARNS ANOTHER ENTRY IN THE DRAWING... SO THE MORE YOU GET RIGHT, THE BETTER YOUR CHANCES TO WIN. HINT: THERE ARE CLUES IN THIS ARTICLE!

Where Was

This? Name of This

Hotel?

When Did This

Go Away? CONTEST DEADLINE IS MARCH 1, 2021. ENTER AT

WWW.SPTMAG.COM/WHATSCHANGEDCONTEST

EXCERPT

“Mountain of Change” Winter 1991 • by Chris Bessler

If all this sounds like Schweitzer is serious about building a destination resort, you’re right. Changes in the works for every year until the 21st century promise to be just as spectacular as the ski village grows many times over into an alpine pedestrian village with hotels, restaurants, boutiques, convention facilities, and underground parking. A crowning jewel, a mountaintop restaurant on Schweitzer Peak, is planned. Jean chased him, trying to get him for an interview for years when he was still in prison and when he was released to the halfway house. We finally got the interview after he was released and had written a book. And that brings us to Billie Jean, with

the biggest list of stories. Billie, give us a few of your most memorable ones. BJG: I told you I’m not a good speaker and I wouldn’t have anything good to say. SC: That was perfect. Thank you. Thank you very much. SD: You’re so succinct.

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billie jean gerke

EXCERPT

“Timber Town”

Summer 1994 • by Billie Jean Gerke

Generations of loggers have come and gone in North Idaho, and more will follow. Many of the men working in the woods today are following the footsteps of their fathers and grandfathers who logged here earlier in the century. At that time, logging was one of the few ways to make a decent living here. Not that it is merely a matter of making a living. Timber gets in your blood, they say. It is a lifestyle and a culture.

READ ‘EM

BJG: Okay, my first cover story was the Summer 1994 issue, in which I wrote the “Timber Town” cover story. And of course as we all know, I married a local logger. CB: That’s really getting into your work right there, Billie Jean. BJG: I wrote the story two years after we got married. So that was kind of cool, talking to the old-time loggers. So many of the people I talked to for that story, of course, have passed on. It was just really great looking into the history and seeing all these great historic photographs, many of them by Ross Hall. Also, just having that connection with my own family being a family with multiple generations logging. One of the best things about my job was getting to meet people that I otherwise normally would not have a chance to meet. My first feature interview I believe was the humorist Patrick McManus (Summer 1995). So that was really cool to meet him. I went out to his home. They had a second home on the Clark Fork River at the time. I believe the second feature interview I got to do was with the inventor, Dr. Forrest Bird (Winter 1995) and so that was terribly fascinating, getting to interview him and learn what a tremendous life he had. Getting a tour through his home and his medical research building and even getting to see how they grew all their own food. He opened up this floor in this back outbuilding to go down and see his massive pantry of canned goods... so it was so cool to see the way that he lived and the work that he did and think about all the lives that he saved. And here it was, out in the boondocks, this high technology manufacturing facility, way, way, way out of town. It was always great. You know I grew up here, partly; five years of my schooling was in Sandpoint. I went back to my home state, Wisconsin, to study journalism. I

never imagined that I could have a career in my hometown. I moved back because I wanted to be back in the Northwest but I thought I would live in Spokane. But after living here a few months I realized, I did not move back to the Northwest to live in Spokane, I came back to live in Sandpoint. So I believe it was January 2, I marched downtown and I went into the Sandpoint Unlimited office and I talked to Debbie Ferguson and told her, here I am, I have a journalism degree, I want to stay in my hometown, what’s here for me? And she pointed across to the Farmin Building and she said, you should go talk to Chris Bessler, he just started a publishing company and just published Sandpoint Magazine. So I went straight from the Sandpoint Unlimited office and went upstairs in the Farmin Building and walked in with my little portfolio. CB: Yes, you looked very businesslike. I remember that. BJG: I had heels on in the winter, and my dress pants. And I was 23 years old. They were in this little one-room office, just him and Sandy Compton. Chris was like, I’m really busy, you’re going to have to make an appointment and come back (laughs). SC: He always says that and then he talks to you. CB: All the big corporate guys are going to say that Billie Jean, come on. BJG: I was just always always so grateful to be able to work in my chosen career in my hometown. I used to tell people, “I have the best job in Sandpoint.” And I meant it. I had the best job in Sandpoint. It was so fun. And it was a lot of hard work too, of course. Just being able to meet people I had never met before and to have a pulse on what was happening in Sandpoint... CB: And that’s pretty good for someone who can’t speak.

Want to read any of the memorable stories mentioned by our writers in this article? We’ve assembled links

to these stories out of our archive, at SandpointMagazine.com. Read at www.sptmag.com/30years

SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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pictured in history

THE HOMESTEAD CABIN: RESPECT THE SHED by Jennifer Lamont Leo

THE CABIN WAS REASSEMBLED IN LAKEVIEW PARK IN 1982. PHOTO BY NANCY RENK, USED COURTESY BONNER COUNTY HISTORY MUSEUM

S

ometimes historical treasures are hidden in plain view. That’s true of a tool shed now bearing a new distinction as the Homestead Cabin. The adventure started with a leaky roof and ended with an important piece of local history, rediscovered. For years the rustic cabin has stood in the Native Plant Society Arboretum, next to the Bonner County History Museum in Lakeview Park. As sheds go, it’s a charmer, resembling a woodcutter’s cottage from a fairy tale. Even so, it’s easy to overlook. Then, last winter, the roof leaked. The need for repairs sparked a deep dive into the building’s history. According to museum records, the 16- by 24-foot cabin originally stood on Shingle Mill Road, on a parcel of land homesteaded in 1904 by Theodore A. Hepner. The exact age of the structure is unknown, but if Hepner built it, which seems likely, then it dates at least to 1904, possibly earlier. In 1919 Hepner sold the property to Myrtle Shaffer, who sold it a year later to Ben C. Jones, a veterinarian relocating from Oklahoma. For the next 45 years or so, the veterinary practice thrived and the cabin served as the “hospital.” Ben and his wife, Dollie, were active in the Kootenai and Pomona Granges and the Sandpoint Chamber of Commerce, and Ben led Bonner County’s first 4-H Club. The Jones family occupied the property until Ben’s death in 1965. Years later, Ben and Dollie’s daughter, Claudia Jones Wilson, remembered seeing Hepner’s original homestead patent signed by President Theodore Roosevelt. (According to the Homestead National Monument of America website of the U.S. National Park Service, it is more likely the document was signed by a land-office clerk on behalf of the president.) By 1980 the cabin was in the possession of Boise attorney James E. Bruce, Jr., who donated it to the museum. At the time, former Idaho governor Don Samuelson served on the Bonner County Historical Society Board of Trustees. Upon hearing the cabin was slated for destruction, he proposed salvaging it,

and the board agreed. In the fall of 1981, under Samuelson’s direction, the Pomona and several other granges pitched in to dismantle the structure and move it to Lakeview Park. This laborious process required marking and labeling each piece before it was hauled to the park. Meanwhile, another group of volunteers poured a cement foundation. With the onset of winter, the project was paused until spring, when workers made the unhappy discovery that rain had washed away much of the labeling, turning the pile of lumber into a giant puzzle. The men persevered, however, and the cabin took shape. Chinking the logs became a summer-long community project. According to a report written by Virginia Overland, “Anyone who wanted to try their hand at it were furnished with mud and trowel,” including children. A shingle roof was added in the fall of 1982. Thus the cabin was resurrected as a storage shed, first for the museum, then for the Native Plant Society. When the NPS approached the museum about the leaky roof, the timing was ripe for change. With the NPS’s agreement, Heather Upton, the museum’s executive director, proposed to the BCHS board that the museum reclaim the cabin for additional exhibit and educational space geared toward children. “Schools are telling us they want third-space immersive educational opportunities, and education is an important part of our mission,” Upton said. “In essence, the cabin is our largest artifact.” Upton said that the museum has applied for a community enhancement grant from the Idaho State Historical Society for the $8,730 needed to refurbish the space. She has also been seeking out skilled labor. “Cedar shake has become a bit of a lost art,” she said, “but we have been able to find a few craftsmen that specialize in it.” Visit the Homestead Cabin in Lakeview Park. And keep an eye out for changes to come. SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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I

t’s a lot easier to describe Ann Porter’s physical appearance than her artwork. She is on the short side, but by no means petite—a word that conveys something delicate. Instead, Porter is lean, wiry even, definitely not looking like she’s in her mid 60s. And when she turns her bright blue eyes your way, you can almost see the gears turning. “I think the reason I make work is I’m interested in the narrative,” said Porter, a well-established mixed media artist for the past 20 years who vacillated between pursuing art and pursuing literature throughout her college years. “I thought art was something other people did,” Porter said, who finally earned an English degree from Reed College in Portland, Oregon. When she moved to Sandpoint in the ’80s, she worked for Sneaky Tees and learned the commercial design business, dabbling in all manner of jewelry design, illustration, and printing. By the time her daughters were near grown, she thought about continuing in design, with art director the next logical step. She opted instead for graduate school, attending college at the same time as her grown daughter. At 47, it was a major turning point. SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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F EAT UR E S main

PREVIOUS PAGE, ARTIST ANN PORTER LIKES TO PAINT THE NARRATIVE IN THIS CURRENT WORK, A VARIATION ON “PASSENGERS.” THIS PAGE, TOP, PORTER TOOK A CRASH COURSE IN STAINED GLASS FROM ARTIST FRIEND PATRICIA BARKLEY. BELOW, PORTER SAID THE INTERNET MAKES SMALL TOWN LIFE EASIER.

After graduating from Washington State University, Porter hired on at Black Hills State University in Spearfish, South Dakota. When she found out she was going to teach stained glass, she called up her pal Patricia Barkley and traded for a crash course from one of the best. In her 15-year tenure, she taught just about everything: art

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history, art and technology, stained glass, drawing, sculpture, 2D design, 3D design, and ceramics. “I feel like I gave it my all,” she said, noting that teaching didn’t leave nearly enough time for her own artwork. Since retiring in 2018, she has been steadily making work and enjoying being back in Sandpoint. Commuting back and forth to South Dakota gave her an opportunity to consider if she wanted to retire elsewhere, Porter said, yet while she might have felt claustrophobic living in a smaller town in the past, technology today offers a broader vista. “With Internet you’re way better off in a small town than you used to be,” explained Porter, who has strengthened ties to Spokane and other arts hubs. She has been writing for a Spokane-based radio show called “Men in Charge,” for example, which appeals to her longstanding interest in literature and written—versus visual—expression. Porter also joined Saranac Art Projects, a contemporary, member-driven cooperative in Spokane, Washington, where she exhibited the series, “Passengers.” For that Porter employed digital technology to alter photographs she took at various airports and printed them in various ways, including on large silk banners. Before that, “Saints and Stuffies” highlighted Porter’s drawing skills with a series of stuffed animals in unlikely narratives. “Angels and Guns” incorporated stained glass, as did “Preaching to the Birds,” while “Twins,” a sculptural series, is a reminder of of the so-called circus freak show. Her current work is a variation on “Passengers.” “I’m really interested in the space between people,” Porter said, explaining one of her most recent artworks. We are in the studio she built behind her home, overlooking a few duplexes, the alley, and her postage-stamp of a yard, where raised beds await attendance. The canvas on the easel shows two figures, a snippet of a photo Porter took at the airport. She points out the shape created between the figures on the canvas. The metaphorical space intrigues her, too, and the image itself, especially when it’s been broken down into a grid, she said. “How little info we need to make an image recognizable,” she mused. For Porter, process and the concept she’s exploring drive decisions about which media to use. So today it’s paint but tomorrow, it could be something else. “I like that [art is] visceral,” said Porter. “It allows you to look at yourself in an unaccustomed way. And hopefully a way that’s interesting to others.” Look for Porter’s latest project: a post-Austen novel of self discovery in the context of the manners of the time. “I’m just now finishing up the fourth draft and am about to start sending it out,” said Porter. See her work at www.AnnPorterStudio.com

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by Beth Hawkins

W

hat if trees could talk? That’s the premise for a new children’s book authored by Sandpoint rancher and entrepreneur Jack Parnell, titled “The Old Apple Tree and Friends,” where a wise old tree in the meadow shares her humor and wisdom. “The idea came from a love of big trees,” said Parnell, who grew up on a small dairy farm. “Ever since I was a little guy, I always thought if trees could talk, what a wonderful experience that would be.” Parnell said the tree became a mechanism for getting out two messages to young readers: the importance of agriculture,

and that the greatest natural resource we have is our young people. “In this era of super-communication, we tend to redirect our attention on other things,” said Parnell, who has had a distinguished career in the agriculture industry. He was the Acting Secretary of Agriculture under President George Bush, and named Livestock Man of the Year in California by his peers. He and wife, Michelle, also breed champsionship Clydesdale horses at their Parnell Ranch in the Selle Valley. One, Ramsey, was the subject of his first book. “We take for granted the abundant agriculture supply and SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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F EAT UR E S main

pple Tree and Freinds

p l e p T A r d e l e O e h T and Friends

Jack Parnell

Jack Parnell PREVIOUS PAGE: JACK PARNELL AND HIS WIFE, MICHELLE, SURROUNDED BY CLYDESDALES, A BREED FEATURED IN “MY NAME IS RAMSEY: I’M A CLYDESDALE STALLION,” COURTESY JACK PARNELL THIS PAGE: THE COVER OF THE NEW BOOK, ILLUSTRATED BY BONNIE SHIELDS, WAS DRAWN AROUND A PHOTO OF THE ACTUAL APPLE TREE OF THE STORY.

its role in creating affluence in this country,” he said. He wants children to understand the importance of growing food, and ties that to his larger message: that every child has a wonderful potential, and they’re the “seeds of greatness.” “That potential will only be developed to that extent that others help them,” he adds. “It’s a real tree, you know,” said Bonnie Shields, who spent from June through September creating illustrations for the book. “I think it’s important that people know it’s real, and that the message is real, too.” Shields explained she was thrilled to be asked to illustrate for Parnell a second time. “I love Jack Parnell,” she said. “He’s one of my heroes, and our message is the same. [Illustrating] is a way of getting my part of the message out.” Shields was joined by Jack’s son Lonnie Parnell in creating the book’s fanciful illustrations. Jack Parnell previously authored and published a book titled “My Name is Ramsey: I’m a Clydesdale Stallion” which was also illustrated by Shields. “Bonnie is phenomenal, and it’s what I envisioned.” The book is available in local bookstores in time for the holiday shopping season.

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Brosh is back with... Solutions and Other Problems by Lyndsie Kiebert

W

hen Sandpoint Magazine spoke with author, illustrator, and 2004 Sandpoint High School graduate Allie Brosh in 2013, she was in the midst of a whirlwind. Brosh’s frank writing and perfectly crude drawings struck a chord with the world, and her graphic memoir—Hyperbole and a Half—was well on its way to becoming a No. 1 New York Times bestseller. Asked at the time what was next, Brosh didn’t know for sure, though she admitted that she could see herself writing another book. It only took the better part of a decade, but Brosh is back with a more-than-500-page creation titled “Solutions and Other Problems,” and people around the world who crave her honesty and comedy are rejoicing. Just as she leans on images to tell her stories within the pages of her books, Brosh is using photos from the last seven years to update her loyal following through a series of albums shared on her “Hyperbole and a Half” Facebook page. “I wanted to do something for all the kind people who worried about me while I was absent from the Internet,” she wrote online. “This is an attempt to answer the question of what my life was like during the seven years between books.” Through snippets of journals, draft illustrations and many, many photos from scenic walks, Brosh provides a raw glimpse into her world. It’s a world where curiosity, humor, and selfexploration are king, and where mental illness and staggering grief walk hand-in-hand with grace and serendipity. It’s the world that Brosh first shared with her readers in “Hyperbole and a Half.”

It’s only natural that the people who found resonance in her debut—the “kind people who worried” about her over the past seven years, as Brosh described it—would be chomping at the bit to confirm her wellbeing and get their hands on her art and words again. So what did happen in Brosh’s life over the past seven years? She divorced and remarried. She moved, and adopted pets. She had tumors surgically removed. She lost her sister, Kaiti, to suicide. Brosh shares these happenings in “Solutions and Other Problems” to varying degrees. The chapter that addresses her sister’s suicide, in particular, strikes the reader with its candidness. There is no script for how to talk about suicide, and certainly no guide for how to share your profound and confusing grief in a graphic novel. Brosh does so with a series of wordless comics depicting her relationship with her sister. It is a perfect tribute to an imperfect bond. One drawing shows Kaiti in her SHS soccer jersey—a miniscule but meaningful reference to their North Idaho upbringing. “Solutions and Other Problems” is sad, and funny, and comfortably familiar: Brosh’s characters—from her own pink-andyellow clad avatar to the goofy dogs and wide-eyed humans— are old friends, back after seven years to comfort and entertain her loyal fans. As Brosh reenters the spotlight of authordom, many of her readers are feeling seen and understood once more. It’s a reciprocal relationship, exemplified in the sign-off that Brosh has used in recent weeks each time she shares another collection of memories on social media: “Thank you for believing in me.” Learn more at www.hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.com. SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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F EAT UR E S main

‘I had a story to tell’

SANDPOINT’S MINDY CAMERON PENS MEMOIR by Beth Hawkins

“Women have always left their children, but it’s usually out of desperation—abuse, depression, poverty. As a young woman in Boise, I was not desperate; I was determined to change my life, a determination fueled by the intensity of new love, desire to pursue a budding career, and an independent spirit set free by the emergent feminist movement.” - Excerpt from “Leaving the Boys” 44

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I

t’s been five years since Mindy Cameron, 78, a retiree and journalist extraordinaire, first started writing her memoir “Leaving the Boys.” She wanted to tell her life’s story about her career accomplishments as a woman forging her path in a world that was primarily dominated by men at the time. She also wanted to write about finding the love of her life, husband Bill Berg. And most importantly, as the title of the book suggests, she wanted to write about the painful decision she made years ago when she left her young sons with their father to pursue a job opportunity and a new romance. So when Cameron managed to ‘get a few things on paper,’ she had her husband, her friends, and sisters read what she had written. “Everybody said ‘Huh, nothing’s really working,’ ” Cameron recalls. Apparently even a career journalist can find the process of writing a memoir a daunting challenge. But instead of giving up on the project, Cameron met the dilemma head-on with the same determination that’s led her along her life of success—she acquired a Master’s of Fine Arts degree from Pacific University in 2018. Not only did Cameron further hone her writing skills, she thoroughly enjoyed the educational process. “Particularly for a journalist who’s used to writing a certain way and reporting on things out there, for a memoir you really have to dig inside yourself, and I wasn’t a very introspective person,” Cameron said. “My complete

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draft of the book was my thesis statement. I spent the next year-plus doing some pretty significant revisions and got it ready for publishing.” The completed result—a 180-page paperback—was just published in July 2020. But it’s only the latest in a decades-long list of accomplishments for Cameron. She has held prestigious positions throughout her career as a journalist and editor at newspapers including the Lewiston Morning Tribune, Idaho Statesman, and Seattle Times. And in retirement, she didn’t rest on her laurels; she co-founded Sandpoint’s Panhandle Alliance For Education nonprofit in 2002 along with her husband, and also served on the Lake Pend Oreille School District Board of Trustees. Writing a memoir had been in the back of Cameron’s mind for decades, ever since she had become the first female news executive outside the features section in 1981. More recently, she was spurred along by the #MeToo movement. Cameron realized that she ‘had a story to tell’ about her early career challenges as a woman working in a male-dominated field, and also the decisions and consequences she encountered as a young mother. “I didn’t have serious issues around (the #MeToo movement issues), but there were the kinds of things that women in my position were confronting then.” One such recollection she discusses in the book is approaching her editor and asking him why a male colleague of hers with similar experience was making more money than she was. Her editor’s answer was that the man had a family to support. Cameron writes in her book: “CLICK! The instant I realized that being a woman was an excuse for a lower paycheck was the moment I became a feminist.” Writing the book has taken Cameron on a great ride through the past. “That’s the one thing I discovered early on,” she said. “Once you get into that memory circle, memories beget memories. And when you have to show, not tell, you remember the sensory and the place, and it became something I really enjoyed, the scenes I could call up.”

At the heart of Cameron’s memoir is the decision she made as a divorced mother raising two young sons in the 1970s. As the title reveals, she left her boys in the care of their father so that she could pursue a job opportunity and new romance in New York. In the book, Cameron often returns to that sometimes-painful topic, but she discusses it now in a matter-of-fact manner. “This is not a how-to book. It’s my story and how I handled it,” she said. “I expect some readers to make some judgments.” Her two sons are grown now, and Cameron enjoys family vacations on Lake Pend Oreille with her children and grandchildren. “I think they’re pretty proud of me, for both my career and publishing the book. They know how important this was to me.” “Leaving the Boys” is available at Vanderford’s and other local retailers, and online at www.Amazon.com.

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All things in moderation THREE LOCAL SOCIAL MEDIA SITE MODERATORS SHARE THEIR EXPERIENCE by Carrie Scozzaro

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n 2015, former Sandpoint mayoral candidate Mose Dunkel turned to Facebook to communicate with voters during his face-off with Shelby Rognstad; Rognstad went on to win the election, while Dunkel realized that the power of the PC was mightier than the sword. “During the campaign I realized there was not a place that allowed free uncensored opinion regardless of the topic,” said Dunkel, who also ran (unsuccessfully) for Sandpoint City Council in 2017. “When the election was over I felt there was a demand for a local group to discuss topics openly and to stay current on news that affected our area.” So Dunkel created the site called Rosebud and became what’s known on social media platforms like

Facebook (the most popular such forum in 2019, according to Pew Research Center) as a moderator. Not to be confused with a political moderate, a moderator is someone who accepts (or rejects) requests to join the group—similar to a friend request—and acts as the control valve for what is and isn’t allowed to be posted on the site. With 1,200 members from teenage years on up, said Dunkel, “Rosebud has a wide mix of viewers who help keep the discussions balanced most of the time.” Thus, he approaches the site with a laissez-faire attitude. Indeed, Rosebud is a reference to a boyhood sled owned by the lead character in “Citizen Kane,” the 1941 movie directed, co-written, and produced by Orson

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PREVIOUS PAGE, MOSE DUNKEL BECAME A MODERATOR IN ORDER TO ALLOW PEOPLE TO “SPEAK AND BRING UP EDGY POINTS.” PHOTO BY MARIANNE LOVE THIS PAGE, TOP: RICK LARKIN MODERATES SANDPOINT LOCAL FORUM, WHICH CURRENTLY BOASTS ALMOST 9,000 MEMBERS. PHOTO BY TYLER COCHRAN BOTTOM: COREY VOGEL’S PAGE FOR THE CLARK FORK COMMUNITY REJECTS NEGATIVITY, MAKING FOR AN ACTIVE MODERATOR’S JOB. PHOTO BY MARIANNE LOVE

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Welles, who was also its leading man. “It’s a loose connection to the media still being able to steer the public perception,” said Dunkel. He relishes the idea that “people can speak and bring up edgy points that likely wouldn’t be allowed in other places,” even though he’s been accused of bias by both liberals and conservatives. At seven times the size but roughly the same age as Rosebud, Sandpoint Local Forum takes a different tack. “The focus was to provide local people a safe place to discuss local issues, keeping political and religious opinions out to avoid the ridiculous drama they seem to create,” said Rick Larkin, who moderates the site along with its founders, Don and Lorri Goodman. Their most common posts are “people looking for help, work, lost pets, and letting others know about important issues that were coming before the county or cities for action.” While politics still creeps in, they are more rigorous in policing posts, said Larkin, a retired volunteer firefighter who was born and raised in Sandpoint, but has since moved to Hayden, where he runs his own online marketing business. “We do not allow foul language, negative political references, name calling, or complaints about local businesses unless it’s something that affects the entire community as a whole.” An ordained pastor who also runs the Prayer Warriors in Service to Jesus page, Larkin finds the issue of biases challenging. They set up a keyword notification to filter things they don’t allow on the site and encourage members to report violations, he said, only to have some members report anything they don’t agree with. “It is hard to read some things that go against your beliefs, and not respond or retaliate,” admits Larkin who, like Dunkel, has been accused of bias by both “sides” of the growing political divide. “I have been attacked on Messenger for being a liberal jackass, or a conservative Christian, by people we removed, or removed their comments,” he said. Similar in size to Rosebud and older

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than both it and Sandpoint Local Forum by one year, Clark Fork caters to around 2,000 members. Conrad “Corey” Vogel became one of four moderators for the site a year-and-a-half ago. “Our focus is to have an area on Facebook that isn’t clogged up by political posts and rants, anger, misleading information, or just negativity,” said Vogel, who works for a civil engineer/ land surveying company and enjoys landscape photography. They restrict non-local political posts of any kind, said Vogel. “They could start out well with everyone being respectful, but 100 percent of the time they degenerate into mud slinging contests and bitter arguments between longtime friends.” Popular posts include landscape photographs and community events and news, contributed by varied ages, from high school students to long-time residents. Like Dunkel and Larkin, Vogel figures he spends a few hours a week on the site and is clear-eyed about both the upside and downside of platforms like Facebook. Facebook offers instant viewership, said Vogel. “When something pops up on Facebook everyone can see it and respond to it within hours instead of days.” The downside includes heated emotions and falsehoods—whether unintentional or deliberate—something Dunkel calls the “double edged sword of free speech.” Another issue is the potential for misunderstanding, said Vogel, noting the ease with which people can read into things what they want. “You can post a paragraph of text and have 10 people read it, and there is a chance that those 10 people will all come away with a different meaning,” he said. “Moderating can seem like a very thankless job,” said Vogel, who thinks a good moderator is patient, and willing to put themselves in the writer’s shoes. “But there are times when people really understand and thank you for keeping things on a straight path. Those times are nice and make it worth it.”

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Firewood Rescue Weekend warriors warm homes and hearts by David Keyes

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irewood can produce light from darkness, heat from cold, and in more than a few local situations, hope from despair. The local nonprofit organization Firewood Rescue began in 2018 when an educator, who has a long history of assisting veterans, heard one too many stories about area residents who had fallen on hard times and didn’t know how to reach for help. “I thought ‘What about the elderly, disabled, seriously ill, and folks who found themselves in dire circumstances through no fault of their own?’ ” Organizer Paul Krames recognized a

need, and had an idea for a solution, so he did what any other difference maker does—he started a Facebook page. Almost immediately, volunteers and firewood suppliers were attracted to Firewood Rescue on Facebook. The activity level soon became frenetic and Krames organized a board of directors. In less than a year, board member Eileen Epstein transformed FR from a “weekend warrior project to be able to mobilize and coordinate volunteer resources throughout the week as well,” he said. In 2018, the group would meet over a weekend, gather, split, and stack wood, load it into trucks and trailers, and

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deliver. Now the organization cuts and splits wood several times a month and has accumulated significant amounts of firewood in two locations in Sagle way before the first hints of cold weather. There were more than 50 cords of cut, split, and neatly stacked wood at each location by the end of the fall, with many more work parties planned. A lack of firewood is usually a symptom of something catastrophic going on. That is why FR partners with Community Action Partnership. For the most part, CAP refers folks to Firewood Rescue as part of a comprehensive approach to link services with the needy. Krames knew he was on to something when he received a tip about an elderly veteran the first winter FR started. The man had just had surgery and his only source of heat was wood.

Winter had set in. Krames knocked on the vet’s door to let him know he had a whole bunch of wood with him and volunteers who wanted to stack it up. “He was so choked up, he turned his back and started to cry,” Krames said. “This man was too proud to ask for help.” Recent FR stories would warm any heart, including support for a wheelchair-bound amputee; a family whose father and husband was in a horrific, near-fatal crash; and a 70-year-old woman who had holes in her roof, whose only source of heat is a wood stove. Mel Dick, immediate past president of Sandpoint Rotary, joined with Rotarians John and Donna Lorenz and others to prioritize FR last year. Rotary donated money and labor, and Rotarian Eric Donenfeld, co-owner of Northwest Autobody, donated secured property as a waypoint for

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PHOTO, P. 51: DAN MCLAUGHLIN, PAT VANVOLKINBURG, MEL DICK, MIKE NUNKE, MARGIE BUSH, DAN DEVOY, AND DALLAS COX ARE JUST A FEW OF FIREWOOD RESCUE’S WEEKEND WARRIORS. LEFT, BROTHERS SCOTT AND CLINT BROW CUT WOOD. PHOTOS BY PAUL KRAMES. BELOW, PAUL KRAMES WORKS WITH THE CREW. COURTESY PHOTO

wood to be dropped off. Current Rotary President Ken Wood applied for and received a Rotary grant to help fund repair of a log splitter and to assist in paying for gas to transport the wood. One anonymous Rotarian matched the grant and Wood made the donation in Dick’s name. “Volunteers run chainsaws, haul wood, load and unload trucks, and make deliveries, often in the cold and rain,” said Krames. “It’s humbling and a little unbelievable. The recipients are always so grateful.” FW Rescue is geared up to help up to 100 families this winter and is bracing for the worst because of the economic fallout from Covid-19. The organization attempts to serve as a bridge to help families and rarely restocks the same family more than once except for rare circumstances. Previous to this year, financial difficulty wasn’t a qualifying condition for help but with many layoffs and economic devastation hitting local families this year, Krames and Esptein felt the organization had to broaden its net. Want to donate, help, or know someone who needs help? Reach the group on Facebook @FirewoodRescue or email krames60@gmail.com.

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A Mighty

FIGHTE Daring eagle rescue at wildlife refuge by Annie Pflueger

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he Kootenai River eagles, often seen at the Kootenai Wildlife Refuge near Bonners Ferry, have returned to the same nest, successfully raising twin eaglets for several years. The pair have provided many onlookers with a unique and wonderful glimpse into their world. As a nature and wildlife photographer, I routinely visited the active nest on a daily basis. The 2020 season was especially exciting. Instead of twin eaglets, there were triplets! Three babies hatched several days apart and were vastly different in size and strength. The firstborn and much larger youngster had taken his first flight and fledged, but remained close to the nest. Ten days later, the second eaglet was observed performing the same first flight ritual of wing flapping and hopping on the nest when its left wing came down on a branch that was vertical and erect. As the young bird struggled to free itself, the impaled branch only went deeper and further through the wing. The trapped eaglet’s repeated attempts to free itself resulted in it hanging by the trapped wing, with its feet dangling off the side of the nest. The nest was precariously placed, approximately 75 feet in the air and between two trees that leaned out over the river. The bird’s entire weight was supported only by the branch that impaled the wing. Realizing time was of the essence, I contacted the experts in raptor rescue and a local arborist who could determine if it was feasible to access the nest and safely free the doomed eaglet. Janie and Don Veltkamp of Birds of Prey Northwest traveled to assist while Michael Richardson, Sarah Jimenez, and Matt Bennett of Skywalker Tree Care assessed the grave situation. Boat captain Genny Hoyle was also available to help. The boat was positioned with Captain Genny and Sarah on board, in the event the remaining youngest eagle tried to fly from the nest and drop into the river. Indeed, when Michael ultimately reached the nest, the second eaglet did awkwardly fly from her home, landing in the water but safely at the river’s edge. Since this fallen bird was not quite ready to fly well on its own, it would be taken to BOPNW’s facility in St. Maries for two weeks of additional growth before being released. Carrying a raptor hood, Michael and Matt made the long and cautious climb up the tree from the ground. When they reached the severely injured eagle, the bird was exhausted, weak, and in shock. Placing a hood over the bird’s head helped SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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keep the bird calm and the handlers safe. Once the bird was hooded, they gently lifted its wing off the branch. The debilitated eaglet was placed in a large duffle bag and gently lowered down the rope 70 feet to the waiting boat below. Once in Janie’s experienced hands, the raptor’s condition was assessed. The eaglet was bleeding and her body core temperature was dangerously low after being exposed to the elements for two and a half days with no food. The wing sustained severe damage and was actively bleeding. A puncture wound larger than a golf ball was left by the branch that held the raptor prisoner. Janie provided medical attention on the spot, stabilizing the eaglet by injecting fluids, antibiotics, and pain medication. The raptor was then fed its first meal in almost three days through a gastric tube down the esophagus into the stomach. The injured eaglet’s condition was very guarded and the prognosis was not promising. Yet despite the odds, the rescue team felt they had made the right decision in freeing the eaglet from certain doom. The team celebrated and said an emotional goodbye to the injured eaglet, now named “Kootenai.” It would travel with its sibling, now affectionately called “Boundary,” to the Birds of Prey NW rehab center for additional care and observation. To everyone’s surprise and relief, at BOPNW the injured eaglet survived the night thanks to round the clock treatments of antibiotics and feedings every few hours. The following morning, Janie took the fragile raptor for examination at Kootenai Veterinary Hospital. The bird’s wing tissue was infected and dying. The massive puncture would require surgery. The left leg was battered but an X-ray showed no fracture, despite the bird’s hesitation to use it. After surgery and back at BOPNW, the young bird’s condition remained extremely guarded, requiring continued antibiotics and tube feeding. Yet each day the young raptor gained strength and weight. Kootenai was a mighty fighter with a strong will to live. Twelve days later, The Veltkamps traveled the three hours back up to Bonners Ferry, bringing the youngest triplet “Boundary” for release near the nest where the three siblings

were born. Boundary was now strong enough to fledge and be with the family once again. The eaglet was placed on the ground. As the original rescue team watched with hope and optimism, the beautiful eagle took off, flew across the river and perched in a tall tree. Over the next several weeks, property owners Dave and Brenda Walters witnessed the reunited eagle family commingle in harmony, actively feeding near the nest. Boundary’s release was a tremendous success! Kootenai faces a very uncertain future. The extensive nerve damage to the wing could be a lasting injury, leaving the bird unable to fly in the wild to hunt or stay safe. For now, Kootenai remains in the great care of Birds of Prey Northwest, with the goal being to eventually release the bird back into the wild. If the injury is permanent, Kootenai will become a teaching bird to help promote raptor education and conservation of these extraordinary creatures. This encounter with Kootenai put me in the right place at the right time, and the series of events that followed have been life changing for me. Persistence, love of nature, and profound determination by a group of strangers working together paid off. I am forever grateful for the expertise of each and every person on the rescue team—who are strangers to me no more. As of late fall, Kootenai was recovering well. All the injuries have healed, even the half-dollar sized wound in the wing. Still, it will take some time to determine if Kootenai can be released back into the wild, or will remain at BOPNW among the 20 permanent teaching birds that help Janie educate students throughout Idaho and the U.S. about raptors and the environment. The most famous of these birds, Beauty, the bald eagle who got a prosthetic beak, is featured in Janie’s award-winning children’s book “Beauty and the Beak” (see story in Winter 2018 Sandpoint Magazine). The challenges Janie and the team faced during Kootenai’s rescue are among many ongoing challenges Janie faces in the rescue, treatment, and reintroduction to the wild of some 150 raptors each year. During the Covid-19 pandemic, there are continuing needs for helping these magnificent birds. BOPNW

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9 OPENING PHOTO: THE KOOTENAI RIVER EAGLES. 1—MICHAEL RICHARDSON, OF SKYWALKER TREE CARE, PREPARES TO CLIMB TO THE INJURED EAGLE, WHILE GENNY HOYLE STOOD BY IN A BOAT PREPARED FOR ANY FALL TO THE WATER. 2—SKYWALKER HOODED THE EAGLE BEFORE RESCUE. 3—THE EAGLE, PLACED IN A DUFFLE BAG, WAS LOWERED 70 FEET TO THE WAITING BOAT. 4—THE MOMENT OF IMPACT. 5—JANIE VELTKAMP OF BIRDS OF PREY NORTHWEST PROVIDED IMMEDIATE CARE FOR THE BIRD. 6—THE RESCUE CREW, FROM LEFT: AUSTIN KEMMIS, GENNY HOYLE, SARAH JIMENEZ, JANIE VELTKAMP, DON VELTKAMP, ANNIE PFLUEGER, MATT BENNETT, AND MICHAEL RICHARDSON. 7—DON VELTKAMP WITH KOOTENAI. 8—KOOTENAI IS CURRENTLY BEING CARED FOR AT THE BIRDS OF PREY NORTHWEST FACILITY. 9—BOUNDARY WAS RETURNED TO THE WILD, WHERE HE WAS OBSERVED REUNITING WITH HIS FAMILY. PHOTO #3 COURTESY OF SKYWALKER TREE CARE. ALL OTHER PHOTOS BY ANNIE PFLUEGER.

receives no governmental funding to cover the costs of food, medicine, or treatment, so donations and volunteers are critical. Learn more about these birds at www.birdsofpreynorthwest.org SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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Prepared to play Winter brings on a new season for sports by Sandy Compton

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he ceremonial celebration of changing seasons is ancient tradition, but we don’t make burnt offerings these days; we put one set of toys away and get out another. In my life, every spring brings “Transition Day,” from snow to not-snow. Ski in the morning; play golf in the afternoon. Yes, it’s possible to schuss and putt on the same day. We missed last year because ski areas closed before golf courses opened. Thanks a bunch, pandemic. Just one more thing—albeit pretty minor—you screwed up. In the season of this magazine, we move from not-snow to snow. Winter activity—besides hunkering down and praying for spring—has become as varied as summer recreation.

Golfers go inside, Bikers go fat Some people just keep playing golf. They (wisely?) abandon the north for the Southwest, where some golf courses go in winter. Golf courses that don’t migrate sometimes turn into cross-country ski courses, with a caveat that skiers stay on trails marked by groundskeepers. Steve Johnson, who marshals at the Idaho Club, heads for Arizona about the time his course closes. Don Helander follows that model as well, but makes time for skiing before and after his southern hiatus. (See his recipe for fun on the slopes on page 66.) Marty Presnell plays golf as well, sometimes as much as 36 holes a day, but he moves inside come winter. “I’m not much on being cold,” he said. Pickleball is his winter sport—a cross between tennis and ping-pong played on a badminton-sized court and scored like ping-pong. Sandpoint’s Mr. Metabolism, Jim Mellen, plays pickleball

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“The Jakes,” Mellen said, “like to ‘camp’ at the trailhead, which means throwing out their mummy bags in the snow next to the road.”

MR. METABOLISM—AKA JIM MELLEN —BELIEVES SNOW IS JUST FROSTING ON TOP OF THE FUN. PHOTO BY NATE HARRELL

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ABOVE: FATBIKING IN WINTER. PHOTO BY DOUG MARSHALL. BELOW, FOR BRIAN BAXTER, WINTER SIMPLY MEANS THE FISHING REQUIRES A LITTLE MORE EFFORT TO GET YOUR LINE IN THE WATER. COURTESY PHOTO

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as well, plus ping-pong and squash. But he doesn’t mind the cold. While many bicyclists hang up their wheels come snow and ice, Mellen, Jacob Styer, Steve Myers, and a good number of other bike aficionados keep riding. They move to “fat bikes,” named for balloon tires that allow them to ride on snow. Groomed snow works best. Schweitzer has a designated snow bike trail, but Mellen’s favorite is close-to-town Pine Street Woods, where trails are groomed for fat bikes and crosscountry skiers. Mellen does both. Fat bikers also ride in Sherwood Forest at the end of Pine Street—as long as trails are well packed. Steve and Julie Meyers, who bike year-around and add alpine touring skiing in winter, just purchased a piece next to Sherwood Forest, and have opened much of it to public bike use. “You can come out of Little John in Sherwood Forest,” Mellen says, “make a U-turn and zoom right into the Momentum Trail on their place.” Other cyclists take at least a few rides in the winter, fat bikes or no. Marla Groot Nibbelink rides to the office on days she deems it possible without risking injury or frostbite. Dozens participate every 29-plus-or-minus days in The Full Moon Bike Ride, touring the streets and bike paths of Sandpoint, Dover, Ponderay, and Sagle. The Full Moon is sponsored and encouraged by Greasy Fingers bike shop owners Brian Anderson and his partner Jane. The ride always starts at Eichardt’s on Cedar Street, but only Anderson knows the destination until arrival. Schweitzer Marketing Manager Dig Chrismer keeps it simple. Winter comes and she hangs up the mountain bike. “I don’t really have time to ride a bike in the winter because I am too busy skiing.” Well, her office is only 200 yards from the bottom of the Great Escape Quad.

Taking it to the limits of “stuff” to do Mellen admits that seasonal transition has its challenges. “October catches me,” he said. “It will be a warm sunny morning; by late day I’m thinking words like ‘hypothermia.’ Sometimes, though, you can ride your bike and ski the same day.” He might be the ultimate season switcher. Summer: bike, hike, backpack, run. Winter: fat bike, snowshoe, cross-country ski, downhill ski, and snowboard—his favorite winter toy. He gave up an alpine touring setup for his split board, a two-piece contraption that allows crazy... uh, I mean, enthusiastic persons to climb mountains with the aid of skins (we will get to those later) and then put the two pieces together and slide back down. “Split boards are stupid,” he admits, ”but if I’m going to do that much work, I want the ultimate enjoyment coming down.” Mellen weighs negative 50 pounds, but his toys keep him bound to the planet. Styer rides his bike all winter with special equipment like a pair of mittens integrated into the handlebars. As an accountant, he makes an Excel list every January entitled Stupid “Stuff” To Do. He, Mellen, and Jake Ostman co-conspire on filling out and fulfilling the objectives of the SSTD. While Mellen was still an AT skier, they once skied into Savage Basin, an

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all-day-plus jaunt—twice—to set up and retrieve a remote camera station as part of a Friends of Scotchman Peaks Wilderness mustelid study. “The Jakes,” Mellen said, “like to ‘camp’ at the trailhead, which means throwing out their mummy bags in the snow next to the road.” After all, the list is called “Stupid ‘Stuff’ To Do.” About skins. Skins were first made of—surprise—skins; strips of hide mounted on skis with the hair side down. A skier pushed against the grain going uphill and glided with the grain down. Now, they are high-tech synthetic strips with a sticky backing that adheres to skis or split boards, part of setups that allow Mellen, “the Jakes,” and others to achieve their winter “stuff.”

Open water and thick ice Fisher folks might be the all-time best example of B.F. Skinner’s principle of random reinforcement. Winter or summer, they actively wait patiently for a leviathan to take whatever is tied to the end of the leader that is tied to the line that is coiled on the reel that is clamped to the rod that they hold in their hands, while actively waiting patiently. Ed Robinson and Brian Baxter are different types of fishermen, but they both fish all winter. Robinson prefers open water. Baxter loves the ice. “I continue fly fishing as weather allows all winter,” Robinson said. “My friend Dan and I sometimes fish out of a kayak, even in January. We pick the best, sunny days for this kind of silliness, and quiet stretches of water, since dumping the boat would be potentially fatal.” (It should be stated that kayaking in winter is stupid and not to be recommended).

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Add it to the SSTD list “A person needs to redefine their idea of success in the winter,” Robinson said. “A couple of tugs and a fish or two is a good day in January. It also has to be above freezing. Otherwise the fly line freezes in the guides.” Fishing guides also freeze, is my guess. Baxter leads outdoor education SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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AT LEFT: SPLITBOARDER BEN PETERSEN GOES BIG ON THE SHOULDER OF MOUNT CASEY IN THE PACK RIVER DRAINAGE. PHOTO BY AARON THEISEN RIGHT: SETTING UP TO PAINT ALONG THE BULL RIVER. PHOTO BY ED ROBINSON

F EAT UR E S main

classes winter and summer through his company, Silver Cloud Associates. He also fishes summer and winter. And spring and fall. Baxter likes to fish. “In winter,” he said, “I move to different gear. I carry minispinning outfits averaging 28 inches long with tapered poles and mini reels in my sled. Add to those a good ice auger, a perforated ladle for clearing holes, a couple of rod stands, and a comfortable foam lid bucket and you’re all set. “I like to fish early, but Mother Nature can surprise you any time of day with a nice fish. I leave for the lake while it’s still dark. I pull my sled through the woods just before first light, and there is a certain magic about it. Once on the ice, I have just enough time to drill holes and drop bait as the sun rises. I get to celebrate that morning event as the fish start hitting. “I sometimes fish lakes that I fish in the other seasons. But generally, I stick to smaller, remote or hidden lakes where I can find solitude.” Speaking of ice, niece Emily Compton and her husband James, as well as nephew-in-law Christian Thompson, have been known to change their vertical world from rock to ice come winter, trading in their climbing shoes and talc bag for crampons and an ice axe. Possibly another addition to the SSTD, but that’s just my point of view. They all love to climb.

Outdoor in. Indoor out High adrenaline or maximum cardio is not the only thing people seek in the winter, and indoor recreation is not always at the “Y” or the gym. Groot Nibbelink notes that the population of Eichardt’s, Idaho Pour Authority, and similar businesses increases as winter comes on. There is also binge watching Game of Thrones or the like. Sometimes, what might be traditionally viewed as indoor recreation moves out. Fly fisherman Robinson is also a plein air painter, meaning that he sets his easel up outside. “I do a lot more studio work in the winter,” he said, “but I love getting outside to paint in the winter; it feels like I’m getting away with something.” Like his fishing, it has to be above freezing. “Oil paints work fine below freezing, but it’s a sedentary activity, so staying warm is a major issue. I’m slow, so filling a 6” x 8” canvas is plenty for a winter painting expedition. I sometimes bring a pad

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to stand on to insulate my feet a little from the snow. I have a nice pair of insulated boots (same ones I use for snowshoeing).” Oh, yeah, he does that, too, his winter substitute for hiking and backpacking. His wildest winter painting adventure was while painting near where Deep Creek enters the Kootenai River in Boundary County. “The county plow operators had left a flat bench of rock-hard snow a foot high next to the county road,” he recalled. “‘Perfect,’ I thought, and I set my easel on top of that. Later, I heard a commotion behind me, turned and saw a county plow truck bearing down on me, winging the bench I was standing on over the bank. He got to within about 100 feet, gave me a big wave and lifted the blade.” Whew. He confessed that the painting he made that day wasn’t nearly as memorable as the day itself.

Zoom, zoom Speaking of motorized equipment, there is also a seasonal change from power boats, jet skis, motorcycles, and off-roadvehicles to snowmobiles and snow bikes. Northern Idaho offers miles of groomed and ungroomed snowmobile riding, particularly around Priest Lake and the Trestle Creek/Lightning Creek road complex. A large majority of national forest and state lands in the Selkirks and West Cabinets—including some that are closed to summer motorized use—are open to snowmobiling. Snow motorbikes are a relatively recent phenomenon, basically a motorcycle refitted with a ski in the front and a chaindriven track in the back similar to a snowmobile track, only narrower. Since 2010, local company Timbersled has offered— through dealers—a variety of kits with which a motocross or off-road motorcycle can be converted to snow use.

Stay warm out there In any case, if you don’t follow Johnson south to the arid zone or just queue up a winter’s worth of high drama, remember to stay prepared to play in winter land. Layers are good. High-energy snacks and a thermos of hot chocolate are well worth the weight. Warm feet are key to a good day in the cold. Get up and walk around once in a while if you are ice fishing. And keep checking stuff off the SSTD list.

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Tamarack THE GLORIOUS

The tamarack tree – Larix laricina, also called the American larch – is a signature tree in North Idaho. It’s one of the few conifers that loses its needles for the winter. Just before its needles drop, typically in late October, they turn a beautiful, golden color.

DID YOU KNOW...

1.

TAMARACKS OR LARCH TREES CAN GROW UP TO 75 FEET TALL, AND LIVE UP TO 180 YEARS.

NORTHERN TRIBAL PEOPLES USED THE ROOTS TO SEW BIRCH BARK CANOES, AND THE WOOD FOR ARROW SHAFTS.

7. 6.

2.

THE FRUIT IS A SMALL, UPRIGHT CONE, REDDISH-PURPLE WHEN YOUNG, THAT STAYS ON THE BRANCHES FOR TWO GROWING SEASONS.

3. 4. 5.

IN SPRING, BOTH MALE AND FEMALE FLOWERS APPEAR. MALES ARE YELLOW-GREEN, AND FEMALES ARE RED.

BRANCHES ARE FEATHERY AND CLUSTERED AND GROW HORIZONTALLY OR JUST SLIGHTLY UPWARD.

TAMARACK OR LARCH IS PRIZED FOR FIREWOOD. THE WOOD IS DURABLE AND DENSE AND IS USED FOR POSTS, LOG CABINS, AND MINE SHAFT TIMBERS. ITS PRIMARY INDUSTRIAL USE IS FOR PULP WOOD, USED TO MANUFACTURE PAPER.

THE BARK IS GRAYISH TO REDDISH BROWN WITH THIN, IRREGULAR SCALES, GROWING MORE GRAY AS THE TREE AGES. THE INNER LAYER IS A RED/PURPLE. SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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HolySnow!

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There’s a new mountain to ski at Schweitzer by Sandy Compton

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t the end of the summer of 2019, Schweitzer Resort mountain manager Rob Batchelder and I rode the Great Escape Quad to the top of the mountain for a peek into the Outback Bowl and a check on progress of the construction of the Cedar Express Quad and the Colburn Triple. The sneak preview of the goings-on in the Outback was interesting and exciting, but without the presence of the white stuff skiers and boarders dream of, it was all abstract. A ski season later—albeit a shorter one than we would have liked, courtesy of Covid—it seems that a whole new ski area has been discovered and revealed in the en-

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PHOTO BY WOODS WHEATCROFT

a new mountain to ski at Schweitzer

virons of Colburn Lake. A first view from the top of Whiplash last December evoked two words, the first being “Holy” and the second not being “cow.” Since this is a family magazine, we will use the euphemism “snow” to replace the word that is not “cow.” “Holy snow!” I exclaimed. “It’s a whole new mountain.” I am not the only person who has exclaimed that. In fact, Schweitzer’s marketing maven Dig Chrismer, who has worked—and skied—on the mountain for a decade confessed, “This place is my playground, my backyard, where it doesn’t matter the day, the conditions, or the season, I know where I am. Imagine my surprise this past December when I dropped off Kaniksu and got utterly and completely lost.” She also noted, that after getting reoriented, she was soon skiing through a newly created glade, giggling with joy. Just when you think you know a mountain, it changes on you. And boy—or girl—is it fun!

What’s in a word? Back in the day when there was still a huge rock right in the middle of Upper Kaniksu, two friends whiling away the ride on Chair Six—the only long chair ride back to the top—decided that the word “fun” had no direct synonym. Others come close— amusement, pleasure, joy—but none really mean “fun,” in the truest sense. It was also decided that they were having some. That rock is long gone—did Patrol use their leftover dynamite to remove it once upon a spring?— as is Chair Six, but the fun factor in the Outback Bowl at Schweitzer Mountain Resort has increased dramatically. If you haven’t tried it, you may be

skeptical, because the Outback has been fun for all the decades there have been lifts to ride back there. Last winter, however, due to some genius chair placement, extensive glading and brushing, and fanciful run creation, the factor went way up. In fact, when Schweitzer staffer Randi Lui was asked her opinion of the new experience(s) available in the Outback, she used the word seven times in three minutes, and seven times fun is really fun. “At first,” she said, “I wasn’t very excited, because I was very fond of Chair Six—it was my Zen place for leg recovery and peace and quiet—but after riding the new lifts and skiing the new terrain—which is really old terrain that they fixed up—it’s actually a lot of fun. You can get a lot more runs in over a lot more interesting landscape.” Some needed more convincing than others. Chrismer said that initially there were a few negative responses from Schweitzer regulars including “trampled snow” and the loss of the chance to rest that Chair Six afforded. “But, when I reached out to them at the end of the season,” she said, “they had become very happy with the work we did.” It is still possible to get a modicum of rest on the Colburn Triple, even though it doesn’t stop near as often as Six used to— like, hardly ever. Those who lament the loss of Six because it gave them a chance to recover from the effects of the Lakeside Chutes can take comfort that the ride on the Triple is just a few minutes shorter than the ride was on Six. And, if you want to really rest, you can glide over to the Sky House on the mountaintop without having to push hard.

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winterad v e n t u r e s The Triple has 160 chairs that seat three, while Chair Six had 146 chairs that seated two. More people get to the top sooner and lift line time is greatly reduced. Sandpoint teacher John Hastings had his happy face on when he said, “I never had to wait in line, even on busy weekend days.” On weekdays? Ski on! Or board. Whatever. No lines. No waiting. “Yeah, but what about all those other skiers stealing my lines?” the powder hounds howl. Don’t growl. There are a lot more lines to steal.

Transversing: More turns & fun

While construction crews were busily pouring concrete and putting up towers, as well as disappearing Six—done so completely that even Schweitzer vets like Chrismer wonder where it used to be—loggers and accompanying brushing crews were doing the really important work of making new places to ski. Some secret stashes were lost, but new steeps and glades were opened up for more—for lack of a better word—fun. In the process of reborning the Outback, a heroic amount of glading was done to keep tree skiers busy and happy. Along with this, five designated runs were created—four groomable—that peel off of Lower Kaniksu. In order of appearance, Casper, Triple Bypass, Slapshot, and Roller Ghoster are four black diamonds that drop to skier’s right. Roller Ghoster, the ungroomed one, is actually the Chair Six lift line—sans towers—beginning where Six exited the trees at skier’s right of Lower Kaniksu. The new blue run, Know Fun, is a left turn just below the Have Fun exit. There’s that word again. Groomers are great, but it’s the new glades that are—for some—the most fun.

For the last few years, Helander—who can make a game out of anything—and friends have been enjoying what he calls “transversing.” The concept allows snow riders to get the maximum amount of powder in between designated runs. It goes like this: drop in, make a few turns, choose a direction, and traverse to a new line, then take some even number of turns, traverse to the next line, and repeat. Proceed as far as possible in the direction of your original traverse without dropping into a groomer (traversing across a groomer is allowed). Do it again. The Schweitzer Mountain Resort record for transversing pre-Colburn Triple began just to the right of the top of Upper Kaniksu and ended with four turns down skier’s right side of Whiplash to the runout on the south side of Colburn Lake. This is still possible from the top of the Triple, with the added bonus of being able to load back on said lift just a few turns down Vagabond. But transversers have also found a new place to play. “Cedar Park at Schweitzer—the new quad—it’s readymade for that,” said Helander. “You unload right at the top of Lower Kaniksu, and then skier’s left and right—left particularly—you have looong traverses and you get to experience all these different fun powder lines, but not all on the same vertical line. You get a lot of great lines in between traverses, and the run can last forever—or almost. The Cedar Park terrain lends itself to that overall.” Yeah. What he said.

It’s all new, and all good

Then there’s the lift ride itself

“I’ve been skiing Schweitzer since we moved here in the mid ’80s,” Don Helander said, “and I appreciated the Outback and riding the long Snow Ghost chair. I’m always open to change, though, and back there, it’s all good.” Between the new designated runs accessed by the Cedar Express Quad, what once were almost unskiable thickets are now wide glades. This “fixed-up” terrain sports some of the steepest—surprise!—and thereby most fun topography on the mountain. Chunks of double, black-quality drops revealed by the logging and brushing pepper the slopes skier’s right of Kaniksu. Between Blue Grass and Casper, for instance, where Tower 19 used to point tree skiers toward a bit of heaven, lies a newly revealed two turn thrill you might want to survey closely before dropping off the edge. Where once Hastings and a skier probably not to be named later fought their way through an alder patch into the

Riding the Colburn Triple tends to reinforce the idea that you are in a whole new ski area. From the load to about a third of the way up, riders are treated to an almost unobstructed view of the Lakeside Chutes and all the slopes between Whiplash and Debbie Sue. It dawdles along to the north of Colburn Lake, even running downhill a bit before taking a sudden turn uphill. “Holy snow,” indeed. Just below Mid-Rock, a Triple rider finds themselves looking at what seems straight up. The aspect is jaw dropping, and you might find yourself wondering, “Just where in the ski world am I?” That question may continue into the 2021 season. Chrismer gave out that they have created more glades between Stella and Phineas’ Forest. Plans are to continue thinning brush between Whiplash and Debbie Sue. And—bonus!— brushing crews worked the lower half of Kathy’s Yard Sale.

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blessed relief of the Chair Six lift line, the 100 percent morass of brush and trees we ... uh, I mean “they” ... escaped is now open to ride.

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a new mountain to ski at Schweitzer

“You get a lot of great lines in between traverses, and the run can last forever—or almost.” ABOVE: LOOKING UP THE NEW COLBURN TRIPLE ABOVE THE UPPER KANIKSU RUN. PHOTO BY WOODS WHEATCROFT. BELOW AND RIGHT: SKIERS ON NEW RUNS AT SCHWEITZER. PHOTOS BY DOUG MARSHALL.

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Schweitzer to Canada Going the distance on the Selkirk Crest... times two by Cate Huisman

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ocal E.J. Jensen has skied the Schweitzer backcountry for years. He’s done the Redneck Traverse over to Caribou Creek and out the Pack River more times than he can count. He’s skied out of the West Fork Cabin up near the Canadian border a few times, and he’s snowmobiled by Roman Nose and onto the Selkirk Crest from Priest Lake.

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a new mountain to ski at Schweitzer

But until last winter, he’d never linked all his routes together. To look for a route that would take him from Schweitzer to Canada, E.J. started out at home: “I bought all the topos and put them all together on the kitchen floor.” The idea was to stay on the Selkirk Crest where possible, but ultimately he chose a route that was a compromise between appealing ski descents and “actually being able to make it there.” The last piece fell into place when he found a logging road that went right to the border. He recruited two skiing buddies, local firefighters Britian Whitley and Cody Lile, to attempt the route. They agreed that the latter half of March would be the best time window, when days are growing longer but there is still plenty of snow. Before then, they set up caches two days’ skiing apart, which enabled them to keep their pack weights down to 30 pounds, a reasonable amount for skiing. They tried out their tent, set up the route on a navigation app, and uploaded it to their phones. But despite all the planning, they didn’t know whether they would be able to complete the traverse. None of them had done anything like it before. “March 15 was a really nice day,” Jensen recalled, so they decided to go for it then. A ridge of high pressure had built behind a major storm, and they ended up having clear weather for the whole trip. Being able to see their route was crucial, making navigation much easier than it would have been in the fog and clouds that locals know often beset the Selkirk Crest. “Day 1 was basically the Redneck Traverse plus a little; we’d done that dozens of times,” said Jensen. Heading north from Schweitzer’s Sky House, they found that the aftereffects of the storm (which Sandpoint residents will remember from the number of trees it left in the streets) were a mixed blessing. The firm crust it created made for good traveling conditions where their skis didn’t sink into deep soft snow. But it also made the downhill runs less fun. Arrival at their first camp led to a flurry of activity. First, they tried to get anything that was wet into the sun to dry, although there was little sunlight left. They put their stove’s fuel canisters inside their clothing to warm them up. While Lyle and Whitley set up their tent, Jensen started melting snow for water, trading in a warmed fuel canister from someone’s clothing each time the stove fuel started to cool. “As soon as the sun went down, it was 20 degrees colder instantly,” said Jensen. They put on all their clothing, whether it had dried or not. At night they slept with their damp boot liners in their sleeping bags to keep them from freezing. On the second morning, the team struck out into terrain they weren’t as familiar with. From the north side of Flat Top Mountain, they dropped down into a low drainage, and from there it was all uphill. “There was one little spot in the middle where we skied [downhill] a little bit,” said Jensen. For the rest, “It was eight hours straight with skins on.” Skins are strips of SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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PHOTO PREVIOUS PAGE, SKINNING ACROSS HARRISON LAKE ON DAY FOUR. THIS PAGE LEFT: A DRONE SHOT OF HARRISON LAKE LOOKING SOUTH ALONG THE SELKIRK CREST AND THE SEVEN SISTERS. RIGHT, E.J. JENSEN, CODY LILE, AND BRITIAN WHITLEY, READY FOR ADVENTURE. PHOTOS BY GWEN LETUTOR

napped material attached to the bases of skis that enable skiers to travel uphill without sliding backward—they are essential equipment for this kind of expedition. The team had been looking forward to removing the skins for a final descent to Fault Lake, but the fun failed to materialize. “On paper it should have been one of the best skis,” said Jensen. Instead, it was “a quick ski, but not an enjoyable one. The snow was rock hard.” Worse yet, they didn’t make it to their cache. It had been hard to make good time in the thick timber down low, and all the hours on skins the rest of the day still weren’t enough. Despite an awesome sunset, this evening was the low point of the trip. “You’re finally starting to realize what you got yourself into,” said Jensen. Resigned to making do with what they had with them, they repeated the pattern of setting up the tent, drying clothes, and melting water. “The hardest thing to do was to have stoves going long enough to make enough water for three guys, plus water for the next day,” Jensen said. There was no running water anywhere on the route, and they ran the stoves for three to four hours a night just to have enough water for cooking and drinking. For the first two days, aborting the trip would have been relatively easy; they could head down to the Pack River Road if they felt they had bitten off more than they could ski. But as they moved north on Day 3, bailing out became progressively harder. Fortunately, they also grew more confident as the rhythm of their travel became established. As Jensen said, “You didn’t really have to be fast; you just have to keep going. Once you got used to that, it was okay.” Mornings they were on their skis by 8:30 or 9 a.m., and they kept skiing until 5:30 or 6 p.m. Beyond just completing the miles, the trio had to keep themselves safe. Because of the cold, the remoteness, the objective hazards of skiing injuries and avalanche danger, they had to take more precautions than on their day trips closer to civiliza-

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tion. “Avalanche conditions were really stable,” Jensen remembered. “It was easy to travel quickly.” Nevertheless, they had to stop occasionally to dig pits to assess the stability of the snow, and to forego some lines they would have enjoyed skiing. Except for missing their cache on Day 2, the skiers made the mileages they had planned. Although they were out of cell phone contact most of the time, they found a spot where their phones worked on Day 4, so they were able to call and confirm their plans with the friends who were to meet them at the end of the trip. By the evening of Day 5, the group had reached the West Fork Cabin on Smith Creek northwest of Bonners Ferry, where they spent the night. The next day, they left their packs at the cabin and skied a couple of descents to the road Jensen had found on the map, which fulfilled its promise as the last piece to fall into place. They reached the border about 4 p.m., and then sat down in the snow to drink a beer, feeling both elated at their accomplishment and sad that it was over. Then their friends met them on snowmobiles and towed them back to the cabin, where they attempted to celebrate. “But we were all so trashed and tired, it wasn’t too much of a party,” Jensen recalled. He figures they skied 63 miles and climbed a combined total of about 21,500 vertical feet. As far as they know, they are the first party to have completed this traverse in winter. And other than that missed cache, a broken boot buckle, and a few minor blisters, it went off without a hitch, leaving them eager to head out again. This winter, they’re thinking of setting up a base camp so they can ski some of the lines they had to pass by on their destination-driven traverse. Or maybe they’ll try a traverse through the Cabinets. They have some other friends who might want to come along. They’ll be looking for another weather window, maybe with better snow for descents. The first traverse was clearly just the beginning.

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Traverse redux: Gibson’s Group After Jensen and friends returned from their trip to the Canadian border (previous story), winter came back to the Selkirks, and in its midst, a second group of snow travelers headed out along the crest. The son of a Schweitzer patroller, Jasper Gibson used to hang out in the lift shack at the top of the old Snow Ghost lift and gaze over the sea of mountains beyond it. The trip he planned at the end of March with friends Zeppelin Zeerip and Joey Sackett was a chance to immerse themselves in that landscape for 10 days. While they were thinking of tapping the Canadian border, they just wanted to ski and ride—Gibson was on skis, while Zeerip and Sackett were on splitboards—snowboards that split in half so riders can attach skins and climb uphill. For five days after they set out from the top of Schweitzer’s T-bar, it dumped snow. After being inundated with the white stuff their first night—Gibson remembers 1 to 2 inches an hour—they traversed north to Jeru Peak and their first cache. There they paused to spend an entire day exploring. The following day took them past Fault Lake and to a fabulous ski down McCormick Ridge that Gibson said was “one of the best tree skiing runs of my life”—no small claim from a person who has been skiing since he was two. With a beautiful camp in a bowl they called “Old Man’s Hollow,” for its big trees draped with goat’s beard moss, they spent another snowy day sightseeing. Day 6 was less fun. During a long traverse north, “The snow was clumping to our skins and the top of our skis; we were getting soaked, it was everywhere.“ Gibson estimates the sticky snow added 10 pounds to the weight they were each carrying. And the day ended with Zeerip’s snowboard breaking.

THE SELKIRK TRAVERSE CREW, KIX KAMP, JASPER GIBSON, JOEY SACKETT, AND ZEPPELIN ZEERIP. KIX WOULD END UP BAILING OUT AFTER THE FIRST DAY DUE TO FAMILIAL FACTORS. MIDDLE CENTER: JASPER AND JOEY SKINNING THEIR WAY THROUGH AN OLD BURN ON THE SECOND DAY. THAT DAY THE TRIO TRAVERSED 10 MILES OVER PEAKS AND INTO DRAINAGES. MIDDLE LEFT: MAYBE THE BEST FEELING EVER : DRYING SOGGY, SHRIVELED TOES BY A HOT FIRE. MIDDLE RIGHT: ZEPPELIN MAKING HIS WAY AROUND FLAT TOP MOUNTAIN. THE TERRAIN IN THE DISTANCE IS PART OF WHAT HAD BEEN TRAVERSED THAT DAY. BOTTOM: THE ROUGH GAME PLAN ON CAMP LOCATIONS AND DISTANCES. COURTESY PHOTOS

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TOP : JOEY SACKETT AND ZEPPELIN ZEERIP WALLOW THROUGH WAIST DEEP SNOW EXPLORING AN UNKNOWN COULOIR. THEY NAMED THE COULOIR HEATHER’S HALLWAY AFTER JASPER’S LATE MOTHER. BOTTOM LEFT: JOEY SACKETT ENJOYS SOME OF THE FRESH SNOW SOMEWHERE NEAR MT. ROOTHAN. BOTTOM RIGHT: JOEY AND ZEPPELIN SET UP CAMP DURING A SNOWSTORM IN THE LIONS HEAD DRAINAGE. COURTESY PHOTOS

So Day 7 required an exit down to the Pack River Road. Zeerip had repaired his board as best he could and descended with its tail flapping behind him. After the exit, his time ran out; other commitments meant he wouldn’t come back to complete the trip. But Gibson and Sackett headed back in a few days later. The weather had changed again; they had nothing but sun and stars for their last few days on the crest. After a beautiful sunset ski north of Harrison Peak the first night, and a camp at Long Canyon Pass the next, they headed across Smith Peak and out Smith Creek for their final night out. The sunny spring weather didn’t pay off for their final descent. As Jensen and his party had observed (and legions of other skiers have discovered), fair weather doesn’t always make for great skiing. “The ski down from the Smith Peak area was horrendous,” Gibson recalled. “There was a foot of corn snow sluffing off, and it was insanely heavy.” The road they finally reached in the basin provided fresh concerns: First they saw cougar tracks, then bear tracks, then cougar scat, then bear droppings. So they spent a fitful evening banging pots and pans, and ultimately survived the night. Friends on snowmobiles brought them out to the roadhead the next morning. Driving back to Sandpoint, they watched the crest go by above U.S. 95. “I’ve seen those mountains my entire life,” said Gibson. “It was cool to have a new perspective on the range, a new sense of place.” Gibson lives in Salt Lake City now, but he’s eager to come back to his home state for another traverse. One gets the sense that there will be a lot more ski and snowboard tracks joining those of the bear and cougar in the years to come.

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“It’s just grown to be the biggest thing on the West Coast,” he said. “We never thought it would get this big.”

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PHOTO BY GARY DAVIS

vintage snowmobile races

the

race is on! by Lyndsie Kiebert

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n several occasions during the winter months, 75-year-old Mike Courteau rises well before the sun, ready to brave the cold to facilitate a growing pastime in North Idaho: Vintage Snowmobile Racing at Priest Lake.

Courteau said that the races have become almost a “full-time deal” for him and his wife, who manage the operation with the help of many volunteers. Though he raced snowmobiles from 1972 into the mid ’80s, Courteau takes on more of a management role for the races nowadays. “I used to [race], but my racing days are over,” Courteau said SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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with a good-natured laugh. “I’m 75, so I don’t do that anymore.” Today’s racers are lucky to have Courteau at the helm, though, as his races have grown to host hundreds of participants and upwards of 700 spectators. “It’s just grown to be the biggest thing on the West Coast,” he said. “We never thought it would get this big.” Snowmobiles from 1985 or older are eligible to race in VSRPL events. There are stock and modified classes, including a 120 Kitty Cat class for children ages 4 to 10, junior classes for ages 11 to 16, women’s classes, amateur and advanced classes, and “even a Master’s class for those brave souls who are 55 and older,” Courteau said. “It’s pretty serious racing—real serious,” he added. Vintage snowmobile racing has a robust history on the West Coast, according to Courteau, but the sport started to lose traction about 15 years ago. He said it’s seen steady growth in

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recent years, a resurgence made apparent in the participation numbers at the Priest Lake races. The first race, held in 2014 at The Inn at Priest Lake in Coolin, saw 25 registered racers. The most recent event—held in early 2020—saw 245 entries. “We’re starting to be pretty well recognized back on the East Coast, where snowmobile racing’s been around for years,” Courteau said, noting that racers have come from as far as Calgary and southern Utah to compete in the Priest Lake events. Part of that growth is thanks to accommodation from the U.S. Forest Service, which now allows VSRPL to host races on the airstrip across Highway 57 from the Priest Lake Ranger Station. Courteau said working with the U.S.F.S. to utilize the space for snowmobile races has been a positive experience and an integral part of the event’s growth. “They’ve just bent over backwards to allow us to do that,” he said.

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“A lot of guys—their wives race and they get very serious, too,” he said. “And the kids are a big hit.”

PAGE 75: THE RACES AT PRIEST LAKE HAVE BECOME A SPECTATOR FAVORITE. PREVIOUS PAGE: CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: RACERS ROUND A CURVE ON THE SPECIALLY MADE TRACK; A RIDER NEGOTIATES OBSTACLES LEFT BY OTHER RIDERS; STAYING ON THE SLED IS CRUCIAL THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: THE RACES HAVE BECOME A FAMILY AFFAIR, WITH BOTH KIDS AND ADULTS PARTICIPATING. THE KIDS’ RACES ARE ALWAYS A CROWD PLEASER. ALL PHOTOS BY GARY DAVIS

The space has allowed Courteau and local volunteers to create an oval ice track each winter, which provides a prime racing experience. With the help of 50-year Priest Lake resident Paul Storro, who owns an excavating business, VSRPL builds a track that’s made up of 16-inch thick solid ice, which is dyed blue just before race day. The process requires two or three weeks of cold weather to create the conditions necessary to pull off such a chilly endeavor. “It takes a lot of work to make the track, but it’s worth it,” Storro said, adding that “fast sleds go fast on ice.” Storro has been racing snowmobiles since 1987, and taking part in VSRPL races since they began. He said his children— three boys and a 15-year-old daughter—all participate in the races as well. The Storros are just one example of a family that’s made racing vintage sleds into a “family affair,” Courteau said. “A lot of guys—their wives race and they get very serious,

too,” he said. “And the kids are a big hit.” It’s understandable why a bunch of four-years-olds on miniature snowmobiles might be a crowd favorite, and the experience often leads to a lifelong love of the niche sport. “It’s been cool to see, since we’ve been doing it so long now, these young kids that started on 120s are up into the juniors, and some of them are up racing with adults now,” Courteau said. “As long as the weather permits, we’ll just keep doing this.” VSRPL plans to host three two-day racing events during 2021: January 16-17, January 30-31 and February 20-21. With the help of countless volunteers and loyal sponsors, Courteau is hoping for another successful season. “It takes a village,” he said, “and it’s good for the community.” Learn more at vintagesnowmobileracingpriestlake.com. SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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ESSAY

photo

The Trees of Winter

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TOP LEFT, AERIAL VIEW BY DAN ESKELSON. WINTER TREES PHOTOS BY DON OTIS. HORSEBACK RIDING IN WINTER BY BILL HAWKINS.

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STAY OR

Play

Homes for living and playing the Schweitzer lifestyle by Carol Curtis

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here are avid skiers in Bonner County who vividly remember riding Schweitzer’s single chair lift to get to fresh powder. It was 1963 and you earned your turns. There was no question locals knew the skiing was amazing, but the secret remained predominately regional. Steady marketing, building, and terrain expansion grew Schweitzer’s reputation to its present day status: one of the largest ski resorts in the Northwest, the largest in Idaho and Washington, and named in 2019 for being the third most affordable. But it isn’t just about the skiing and shredding; for a growing number of people, it’s a great place to both live and play. Real estate at the resort substantially expanded in the ’90s when Schweitzer invested millions in mountain upgrades, including the 82-room Green Gables hotel. When Harbor Properties purchased the resort from receivership, they chose to renovate and convert the hotel to private condos, renaming it

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the Selkirk Lodge. “We sold 37 of the 41 condos in three hours,” said Charlie Parrish, owner/broker at Evergreen Realty. In 2002 Schweitzer expanded again, building upscale condos in what became the White Pine Lodge. They were additionally improving lifts and adding skiable terrain, with Chair 1 being split into two high speed lifts, and the expansion of the Little

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Blue terrain, complete with a T bar. The secret was now out, and every year more awards were being given to the resort by ski magazines as an “undiscovered gem,” “family friendly,” and “one of the top ski resorts in the West.” In 2008, North Idaho joined the national descent into the real estate driven recession. Between 2008 and 2014, the local

multiple listing service showed 34 properties sold under $50,000, with asking prices as low as $25,000. Twenty-seven of the sales occurred between 2011-2013, and 22 of the properties were bank owned. A platted multi-phase subdivision on the mountain, marketed as “The Ridge,” was in trouble. In July 2012, Schweitzer took a leap of faith and attended the Bonner County Treasurer SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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TOP: HOME AT THE RIDGE AT SCHWEITZER OFFERS EXPANSIVE VIEWS OVER BONNER COUNTY. PHOTO COURTESY CHRIS CHAMBERS. ABOVE: NEW CONSTRUCTION AT SCHWEITZER OFFERS A MORE MODERN LOOK. PHOTO BY CAROL CURTIS

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Auction, successfully purchasing 41 parcels of land, approximately 20 acres in total, which was the subdivision’s dormant second phase. Schweitzer’s infrastructure subsidiary, Mountain Utility Company, or MUC, also eventually acquired the water system for that same area. Schweitzer was now better positioned to control the narrative, orchestrate the pace, style, and specific area of real estate investment, while ensuring future construction had sufficient infrastructure. The economic bell curve began its inevitable correction and Schweitzer never looked back. Mountainside, marketed a decade ago as Trapper Creek, sits just behind the Selkirk Lodge, and began to be marketed again in 2014. Today, the 35-unit PUD development is completely sold out, and consists of finished single family homes, homes under construction, and unimproved parcels. The Schweitzer Mountain Community Association provides developers and homeowners with an architectural control committee, but there is no designated builder, so design styles are expanding from a traditional, timber-framed exterior, to more modern metal and glass architectural styles that accentuate the huge lake views. Another development underway is a 24-unit PUD called Harrison Height Condominiums, located on Harrison Lane, which is off Blizzard Drive. The new builds are being offered by Craig Mearns of M2 Construction, who named the development after his father. Mearns has two completed in this development, three more under construction, and a total of ten current projects on the mountain, offered by Mearns and Benjamin Milbrath. “Right now two of the biggest challenges in building are the rising costs of materials, and finding employees,” said Mearns. Mearns is no stranger to building at Schweitzer, having planned and built the development off We All Ski Court, along with numerous custom single-family homes. “Although Harrison Heights are classified as condos, they are really stand-alone homes without a shared wall, and the intent is to create more of a small neighborhood feel,” said Chris Chambers, of Tomlinson Sothebys International Realty. The homes offer 3 or 4 bedrooms, are between 1,500 and 2,000 square feet, and are listed with prices starting at $599,000. As pent up real estate demand has accelerated both sales volume and pricing, always with an eye toward the future, Schweitzer’s owners and management team created a model masterplan in 2017 that covered everything from family and life, to food, wellness, sustainability, summer, and skiing. Phase I began last spring, with the installation of a new, high speed detachable quad, a fixed grip triple chair, creating two new lifts to replace Snow Ghost (Chair 6), the classic, two-seater lift that was removed. Additional terrain was logged to create more runs, and the overall rollout last season was a huge success. The press release for Phase II came in the 2019 summer season, and announced the contract and groundbreaking for a new 30-unit boutique hotel, to be located at the edge of the

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existing upper parking lot, next to the Selkirk Lodge. Although the completion time was initially set for the 2020/2021 ski season, Covid-19 changed everything. Fortunately, Schweitzer can adjust the construction timeline, manage the expectation, and pivot their focus to a myriad of other projects integrated within the larger picture. “We are working to finish the hotel project,” stated Dig Chrismer, Schweitzer’s marketing manager. “There are plans to develop more real estate, but there is a lot of research underway. We want to be smart about the impact—on the environment, the resort, and its infrastructure; we want to do it right.” Schweitzer plans to hire a chief development officer to help with the continued analysis of their real estate portfolio. The final phase aims to create new infrastructure for a midmountain experience. This component will focus on the newer

skier and rider. It includes developing more instructional and rental options for the beginner and intermediate day guest. Access to mid-mountain amenities would come off the roundabout, where long ago horseback riding was offered. This phase proposes eight new runs, a new carpet, and chairlift. The core idea is that expanding access will allow for better human and traffic flow as the mountain visitation numbers continue to grow. This phase is several years out. From enjoyment to employment, recreation to economic investment, Schweitzer Mountain continues to deliver on its initial promise of a fun-filled, friendly, and affordable place to get some exercise, be with friends and family, and enjoy an incredible view whether you’re there just to play-or if you plan to stay a while.

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Before the first snowflake falls

“Get ready for winter early and always assume it is going to be a huge winter.�

#1 tip! Get your snow removal situation figured out early 84

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homeowners’ tips to prepare for winter by Beth Hawkins

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ummers are when we fall in love with Sandpoint, buy houses, and pinch ourselves about how lucky we are to have discovered paradise. Winters are when we stock up on snow shovels (before they sell out in a rush), trade in our front-wheel-drive cars for SUVs, and maybe even question our decision to live in the snowy north! Without a doubt, outdoor recreation fun abounds in winter—skiing, skating, fat tire biking, and more. But it’s a good idea to approach North Idaho’s most unpredictable season of the year with a healthy dose of preparation. It could be a big winter, it could be a mild winter, who knows? So whether you’re new to the area, a longtime resident, or house hunting, we’ve gathered sage advice from local homeowners who have survived—and still thrive!—in North Idaho winters. Rural homeowner Chipby Lawrence, Beth Hawkins 63, has lived in the Selle Valley for 20 years, and said his best advice to others is to be prepared. “Get ready for winter early and always assume it is going to be a huge winter.” He runs through a laundry list of things to do to get your home and property winterized: store firewood, blow out sprinkler systems, mark the road with snow poles, store away outdoor furniture, clear rain gutters, check the roof and waterline heat tapes, block foundation vents, and get snow removal equipment serviced. His go-to snow removal equipment is a tractor with a three-auger snow blower. “If you are on acreage where we get deep snow drifts, a blower can be a far better tool than a truck plow,” Lawrence said. “You can use the bucket if the snow gets wet.” When the Lawrence family was first looking for a house with land, they had a few requirements, including south- and east-facing windows—North Idaho winters are long and dark— and a roof designed to hold snow as insulation. “The construction needed to be designed for snow load and Idaho winters,” Lawrence said about his property search. He advises others to pay attention to roof pitches, making sure they don’t drop snow on the access sidewalks, and having ready access to firewood storage if you’re planning to use a wood stove or fireplace insert for heating. Even with lots of planning, there’s one problem area that continues to give him grief: “I totally failed on the driveway, as I have a north-facing roadway that can get very icy.” Lawrence said his least favorite thing about winter is what folks around here refer to as mud season. “We like snow and temps of 29 degrees. It is the worst when it just goes above 32 and everything turns to mud!” But he recalls the big winter of 2008 as one of his most memorable in Sandpoint. “We had three yards of standing snow at the ranch,” he said. “Every night the wind would fill in the road. You could not even see the tractor from a short distance down the road, but you could see the pure white column of snow flying straight up and then floating away as it blew the snow. It was very memorable and beautiful.” While he does find the silver linings in winter’s wrath, the Lawrence family usually makes an escape to the Caribbean or the Bahamas in the middle of winter, most times aboard a catamaran. “We go sailing where there are few people, but a few restaurants and amazing sights.” Paying attention to roofs and driveways is also advice reiterated by homeowner Stephanie Rief, who was born and raised in Sandpoint, and has lived here most of her life with the exception of a few years in Montana (which also would count for ‘surviving winter’!). Rief lives in the city limits on a quarter-acre of property, and also advises others to start thinking about how they’re going to handle winter well in advance. “Get your snow removal situation figured out now because if you are going to hire someone to do it and you wait, you will most likely be out of luck due to their already packed snow removal list.” Rief’s top choice for snow removal equipment is a snowblower. “Depending on the size, they can be cumbersome and tight to get into some spaces, but a snowblower will save you SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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#2 tip!

realestat e

Winterize!

ABOVE: IN A LA NIÑA YEAR, MOVING SNOW SOMETIMES REQUIRES MORE THAN JUST A SHOVEL. STAFF PHOTO OF BILL HAWKINS. NEXT PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: CHIP LAWRENCE SAID A BLOWER CAN BE BETTER THAN A BLADE. ARNIE RAINS PHOTO. STEPHANIE RIEF POINTS OUT THAT ANIMALS ALSO NEED PATHWAYS CLEARED. STAFF PHOTO. DON’T FORGET TO CLEAR A WAY FOR THE MAILMAN TO REACH YOUR BOX. STAFF PHOTO. BE AWARE OF WHERE SNOW WILL FALL FROM YOUR ROOF. PHOTO BY BETSY FULLING

cover firewood, blow time and muscle aches; it moves out sprinkler systems, more snow and cuts a cleaner mark the road with snow poles, store path than shoveling.” away outdoor furniture, clear rain Outdoor recreation is a part gutters, check the of Sandpoint life for Rief, and she roof and waterline heat tape, and block said the top requirement on her foundation vents property list was to have proper storage. “The biggest thing to consider, for me anyway, is storage space such as a shop, garage, shed, etc. Many hobbies lead to many different types of equipment, bikes, kayaks, paddleboards, boats, ATVs, and when you pay good money for your toys you don’t want to leave them out to be ruined by the snow.” She recalled one particularly big North Idaho winter where she shoveled four feet of snow off of her house to take the weight off the roof. “I was able to walk off the roof onto the snow in the yard because it was so deep. I shoveled my roof more than once due to the amount of snow.” While Rief doesn’t travel to a warmer climate to escape North Idaho, she admits that Arizona does sound pretty nice about midwinter. Her biggest complaint is that winter lasts too long. But what she does love about winter is quite simple: “Watching the snow fall outside, especially big flakes.” She also has an empathy for wildlife that sometimes require a little extra tending. That same big winter when she shoveled her roof, Rief sought some help for outdoor visitors on her property. “I had a friend with a

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backhoe dig a path from the back part of the property and the drive so that the deer could get shelter in my shed.” While there’s no shortage of advice to be gleaned from other folks, homeowners can find a treasure trove of advice dispensed bi-monthly via the Co-Op Roundup—a newspaper that’s been published for more than two decades by the Co-Op Country Store in Ponderay. Editor Kathy Osborne, born and raised here, said there is a broad swath of information out there for homeowners to learn and know. “Get your chimney cleaned, stock up on all the safety things, and there’s the wood burning aspect. But for sure start with a snow shovel. Keep it by the door, because you’ll wake up one morning and you’ll need it.” Osborne mentions that this year looks a little different for suppliers due to the pandemic. “We are in a time where not only us, but other stores, are experiencing empty shelves. Get out there early because winter does come! And by that time, you want to have those things in place.” Speaking of supply and demand, don’t forget wintertime fun. “Make sure you have sleds and saucers,” Osborne said. “School gets canceled all the time. In the wintertime, you get holed up, so have some games and fun, snacky foods for when you can’t get out.” With a forecast for a La Nina winter this year (think lots of snow), residents will have plenty of opportunity to discover their own tips for winter survival. But remember, those big winters, and the mild ones too, are the stuff that make memories. Be prepared and enjoy!

#3 tip! Make sure chimney is cleaned, firewood is covered and you have clear access to your wood storage

The experience, knowledge and proven results To turn your dream into a reality. 208.255.7340 | barryfishercustomhomes.com | Sandpoint, Idaho SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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LIVE YOUR LIFE AS IT SHOULD BE.

LIMITED AVAILABILITY LUXURY WATERFRONT CONDOMINIUMS Life at Seasons at Sandpoint is as big as the 86,000-acre Lake Pend Oreille, as high as its winding forest paths, and as long as the ski runs down the renowned Schweitzer Mountain. Outside magazine wrote that Sandpoint has “the most enviable outdoor recreation,” and the town lives true to that claim.

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Love

realestat e

Our fireplace Beautiful fireplaces make an architectural statement by Beth Hawkins

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lanning to build a house in North Idaho? Architects, builders, and longtime locals agree that a fireplace should be at the top of the “must have” list for a variety of reasons. If properly designed, a fireplace can heat the entire house. They also become statement pieces in a home, oftentimes the focal point of one or several rooms. And finally, the comfort of a flickering blaze helps North Idahoans get through the dark, cold winters in cozy fashion. Architect Eric Owens with SOK Designs in Sandpoint said there are a number of things to consider when planning to build a fireplace, and at the top for most North Idaho clients is the look and design of the fireplace. Instead of the traditional full-rock fireplace that we’re used to seeing,

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Owens said the design trend has been moving more towards a mixed medium. “We’re using a lot of different materials versus the lodge look, incorporating wood, metal, steel plates, a lot of different tiles, to create more of a clean line.” Because we live in a snowy climate, a primary concern architecturally is roof slope and placement of the chimney. “As a general rule, in our part of the country, the fewer valleys and conflicting rooflines is a better scenario,” Owens said. “Being really conscious of that, and how it impacts the roof, is key. You definitely don’t want the chimney sheared off.” As an architect who deals with clients from all parts of the U.S., Owens said the choice to go with a wood-burning fireplace or gas is a personal one. “Every homeowner is pretty specific on whether they’re a pyro or not, but there’s nothing like a real fire burning,” he said, adding that the decision has implications on a house’s cost. “For a lot of people, the clients we’re working with, this is a second home. They want the immediate gratification of flipping a switch.” Another consideration is the placement of the TV within the realm of the fireplace. “That’s kind of a big thing,” he said. “In spec homes, it just gets plopped above the fireplace. But it puts the TV way too high. And for real wood-burning fireplaces, that puts it right above the heat.” Owens said there are several solutions to incorporate the TV in a fireplace, including the creation of hidden pockets in the fireplace to conceal the TV behind doors that swing out and slide back into the cabinet. “Then you can see the TV and equipment when you want it. And it’s a challenge as TVs are getting bigger and bigger.” And because we live in such a beautiful and scenic part of the world, Owens advises homeowners to think about the placement of a fireplace when planning their house design. “A lot of people think it needs to be right in the middle of the wall, but most of these people are building in a place with phenomenal views,” he said. “But the fireplace doesn’t have to be centered. I always push them to think about what you’re giving up. There are beautiful views everywhere, even if you’re in town on a lot. It’s that connectivity to the outdoors that makes for good architecture.” Showcasing the classic masonry craftsmanship we associate with grand lodges is the center-of-the-room fireplace at The Idaho Club golf course’s new clubhouse. The fireplace extends 30 feet from floor to ceiling, a prominent feature of the clubhouse’s rustic, timber-frame style architecture. “It serves as a centerpiece of the clubhouse lobby and the main dining area,” said Bill Haberman, a managing member of Valiant Idaho, the entity that owns The Idaho Club. The fireplace is made of stacked stone sourced from Montana, and took about four to five months to build by a team of masons with Old World Stone. “They put a lot of time and effort into it,” Haberman said. “The appearance of the stacked stone, with more right angles and sharper edges, was intentionally designed to match the lodge homes that have been built along the course.”

PREVIOUS PAGE: STONE AND WOOD FACING THIS FIREPLACE COMPLEMENT THE WARREN ISLAND VIEW FROM THE WINDOW. COURTESY SOK DESIGNS. THIS PAGE, ABOVE: THE IDAHO CLUB FIREPLACE FEATURES ITS NOW ICONIC MOOSE. COURTESY IDAHO CLUB. BELOW: BUILDERS TODAY ARE MORE LIKELY TO OPT FOR NON-TRADITIONAL FACING DESIGNS. COURTESY SOK DESIGNS

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“The fireplace is the center… but it was also designed to be the heater of the whole house.”

realestat e

ABOVE: THOUGHT MUST ALSO BE GIVEN TO SHEDDING SNOW FROM THE CHIMNEY OUTSIDE. ILLUSTRATING MORE NON-TRADITIONAL DESIGNS IS A TRULY UNIQUE, CENTER-OFTHE-ROOM DESIGN. BOTH PHOTOS COURTESY SOK DESIGNS. BELOW: THE TESSIERS’ FIREPLACE WAS BUILT IN THE RUMFORD DESIGN. TESSIER FAMILY PHOTO.

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In true North Idaho form, a moose head adorns one side of the massive rock fireplace—a nod, perhaps, to the frequent sightings of visiting moose on the golf course. Haberman said that it was donated by a member’s friend, and that the rack is about 5.5 feet wide. “It’s an impressive moose!” Haberman said. The other side features a moose in metal. Even though the golf season at The Idaho Club has passed, visitors can still go out and view that grand fireplace for themselves as the clubhouse restaurant will remain open for dinner through winter. “It’ll be fired up and on all winter as a way to welcome guests,” Haberman said. The heat factor of a fireplace was what homeowners Brooks and Amy Tessier had in mind when they designed their unique, handcrafted fireplace while building their timber frame home on Sunnyside Road nearly 40 years ago. “The fireplace is the center of the whole house, but it was also designed to be the heater of the whole house,” Brooks said. He hired local longtime mason Ray Crossingham to build the firebox in the Rumford style. According to Wikipedia, a Rumford fireplace is “a tall, shallow fireplace designed by Sir Benjamin Thompson (Count Rumford), a physicist best known for his investigations of heat. Its shallow, angled sides are designed to reflect heat in the room, and its streamlined throat minimizes turbulence, thereby carrying away smoke with little loss of heated room air.” Constructing the Tessiers’ fireplace was a two-year process from start to finish, with Brooks hauling in local river rocks from Sand Creek, Schweitzer Creek, and other places that they lived during that time. “It was a big project.” And with big projects come lots of little tweaks along the way. “Over a period of time we took it to a level that I would guess would be about 8 or 9 feet to the top of the mantle,” Brooks said. “We have a 25-foot ceiling, though, and I didn’t like the sheetrock above the mantle. So we took it another 8 feet. We did that and it was square. And we got it all done and I didn’t like it. So I took a sledgehammer to one corner. Everything was too square, so I rounded the corner.” And hence, the true character of a handcrafted fireplace had come to life! “I made a real mess when I did that corner, but I really like what we did.” And by adding some dimension, the Tessiers were able to display large pottery pieces, as well as exposing more of the ceiling. They added an eggshell sheen to bring out the natural colors of the river rock— browns, oranges, and purples. “The morning light comes clear across the room and it’s very colorful,” Brooks said. By locating the fireplace in the middle of the great room, where the dining area blends into the living room, Brooks said it has become the true centerpiece of the home. “When the fire blazes, there is a feeling you are living in the wilds of the old trapper days. It’s warm and cozy and content.” As for firewood, Brooks spends summers on their five acres cutting up dead trees. “I have enough firewood for the rest of my life.” Eventually, however, the Tessiers added the convenience and comfort of central heating. And they also now spend their winters in Maui. Perhaps that’s the best heat source of all. Aloha!

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Sandpoint’s store of endless stories The Corner Bookstore is the local used book hub

“Here and bigger and better than ever—not me, the store,” the 80-year-old said with a laugh. story and photos by Lyndsie Kiebert

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im Orbaugh learned to read by watching the highway signs fly by on Route 66 as his family moved from Michigan to California when he was just six years old. Reading remained an interest throughout his life, and books became his profession of choice when he moved to North Idaho over two decades ago. Orbaugh opened The Corner Bookstore on the corner of First and Main in Sandpoint in November of 1997. The bookstore moved to 405 N. Fourth Avenue in 2017, where the thousands of scrupulously organized books now rest, poised for perusal. “Here and bigger and better than ever—not me, the store,” the 80-year-old said with a laugh. Owning a bookstore comes with its fair share of excitement, and not just within the pages of the many mysteries and adventures that live on its shelves. One time, Orbaugh received a call from a man cleaning out his deceased parents’ home in Cocolalla. “He said, ‘I’ve got rooms of books here. You’re welcome to them. I’ve got to get rid of everything. You can’t cherry pick— take them all,”’ Orbaugh remembered.

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It took two SUV trips and plenty of sorting, but Orbaugh found a treasure: a first edition copy of Roald Dahl’s “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory,” of which only 2,000 copies were ever printed. Over the four years he’s owned it, Orbaugh has lowered the price from $7,000 to $5,000, but knows he will likely need to list it online to find a buyer. “[It] didn’t cost me a thing except the gas to get over there,” he said. “Every once in a while I’ll come across things that I haven’t seen.” Orbaugh said the best part about owning his bookstore is the people he’s able to meet. “Especially the young kids who come in at an early age and grow up coming back,” he said. Once such kid is Milinda Driggers, an avid bibliophile and budding writer who grew up browsing The Corner Bookstore and who is now studying English at North Idaho College. Driggers put Orbaugh’s store on the map in July 2020 as she gained national recognition from famed Twilight series author Stephenie Meyer, who hosted a letter-writing contest urging people to write about their favorite bookstore in 500 words or fewer and selected Driggers as the winner. Driggers shared the difficulties of growing up in the foster

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care system, and how The Corner Bookstore remained a much-needed constant in her childhood. “The owner of the bookstore was always incredibly kind to me,” she wrote. “If I didn’t have enough money while buying a book, he would always let me take it anyway and let me pay it back the next time I came in.” She recounts the excitement of finally having saved enough money to buy the Twilight books, and riding her bike to Orbaugh’s shop to make the purchase. “My local bookstore was just so much more than a regular bookstore,” she concludes. “It wasn’t all shiny and new and perfectly organized. It was small and crowded, and a bit messy. It was imperfect. But it had character, and it was easy to see the time, love, and care that was put into it. I am incredibly grateful for my local bookstore, and that it gave me a safe and comfortable place to go to.” Orbaugh is quick to redirect the conversation back to Driggers when her heartwarming essay is mentioned, but will admit that her words “mean a lot” to him. A note from Meyer—which he received along with several copies of her new book as a prize for being the topic of the winning essay—is displayed proudly beneath the glass of the bookstore’s front counter. “Jim, thank you for providing both books and a safe place for kids like Milinda,” it reads. Between caring for the shop and managing his property, Orbaugh admits he rarely has time to read, and often relies on loyal customers to stay up-to-date on what’s popular and worth recommending. “I have one hell of a reading list for when I retire though,” he said, noting exactly when that will be: February 2023, when his lease is up. Orbaugh said that when the time comes, he hopes to sell The Corner Bookstore, as it’s Sandpoint’s only bookstore dedicated to housing such an expansive used collection. “The town needs this store, whether it’s run by me or someone else,” he said. “But there’s definitely a need for it here.”

Sometimes we like to light up the night.

Sometimes we prefer to be alone. Photos Courtesy of Schweitzer Mountain

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realestat e

PRICES SOAR AS INVENTORY DWINDLES

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iscussing Sandpoint’s crazy, booming, mind-blowing real estate market sounds like a broken record ... residential sales in the Sandpoint area are up big this year compared to last year (and the year before that, and year before that). For the sales period of April 20, 2020, to September 30, 2020, there was a 55 percent increase in the volume of sold listings in the Sandpoint area compared to the same period in 2019, and we are now sitting at a median home sales price of $399,949. Awesome news if you’re a seller, and a challenge if you’re a local buyer. What gets a little more newsworthy this year is the spike in sales and prices in outlying areas. We’re talking about Clark Fork, Bonners Ferry, Priest River—those little hamlets that haven’t seen such a big real estate boom since, well, maybe since the last global pandemic came along. The median price for a home in Bonners Ferry is now $320,000, up 31 percent from last year. And remember when we all thought Priest River, and to a lesser extent Priest Lake, was a bargain market? The median house price there went up a whopping 40 percent to $366,475. “They are seeing the same thing we are in Sandpoint, low inventory and rising prices,” said Tia Becker with Realm Partners, and board president of the Selkirk Association of Realtors. She said the Covid-19 global pandemic has ushered in a tremendous

demand for local properties from people looking to escape urban markets. “We’re seeing buyers from all over, Utah, Seattle, California, larger metropolitan areas. With the ability to work from home, people are able to keep their higher-paying city jobs and live a little more remotely.” There’s even a new moniker for towns experiencing an influx of remote workers: Zoom towns. However, buyers are having a difficult time finding a home to purchase here. “There are many times from the listing side that we receive multiple offers, homes go pending after [only] hours of listing, or we even see offers for a significant amount above asking price,” Becker said. There is some relief on the horizon—she said there are several developments coming in spring 2021 including new waterfront condominiums at the Seasons at Sandpoint, the University Park subdivision with 150-plus home lots, and The Retreat at Bay Trail that has been platted to provide 78 new homes. Even though builders are hard to come by, Becker said buyers willing to wait are shifting their strategy when it comes to finding their perfect piece of paradise in North Idaho. “We’re seeing an increase in land sales and I feel that more and more people are switching gears into building homes after not being able to find a home that meets their needs or budget.”

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Selkirk Multiple Listing Service Real Estate Market Trends Vacant land—bonner county

residential sales—All Areas Sold Listings Volume - Sold Listings

2019

2020

543

683

$191,306,159

$301,386,482

2019

2020

26

Sold Listings

245

391

60

58

Volume - Sold Listings

$33,790,891

$63,594,829

88 26

% Inc/Decr

% Inc/Decr

Median Price

$305,000

$371,500

22

Median Price

$87,500

$110,000

Average Sales Price

$352,313

$441,166

25

Average Sales Price

$137,922

$162,646

18

-7

Average Days on Market

202

170

-16

Average Days on Market

101

94

2019

2020

Sold Listings

93

130

40

Volume - Sold Listings

$30,502,300

$49,704,990

62

Residential Sales—schweitzer

Sandpoint City

2019

2020

Sold Listings

28

21

Volume - Sold Listings

$11,081,449

$10,826,900

-2

$352,500

$375,000

26

% Inc/Decr

% Inc/Decr -25

Median Price

$300,000

$349,750

17

Median Price

Average Sales Price

$329,056

$382,346

16

Average Sales Price

$395,766

$515,566

30

Average Days on Market

89

83

-7

Average Days on Market

143

108

-24

2019

2020

residential sales—all lakefront

Sandpoint Area Sold Listings

311

% Inc/Decr

416

34

Sold Listings

2019

2020

24

62

% Inc/Decr 158

Volume - Sold Listings

$125,015,644

$193,781,810

55

Volume - Sold Listings

$13,732,600

$37,197,917

171

Median Price

$362,500

$399,949

10

Median Price

$554,450

$492,500

-11

Average Sales Price

$401,979

$465,845

16

Average Sales Price

$572,191

$599,966

5

-11

Average Days on Market

108

127

18

Average Days on Market

103

92

© for the period of April 20, 2019 to September 30, 2019 versus April 20, 2020, to RESIDENTIAL SALES BY AREA based on information from the Selkirk MLS© 2020 Septmeber 2020 September 10,

September 30, 2020. Real estate stats forfor Bonner and Boundary counties. Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. 2019 to April 20, 2020. Real estate stats Bonner and Boundary counties. Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed.

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Building Services in Sandpoint, Idaho

For moreglass-act-sandmg-june13.v2.pdf builders and builder services1throughout Sandpoint and North Idaho, visit SandpointOnline.com's business directory. 4/25/13 4:22 PM

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introducing locals |

nati ves + n e wcom e rs

NATIVES Newcomers by Marianne Love

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andpoint’s home. They’re happy to live here. That’s the common feeling among this issue’s Native and Newcomers. Whether their local family roots date to the early 1900s or if their history here began during the pandemic, these folks appreciate the good fortune of calling themselves Sandpoint residents. As always, each has a unique story, with Sandpoint in the spotlight.

Native Carrie Jacobson

Carrie Jacobson enjoys a quiet, simple life with her husband Roy at their secluded “dream location.” With childhood memories of living in 11 different Sandpoint rental homes, Carrie, 66, finds contentment in Selle Valley rural life. “There’s no other place I’d rather live,” she said. “My family, their well-being and happiness, are my priorities.” Carrie’s life story includes a tapestry of area historical icons. Her dad, who worked construction at Cabinet Gorge Dam, met her mom, who was employed at the Sandpoint Café. He spent most of his career in local beverage sales/delivery for both Madsen and Bill Jones Distributors. Carrie attended grade school in downtown Sandpoint. “I remember recesses on the playground at the Old Farmin School (now U.S. Bank/city parking lot). There was fierce competition on the tetherball courts and the [monkey] bars,” she recalled. “We would walk across the street to the public library, which was upstairs in the then City Hall.” Several family members held timber industry jobs. Husband Roy put in many years coaching youth basketball and girls softball. His father, Elmer, a fixture at local athletic events, groomed and maintained the Memorial Field baseball diamond as well as the Northside School field. After graduating from Sandpoint High and getting married, Carrie worked for the Whitworth College student activities director while SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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Roy earned his degree. Later, daughters Jenny and Julie, aided by family members and friends, founded Celebrate Life which, for 15 years, raised thousands of dollars and continues to assist community members affected by cancer. The disease eventually took Jenny’s life. Career-wise, Carrie’s experiences began at Dub’s Drive-In and ended with retirement from Northern Lights, Inc. “My favorite was with USDA, Rural Development,” she said. “I had wonderful supervisors and co-workers and the opportunity to experience a wide range of job responsibilities.” Carrie thinks some might look at the life she’s lived here and find her reclusive and boring. “I hope [though] that they see me as caring and content,” she added. Q. What are your must-sees for visitors? A. We’re blessed to have many hiking trails, walkways, and bike paths that provide the opportunity to just enjoy our beautiful surroundings. A drive from

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Sandpoint to Cabinet Gorge Dam provides beautiful views of Lake Pend Oreille, Clark Fork River, the Green Monarchs, and the opportunity to stop at Clark Fork Pantry for a great lunch and delicious baked goods. Q. What are your cures for wintertime cabin fever? A. If you tire of shoveling snow, there’s always cross country skiing, snowshoeing, and Gonzaga basketball! Q. Who is a local who left a lifelong impression? A. Julia Powell. She was “Aunt Julie” to the Garvey kids and their friends. She was a gracious, strong, and encouraging woman. Q. What makes you proud about this community? A. It is such a blessing to have been able to stay in my hometown where my parents, siblings, in-laws, aunts, and uncles lived, to see my children grown and raising their children in the same amazing community. We live in an incredibly generous and caring hometown.

Native Eddie Brown

His given name is Edwin A. Brown, but, at 63, he prefers “Eddie” because “it makes me feel younger.” With his grandfather H.E. and father Les both serving as forest industry businessmen and as Sandpoint mayors, Eddie Brown has enjoyed close access to Sandpoint history. His Brown family story here dates to the early 1900s. He has also experienced hometown generosity, thanks to a community benefit in his behalf, after a 2014 accident left him a paraplegic. Though wheelchair bound, this former Marine literally doesn’t let much grass grow under his feet. He spends several hours weekly aboard his lawnmower, grooming the family estate, which also serves as an outdoor museum. He carries a tree trimmer on a 4-wheeler to park out his woods. These passions come naturally to this former landscaping/land-management specialist. Eddie lived on the Colburn estate until age 5 when his father moved the family to South Euclid. “We lived two blocks from Washington School, three blocks from Memorial Field, three blocks from the junior high (now the Sandpoint Events Center),” he recalled. “It was a great time to be young in a one-stoplight town. I could go on and on about the lifestyle back then.” A gifted storyteller at heart, Eddie happily shares tales of Marine life, construc-

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RCA_


How Long Have We Been Fighting To Protect Our Lake From a Monster Mine? Hint: 1995 was a bad year in

now be going full bore, releasing its toxic runoff the national news. Locally and metals-laden water too. That’s when the first towards our Lake every mining company, ASARCO, single day. launched its serious run But mining compaat exploiting the Cabinet nies have deep pockets, so we need Mountain Wilderness Area. deep resolve. Their goal, build a monster mine under And the continued support of everyone this pristine land that would generate 100 who loves our unique Lake. Please, become million tons of waste piled right beside the an RCA member, write your representative, Clark Fork River. The main tributary to donate money, visit our website, like us on Lake Pend Oreille! Facebook and follow us on Instagram. And that’s when we stepped in to preYes, it seems like this struggle has been vent them. going on a long time but consider this: Now—a quarter of a century, dozens of If built, such a mine would lawsuits, and four mining comcontinue to damage both the panies later—the fight goes on. Wilderness and Lake in perpeBut Lake Pend Oreille remains tuity. In other words, virtually unscathed. forever. Had we, and several others, rock creek alliance Now that is a long time. not resisted, the mine would

rockcreekalliance.org • 208-610-4896

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tion work, motorcycle adventures, occasional missteps, local history, and his spiritualism as a Jehovah’s Witness. Nowadays, he enjoys a good visit along with those yard projects. “As long as I’m able to stay here on the estate, I’ll be all right.” Q. What are your must-sees for visitors? A. As a boy, I spent a night tied off to the edge of the Green Monarchs on a cedar log houseboat. It was one of my most precious childhood memories. If visitors were to experience any of the many bays that line the Pend Oreille shoreline, they too might create lifetime memories. Q. What are your cures for wintertime cabin fever? A. A walk along a well-groomed trail on a crisp, blue-sky day can help bring a person out of the winter blues. Experiencing the quiet serenity of the forest on a beautiful calm day can be spiritual. Q. Who is a local who left a lifelong impression? A. When our family moved into town, a family rented our Colburn home. Darrell Ewing, the father, had a calm, gentle demeanor. I admired his ability to do just about everything a man should know—equipment operator, mechanic extraordinaire, carpentry, plumbing, electric, etc. Q. What makes you proud about this community? A. I’ve always known our community to be caring and generous. I became aware of this firsthand when my brother put together a fundraiser after my accident. Suddenly I became a recipient of kindness and generosity. I was overwhelmed and touched beyond words. We are blessed to live in such a wonderful community.

Newcomer Pam Carlin

After six years of RV traveling, working seasonal jobs, discovering Sandpoint, continued research, and a ten-year stretch in between, Florida native Pam Carlin has found home and her dream job. Just as the pandemic began, she arrived in Sandpoint with her husband John, ready to learn about owning and operating The Flower Farm in Selle. In 2009, hoping to live somewhere with four seasons, while bound for Coeur d’Alene, the Carlins passed through Sandpoint, visiting Coldwater Creek and City Beach, “marveling at the beautiful lake and stunning mountain scenery.” After a couple of days in Coeur d’Alene, they agreed that “we actually preferred the quaint little town of Sandpoint to the north.” Ten years later, while living in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, where John managed a senior living community, Pam searched online and found a Sandpoint business for sale. “I immediately contacted the owner and arranged a visit,” she recalled. “We knew right away it was exactly what we were looking for.” Once in Sandpoint, the couple worked and trained under former owners Dennis Moore and Cindy Scott. “It was a wonderful experience to learn the business and meet many happy customers, validating our decision to become The Flower Farm’s new owners,” Pam said.

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or Personal

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Q. What do folks back home hear about your new life? A. My husband and I are fortunate to live in a place with beautiful scenery and abundant wildlife. We send pictures home regularly. I am inclined also to go on a bit about the work we’re doing for this wonderful business we can now call our own. Q. How have you learned more about the area? A. We did get to the Sandpoint Visitor Center to load up on local maps and brochures. Before we arrived, I actually paged through several issues of Sandpoint Magazine online to get a feel for the community. We also like to take leisurely drives around the area, venturing down back roads and into neighborhoods. Q. Who are some locals who helped you adjust? A. Dennis Moore and Cindy Scott wanted whoever was going to take over their “pride and joy” to be well-equipped to also be successful. I also learned an incredible amount from long-time Flower Farm employee, Akasha Reiner. She’s a joy to work with.

Newcomer Todd Radermacher

Minnesota native Todd Radermacher has given up the reins of the famed Budweiser Clydesdales in favor of working with “gentle giants” right here in Sandpoint. For several years, Radermacher, 55, drove for AnheuserBusch at exhibitions throughout the West. He also worked with production of Budweiser Super Bowl commercials and drove the

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It’s a perfect fit for Pam, who holds college degrees in ornamental horticulture and accounting. Before leaving Florida, she worked in the family business of growing turf grass for golf courses. “I got to grow-in and establish a new golf course as superintendent along with my husband and father,” she said. “It was a thrill to watch the first golfer tee off on the beautiful course we worked so hard to cultivate.” With one season at The Flower Farm under her belt, Pam seems happy with her decision. “I’m most proud that I didn’t give up on my dreams,” she said, “and that I found a way to finally be a business owner who also gets to shovel snow.” Q. What did you happily leave behind? A. Florida has unbearably hot, humid weather many months of the year. Wisconsin winter days were damp and cold with downright brutal temps, dipping far below zero days on end. Knowing I will not likely experience many such days makes me very happy.

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Western hitch in events from the Rose Parade to MLB games. “I had a great career,” he said. “I got to see a lot of the United States and met so many awesome people.” Radermacher and his wife Dianna (Dee), an accomplished photographer, who once drove Sandpoint’s popular Round Town Trolley, are managing the Parnell Ranch Clydesdales in Selle. (See story on page 41.) After residing several years in the Midwest, where their son Jake still lives, the Radermachers recently built a home with an expansive view of the Selkirk Mountains. Originally from the St. Paul area, Radermacher learned to drive draft horses during summers on his uncle’s Colorado ranch. His uncle had a contract with Adolph Coors, performing with Belgian hitches around the country. A 1985 stop at Sandpoint’s Idaho State Draft Horse Sale led to his meeting Dee. The two were married in 1990. “... I got my experience with horses and marketing which led to being available when Anheuser Busch had an opening with their traveling Clydesdale team,” he recalled. “It’s been a very positive career.” Of all the highlights, Radermacher said the most poignant was a wheel horse, Bud. “He would stand stock still amongst a semi-circle of children in wheelchairs and offer his head to each and every kid!”

Schweitzer Mountain in the Village 208.255.1660

Though the Budweiser chapter has ended, Radermacher sees perks with his new job. “Waking up in my own bed,” he said, “not having to eat out for every meal and still working with majestic Clydesdale horses but in beautiful North Idaho. “ Q. What did you happily leave behind? A. Humidity. Q. What do folks back home hear about your new life? A. “Sorry, it’s full here ...I only got in because I married one of the Round Town Trolley girls.” Q. How have you learned more about the area? A. Listening to my wife and her stories and which road to take and when. Q. Who are some locals who helped you adjust? A. Bryan and Kaye Ross of Stillwater Ranch and Jack and Michelle Parnell of Parnell Ranch. They’ve been welcoming and helpful and treated me like family right away.

213 Church St Downtown Sandpoint 208.263.5157

W W W. A L P I N E S H O P S A N D P O I N T. C O M

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winter guide 2021

2020-2021

|

winter guide

get

OUT!

THERE’S PLENTY TO DO IN SANDPOINT NO MATTER WHAT THE WEATHER OR SEASON.

FIND A COMPLETE GUIDE AT www.SandpointOnline.com/rec.

Outdoors Skiing AND RIDING. Schweitzer Mountain Resort has 2,900 acres and features 92 trails and open bowl skiing just 11 miles from downtown Sandpoint. The mountain boasts 2,400 vertical feet. Ten lifts serve two open bowls, treed glades and three terrain parks. www.Schweitzer.com (208-263-9555). See story, page 65. Cross-country Skiing. The Sandpoint Nordic Club has the best resource for groomed trails at www.SandpointNordic.com. The club maintains 5 km of gentle trails at Pine Street Woods and 10 km at the Lakeshore trails at 8000 Lakeshore Drive. Schweitzer Mountain offers 32 km of groomed trails with the most predictable snow thanks to its elevation. www.Schweitzer.com. Western Pleasure Guest Ranch, www. WesternPleasureRanch.com, has 10 km of trails; and the state parks at Round Lake, Farragut and Priest Lake all have maintained trails. Not groomed but right in town, the Pend d’Oreille Bay Trail north of City Beach offers a very flat 2.5 km lakeside jaunt. Backcountry. Nearly unlimited options exist on public lands surrounding Sandpoint up national forest roads such as Roman Nose and Trestle Creek. Call the Sandpoint Ranger District (208-263-5111) or the Bonners Ferry Ranger District (208267-5561) for maps and current conditions, including avalanche advisories. Call the Idaho Panhandle Avalanche Center toll-free at 866-489-8664. For a guided backcountry experience, take an excursion from Schweitzer via snowcat with Selkirk Powder or check out their new heli-skiing opportunity (208-263-6959). www.SandpointOnline.com/rec or www.fs.usda.gov/ipnf. Sleigh Rides. Western Pleasure Guest Ranch, 16 miles northeast of Sandpoint on Upper Gold Creek Road, offers sleigh rides in a rural setting for groups and couples. www.WesternPleasureRanch.com (208-263-9066). Snowmobiling. Snowcat trails around Sandpoint and Priest Lake in the Selkirk Mountains are renowned; for more information, contact Sandpoint Winter Riders, www.IdahoSnow.org (208-263-0677) or Priest Lake Trails & Snowmobile Club (509-466-3331) or www.priestlake.org. For guided rides at Schweitzer, contact Selkirk Powder. www.SelkirkPowder.com (208-263-6959). State Parks. Three state parks are within close range to

PHOTO BY DOUG MARSHALL

Sandpoint Farragut (208-683-2425), Round Lake (208-263-3489) and Priest Lake (208-443-2200) with activities such as camping, cross-country skiing trails and snowmobiling. www.parksandrecreation.idaho.gov. Walking. For cleared paths, try the Pedestrian Long Bridge alongside Highway 95 over Lake Pend Oreille; the paths along the Sand Creek Byway; Travers Park on West Pine Street; City Beach downtown; Sandpoint-Dover Community Trail along Highway 2 West; Lakeview Park, through and around the Kinnikinnick Native Plant Society Arboretum; and overlooking Sand Creek at the Healing Garden next to Bonner General Health. Wildlife Refuge. Kootenai National Wildlife Refuge, 30 miles north of Sandpoint near Bonners Ferry, has more than 2,700 acres and abundant wildlife and birds. Hiking trails to a waterfall and around a pond, auto tour routes. www.fws.gov/ kootenai (208-267-3888). WaterLife Discovery Center. On Lakeshore Drive, the center offers interpretive trails and self-guided tours of fish habitat and an interpretive area on the Pend Oreille River. www.FishandGame.idaho.gov (208-769-1414). Fishing. There’s great ice fishing on Lake Pend Oreille at the north end of the Long Bridge in front of Condo del Sol. Main prey is perch, though bass and trout are also caught. Ice fishing is also popular on smaller lakes: Cocolalla, Mirror, Gamlin, Shepherd, Round, Antelope and Priest. Lake Pend Oreille’s deep waters rarely freeze, and even in midwinter charter fishing boats pursue its trophy rainbow trout. Ice Skating and Sledding. When conditions are right, ice skaters flock to Third Avenue Pier, Sandpoint City Beach or Sand Creek below the Cedar Street Bridge. Round Lake State Park maintains both regular and speed-skating rinks (208-263-3489). For sledding, Schweitzer offers Hermits Hollow Tubing Center (208-255-3081).

Indoors

Art Galleries. Truly an arts town, Sandpoint has numerous galleries and artists’ studios. Downtown take a walking tour; on First Avenue check out ArtWorks, Cedar Glen Gallery/ Ferrara Wildlife Photography, Hallans Gallery, and Hen’s Tooth SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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Pine Street Woods

Trail head

Clark Fork

Map © TerraPen Geographics

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Studio. Art lovers may also visit Pend Oreille Arts Council, 302 N. First Ave., There are many satellite gallery locations that host revolving art exhibits yearround. www.ArtinSandpoint.org (208263-6139). At Schweitzer, the Artists’ Studio in the White Pine Lodge features local artists. Museums. Enjoy many fine displays depicting old-time Bonner County at the Bonner County History Museum. Open Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free admission on the first Saturday of the month year-round, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Located in Lakeview Park, 611 S. Ella. www.BonnerCountyHistory.org (208-263-2344). Movies. The Bonner Mall Cinema is a six-plex theater inside the Bonner Mall on Highway 95, featuring new releases weekly (208-263-7147). The historic Panida Theater downtown at 300 N. First shows foreign and independent films, plus film festivals (www.Panida.org). Athletic Clubs. Greater Sandpoint has a plethora of opportunities, but the most comprehensive is Litehouse YMCA, 1905 W. Pine St., with a 25-meter indoor pool, courts, a weight room, group classes, and a sauna and spa. Open daily, with facilities reserved for vulnerable populations from 10 a.m. ‘til noon on Wednesdays and Fridays. www. ymcainw.org (208-263-6633). Spas. Get pampered at Wildflower Day Spa, www.thewildflowerdayspa. com (208-263-1103) or Solstice Wellness Spa at Schweitzer Mountain. www.SolsticeWellBeing.com (208-263-2862). Breweries and Pubs. Down-

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n e wco m e rs town, see brewing in action at MickDuff’s Beer Hall, the production and tasting room, open daily at 220 Cedar St., (208-209-6700) or visit their family restaurant at 312 N. First. www.Mickduffs. com (208-255-4351). For pubs that serve a lot of craft beers, try Eichardt’s Pub & Grill at 212 Cedar St. (208-263-4005) or Idaho Pour Authority at 203 Cedar St. (208-597-7096). Taste handcrafted ales at Laughing Dog Brewing in Ponderay; taproom is open at 805 Schweitzer Plaza Dr. 7 days a week from noon to 8 p.m. www.LaughingDogBrewing.com (208263-9222). Matchwood Brewery, at 513 Oak St., offers a craft beer for every taste,

with eight beers on tap. www.MatchwoodBrewing.com (208-718-2739). Utara Brewing Co., 214 Pine St., offers 11 “core” beers anda small bites menu. www. UtaraIdaho.com (208-627-5070). Wineries and Wine Bars. Pend d’Oreille Winery features tours, wine tasting, and a gift shop. Open Tues.Sun. 12 to 8 p.m. 301 Cedar St. www. POWine.com (208-265-8545). Small House Winery is open Saturdays and by appointment at 1636 Baldy Park Dr. www.SmallHouseWinery.com (208-2902016).

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SHOPPING

PHOTO BY DOUG MARSHALL

IS YOUR INTERNET READY FOR

Downtown retailers are going all out in the Sandpoint Shopping District, where shoppers will discover a fine array of eclectic shops and galleries with clothing, art, and gifts galone. www.DowntownSandpoint.com. Highlights include the Cedar Street Bridge Public Market with retailers such as Carousel Emporium and Huckleberry Depot, art, and food such as Cedar Street Bistro, all in a beautiful log structure spanning Sand Creek. www.CedarStreetBridge.com (208-255-8360). Just down the street are First Avenue retailers such as Finan McDonald Clothing Company, Larson’s Department Store, Northwest Handmade and Campfire Couture. Antiques abound at Foster’s Crossing, a mini mall with lots of collectibles, on Fifth between Cedar and Oak streets (208-263-5911); and MarketPlace Antiques & Gifts, open daily, at Fifth and Church (208-263-4444). Just out of town, Bonner Mall in Ponderay has stores large and small; it’s on U.S. Highway 95 two miles north of Sandpoint (208-263-4272).

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LODGING

sandpoint

Spa or Sauna

Pool on site

Restaurant

Bar or Lounge

54

x

x

x

x

x Downtown Sandpoint on the lake. Indoor pool, sauna, fitness room, hot tub. All rooms with lake view. Dine at Trinity at City Beach. Also 22-site RV park. www.BestWesternEdgewater.com

208-263-3194 or 800-635-2534

Daugherty Management

21

x

x

19

x

x

60

x

x

x

208-263-1212

Dover Bay Bungalows

x

x

x

Free breakfast with waffles, 24-hour hot tub, free wireless internet. Family suites. Schweitzer ski packages. At the base of Schweitzer Mountain, two miles from Lake Pend Oreille.

208-263-2210

Lodge at Sandpoint

25

x

x

x

x Accommodations for weddings, retreats and banquets. Lakeside with swimming and docks. Views of lake and mountains for an unforgettable Idaho vacation. www.LodgeAtSandpoint.com

208-263-2211 50

x

x

x

x

Pend Oreille Shores Resort

Fully furnished condos and on-site athletic club on Lake Pend Oreille. Stay and play packages. See ad, page 41. www.POSResort.com

208-264-5828

Selkirk Lodge

70

x

x

x

x

x

x Mountain accommodations, stay-and-play packages. Spectacular mountain and lake views. Outdoor heated pool and hot tubs. See ad on back cover. www.Schweitzer.com

208-265-0257 or 877-487-4643

Sleep's Cabins

4

x

x Sleep's Cabins have been a beloved part of the community and a landmark on Lake Pend Oreille since the 1930s. Perfect for family vacations. See ad page 44. www.SleepsCabins.com

208-255-2122 8

Twin Cedars Camping and Vacation Rentals 208-920-1910

Sandpoint’s luxury vacation home rentals, with properties on the lake and the mountain. See ad, page 5. www.DM-Vacations.com

Waterfront bungalows at Dover Bay in Marina Village. Fully furnished, lake and mountain views. Fitness center, marina, hiking/biking trails. See ad, page 4. www.DoverBayBungalows.com

208-263-5493

FairBridge Inn & Suites

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Meeting Rooms

No. of Units Best Western Edgewater Resort

Kitchen

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DAUGHERTY MANAGEMENT VACATION RENTAL HOME IN SANDPOINT

x

x

Owner-managed vacation rental homes and camping cabin; RV sites on Lake Pend Oreille and in the Selle Valley; other unique rentals. Horse/dog friendly. www.TwinCedarsSandpoint.com

SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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eats+

drinks

Living up to

our ‘ski town’ name Sandpoint’s thriving (and delicious) après-ski restaurant scene by Beth Hawkins

A

fter a fabulous day on the slopes at Schweitzer, skiers and boarders are ready to enjoy a delicious meal in an inviting and relaxing atmosphere. It’s called the après-ski scene if we’re getting fancy about it. There are several top-rated restaurants right on the mountain—get a rundown of them in Schweitzer Magazine, an insert in this magazine’s issue!—which makes it all the more comfortable if you have slopeside accommodations. If you’re heading down the mountain after a big ski day, however, you’ll still find that lively après-ski scene in downtown Sandpoint. We are named a ski town in some of the national publications. One of the most centrally located restaurants in town, in the “heart” of downtown Sandpoint, is Baxters on Cedar at 109 Cedar St. “Upstairs is casual dining with dimmed lights and great ambiance,” said Brandon Emch, co-owner and operator of Baxters and Baxters Backdoor (located downstairs). “We are known for our lobster roll, meatloaf dinner served with a portobello mushroom gravy, seasonal fish specials, Friday and Saturday prime rib, and of course, key lime pie.” He recommends that parties of six people and larger make reservations (208-229-8377); Baxters also offers large areas for private dining parties. Emch said to be on the lookout for “sporadic dinner specials” throughout the year. Open Monday through Saturday from 11 a.m. ‘til 9 p.m. Emch also co-owns Baxters Backdoor, located downstairs from the main restaurant, where folks can grab a glass of wine or a beer. “It has an eclectic skier and snowboarder friendly atmosphere featuring signs and homage to Schweitzer.” Open Fridays and Saturdays from 3 p.m. ‘til close, with live music from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. The beautifully restored Belwood Building in downtown Sandpoint is home to the Pend d’Oreille Winery tasting room, 301 Cedar St., where skiers and boarders can relax with a glass of

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PHOTO COURTESY PEND D’OREILLE WINERY

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“The winery feels like a perfect destination after a day on the slopes.” SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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drinks TEMPTING OPTIONS ON THE SWEET LOU’S MENU INCLUDE THE RIBEYE SERVED WITH VEGETABLES AND LOADED BAKED POTATO, AT RIGHT, AND THE HOMEMADE CHEESECAKE, BELOW. COURTESY PHOTOS

locally made wine and a bite to eat. “The winery feels like a perfect destination after a day on the slopes,” said winery co-owner Kylie Presta. “We have comfortable seating, friendly staff, hot handcrafted meals and pizza, and local beer and wine. We are also an easy location to stop in when traveling through town.” Pend d’Oreille Winery prides themselves on an award-winning wine selection—try a tasting to sample a few!—and they also strive to keep the food menu updated with seasonal dishes. “Our fall and winter menu offers nourishing soup, pizzas, and handcrafted meals,” Presta said. “And we invite guests to try the salmon chowder, drunken mushroom pizza, roasted pepper dip, or spanakopita. Each of these meals pairs well with our wines.” On Sunday afternoons, check out the winery’s après-ski special: two glasses of wine for $5 each with a pizza order. “It’s the perfect balance—artisan pizza and a full-bodied wine. Just show us your ski pass!” While the winery doesn’t accept reservations, they do suggest that parties larger than eight call ahead to ensure best service. As of early November, the new MickDuff’s Brewing

Stay ile! Awh

Company’s space on Second Avenue was still awaiting some finishing touches. Owners and brothers Duffy and Mickey Mahoney purchased the historic building—originally built as the Sandpoint federal building and post office in the 1920s—and are overseeing a big remodel. “We are getting closer to finishing, and hope that it’s open before the holidays,” Mickey Mahoney said. But the current brewpub location at 312 N. First Ave. continues to serve favorite cold-weather appetizers, sides, and entrees to accompany their impressive locally crafted beer lineup. In fact, the brewpub has been the recipient numerous times of “Bonner County’s Best Happy Hour.” Happening from 3 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., enjoy a buck off select beers and appetizer specials. For a satisfying warmup from the menu, make sure someone at the table orders the beer cheese soup. “It’s a blend of cheese, a medley of vegetables, and bacon bits with our Knot Tree Porter,” said Duffy Mahoney. Another starter that’s popular with skiers and boarders who are seeking a delicious carb load-up are the gorgonzola fries. “And here’s a hot tip—get both the beer cheese soup and the gorg fries, and dip the fries in the soup!” A popular, hearty item on the main menu is MickDuff’s Kobe beef burger—”Get it any way you want it,” Duffy Mahoney said— served with a side of the brewpub’s hand-cut Idaho potato fries. If you’re just planning to grab a beer, check out MickDuff’s Beer Hall just a few blocks away at 220 Cedar St. “It’s all fun and games with pool, foosball, and lots of TVs for sports.” And look for live music on Friday and Saturday nights. Since fries have already come up, it’s important to note that the garlic fries are somewhat legendary at Eichardt’s Pub and Grill, 212

Natural beer, food & fun!

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Come visit us today at one of our two locations:

|

SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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312 N First Ave.

Beer Hall & Brewery

220 Cedar St.

MickDuffs.com

301 Cedar St #101 | Sandpoint, ID 83864

112

Family Friendly Brewpub

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E ATS + D R I N KS Cedar St. They’re served in a basket that’s meant for sharing, covered in grated parmesan cheese, fresh garlic, and herbs. Wash ‘em down with a beer on tap—Eichardt’s has a large selection of regional and local varieties to choose from. Eichardt’s is a cozy, intimate space, and it’s surprising to realize that the popular pub serves up gourmet dinners. One to try is the Creole shrimp bowl with shrimp, peppers, and onions served over rice pilaf with the pub’s Creole cream sauce. And finally, what’s better after a big day of skiing and boarding than a giant pizza? The pies at Second Avenue Pizza, 215 S. Second Ave., are known for their piled-high toppings. In fact, the restaurant maintains that the Jukebox Special, loaded with pepperoni, salami, spicy Italian sausage, mushrooms, olives, and onions, weighs a staggering seven pounds (we’ll take their word for it)! A great way to start off your meal is to order a large garlic bread—it’s warm and tasty with cheese and garlic, served with a bowl of meat marinara sauce. The dining area is large and spacious for big groups, but it can definitely get busy; for faster service, call in your order before you head down the mountain. And finally, skiers and boarders don’t have to go far from the bottom of Schweitzer Mountain Road to relax in the warm, welcoming atmosphere of Sweet Lou’s, 477272 Highway 95 in Ponderay. “It doesn’t get cozier than a warm, log cabin, which is how our restaurant is designed,” said Meggie Foust, co-owner of Sweet Lou’s, who said the building was made of locally sourced logs and white pine. “Snuggle up in a warm booth and enjoy hearty servings of comfort food after an epic day on the mountain.”

• D ilu

n as . co m

Delicious nDailys Come & Taste! Baxtersoncedar@gmail.com • 208-229-8377 • 109 Cedar St, Sandpoint

Monday - Saturday 11:00 am-9:00 pm

208.263.0846 207 Cedar st. | Sandpoint Idaho SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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Seasonal Pub Fare with a Unique Twist Winter Hours Mon-Sat 11:30am to 9:00pm 301 Cedar St., Suite 102 208.265.PORK

www.sandpointfatpig.com

TOP: A HEARTY BREAKFAST WITH SAVORY HOME FRIES AT PACK RIVER STORE. ABOVE: THE CHEESEBURGER IS MADE WITH LOCAL WOOD’S MEATS, AND PACK RIVER SAUCE. PHOTOS BY RACHEAL BAKER.

been difficult re-training the locals on which door to use, but people seem to like the new setup and we sure do too,” she said. And foodies are abuzz over the store’s gourmet dinner events. “We took a chance with our first five-course tasting menu in January of 2019. There were only 10 people who signed up, and we weren’t sure if people were going to be into it,” Brittany said. “We have since started doing two a month, because they are selling out so quickly.” Brittany said the dinners serve as an outlet for Alex, who has professional training in French cuisine. Due to limited space, Pack River Store requires reservations for the dinners, which are typically five to seven courses, and last about three hours. They are also planning some fall wine pairing dinners, so keep an eye out for more coming up on their website, at www.PackRiverStore.com.

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SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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drinks

Schweitzer is Heating Up

the Drinks! by Jenifer Caudle

L

a Niña is headed our way this winter with the hope of a lot of snow. If you’re enjoying that snow at Schweitzer Mountain Resort, there’s no better reward for a long day of skiing than a tasty hot drink! Whether it’s a stop at the Sky House or finishing up the day at Taps with friends, we’ve got you covered on tasty après ski drinks to try this season.

Sky House On the summit of Schweitzer Peak, the Sky House offers an incredible panorama, and plenty of drink choices at both the cafeteria-style Red Hawk Cafe and the more intimate Nest bar and restaurant. Whether you’re taking a midday break or treating yourself before you take the last run down to the village, cozy up to the bar or settle into a seat on the deck to sample

Local Natural Delicious

Winter Ridge Natural Foods is your onestop-shop to support your healthy lifestyle. Organic Produce Salad Bar Deli Hot Food Bar Local Grass-Fed Meats and Dairy Extensive Wellness and Beauty Departments Exclusive Wines and Cheeses Beer and Kombucha on Tap Robust Bulk Items Healthy On-The-Go Foods And So Much More.

(208) 265-8135 www.WinterRidgeFoods.com

703 Lake Street at Boyer St Sandpoint, ID

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NeW Location... your happy place Air Roasted Organic Coffee Beans Espresso Blended Drinks Deli Foods Free WiFi

119 N First SaNdpoint moNarchmouNtaiNcofFee@gmail.com

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A WARM DRINK IN WINTER, PHOTO BY EUGENIV RESERV. HOT COCOA WITH SPRINKLES AT THE SKY HOUSE, COURTESY PHOTO. A HOT APPLE CIDER DRINK. PHOTO BY PATRICK FORE

a spiced Hot Toddy. Created by Sky House bartender, James Bartkiewicz, the Chai Spiced Hot Toddy features chai spiced honey, black tea infused bourbon, lemon, and orange. This combination of winter citrus, black tea, and warm spices is sure to heat your insides on even the coldest days. For all the huckleberry lovers out there, The Huck Snow is the one for you—a classic hot chocolate mixed with 44 North Huckleberry, Stoli vanilla, and finished with a dose of whipped cream.

Taps Hang up those skis and head over to Taps Bar—the prime après ski spot. With pool tables, TVs, live music, and a great list of local beer and tasty cocktails, Taps is the best place to relax and hang out with friends after a day on the slopes. Putting a spin on two classic winter cocktails are the King of

the Hill—a hot chocolate with Crown Royal and butterscotch Schnapps—and the Caramel Apple Toddy, made with caramel vodka and bourbon hot apple cider. Or, if you’re looking for an afternoon pick-me-up, try the Ooooo Baby, a hot coffee mixed with bourbon, Irish cream, hazelnut liqueur, and coffee liqueur—ooooo baby, that sounds delicious!

And all the rest! There’s more on-mountain drinks to explore. In the village, the Mojo Coyote Cafe, Chimney Rock Grille, and Pucci’s Pub offer various specialties, while the specialty market Gourmandie offers grab-and-go choices. And just down from the village, off the Northwest Passage, the St. Bernard is a great spot for casual drinks. Bottoms up!

serving you 7 days a week at two locations!

Sweet Lou’s Restaurant & Bar Hwy 95 N Ponderay | 208.263.1381

Come hungry, Stay late, Eat well! www.sweetlousidaho.com

Sweet Lou’s Restaurant & TAP HOUSE 601 Front Ave. 208.667.1170 | DOWNTOWN Cda

SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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Forty One South’s Cassandra Cayson reflects on her first decade by Beth Hawkins holds, and of course what she loves to order on the menu. Q: What’s been the biggest challenge of the past 10 years? Cayson: The restaurant industry is full of ups and downs, especially in a seasonal town in North Idaho and I can definitely say that not a single year has been the same as the last. The most consistent challenge with business here is finding enough staffing, especially in the summer season, and then balancing the labor cost in the winter to keep your core staff onboard. We are blessed to have a wonderful core staff who have helped develop the business over the years and also create an undeniable family unit—but just as other businesses in Sandpoint have experienced, additional staffing options are limited. Q: What’s been the biggest reward? It is a reward to come to work and to actually look forward to seeing your coworkers and having a great time during service. We all put a lot of effort into our “work culture” to maintain this. Looking back over the past 10 years, I can say that we have worked with some amazing people and although some might have moved on to other paths, they have each played a role in getting Forty One to where it is now. Q: What do you know now that you wish you had known a decade ago?

Oh goodness, so many things! This year has definitely taught me patience and to just take a lot of things one day at a time. There is a lot out of our control right now and we can only continue working on our part to do the best of our ability each day. Q. Any employees who have been there all 10 years? Our head chef Mike Dabrowski was actually here at the very beginning as a line cook through my first summer season. He moved to Seattle to work with Chef Tom Douglas for a few years but has been back at Forty One now for over four years. Q. What does the future look like for Forty-One South? We are excited to have made it through the 2020 season and look forward to many more successful years here. Whether it be here at the restaurant or catering at private offsite events, we are thrilled for Forty One South to continue to be a part of so many special celebrations for our guests. Q. What is your all-time favorite dish from the past decade at Forty One South, and why? It’s so hard to choose just one! We change our menu four times a year so I have favorites for each season. The buffalo meatloaf is my go-to comfort food in the winter, but in the summer months I am addicted to the steelhead trout. Luckily you can’t go wrong with any item on the menu.

Restaurant & Catering serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 150+ bottles of wine • 100 different beers Gas • propane • showers • ice • convenience store 1587 Rapid Lightning Rd, Sandpoint, ID • (208) 263-2409 • VISIT US on SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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eats+

drinks

DISH

the local

Who loves Taco Tuesday? Apparently it’s something we all missed, because Jalapeno’s Mexican Restaurant, 314 N. Second Ave., just brought back this local favorite. Every Tuesday, enjoy $3 house-made crispy tacos filled with beef or chicken— which is a great deal considering the restaurant has amazing chips and salsa to start things off! Wash it down with their Taco Tuesday drink specials: Mexican draft pints are $4, and a Hornitos® Margarita is just $6 for a 12-ounce, or splurge because hey, it’s Tuesday, with a 16-ounce for two bucks more. You won’t have to go far to find the new home of Spud’s Waterfront Grill, now located at 202 N. Second Ave. The move to the building—just about a block away, still in downtown Sandpoint—is temporary while the landlord of the original First Avenue location does some repairs to the Sand Creek building’s foundation. Spud’s owner Peter McDaniel estimates they’ll be out about four to eight months, but has found a silver lining in the change-up. “The great

thing about the new location is we have about two and a half times more indoor seating,” said McDaniel. Customers will still be able to find some of the most popular breakfast and lunchtime favorites on the menu, including those famous potatoes with delicious toppings. If you’re searching for a unique dining experience, check out The Idaho Club, 151 Clubhouse Way. The beautiful clubhouse will be open this winter for dinner Wednesday through Saturday, and also Sunday brunch. “The menu is the same dinner menu that we rolled out in the middle of July,” said Bill Haberman of The Idaho Club. “We are also planning some happy hour specials at four o’clock.” For vegetarians who are in search of a winter warmup, try the pho chay at Beet and Basil on The Creek, 105 S. First Ave., open for dinner Tuesdays through Saturdays. General manager Jeremy Holzapfel said the Vietnamese soup is one of most popular items on the menu in the colder months, and it’s made with a savory

Serving dinner 7 nights a week Reservations Recommended WORLD FAMOUS

HAND-PRESSED HAMBURGERS

LOCALLY RAISED 208.263.2313 | 222 N FIRST AVE. SANDPOINT, ID

208.265.2000

“We Salt The Margaritas And The Side Walk”

41 Lakeshore Drive, Sagle www.41SouthSandpoint.com

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WARM UP AT EVANS BROTHERS COFFEE WITH A BOCCE’ FALL HOT DRINK. THE SPACIOUS DINING ROOM AT THE IDAHO CLUB IS OPEN FOR WINTER DINNER AND SUNDAY BRUNCH. BOOST YOUR IMMUNE SYSTEM WITH A VEGGIEPACKED BOWL AT DI LUNA’S. COURTESY PHOTOS

blend of tofu, veggies, and rice noodles served with a side of bean sprouts. “The pho is gluten-free and can have chicken, beef, shrimp or salmon added to it.” Another favorite is the kung pao cauliflower—it’s on the appetizer menu, and it’s a dish that everyone at the table will be talking about! The vegan fried cauliflower is tossed in kung pao sauce with peanuts, hot chilies, and scallions. Evans Brothers Coffee, 524 Church St., is a family-owned and operated business founded in Sandpoint. The company has now branched out with locations in Coeur d’Alene and Spokane, as coffee aficionados keep clamoring for more of their fresh coffee roasted daily. The Sandpoint location in the Granary District is open daily, and offers a large open space to relax with friends or to spend some quality time with your laptop, while sipping artisan coffee. For a cold weather warm-up, try the Bocce’ Fall made with dark chocolate, paired with an orange blossom almond syrup, headwall espresso,

Hly S E R F ad Dai Bre

and criollo chocolate garnish. Boost your wintertime immune system with a colorful, flavorful, veggie-packed bowl at Di Luna’s Cafe, 207 Cedar St. Owner and chef Karen Forsythe recommends the forbidden rice bowl. “It has organic deep purple rice that is very high in antioxidants, combined with pickled vegetables, kale, miso vinaigrette, and toasted almonds.” Another favorite on the menu is the pharaoh bowl with farro, kale, sunflower seeds, roasted butternut squash, cauliflower and carrot, lemon tahini, and za’atar. The cafe is also open for breakfast, and for those with hearty appetites check out the Italian scallion egg scramble, made with Italian sausage and asiago cheese, served with a side of potatoes and toast. Guaranteed you’ll be ready to hit the ski slopes after this filling meal … that, or a long winter’s nap.

BULK FOOD

LUNCH

TAKE-N-BAKES Hours:

M-F 8:30-5:30 Join us on

208-263-9446

1326 Baldy Mtn. Rd. Sandpoint, ID 83864 . www.millerscountrystoresandpoint.com SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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Downtown ea ts+ drinks

Sandpoint

Dining Map 4

Miller’s Country Store & Deli

6

Pack River Store

7

Winter Ridge Natural Foods

8

Baxters on Cedar

9

Beet & Basil

10 Burger Dock 11

Chimney Rock at Schweitzer

12

Di Luna’s Long Weekend Café and Gift Shop

Sand Creek Byway

Visitor Center

Larch

SA

N

The Idaho Club

Bonner General Health

Poplar

Spuds Waterfront Grill

Alder

19 Jalapeño’s Restaurant 20 Second Avenue Pizza

Eichardt’s Pub & Grill

Main

Cedar

22 Mickduff ’s Brewing Co.

Brewpub 23 A&P’s Bar & Grill 24 The Back Door

25 21

Farmin Park

To Dover & Priest River

Cedar St.

Cedar St. Bridge

8 24

Town Square

19

22 23

17

3

Panida Theater

Bridge St.

10

City Beach

9

Lake St.

7

N

12

Pine St.

S. Fourth Ave.

Division St.

Pine

1

Fourth Ave.

Church

Boyer Ave.

Beer Hall & Brewery 26 Pend d'Oreille Winery

26 13

Main

Oak

25 Mickduff ’s Brewing Co.

E

Bonner General Health

Fifth Ave.

18 Sweet Lou’s

Third Ave.

16 Sky House At Schweitzer

W

K

Healing Garden

15 Forty One South

21

CR

Fir

14 The Clubhouse Restaurant at

17

D

EE

13 The Fat Pig

Elks Golf Course

Pend d’Oreille Bay Trail

Davis Grocery & Mercantile

5 Baldy Mountain Rd.

First Ave.

4 5

Bonner Mall

Second Ave.

Monarch Mountain Coffee

Kootenai Cut-off Rd.

S. Second Ave.

3

Schweitzer Cut-off Rd.

PARKING

Mojo Coyote at Schweitzer

To Hope & Clark Fork

18

Boyer Ave.

Evans Brothers Coffee

To Schweitzer Mtn. Resort

Division St.

1 2

11 16

LAKE PEND OREILLE

2

14 6

To Bonners Ferry & Canada

20

Marina

To Sagle & Coeur d’Alene

S

15

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Forty One South Dining. Photo by Doug Marshall

COFFEE & CAFES EVANS BROTHERS COFFEE

Restaurant index by type of cuisine. Locate by number on dining map

01

524 Church St. Located in downtown Sandpoint’s historic Granary Arts District. Enjoy exceptional coffees and espresso, including the popular Headwall Espresso Blend. Locally baked pastries, breakfast burritos and more. Open daily. 208-265-5553 www.EvansBrothersCoffee.com

MOJO COYOTE AT SCHWEITZER 02 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. Enjoy a fresh Evans Brothers espresso and treat your sweet tooth to a warm scone. Fresh-baked pastries, breakfast burritos and lunch specials. Fine selection of beer and wine. 208-255-3037 www.Schweitzer.com

MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE 03 119 N. First Ave. Sandpoint’s original coffee roastery and coffeehouse, now located in the heart of downtown on First Avenue! Premium micro-batch always-organic beans. Open daily. www.MonarchMountainCoffee.com

PACK RIVER STORE

WINTER RIDGE NATURAL FOODS 07 703 Lake St. A natural foods grocery store with in-house deli, bakery, meat department, organic produce department, a juice and espresso bar, and hot food bar with indoor seating. Open daily. 208-265-8135 www.WinterRidgeFoods.com

ECLECTIC/FINE DINING BAXTERS ON CEDAR

08

109 Cedar St. Daily specials, fresh local products. From steaks and chops to half-pound burgers, great salads, and Baxters’ signature Key Lime pie. Open Monday through Saturday. 208-229-8377 www.baxtersoncedar.com

DELICATESSENS & MARKETS DAVIS GROCERY & MERCANTILE 04

BEET & BASIL

09

620 Wellington Pl., Hope. Cafe and coffee shop with fresh-made pastries, sandwiches, and gluten-free options. Full-service grocery store supplies local produce, meats, wine and beer, and handcrafted goods to the Hope community. 208-264-0539 www.DavisGroceryinHope.com

105 S. First Ave. Global street food with a local flair, featuring unique options for vegetarians, vegans, meat lovers and those with dietary restrictions. Overlooking the marina with a warm fireplace and fabulous antique bar. Open Tuesday through Saturday. 208-920-6144 www.beetandbasil.net

MILLER’S COUNTRY STORE & DELI

THE BURGER DOCK

05

1326 Baldy Mountain Rd. Wholesome goodness with a selection of fine deli meats and cheeses, bulk food items, pie fillings, and delicious fresh-baked pies, breads and pastries - plus soup and sandwiches, take-home dinners, and soft-serve ice cream. Inside and outside seating. Open Monday through Friday. 208-263-9446 www.MillersCountryStoreSandpoint.com

10

116 N. First Ave. Voted Best New Business in Bonner County 2019! Handcrafted, locally sourced gourmet burgers. Vegan-friendly options. Beer specials during pro-football season. Waterfront view of marina. Open daily. 208-597-7027 www.theburgerdock.com

SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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06

1587 Rapid Lightning Rd. A country store with gourmet fare, serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Grab ‘n’ go burritos and salads, grocery necessities, plus a chef’s menu featuring weekly specials and more. Open daily. 208-263-2409 www.PackRiverStore.com

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+

ts | Local Dining Guide Eatsea &Drinks drinks

for a complete interactive guide to all local dining, go to www.sandpointdining.com

CHIMNEY ROCK AT SCHWEITZER

AT RIGHT, TOP TO BOTTOM: PACK RIVER STORE; PHOTO BY RACHEAL BAKER, PEND D’ OREILLE WINERY, FORTY ONE SOUTH; PHOTO BY DOUG MARSHALL AND JALAPEÑOS RESTAURANT.

SKY HOUSE AT SCHWEITZER

11

10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. Fireplaces, comfortable seating in the bar, and diverse cuisine. Enjoy an extensive menu including high-quality steaks, hearty pasta, scrumptious salads and exquisite seafood. Open daily inside the Selkirk Lodge at Schweitzer. 208-255-3071 www.schweitzer.com

DI LUNA’S LONG WEEKEND CAFÉ AND GIFT SHOP

207 Cedar St. American bistro café offering regional, sustainable foods including hand-cut steaks, homemade soups and vegetarian cuisine, plus eclectic gifts for sale. Check the website for dinner concerts. Open Friday through Monday. 208-263-0846 www.DiLunas.com

THE FAT PIG

SWEET LOU’S RESTAURANT

13

18

477272 U.S. Highway 95 in Ponderay. Open daily. Terrific traditional and regional fare. Serving hand-cut steaks, freshly ground burgers, wild salmon and smoked ribs. Familyfriendly environment. Full bar. A second location is located in Coeur d’Alene. 208-263-1381 www.SweetLousIdaho.com

ETHNIC JALAPEÑOS RESTAURANT

19

151 Clubhouse Way. Stunning new clubhouse restaurant with fine dining and bar. Americana menu features steak, regional seafood, salad, pub favorites, and weekly specials. Bar menu includes burgers, sandwiches, salads, and appetizers. Open daily; public welcome. www.TheIdahoClub.com.

314 N. Second Ave. A Sandpoint favorite for over 20 years offering both traditional and Americanized Mexican dishes in a fun, family-friendly atmosphere. Full bar, patio seating, banquet facilities, glutenfree menu and quick to-go menu offer something for everyone. Open daily. 208-263-2995 www.SandpointJalapenos.com

FORTY ONE SOUTH

SECOND AVENUE PIZZA

41 Lakeshore Dr., Sagle. South end of the Long Bridge. Waterfront dining in an elegant lodge setting; exquisite service paired with innovative cuisine make for one of North Idaho’s premier dining experiences. Open 7 nights a week for dinner. 208-265-2000 www.41SouthSandpoint.com

SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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17

202 N. Second Ave. (temporary new location due to construction). A landmark restaurant in Sandpoint since 1995, Spuds creates everything from scratch, from soups and elaborate baked potatoes, to loaded salads, unique sandwiches and desserts. Serving breakfast and lunch Tuesday through Saturday. 208-265-4311 www.spudsonline.com

THE CLUBHOUSE RESTAURANT 14 AT THE IDAHO CLUB

|

SPUDS WATERFRONT GRILL

12

301 Cedar St. Suite 102. Enjoy an extensive draft beer selection in a warm pub environment with a rotating wine list. Refreshing twists on classic pub fare with a complete vegetarian menu offered for lunch and dinner. Open Monday through Saturday. 208-265-PORK (7675) www.SandpointFatPig.com

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16

10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. Ride the chairlift to the Sky House for a lunchtime experience unlike any other. Featuring a chef-inspired menu from locally sourced, farm-fresh ingredients, with a fabulous view at the resort’s summit overlooking Lake Pend Oreille. 208-263-9555 www.schweitzer.com

15

20

215 S. Second Ave. Savor the piled-high specialty pizzas, loaded with fresh ingredients on homemade dough, or calzones, specialty salads and sandwiches. Gluten-free choices. Beer and wine, take-and-bake pizzas available. Free delivery; open daily. 208-263-2995 www.secondavenuepizza.com

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E ATS + D R I N KS Pack River Store

PUB-STYLE

EICHARDT’S PUB & GRILL

21

212 Cedar St. Relaxing pub and grill mixes casual dining with seriously good food. Completely family friendly. More than a dozen beers on tap, good wines and live music. Upstairs game room with fireplace. Locally supported and nationally recognized since 1994. Open daily. 208-263-4005 www.EichardtsPub.com

MICKDUFF’S BREWING CO. BREWPUB

22

312 N. First Ave. Handcrafted ales in a family-friendly downtown atmosphere, brewing natural ales and root beer. Menu includes traditional and updated pub fare – gourmet hamburgers, sandwiches and handcrafted soups. Open daily. 208-255-4351 www.MickDuffs.com

Pend d’Oreille Winery

TAVERNS, BREWERIES AND WINERIES A&P’S BAR & GRILL

23

222 N. First Ave. Longtime downtown tavern is home of the world-famous PJ’s hand-pressed hamburgers made with fresh Wood’s ground beef in a relaxed and friendly environment. Plus the best fries in town! Pool table, TVs, live and DJ music most weekends. Newly remodeled and family friendly. Open daily.

Forty One South

24

THE BACK DOOR

Located downstairs at 111 Cedar St. It feels like you’re going into a speakeasy from the prohibition years; a warm and intimate space featuring wines and craft beers along with a great tapas menu. Open Monday through Saturday. 208-610-7359 www.BaxtersBackDoor.com

MICKDUFF’S BREWING CO. BEER HALL & BREWERY

25

220 Cedar St. Family-friendly brewery tasting room boasts 16 taps, local bar art, free popcorn and weekly entertainment. Beer Hall is BYOF (Bring Your Own Food)-friendly and has a beer for every taste. 21 years or older for live music on Friday and Saturday nights. Open daily. 208-209-6700 www.MickDuffs.com

PEND D'OREILLE WINERY

Jalapeños Restaurant

26

301 Cedar St. Locally made wines, tasting room, house-made appetizers, live music, local art installations, and refillable wine growlers, located in the renovated and historic Belwood 301 Building. Open daily. 208-265-8545 www.POWine.com

SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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eats+

INDEX

drinks

advertiser

7B TV Dish A Glass Act All Seasons Garden & Floral Alpine Shop Ameriprise Financial ArtWorks Gallery Barry Fisher Custom Homes Bonner County Fair Bonner General Health Century 21 Riverstone Century 21 Riverstone Carol Curtis CO-OP Gas & Supply Coeur Private Wealth Coldwell Banker Bizarre Bazaar by CAL Dan Fogarty Construction Dana Construction Daugherty Management Dover Bay Electrology Center Eve’s Leaves Evergreen Realty Evergreen Realty Charesse Moore Finan McDonald Clothing Fogarty Construction Greasy Fingers Bikes Guaranteed Rate Hallans Gallery Hendricks Architecture Keokee Books Keokee media + marketing KPND Radio

17 98 39 12, 104 127 39 87 61 18 31 95 24 45 9 49 96 63 5 64 127 13 6, 96 IBC 21, 49 98 107 40 39 21 46 127 107

Lewis & Hawn – Dentists Lewis & Hawn – Sleep Solutions Litehouse Foods Maria Larson, Artist Monarch Marble & Granite Mountain West Bank North 40 Outfitters Northland Cable Northwest Handmade Panhandle Special Needs Pend Oreille Shores Resort Realm Partners Realm Partners – Jeremy Brown Remax in Action ReStore Habitat For Humanity Rock Creek Alliance Sandpoint Building Supply Sandpoint Momentum Sandpoint Movers Sandpoint Nordic Club Sandpoint Online Sandpoint Optometry Sandpoint Reader Sandpoint Storage Sandpoint Super Drug Sandpoint Waldorf School Satisfaction Painting Schweitzer Mountain Resort Selle Valley Construction Skeleton Key Skywalker Tree Care Sleep’s Cabins Super 1 Foods

19 52 23 39 93 15 4 108 3 103 15 88, 89 86 50 95 101 97 28 102 107 126 49 103 100 22 20 86 BC 2 39 21 42 57

Syringa Cyclery Taylor Insurance The Local Pages Timberframes by Collin Beggs Tomlinson Sotheby’s Realty Cindy Bond Tomlinson Sotheby’s Realty Rich Curtis Tomlinson Sotheby’s Realty Chris Chambers Wildflower Day Spa Willamette Valley Bank

127 53 108 83, 98 IFC 26 1 36 34

SCHWEITZER MAGAZINE • Insert between pages 64-65 • 7B Boards Alpine Shop Boden Architecture Cedar Street Bridge Coldwell Banker Daugherty Management Finan McDonald Sandpoint Shopping District Schweitzer Rossignol Experience Center Tomlinson Sotheby’s Shawn Taylor Tomlinson Sotheby’s Alison Murphy Tomlinson Sotheby’s Chris Chambers Visit Sandpoint

8 32 18 18 31 4 7 22 2 21 8 3 25

Go Exploring with Keokee Guide Books www.KeokeeBooks.com NEW D E ITION

$26

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E ATS + D R I N KS

SANDPOINT professional

ELECTROLOGY CENTER for permanent hair removal

LEIGH ANNE CHORZEMPA LICENSED ELECTROLOGIST Serving Sandpoint For 29 Years

208 290-5714

or

208 263-5530

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Sandpoint Community Resource Center provides

an extensive website offering information about how to receive help in areas as diverse as healthcare, housing, utilities, and clothing, while also connecting those who want to help with groups in need of volunteers. There is even an option to register your organization’s need for volunteer support. Learn more about it at www.sandpointcommunityresource.com 208-920-1840.

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Alpine Motors Your Buick, GMC truck

dealer. New and used sales and leasing. Full service, parts and body shop. Highway 95 N., Ponderay, 208-263-2118, 1-800-430-5050. www.AlpineMotors.net

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Vanderford’s

Keokee A marketing communications firm

providing web design, hosting, search engine optimization and marketing, graphic design, editorial, media consultation and more. 405 Church St., 208.263.3573. www.keokee. com. We publish Sandpoint Magazine and SandpointOnline.

Shop Sandpoint Go to www.shopsandpoint. com, for local web links to trusted services, merchants, artists, craftspeople, farmers and green building. Write your own reviews in the new SandpointBlog. Fun reading, recycling, and more!

Offering the latest books and novels, office supplies, machine supplies and free delivery in Sandpoint. Order online. 201 Cedar St.,

208-263-2417. www.Vanderfords.com

Sandpoint Super Drug The Center for Functional Nutrition offers a full line of clinical nutrition products including Klaire, Thorne, Pure, Ortho Molecular, and Apex. 604 N. 5th Avenue.

ADVERTISING INFORMATION Get current rate sheet on our website www.SandpointMagazine.com or call

208-263-3573 and talk to Sales Director Clint Nicholson (ext. 123; email clint@keokee.com).

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Ready for Winter story and photo by Kevin Davis

W

e North Idahoans know how to do winter, and that’s good as the winter season here is a long one. It stretches solidly from November to April, and sometimes it greedily snatches days from October and May. That’s half of the year that we dwell in the snow, under the gray overcast skies, and the long dark nights. To make it through a North Idaho winter we have to be prepared. Winter preparation is an age-old endeavor in the northern climes and many of us have mixed feelings about putting up firewood. In any month you can see someone hauling home a truckload of firewood. I give them a secret thumbs up because I know they were out there working hard, often in unbearable heat. Many of us have gardens and spend autumn days putting up the gardens and canning fruits and vegetables; kitchens full of canning jars, bowls, fruit flies, and ripe scents of steaming apples or chopped carrots. Preparedness is crucial because we live in a valley where we never know how harsh the next winter is going to be. My first big winter was ‘96. The snow came heavy in early November and didn’t let up. Subarus were plowed up and buried in deep piles throughout downtown. With the turkey and trimmings, we waded through waist-deep snow to the door of a friend’s house in Sandpoint for Thanksgiving. I was working for Idaho Fish and Game as the kokanee trap tender at Sullivan Springs. I stayed at the fish trap for a ten-day-on, four-day-off hitch. The weather was relentless through December, snowing day after day. The house I was sitting up Cascade Creek, east of Clark Fork, was getting buried and my days off were spent shoveling roofs, decks, and walks. Luckily the neighbor loaned me a tractor a couple times and work loaned me a snow blower. Without that generosity I was surely buried. And that generosity is a defining feature of life in Sandpoint. I always try to pay it back, and that’s a part of winter I covet; people helping people. I’m always

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SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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good for helping someone who’s stuck in the ditch. It gives us a chance to test our meddle, to forge ahead come what may, not to mention lend someone a hand. “Okay, stand back, I’m gonna give’r hell!” North Idahoans know when it’s more serious too and come together to shovel roofs before they collapse, plow a driveway, or donate a cord of wood for someone to get through the winter. When just driving to work is a white-knuckle experience, we all need a release. Skiing at Schweitzer has been a pastime for locals since 1963. On a big powder day, I love hearing wild ecstatic hooting and hollering. The whole mountain is charged with vibrant energy and everyone is happy. Riding through mountain terrain on a snowmobile, unencumbered by trails, or the ground, the options of where you can go are limitless. You truly can reach the untouched on a snowmobile and get the feeling that there is nobody for miles around. Snowshoers can access the mountains on winter logging roads. Closer to home, Pine Street Woods offers gear for rent and trails that wind through the forest. Nordic and skate skiing are great ways to get the heart rate up and burn off some stress. Ice skating in North Idaho can be a frustrating experience and let me just say that a sports complex with a full hockey rink would be a boon for Sandpoint. To an outsider it might seem like we’re running ragged all winter long. That’s just how life here looks. Because we’re prepared, we’re more efficient. We slow down to help people out because that’s our community, and when the work is done, we get out and have some fun.

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C haresse M oore

Knowledge • Experience • Dedication • Integrity • Results Marketing That Sells cell. 208.255.6060 | email. charesse@evergreen-realty.com

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An Expert in our Area *Based on Selkirk MLS data for 2004-2020

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Profile for Keokee :: media + marketing

Sandpoint Magazine | Winter 2021 - Wide Open Territory  

One true thing about North Idaho is adventure waits just outside your door - winter or summer. And in our Winter 2021 issue we'll help guide...

Sandpoint Magazine | Winter 2021 - Wide Open Territory  

One true thing about North Idaho is adventure waits just outside your door - winter or summer. And in our Winter 2021 issue we'll help guide...

Profile for keokee