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SUMMER 2020

north idaho on the

rocks EXPLORations in our mountainous heart

INSIDE: SANDPOINT

visitor guide 2020

A CENTURY OF GIVING Elks celebrate milestone birthday

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SHOWING THE WAY A guide to summer recreation

BUILDING SMALL Sandpoint supports smaller homes

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www.TSSIR.com

Anytime Info

For recorded information or to speak to the listing agent, call 208.449.0071 and use the 4-digit property code.

www.KullyspellLuxuryEstate.com Hope, Idaho ATI #1158 $20,000,000

www.LochHavenEstate.com Sagle, Idaho ATI #1564 $13,500,000

www.GlengaryWaterfront.com Sagle, Idaho ATI #1239 $3,950,000

www.ScenicBottleBayHome.com Sagle, Idaho ATI #1338 $1,499,000

www.SunnysideLakeviewEstate.com Sandpoint, Idaho ATI #1274 $1,295,000

www.WarrenIslandShore.com Hope, Idaho ATI #1577 $1,195,000

www.GraniteCreekRetreat.com Nordman, Idaho ATI #1572 $1,050,000

www.MarinaTownPenthouse.com Dover, Idaho ATI #1492 $869,000

www.28AcresGypsyBayRd.com Sagle, Idaho ATI #1443 $699,000

www.WaterfrontAtPoulinDrive.com Sagle, Idaho ATI #1528 $549,000

www.MillHarborEstates.com East Hope, Idaho Starting at $685,000

www.WestshoreWaterfrontLots.com LaClede, Idaho ATI #1510 Starting at $425,000

www.0Hwy95SagleAcreage.com Sagle, Idaho ATI #1108 $365,000

www.JanishDriveLakeview.com Sandpoint, Idaho ATI #1231 $349,000

www.HopeWaterviewProperties.com Antler Point Estates, Hope, Idaho ATI #1020 All Lots $175,000

www.IdahoClubLot.com Sandpoint, Idaho ATI #1095 $139,000

Cindy Bond,

Associate Broker, GRI, CRS www.CindyBond.com cindy.bond@sothebysrealty.com 208.255.8360

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ATI #1170

, Associate Broker, GRI, CRS 208.255.8270

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208.263.1808

www.sellevalley.com RCE-1102

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Sandpoint's Finest LUXURY VACATION HOME RENTALS

Villa Z Estate

Point at Sandpoint

Lakeshore Landing

Stay in the best luxury vacation rentals in Sandpoint. From exceptional waterfront ‘family reunion’ retreats, Seasons at Sandpoint condos, Dover Bay or Schweitzer. Each home is fully appointed and comes with 24/7 concierge service. Performance boat rentals, paddle boards, Hobies available for rent too. At a Daugherty Management home, you’ll create memories that will last a lifetime!

Warren Island

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Local, Professional Vacation & Long Term Rentals Full Service Property Management & Home Care

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www.dm-vacations.com

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Becky Freeland 208-290-5628

Curt Hagan 208-290-7833

Charesse Moore 208-255-6060

Courtney Nova 208-290-7264

Ron Nova 208-304-2007

Kathy Robinson 208-255-9690

Maddie Gill 208-597-3955

John Dibble 208-290-1101

Danny Strauss 208-290-2946

Brian Jacobs 208-610-3188

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Luke Webster 208-255-8597

Mystic Webster 208-255-8199

www.Evergreen-Realty.com // www.SchweitzerMountain.com 321 North First Avenue, Sandpoint, ID Toll Free 800.829.6370 // 208.263.6370 // Fax 208.263.3959 Evergreen Realty is pleased to sponsor our local Habitat for Humanity Charlie Parrish 208-290-1501 001-09 Entry_SMS20.indd 6

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departments

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features 37 43 45

51 57 67 71

kindness in the heart of a community When times get tough, it’s neighbors to the rescue

sandpoint steps up

Locals and businesses respond to pandemic with action

at the ready

Bonner General Health on the front lines of a pandemic

in the spirit of adventure Guiding your way to summer fun

it takes a village

Early childhood learning in Bonner County

building a future PSNI sets $1 million facility goal

A century of good works Elks Club celebrates 100th birthday

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r

78 82

somewhere between hiking and climbing Add rock scrambling to your summer repertoire

reading the rocks

A story written in stone waits to be told

five feet from a million dollars Bonner County’s mining history

SANDPOINT MAGAZINE

S U M M E R 2020, VOL. 30, NO. 2

On the cover:

Miles Wheatcroft scrambles above Beehive Lake. Photo by Woods Wheatcroft

SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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departments 10

almanac

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calendar

31

interview: musician Apryll Walker

49 Pictured in History: Community Hall 60 Art: Local craft instrument makers

THE PUBLISHER PAUSES TO ADMIRE GRANITIC FORMATIONS ON A HIKE TO THE WIGWAMS IN THE SELKIRK MOUNTAINS. PHOTO BY SANDY BESSLER

87

Photo Essay: Really Cool Rocks

114 marketwatch

Publisher’s note

I’ve riffed before in these five inches o’ contemplation about natural disasters I’ve brushed up against: floods, fires, earthquakes, windstorms, and a certain volcanic eruption 40 years ago. But surely the strangest is the pandemic we find ourselves in as this summer issue goes to the printer. That the coronavirus is invisible, spreads by means still not well understood, and can be deadly makes it somehow more insidious than the standard-issue disasters we’ve tasted before. But there’s one striking attribute the pandemic has shared with more familiar calamities: the goodness it has brought out of so many people in our town. In the face of adversity we often see the best of human nature, and those are the stories we’ve followed in our coverage of the town response. I find them inspiring, and I hope you do too. Meanwhile, there’s a summer of great experiences awaiting, and some of the best are to be found in the remarkable mountain ranges we’re blessed to live among. Our feature stories this issue dive into the geology, history, adventure, and beauty of our magnificent mountains. If you haven’t already, be sure to get some wild rambles onto your shortlist this summer. A day among the peaks just might be the perfect reminder that, virus or not, we’re sure lucky to live right here and right now. CB

117 natives and newcomers 133 The local dish: Where and what to eat 140 sandpoint of view: Terry Huggins keeps it clean

REAL ESTATE 92

walnut housing

New development sets the tone for affordable future

101 sustainable and in tune with nature Earth berm design still holds appeal

106 a suRprising quartet

Sandpoint’s former federal building has sisters throughout the U.S.

111 ponderay takes huge step To become the little city with a big future

EATS & DRINKS 124 weathering the storm Local restaurants cope with Covid-19

128 don’t mess with texas Authentic BBQ is now in Idaho

130 changing the game

New restaurant opens at Idaho Club

Publisher Chris Bessler COO Jeff Lagges Editor Trish Gannon Assistant Editor Beth Hawkins Advertising Director Clint Nicholson Art Director Pamela Morrow Design Team Nicole Rios, Robin Levy Social Media Chase Urquhart, Laura Walsh Office Manager Susan Otis IT Manager Ethan Roberts

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Contributors: Bridger Andres, Caren Bays, Bonner County History Museum, Sandy Compton, Carol Curtis, Kevin Davis, Susan Drinkard, Mike Frantz, Mary Franzel, Lisa Gerber, Hays Chevron, Fiona Hicks, Cate Huisman, David Keyes, Kermit Kiebert, Lyndsie Kiebert, Jennifer Lamont Leo, Lacey Lindgren, Marianne Love, Doug Marshall, Jim Mellen, Charles Mortensen, Ben Olson, Patrick Orton, Don Otis, Jackye Penney, Annie Pfleuger, Winter Ramos, Cameron Rasmusson, Laura Roady, Carrie Scozzaro, Kathie Slora, Bruce Usher, Corey Vogel and Woods Wheatcroft.

Sandpoint Magazine is published twice yearly, in May and November, by Keokee Co. Publishing, Inc. 405 Church St., Sandpoint, ID 83864 Phone: 208-263-3573 Email: inbox@keokee.com ©2020 by Keokee Co. Publishing Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Subscriptions: $12 per year, payable in advance. Send address changes to the address above. Visit our web magazine published at www.SandpointMagazine.com. Printed in USA by Century Publishing, Post Falls, Idaho.

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JOHN ERICKSON 208.597.5367

MARK JENSEN 307.760.8863

JAKE OLIVER 208.290.5233 SandpointMagazine.com SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

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almanac

THE PATH

to a crazy

adventure REVISITING A SELKIRKS INITIATION

THIS PAGE: JIM MELLEN REVISITS A MEMORABLE HIKE IN THE SELKIRKS. FACING PAGE, TOP: DAVE KRETZSCHMAR SETS OUT ON THE BRIGHT AND SHINING PATH. PHOTOS COURTESY JIM MELLEN

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hiking the selkirks |

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...lightheartedly, I suggested we hike from right where we were to Beehive Lake, 15 miles to the north, and more than a dozen peaks and valleys away. ... Little did I realize that my real initiation into hiking the American Selkirks was about to begin.” Those words were written in memory of a time in 2003, when my wife Sandii and I acquainted the late Dennis Nichols with the Selkirk Mountains in preparation for the upcoming book he was writing, “Trails of the Wild Selkirks,” first published by Keokee Publishing in 2004. In the 16 years since, I have helped to write three further editions to the book... and have always wanted to revisit the hike that prompted Dennis’ words above in that first book. We completed that hike in two days, but I wanted to see if I could do it in one. I love mountains. I love looking at them, sleeping in them, climbing them, and sliding down them. And we have some of the greatest mountains right in our backyard! The Selkirk Mountains are the range just west of Sandpoint and the Purcell Trench. While not as rugged as the Selkirks north of the border, they are among my favorites. Parts of the Selkirks are designated by the U.S. Forest Service as “recommended wilderness.” I wish the whole Selkirk Crest was a protected wilderness. In revisiting this hike, there was no shortage of folks up for a crazy adventure. As friend Emily Erickson put it, “I want the full Jim Mellen experience. The crazy hard, borderline silly adventure.” So, my buddy Dave Kretzschmar gladly agreed to join me in this quest. The summer of 2019 was the best in recent memory, with regular rains and no smoke. We chose the end of July for this hike, reasoning that the bugs would have subsided and there would still be snow for water sources. Leaving Fault Lake early on July 30, my legs felt like noodles, and I was anxious about my ability to accomplish this feat. But soon the impressive sublimity displaced any anxiety and we settled into a scorching ,3/4-mile-per-hour pace. Honestly, the terrain would not permit

anything faster! At a weeping, mossy watering station we loaded up and climbed to a magnificent alpine meadow wetland complete with elephant’s heads, then to a saddle that overlooks Hunt Lake. When we summited Gunsight Peak (it’s called Gunsight because there is a notch at the summit, so really there are two peaks close together), we saw what looked like a “bright and shining path” to Chimney Rock. The granite in the Selkirks is second to none—so clean it can literally be eaten from! And the views from here are magnificent. Lake Pend Oreille, Priest Lake, the Cabinet Mountains, and Canadian ranges were all visible on this lovely day. It was quite warm, but there was always a light breeze to make things pleasant. But looks can be deceiving and we found that our bright and shining path was fraught with a series of deep and steep notches to be descended and ascended. The heat of the day had us battling dehydration so when Dave spied a pond on the west side of the ridge, we loaded back up with water. We were fortunate to find remnants of snow the rest of the way. The normally dependable snowpack had all but disappeared! Passing by Chimney Rock we were once again overwhelmed by the unsurpassed beauty of that granitic formation. Silver Dollar Peak was the next major peak along the way. I had climbed it before and found it not technically difficult, so I consulted Google Earth to check out

the route down the north aspect. Even though it looked doable, we soon found ourselves in a pickle. Thinking that there must be an easy way down, we pressed on through some pretty gnarly spots. After a while, we were thinking definitely not turning around and going back through that spot again, so we toughed it out. As writer Ammi Midstokke puts it, “If you’re going to be stupid, you’d better be tough.” Looking back at our route, we were astonished at the steepness. After skirting a few minor peaks, we were about to conquer Twin Peaks. The day was growing short and so was our energy, but the Twins were the last hurdle before the descent to Beehive Lake, and the end of this hike. Bugs at the lake made us decide to camp in the rocks just above. We slept under the stars that night, or actually, under the mosquitoes! The next morning Sandii met us on the trail to give us a ride out. But we did it, we hiked it in one day! I could not have asked for a better partner than Dave. And for three full days afterwards, I was totally exhilarated! There is something inherently healing by giving something all you’ve got. So I would encourage each of you to take on a challenge—hike, bike, write a song, start a new career—anything that you really don’t know that you can accomplish. You may be pleasantly surprised! And if you have some time to spare... initiate yourself into the wonder of our American Selkirks.

–Jim Mellen

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SHELTER IN PL ACE NEW STRUCTURE GRACES ROUND LAKE

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he natural beauty of Round Lake State Park—our own personal recreation gem just 10 miles south of town—is coveted by recreationalists, anglers, picnickers, daytrippers, and overnight campers alike. At 142 acres, there is plenty of open space to explore the park’s forested trails, or drop a canoe into its tranquil waters. And now there’s another reason to love this special place: a new 30’ by 40’ shelter that’s open this summer to accommodate family picnics and group gatherings, and provide a place to duck under when an occasional storm blows through. Park Manager Mary McGraw couldn’t be more pleased with the addition. “Most of it is engineered wood, made right here in Idaho,” she said. “The timbers looked big and bulky when they came in, but when it all came together it was beautiful.” She notes that stones at the pillars’ bases match those found in the park, and applauds building contractor CoyotePak Construction. “They’re new to the area, and were great to work with,” she said.

THE NEW SHELTER AT ROUND LAKE FEATURES ENGINEERED WOOD HARVESTED PRIMARILY IN IDAHO. COURTESY PHOTO

-Beth Hawkins The shelter is open year-round, as is the park. For more information, and to inquire about reserving the shelter, go to www.SptMag.com/shelter.

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phone 208.265.4558 fax 208.263.5721 2025 West Pine Street Sandpoint, ID www.SandpointDentists.com

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shelter in place + dog beach buzz

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THE BUZZ ABOUT DOG BEACH WITH PROGRESS, COMES CHANGE

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og Beach is a bustling construction site as Burlington Northern Santa Fe builds a second train bridge across Lake Pend Oreille, but access to the beach will be maintained during and after the project. In addition, BNSF is paying for and building both temporary and permanent trails adjacent to Dog Beach that ensure walkers, joggers and bicyclists will continue to enjoy access along the Sagle-to-Sandpoint Community Trail. “The pedestrian tunnel being installed by BNSF will be a permanent fixture of the trail,” said BNSF spokesperson Courtney Wallace. “It is crafted in the same style as the tunnel that was installed by the county underneath Bottle Bay Road.” While improvements are welcome, patience will be key as the bridge project is expected to take between two and five years to complete. “BNSF will continue to utilize its property, which includes Dog Beach, as the project continues,” Wallace said. “We will maintain security fencing and other measures around the job site; however, people will still be able to safely access parts of Dog Beach.”

TOP: A DRONE PHOTO BY BRIDGER ANDRES CAPTURES CONSTRUCTION OF A WORKING BRIDGE THAT WILL BE USED TO HELP BUILD A SECOND BRIDGE. BOTTOM: BUILDING A BRIDGE IS A BUSTLING PROCESS. PHOTO COURTESY BNSF

-Beth Hawkins For project updates visit www.KeepSandpointRolling.com.

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LOCAL INDIE FILM GROUP TO PRODUCE FILMS LOCALLY COMPANY SEES WIN/WIN FOR CUSTOMERS, LOCALS

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mericans are ditching standard cable television providers in droves for more customizable, affordable, over-thetop application subscriptions. As demand for this model increases, so will the opportunity for indie filmmakers to reach niche audiences. Three local entrepreneurs are looking to seize this opportunity in the state of Idaho. The Idaho Film Company is a new feature film production company looking to make at least two feature films per year in Sandpoint and surrounding areas, with eventual expansion to the rest of the state. Their goal, according to promotional materials, is to create niche demand with a slate of feature films and projects which have substance, style and story, and rely on good filmmaking, good filmmakers and good people. TIFC was founded by Jimmy Matlosz, a 30-year veteran in the filmmaking industry. Matlosz moved to Sandpoint in 2009 and quickly realized the potential for powerful filmmaking in the area. Matlosz sees TIFC as a way to entertain a niche audience nationwide, while also providing an economic boost to local business owners. Their films will be produced during the shoulder months of the year, when tourism slows down in northern Idaho. Matlosz beleves TIFC will help the local economy during these times as talent and staff will stay in hotels and shop locally. He also said there is an untapped local talent pool of artisans, businesses and freelance workers who could benefit from employment and utilization in the art of filmmaking. “I can’t think of too many local businesses that wouldn’t be affected in a positive way,” Matlosz said. Matlosz is joined in management of the company by Producer Mitchell Fullerton and Chief Technical Officer Sarah Priestnall. TIFC’s first film, “Lycanthropy,” is currently under development, with production slated for spring of 2021 due to the pandemic restrictions in place. The production date and title for the second film is yet to be determined, based on what additional investors and market demand may come along.

-Chase Urquhart Learn more at www.TheIdahoFilmCompany.com.

The READER... A newspaper for those who do things diierently.

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local indie film group

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JIMMY MATLOSZ OPERATES A REMOTE CAMERA FOR THE FEATURE FILM F.E.A.R. WHILE DIRECTOR GEOFF REISNER, SEATED BESIDE HIM, OBSERVES THE SCENE UNFOLDING. SHOOTING THIS FILM ON A REMOTE LOCATION WITH LIMITED BUDGET INSPIRED THE LAUNCH OF THE IDAHO FILM COMPANY. COURTESY PHOTO

It’s not

what

to think. It’s

how

to think.

®

Now Enrolling Nursery - 8th Grade Call for your guided tour! 208-265-2683 www.sandpointwaldorf.org

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SIGNS AROUND TOWN MAKING SANDPOINT... STOP, LOOK AND LISTEN read! LOCAL STOP SIGNS OFFER WISDOM AND WISECRACKS

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ne in town says “STOP your bellyaching.” Another advises, “STOP doing the same thing and expecting different results.” And at Selle Road and Colburn-Culver, there is good counsel to “STOP making excuses.” Ask Sandpoint residents what they think about the sayings that adorn local stop signs, and many will wonder what you’re talking about. But once you spot one or two stop signs that have been augmented with various sayings, you start to notice there are dozens of quips scattered on stop signs around the town and county. The words added to the signs are typically small stickers with white words. The individual who has taken up this quest for social commentary is unknown, but he or she has been at it a long time now. “It’s been going on for years,” said Sandpoint Police Captain Rick Bailey. “I’ve been working law enforcement in the area for over 31 years and, recollection-wise, I’ve probably seen it going on for at least 25 years.” To the sign writer’s credit in these divided times, there’s little political commentary. Most stick to quips or humor. “STOP eating your boogers,” says one. Another borrows a line from a popular song with “I think it’s time we STOP children, what’s that sound... .” Humor aside, Bailey pointed out that “altering a traffic control device is unlawful. You can be charged if you are caught doing it. Even though some things are fairly humorous on them and put a smile on your face, it is against the law.” Still, after two decades of stop sign messaging, the sign at Oak and North Ella may sum up the writer’s view. “Nothing’s gonna STOP us now,” it declares.

-Chris Bessler For a slide show of 40-plus signs, click to www. SptMag.com/ stopsigns. 16 16

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making sandpoint stop & look

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First in Fashion

! Visit us downtown and pamper yourself with unique, carefully chosen apparel collections and accessories to complement you and your contemporary lifestyle.

326 North First Avenue, Sandpoint a 208.263.0712 www.EvesLeaves.com

Men’s & Women’s Clothing & Footwear for the Northwest lifestyle since 1986. ONCE YOU SPOT YOUR FIRST ONE, IT’S HARD TO MISS THE MESSAGES LEFT ON STOP SIGNS AROUND SANDPOINT... AND HARDER STILL NOT TO LAUGH. STAFF PHOTOS

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CO-OP Gas & Supply Company is your farm, home, and hardware cooperative. As a member owned cooperative we pay dividends to our members annually on purchases in profitable years. No other local farm and hardware store pays you dividends on your purchases. Being locally owned and operated means the money you spend here stays here, creating jobs for your friends and neighbors, and strengthening our economy as we have been doing for 85 years. Why not drop by and see if membership at the CO-OP is right for you?

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master parks plan

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PREPARING FOR DECADES OF SANDPOINT RECREATION

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ABOVE: THE RESTORATION OF WAR MEMORIAL FIELD’S GRANDSTANDS KICKED OFF A PARK REVITALIZATION EFFORT. BELOW: THIS SUMMER THE FIELD WILL SEE THE INSTALLATION OF ARTIFICIAL TURF. STAFF PHOTOS

im Woodruff has seen a thing or two in his three decades with Sandpoint Parks and Recreation. The parks system as it exists today barely resembles the small-scale operation that Woodruff entered into at the beginning of his 34-year career. This year, the veteran parks director approaches yet another milestone: the formation of a master parks plan. Slated for approval by the Sandpoint City Council in July, the Parks Master Plan sets the course for another two decades of Sandpoint recreation. “I’m super excited as we look to the future,” Woodruff said. The master plan developed across four phases. The first generated steady public engagement, with a scientific survey mailed to residents and an online questionnaire, both generating significant returns. Next was a catalog of all the properties and assets under the parks system with an eye toward “broad-based needs, preferences and priorities.” That provided a framework for the third phase, which focused on major parks like City Beach and War Memorial Field. Finally, the year-long effort rounded out with a comprehensive operational and maintenance plan. “I think we’re really excited about having a planned, 20-year effort that

really focuses on multipurpose use for all of the park assets that we have,” Woodruff said. While no funding source has been approved for parks improvements, Woodruff said the plan “puts the cart before the horse.” Once it’s time to fund projects, the city can look for money through such avenues as traditional public funding, naming rights, grants, partnerships, or donations. The plan comes at a pivotal time for Sandpoint parks. Just last year, the city council reached a long-awaited crossroads when it opted for artificial turf over natural grass at War Memorial Field. A controversial and hotly debated decision, it required a tie-breaking vote from Mayor Shelby Rognstad. For Woodruff, the plan is the culmination of a mammoth effort that sought to bring the entire community together. It’s also a capstone for his own career, which saw the parks grow from a handful of properties to the robust recreational system it is today. “Over those 34 years I give thanks and credit to all the elected officials, hundreds of staff, thousands of volunteers and supporters and each citizen who supports our efforts with their tax dollars,” Woodruff said. “Quality of life is a common value that we have always shared. It’s the Sandpoint way.”

-Cameron Rasmusson

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LEFT AND BELOW: ONLY LOCAL MARKET OFFERS GLUTEN FREE CINNAMON OATMEAL AND BUTTERMILK PANCAKES, AND FRESH GREENS. ABOVE: VEGGIE STARTS AT THE UPPER PACK FARM AND ART MARKET. COURTESY PHOTOS

www.AlpineShopSandpoint.com TWO LOCATIONS

213 Church St Downtown Sandpoint 208.263.5157

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Schweitzer Mountain ountain in the Village 208.255.1660 208.255 1660

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local farmers’ markets

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HERE’S TO HOMEMADE NEW FARMERS’ MARKETS OFFER MORE WAYS TO ACCESS FARM-FRESH GOODS

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orth Idahoans have an appreciation for local goods. Food and crafts grown and created by friends and neighbors beat out the competition any day. Sandpoint’s farmers’ market is a tradition on Saturdays downtown, but thanks to this love for local, new markets are taking root in Bonner County. The Only Local Market in Cocolalla opened in August 2019, bringing new life to the iconic cabin located just off U.S. Highway 95 between Encoder and the post office. The indoor, year-round market currently offers everything from raw milk to fresh produce to baked goods to locally raised meat to handmade soap—all created by local farmers and artisans. The creators offer their goods at the store. “What we are looking to do is our little part to help promote an agriculture-based economy, or at least to help foster more of an agricultural community,” owner Thomas Fletcher said. “But in

order for the little guys to make it, you need ways for them to sell their goods.” This summer, Only Local is inviting its vendors to set up outside the cabin on Thursdays 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturdays 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. The Upper Pack Farm and Art Market is open next to the Samuels Store on the first and third Saturday of each month through early October. The Upper Pack Market will offer produce and cottage goods as well as arts and crafts, and run each day from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. “Our mission is to encourage a greater sense of community while helping to support the creative and hard-working people that live here,” said Barbara Nunke, one of the market organizers.

-Lyndsie Kiebert Local markets can be found on Facebook @UpperPackMarket, @OnlyLocalCocolalla and @SandpointFarmersMarket.

PROTECTING WHAT MATTERS MOST FOR OVER 30 YEARS www.taylorinsurancesandpoint.com 1009 West Superior Street • Sandpoint, ID 83864

208.263.2708

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EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR DEBBIE LOVE OF THE BONNER COMMUNITY FOOD BANK SAYS THEY ARE “VERY GRATEFUL” FOR THE SUPPORT. COURTESY PHOTO

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RECEIVES SUPPORT

INNOVIA FOUNDATION PROVIDES OVER A QUARTER MILLION DOLLARS IN SPRING GRANTS

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n 1974 the Innovia Foundation, then known as the Inland Northwest Community Foundation, established an investment fund to provide charitable giving for eastern Washington and northern Idaho. This year, organizations supporting Bonner County have benefited greatly from the foundation's largesse, receiving almost $300,000 in cash support. When people with money want to connect with a way to give, Innovia Foundation steps in. Donations made to Innovia are placed into an endowment fund, and the profits earned by that fund are funneled to various community organizations throughout the Inland Northwest. The capital—almost $128 million at the end of 2018—remains untouched, generating interest to fund new projects. The annual process for community grants was already underway when the coronavirus pandemic arrived, so the foundation quickly built a separate COVID-19 response/ recovery fund to provide additional support to area communities. Two rounds of almost $80,000, were awarded as of June to more than 20 different nonprofit groups meeting needs raised by the virus. That's on top of the almost $200,000 given this spring to organizations that serve the Bonner County area. “The Sandpoint community has been great to work with,” said Aaron McMurray, chief strategy officer for the foundation. “There are so many strong community leaders there working to better the community.” Grants from both funds have been made to a variety of organizations, ranging from the animal shelter and the Priest Community Forest Connection to the Angels Over Sandpoint and the Bonner Community Food Bank. The Sandpoint Community Resource Center was another recipient of funds from Innovia, receiving $11,500. “We are so blessed and thankful,” said Linnis Jellinek, the group's executive director. “As you can imagine, we've been slammed. There's more needs (in our community) than ever before.” SCRC serves as a “one-stop-shop” for community members in need, helping to connect their clients with the various charitable organizations that provide support when residents need it. This may include help in paying electric bills, support for cancer care,

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There are so many strong community leaders (in Sandpoint) working to better the community.”

or even a simple meal. The organization partnered with Sandpoint350 in the Givea-Meal/Get-a-Meal effort, where customers at 17 area restaurants can buy a meal to be donated to those in need. “We were able to give out meals to hospital workers,” said Jellinek, pointing out that these are people working long, stressful hours who can use an evening where they're not obliged to cook. Though the community was rallying out of a shutdown in early June, there are many who still need the services SCRC provides. “When someone is struggling, the last thing they want to do is have to reach out to a dozen different agencies for help. That's where we come in,” said Jellinek, urging anyone in need to call its office. Bonner Community Food Bank received $18,000 in the first two rounds of grants. “Every social and economic crisis triggers anxiety for people,” said Executive Director Debbie Love. “Our funding partnership with the Innovia Foundation allows the Bonner Community Food Bank to continue serving those in need and expanding outreach to those staying at home during the pandemic. It has given us a level of consistency which has created a calming effect for our recipients. We are very grateful for the support of the Innovia Foundation,” Love added. Innovia's McMurray said the financial support will continue. “We are partnering with organizations in town to establish a new fund—an economic recovery and community resilience fund for small businesses,” he said. It will provide needed dollars via micro grants to businesses struggling to keep their doors open.

-Trish Gannon To learn more about Innovia, visit www.Innovia.org.

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NOTEWORTHY Monarch Mountain Coffee moves

Long a staple downtown, Monarch Mountain Coffee made the move from Fourth Avenue, next to the post office, to 119 N. First Ave., near City Beach, in February. Owner Sherry Wilson said the move was necessary as the former building was in a state of disrepair and no longer usable. Coffee roasting will now take place off site.

Radioflash

Filmed in Sandpoint and the surrounding area in 2017, “Radioflash” debuted in movie theaters in 2019, and this spring became available for viewing on several online streaming services. Directed by Ben McPherson and starring Dominic Monaghan, Will Patton and Brighton Sharbino, the movie tells the story of a tech-savvy teenager and her father who seek refuge with her grandfather in the mountains after an electromagnetic pulse wipes out infrastructure in the western U.S. Although reviews were not particularly kind (“...marginally

LEFT TO RIGHT: A NEW PLAY AREA AT CEDAR STREET BRIDGE. COURTESY PHOTO. THE OSPREY SETTLE IN TO THEIR NEW NEST AT MEMORIAL FIELD. MUCH OF FIRST AVENUE IS SPORTING A NEW STREET ‘FACE.’ STAFF PHOTOS.

more thrilling than the average wine-tasting” is an example), the scenery, as we all know, is spectacular.

New Nest for Osprey

Changes at Sandpoint’s War Memorial Field this summer also means changes for the resident osprey... and for the popular osprey cam. The light pole that supported the nest and live webcam has been moved, and a new pole—just for ospreys, with no street lights but with the webcam—was generously donated by Avista Utilities. It was erected by the city at a new location right alongside the lake in February, in order to be up before the osprey returned. Watch them as they raise this year’s young at Ospreys.SandpointOnline.com.

New Play Area at Cedar St. Bridge Early in spring 2010, Creations installed a new play area for kids just outside their store at the end of the Cedar Street Bridge. “The Discovery Play Area includes a tree house climb-

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ing feature custom built by Tiny Town Studios [and includes] a climbing wall entrance, an elevated, swinging walkway and a slide!” said Board President Kate Mansur. They are adding new children’s museum-style activities and games as well. The Creations Museum Store is open seven days a week, and there’s also a drop-in art studio for children. Both the play area and the art studio will comply with all state health guidelines. Call ahead to ensure they are open.

New Look for Downtown

While much of downtown Sandpoint was closed for the spring, work on the city streets picked up pace and, by mid May, the next portion of downtown revitalization was finished. The expanded streetscape along First Avenue features new trees and street furniture, wider sidewalks, curb bulbouts and a traffic-slowing mixture of parallel and angled parking.

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A 35th Lost in the ‘50s

May was surreal as it marked the first time in 3 1/2 decades without a downtown full of antique cars and celebrating people, while the sound of old-time rock and roll drifted out from the fairgrounds. But organizer Carolyn Gleason, who owns Second Avenue Pizza downtown, said a 35th Lost in the ’50s “is still gonna happen.” What she doesn’t know—yet—is when. While the second weekend in May of 2021 is a planning goal, as we learned this year, other things can get in the way. As always, funding the event (over the decades Gleason has, many times, paid for expenses out of her own pocket) will be crucial. Want to help ensure it happens? Stop by Second Avenue Pizza and make a donation toward the show. “If the people who enjoy it so much just donated $5 or $10,” she explained, that would go a long way to making sure the event can roll on. “We will be back,” she said.

If you must

Live Life

on the edge Take comfort in knowing we’re here for you if you fall. Don’t miss out on recreation … or great healthcare while you’re visiting, because people don’t plan for accidents while on vacation. Good thing we do. For a comprehensive list of our services please visit BonnerGeneral.org 520 N. Third Avenue, Sandpoint, ID 208.263.1441

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EVENTS

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IN LIGHT OF PANDEMIC PRECAUTIONS AND AN EVER-CHANGING CALENDAR, PLEASE CHECK WWW.SANPOINTONLINE.COM OR EACH EVENT SPONSOR TO CONFIRM STATUS

JULY

10 ArtWalk Opening Receptions. POAC sponsors the 43rd annual revolving art exhibit starting with Friday evening opening receptions from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at 20plus downtown galleries; art exhibits remain on display through Aug. 28. www.ArtinSandpoint.org. 208-263-6139 11 Sandpoint Antique & Classic Boat Show. Browse along the Sand Creek boardwalk to view wooden boats, plus enjoy waterthemed activities, contests, and more during the 18th annual Sandpoint Antique & Classic Boat Show. Sponsored by Inland Empire Antique & Classic Boat Society. 208255-1876 11 Shangri La at the Lake. Underground Kindness holds their 7th annual fundraiser featuring dining, dancing, live and silent auctions, plus interactive presentations with the founder and students. Proceeds benefit UK’s work in local public schools, the juvenile justice center, Kinderhaven, and the Sandpoint Teen Center. www. UndergroundKindness.org. 12 Jacey’s Race. Competitive 5k race for runners and walkers, and 1k fun run for kids benefits local children with cancer or lifethreatening illnesses. www.Jaceys-Race.com. 18-19 Northwest WineFest. Outdoor concerts, wine tasting, plus family activities at Schweitzer Mountain Resort. www. Schweitzer.com. 208-255-3081 25 Crazy Days. Downtown merchants offer big deals in annual sidewalk sale, sponsored by the Sandpoint Shopping District.

AUGUST

8 Wings Over Sandpoint Fly-in. Regional pilots fly into Sandpoint Airport during the 15th Annual Wings Over Sandpoint Fly-in featuring a breakfast and aircraft display. Gates open at 8 a.m.; breakfast is from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m., and planes are displayed from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Sponsored by the Sandpoint EAA Chapter 1441. 208-255-9954 8 Sandpoint Elks 100th Birthday. Cel-

ebrate a century of community giving with Sandpoint Elks Lodge #1376. 208-263-3811 8-9 Arts & Crafts Fair. POAC’s 48th annual juried arts and crafts exhibit in downtown Sandpoint, with artists' booths, kids' activities, food and more. www.ArtinSandpoint. org. 208-263-6139 9 Schweitzer Huckleberry Color Fun Run. See Hot Picks, next page. 14-15 PRCA/WPRA Rodeo. Bonner County Fairgrounds hosts the fifth annual PRCA/ WPRA rodeo event. PRCA is the highestpaying rodeo organization in the world, and sanctions rodeos in 37 U.S. states and 3 Canadian provinces. In conjunction with the PRCA event, there will also be women’s barrel racing sanctioned by WPRA. www. SandpointBonnerCountyRodeo.com. 14-16, 21-23 Artists' Studio Tour. Annual self-guided driving tour of working studios through North Idaho. www.ArtTourDrive.org. 800-800-2106 19-22 Bonner County Fair. Old-fashioned country event at the Bonner County Fairgrounds, featuring the Challenge of Champions bull riding on Friday, and the Demolition Derby on Saturday night to round out the fun. www.BonnerCountyFair. com. 208-263-8414 22 Beerfest. Sample local and regional brews and enjoy a festive beach party from noon to 5 p.m., sponsored by the Sandpoint Chamber. www.SandpointChamber.com. 208-263-2161

SEPTEMBER

4-7 Schweitzer Fall Fest. Annual outdoor music festival at Schweitzer Mountain Resort with performances, chairlift rides, kids' activities and microbrews under the tent. www.Schweitzer.com. 208-263-9555 5-6 Coaster Classic Car Show. Take a step back in time when Silverwood Theme Park hosts one of the biggest classic car shows in the Inland Northwest! www.SilverwoodThemePark.com. 208-683-3400 12 CHAFE 150. See Hot Picks, next page. 14-19 WaCanId Ride. Tour two states and

one province on the annual 350-mile/560kilometer WaCanId Ride, presented by the International Selkirk Loop and Rotary International. www.WaCanId.org. 888-823-2626 19 Ponderay Neighbor Day. Enjoy a familyfriendly community carnival—Ponderay Neighbor Day—that is fun for all ages, held from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. at Harbison Field (behind the Hoot Owl restaurant) in Ponderay. Free activities include kids' crafts, pony rides, petting zoo, inflatables, carnival games, tastings, demonstrations, and live music. There will also be food and retail vendors on site. Free and open to everyone! Sponsored by the City of Ponderay. For more information, call 208-265-5468. 19 Head of the Pend Oreille Regatta. The Pend Oreille Rowing and Paddling Association hosts the 10th annual regatta when rowing clubs from the Northwest and Canada gather at The Mudhole in Priest River to compete in a 1.7K headrace and a 1K stake race. A great event for racers and spectators alike! www.PORPA.org. 20 Scenic Half. See Hot Picks, next page.

OCTOBER

Weekends in October—Scarywood. Silverwood Theme Park transforms into Scarywood, weekend evenings in October. www. SilverwoodThemePark.com. 10 Harvest Fest. Sandpoint Farmers' Market closes out the season with entertainment, food booths, activities, displays downtown. www.SandpointFarmersMarket. com. 208-597-3355

SANDPOINT WOODEN BOAT SHOW. PHOTO BY DOUG MARSHALL

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See complete, up-to-the-minute calendars at www.sandpointonline.com

Huckleberry Color Fun Run Colors and more colors of fun! Exercise is even better when there are lots of smiles involved—and that's just what families will experience during the Huckleberry Color Fun Run at Schweitzer Mountain Resort Sunday, August 9. Participants can either run or walk the 5k or 2.5k, with the expectation that they will be covered in color—tossed by the forest urchins along the route—by the time they finish. The perks make it an even more memorable experience— everyone receives a pair of sunglasses (to help keep that color powder at bay), a T-shirt, a powder pack to toss, a full-day scenic foot passenger chairlift ticket for the day, a gourmet hot dog with huckleberry and veggie embellishments, plus a fun morning of being active! www.Schweitzer.com.

ArtWalk ABOVE: THE HUCKLEBERRY COLOR FUN RUN AT SCHWEITZER. LEFT: ARTWALK IS A FEAST FOR THE EYES. BELOW: A RIDER IN THE CHAFE150 ON THE BRIDGE TO NOWHERE IN HOPE. BOTTOM: KIDS ALSO PARTICIPATE IN THE SCENIC HALF. COURTESY PHOTOS

Artwalk is a visual feast for the eyes. Now in its 43rd year, the Pend Oreille Arts Council has presented ArtWalk as a way to expand the community's involvement in the arts. And while this summer's date has been pushed back a few weeks, this coveted event—and the artwork it celebrates—will be just as inspiring. Browse exhibits in numerous downtown venues while strolling through the opening receptions, held from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday, July 10; art remains on display through August 28. During the receptions, there will also be opportunities to meet the artists, purchase select pieces, and shop local retailers. This free citywide event is a local treasure ... enjoy! www.ArtinSandpoint.org.

chafe 150

Although the Sandpoint Rotary’s 13th annual CHAFE 150 was pushed back to September 12, enthusiasm is riding high for this year’s event. The 150-mile route is a grand loop around the Cabinet Mountains through gorgeous lake and river valleys. Not up for the full 150 miles? CHAFE offers a magnificent 80-mile route, as well! Learn more and register at www.CHAFE150.org.

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Jot down the Scenic Half on your family calendar for September 20. Presented by the Greater Sandpoint Chamber of Commerce, the marathon hosts two events, giving participants the option to compete in a 13.1-mile half marathon or a 10k, with a route that includes the scenic Long Bridge across Lake Pend Oreille. And for the youngsters, the Kids 5k Run, presented by Washington Elementary staff and parents, takes place along the Sand Creek Trail. Register at www.ScenicHalf.com.

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A Musical

LIFE

Apryll Walker, mother and former band manager of Redhead Express, now shares her love of music by teaching in Sandpoint by Lyndsie Kiebert

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ust before Christmas of 2018, a video began circling on local Facebook pages featuring a stunning rendition of the classic Christmas song “God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen.” While the video—vocals, music and even production values—was first rate, its local popularity was driven by its setting: our very own Sandpoint, Idaho. The group, Redhead Express, had performed at the county fair and Panida Theater, but for many locals the video was their first introduction to the band. So what was the connection to Sandpoint? The family, all but one daughter, now calls North Idaho home. And the family’s matriarch, Apryll Walker, isn’t just a regular mom—she’s a cool mom, who has gone from managing her own children’s musical career to supporting the musical growth of local children. The mother of seven homeschooled her children on the road for a large portion of their lives as the family started Redhead Express—fronted by her four daughters—and traveled the country opening for some of country music’s biggest stars. She’s gone from piano teacher to band manager and back again, and is settled now in Sandpoint as a piano instructor and children’s choir director at Bella Noté Music Studios. With Redhead Express retired as of October and her new focus on teaching Sandpoint’s next generation of performers, Walker sat down with Sandpoint Magazine to reflect on where this musical life has taken her and her family.

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Sandpoint Magazine: I hear you were number nine out of 10 kids growing up. I’m wondering what that was like. Apryll Walker: I had six older brothers, so that says a lot right there. I was a tomboy, I loved to be outside, I loved short hair, I loved to be barefoot. I was kind of tough. I was a nice kid, but I didn’t let anybody push me around. My sisters were on either side of me, so the [youngest children] were three girls, and I had one older sister. It was loud. It was busy. It was fun. My whole life, I’ve always liked having a lot of people around me, people in my home, just because I’m used to lots of noise. SM: It sounds like you guys were pretty musical. AW: Yeah. My dad had a beautiful baritone voice and he was always the one who would be chosen to play the part of Jesus in the Easter cantata because you could hear—like, if you went to church with us—you could hear him over the whole congregation … And my mom played the organ. She couldn’t sing, couldn’t carry a tune for some reason, but she loved music, so all 10 kids played the piano, all 10 kids could sing, all 10 kids learned to play a band instrument and the girls all learned to play the violin. She wanted to have a band, but she couldn’t get us to gel, to make it work—there was just too much going on. SM: Tell me about the family band you ended up creating with your kids. AW: We were living in Alaska and I was substitute teaching music classes in the schools. I was teaching my kids piano, and

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PREVIOUS PAGE: BRETT AND APRYLL WALKER (ON RIGHT) WITH DAUGHTERS ALISA AND MEGHAN CIRCA 2009 IN NASHVILLE. THE WALKER FAMILY AT THE HISTORIC SAM DAVIS PLANTATION IN SMYRNA, TENNESSEE. LEFT TO RIGHT (BACK) KENDRA, ALISA, MEGHAN, APRYLL, BRETT, JOSEPH, AND SEAN; (FRONT) LARAE AND AMMON. COURTESY PHOTOS

then when my oldest was nine or 10 we started teaching them how to sing, teaching them two-part harmony. My oldest daughter wanted a guitar, so we bought her one at a yard sale. The next one wanted a banjo. Little by little, we started gathering these instruments, and they loved music as much as I did, so I said, “Why don’t we do something with this?” We started performing at farmers’ markets and at the nursing homes and just anywhere anybody would let us play. In the beginning it was me playing the keyboard and the girls would play three-part harmony on their violins, they would sing. People liked it, so we just kept doing it. We had just built our dream home there in Alaska. We cleared the land, the whole family built the house. We moved in in May and we had our big open house and all our musician friends came over. But then three months later we decided we wanted to go and study music. We had a big family meeting and everybody felt like that was what we needed to do, so we sold everything and bought an RV and went S a nd p o i ntM a g a zi ne . co m S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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in t er v i e w out to the Appalachian and Ozark Mountains and started going to jam sessions and learning from the old-timers.

SM: Wow. What a life change. AW: Yeah, it was a big change, but it was a great way to raise a family. We had so much fun and made lots of great memories. We homeschooled, so it made our education more interesting. We would go to maybe a dinosaur dig or a science museum—you know, just wherever we were we would try to take advantage of that area and study history or science or whatever. We ended up getting a job in Branson, Missouri. Branson is the epicenter of live music and live theater. They have probably 150 shows in a week. There are so many theaters there. We didn’t know what we were doing, so we had to quickly figure out how to put on a show, how to entertain, how to use sound equipment, how to move on a stage. We called that our college education—a crash course in how to put on a show. It was hard. It was a lot of work. So my kids learned how to work hard in Branson, and they learned how to entertain, but after two years of that we [knew] we were going to burn out so fast, so we moved to Nashville. We taught our kids that you can go to college, you can sit in class, or you can just dive into life and start looking for the people who are experts in whatever that field is that you’re interested in. SM: How did you all get to Sandpoint? AW: I would say it was God that led us. A lot of people say

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that, but my husband and I have always been drawn to the north. When we first got married we were living in Boise … and we wanted to take a vacation and we both said, “Let’s just go north.” We ended up in Victoria, British Columbia, and that was beautiful, and then we ended up moving to Alaska and raised our kids there. Then we lived in Missouri and Nashville for a long time because middle America is a good place to tour from. But I don’t feel like we fit in the South. We were a little bit frustrated with the music industry. Things have changed a lot and they’ve changed fast. When we felt like it was time to leave Nashville, we all decided [to] go back to the Northwest. We couldn’t go back to Alaska because you can’t tour from Alaska. We had driven through here two or three times … and we just felt drawn to this area. It’s beautiful. It has the mountains and the trees that we love. One day we just felt like, you know what, this is where we’re supposed to be. We drove across that bridge and we felt like we’re home. We love it here.

SM: It sounds like music has been a part of your life since you were a kid. Where all has that taken you? What has music done for you in your life? AW: It’s given me work—when I was 17 I started teaching private piano lessons, and I’ve taught off and on ever since then. It’s brought me a lot of joy because there is nothing I enjoy more than listening to or playing music. That’s my getaway. Some people read a book, some people watch a

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name of section movie—I sit down and play the piano. It has been a way to raise our children in a good, healthy environment. Some people move onto a farm and they raise animals, and I always tell people, “We just raise instruments instead.” It was a great way to keep our family close. It’s not for everybody, that’s for sure, because you have to divorce yourself from normal life. The kids don’t grow up with kids in the schools and they don’t have extracurricular activities. Their social life is different. They learned how to make friends really fast. And they did—they made friends all over the country. As far as the band [Redhead Express], they’ve had some great opportunities. They got into the performing arts circuit, the fair and festival circuit. They were able to open for Charlie Daniels, Collin Raye, Clint Black, Parmalee, Diamond Rio. Even Styx—they sang the national anthem for Styx, for Martina McBride, for Trace Atkins. They’ve had a lot of fun experiences meeting people, opening for people. [Redhead Express retired in October, as two of Walker’s daughters—Kendra and Alisa—are now focusing on raising families of their own. Daughters LaRae and Meghan have joined forces with brothers Sean and Ammon to create a new band in Sandpoint: VybeSlyce. Their mother said the group has a folk pop sound.]

SM: What is it you do at Bella Noté and why do you enjoy it? AW: I just started teaching here in January. Originally I was just going to do the children’s choir, and that’s been fun. I’ve

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NOW LIVING IN SANDPOINT, APRYLL WALKER HAS RETURNED TO HER FIRST LOVE, THE PIANO. COURTESY PHOTO

always enjoyed leading some kind of a group. It was the band for 12 years. So when the studio heard we were settling down [here] they asked if I’d like to pick up their children’s choir. I’ve really enjoyed that. I love working with kids. And teaching piano—I started teaching piano also, here, in January. That’s my first love, is the piano. It’s fun to get my chops up again because I actually put piano on hold for a good 10 years. I didn’t even own a piano while touring. So it’s been fun to get back into that again … and pass it on to the next generation. Watch Redhead Express’s “God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen” music video at www.SptMag.com/sandpointsong.

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by Ben Olson

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IFE THROWS A MEAN CURVEBALL. SOMETIMES YOU’RE ON TOP OF THE WORLD, AND SOMETIMES THE WORLD FEELS LIKE IT’S ON TOP OF YOU. WHETHER IT BE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY, AN UNFORTUNATE EVENT OR A NATURAL DISASTER, WE ALL NEED A LITTLE HELP SOMETIMES.

LYF GILDERSLEEVE (LEFT) WITH TRAVIS DICKSON. "... THE LOVE THAT PEOPLE CAME OUT AND EXPRESSED FOR ME IS BY FAR THE MOST UPLIFTING PART OF MY LIFE THUS FAR,” SAID TRAVIS. COURTESY PHOTO

While there are practically countless organizations and nonprofits in North Idaho willing and able to assist us in our times of need, sometimes the best medicine is kindness shown by our fellow humans. And here, this happens all the time. S a n d p o i n tM a g a zi n e . co m S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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SOMETIMES IT ALL COMES DOWN TO BAD TIMING. Travis Dickson knows a little something about that. The Sandpoint native had just moved back home to work his dream job after receiving a master’s in environmental science and a Ph.D. in paleoecology only to discover life had other plans for him. “After 15 years of chasing my education around, I had just moved home and got situated making the best money I’ve ever made, and now your life is over,” he said. Dickson was diagnosed with brain stem glioma, which is a tumor of the glial cells that wrap around nerve cells and keep them bundled together. “I got a prognosis of about three years,” Dickson said. Suddenly, at 34 years old, everything had turned upside down. After dealing with a bit of shock and depression, Dickson said he got his priorities in order. “When I got that diagnosis, I never worked another day,” he said. “I quit. My values shifted. I wasn’t concerned about my financial future. I was concerned about how I was going to spend my remaining days.” Immediately, Dickson’s extended group of friends banded together and got to work. “Katelyn Shook told me, ‘This is what’s happening: We’re going to celebrate you,’ ” Dickson said.

A couple hundred people descended upon Shook’s family property for a celebration of Dickson, a kind-hearted soul who has touched many people in this community. A silent auction was organized, with partygoers donating what they thought would fetch a good price. A potluck and live concert with dozens of Dickson’s musician friends ended with a hat being passed around. By the end of the night, the crowd had gathered over $14,000, all donated to Dickson so he didn’t have to worry about paying the bills in the immediate future. “Words fail me trying to express my appreciation for everyone that put in that pot,” Dickson said. “The financial part, that’s one thing, but the love that people came out and expressed for me is by far the most uplifting part of my life thus far. It’s my connection to people.” Six years after his diagnosis, Dickson is still in good health, joking that he’s “three years past my expiration date.” There are good days and bad days, but he said that experience where he witnessed an outpouring of love and support is the reason he’s still here today. “I’m tending to focus on my future again,” he said. “That’s pretty cool, you know?”

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COUNTRY WAS GUESSING WHO WOULD BECOME THE NEXT PRESIDENT, Meagan and Jake Hof-

MEAGAN AND JAKE HOFMEISTER AND THEIR TWO CHILDREN FACED MANY DIFFICULTIES AFTER JAKE FELL OFF A ROOF AT WORK. PHOTO BY BEN OLSON

meister were dealing with a much more urgent matter. Jake was working construction up Pack River when he fell off a roof and had to be LifeFlighted to Kootenai Medical with a bilaterally fractured pelvis. “We stayed three nights at Kootenai Medical and came home that Friday,” Meagan said. “Our neighbors had taken care of our high-maintenance animals and people had offered to drop everything and take our kids—luckily our parents are here and had them.” The young family was suddenly faced with the reality that without Jake working, it was going to be a tough winter. “When we pulled into the driveway that Friday, there was at least $1,000 in cash from people that had heard and knew we were coming home,” Meagan said. “Containers for donations were already out at several locations and we had enough dinners dropped off that we didn’t have to cook for weeks.” Friends organized a fundraiser at Idaho Pour Authority and other local contractors chipped in with the rest, generating more than enough to cover Jake’s lost wages and any incidentals they incurred from the injury. “We were SO SO grateful to our community,” Meagan said.

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f eature s “The thing that I learned the most from all of that, aside from my renewed faith in Sandpoint, was that receiving goodness can be hard, but it is just as wonderful as being on the giving end.” Meagan said she was lamenting to a dear friend about how hard it was to accept help when the friend told her, “It makes the giver feel good to help. Your only job is to say ‘thank you’ and it all comes full circle.” Meagan said as a result of the experience, she and Jake do their best to give to local causes, “because of the generosity we received. I think it was important for our kids to see us graciously accept help and then pay it forward. It’s made them more conscious and aware of a sense of community.”

WHILE STORIES OF HARDSHIP BRING A COLLECTIVE POWER OF ASSISTANCE, SOMETIMES IT’S JUST A SMALL ACT OF KINDNESS THAT LEAVES A LASTING IMPRESSION. “My daughter and I have so many lovely people around us

who are supportive, gentle, kind, and considerate,” said Carrie Clayton, a Sandpoint resident. “One such neighbor called me concerned that my garage door was open and my car was gone. After learning that I was up skiing, WHEN CARRIE CLAYTON’S PET RABBIT DIED, they went over to my house, FRIENDS MARTY AND KRISTA ORGANIZED A checked on my dog, and shut FUNERAL. COURTESY PHOTO the garage door for me.” After her daughter’s pet rabbit had to be euthanized, Clayton said another friend organized a special burial ceremony in a pet cemetery on their property. “At this point, I had not had the time to even think about what to do with the body of the bunny,” Clayton said. “This kindness was a huge gift to my daughter.”

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CYNTHIA MASON, AT THE SCHWEITZER ROUNDABOUT, CELEBRATED A DAILY “HAPPY HOUR” LAST WINTER CROSS COUNTRY SKIING. COURTESY PHOTO

AN UNEXPECTED GIFT MEANT THE WORLD TO RETIRED HOPE SCHOOLTEACHER CYNTHIA MASON. “I had a preschool/kindergarten in Sandpoint for many years,” Mason said. “Also, long ago, I was a single mom of two teens and I was teaching and running the business end of the school—it takes a lot of work to teach and run a school. It takes a lot of money to support two teens on your own.” Mason said she ended up working many years without taking a break or a vacation, until a parent of two children who attended her school surprised her with a sudden act of kindness. “In that time period, they noticed I had never taken a break or vacation,” Mason said. “They asked me why not. I told them with raising two teens by myself, I couldn’t afford it.” The parent offered Mason a couple hundred dollars to take a little break. “Tearfully, I accepted,” she said. “To this day, it brings back those tears as I recall her act of kindness. She has since been fighting for her life for a long time and I have been able in some measure to repay her kindness. What comes around, goes around.”

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f eature s WHEN THE CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC PUT EVERYTHING ON HOLD IN MARCH, A COLLECTIVE FEAR AND UNCERTAINTY WAS EVIDENT IN EVERYONE’S EYES.

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Normally social creatures, we were all suddenly told to limit our interactions with others, to isolate ourselves to prevent the spread of the virus. Businesses shut down almost overnight, one after another, and school was cancelled indefinitely. Jobless claims soared as small businesses, with little to no revenue stream, had to lay off their workers. Almost immediately, our community sprang into action. Restaurants began feeding children, and then adults, pitching in to take care of our locals. Community groups organized to sew masks (which were in short supply) for the local hospital and encouraged people to buy gift certificates from local businesses, while individuals reached out to needy families they could support, offered up their ‘extras’ of baby wipes and cold medicine, and one anonymous person visited a senior citizens community to leave two rolls of toilet paper (also now in short supply) on every doorstep. In a matter of days, petty bickering and division was suddenly pointless. The bleaker it got, and the more widespread the virus reached, the more we realized we had to band together as a community to get through this unprecedented period in our world’s history. We were all in it together, come what may. That is the crux to this thing we call community. It isn’t just a random group of people occupying the same space. It’s a fellowship, a tribe of others whose collective power can change lives. A healthy community means we’re not alone here. No matter what life throws at us, be it gold or rotten vegetables, there’s solace in knowing that there are others out there who will catch us when we fall. That’s what binds us together. That’s what makes us stronger than any calamity set before us. Now go out and spread a little kindness.

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Faced with a Pandemic Sandpoint Steps Up Resilient. Supportive. Strong. Those are words that describe Sandpoint’s unwavering response in the midst of adversity. With a decades-long reputation for serving the community, Sandpoint Super Drug, under Scott Porter, met an approaching pandemic head on. They were one of the first in the community to provide for curbside pickup of prescriptions, a provision Porter said will be “forever. We’ve always wanted to do this, and it’s not going to stop.” They also do free home deliveries in town, or mail prescriptions to those who prefer to receive them that way. And for long-term customers, Porter has been picking up the tab for a number of those prescriptions. “A lot of our customers lost their jobs, lost their insurance,” said Porter, “and they just can’t afford to pay.” A number of people have donated to a special fund held by the store to help pay for prescriptions, supplemented by the store itself. The combo hardware store/pharmacy has also gone all-in on face shields. Created by Porter’s brother-in-law, who owns True Seals, a custom gasket/converter company in Spokane, Super Drug has provided several hundred face shields to Bonner General Health, local EMS, Life Care of Sandpoint, the fire department and many local restaurants, and are now reaching out to other businesses looking to reopen and meet health code requirements. When the news got out that medical workers were desperately short of masks, area crafters went to work. Former Sandpoint city clerk Helen Newton had long hosted a “Thursday Knitters” group at her home for those who liked to gather and do handwork, but when gathering in groups was discouraged, they turned their task to making masks—like many others. “I spoke with members of Bosom Buddies, CAL, P.E.O. Chapter V, people connected with volunteers at Panhandle Special Needs, and many more. Some made a dozen or two. Others have made hundreds,” she wrote. A family in Sagle, along with Sandpoint’s Rotary Club, produced thousands. Masks have gone out to the local hospital and medical offices, businesses, nursing homes and friends and family of the mask makers, as well as absolute strangers who were in need. Audra Mearns, battling cancer and quarantining at home, was another who turned her thoughts to masks. The infinitely creative seamstress, who once owned Stitchin’ Sisters, has sewn 650 masks for friends and any others she found who needed them... many who participated in the Operation Face Mask Facebook page, created to connect those who needed masks with those who were making them. “I had no idea so many people would request masks,” she said. “I just felt it was what I needed to do to keep myself sane,” she added. “I had the materi-

DAHER PROVIDED A KODIAK PLANE TO FLY PERCUSSIONAIRE’S VENTILATORS TO SAN FRANCISCO. COURTESY PHOTO

als and the capability.” Tamarack Aerospace, a Sandpoint company that designs and produces innovative technology for aircraft, also answered the call for masks. Tamarack put their focus on the medical community, converting materials they would normally use for creating airplane parts into 3D-printed masks equivalent to the N95 masks for those working in health care. Jacob Klinginsmith, Tamarack president, said the company responded when they heard that Bonner General was running low on vital protective gear. “I am proud to be part of a community where friends, neighbors and businesses come together in times of need,” said Nathan Cropper, the company’s chief engineer. Tamarack workers also sewed cloth masks for the hospital, and leveraged their connections to source 2,400 N95 masks out of China. Rain or shine, for the entire time Idaho was under shut down orders, parishioners of North Summit Church on Division handed out free meals to anyone who stopped. Made by members of the congregation, with ingredients paid for through donations from church members and others, the group handed out over 3,000 free meals to those in need, averaging 80 meals per day. “It’s a blessing for us [doing the giving] as much as it is for those who receive it,” said Kim Brackett. For Nora Morrison, “One of the really great things is the people who go by and honk in support, or even stop in and make a donation to help with the costs,” she said. Churches have long been a bastion of community support, and North Summit, a non-denominational Christian church, was not alone in recent efforts. Cedar Hills Church in Kootenai partnered with Kootenai Elementary and Ivano’s to provide meals, while also providing a community meal every other Saturday. Their “benevolence team” has been out in full force to help those in need, including providing financial assistance where it was called for. All local churches, in fact, have come forward to provide help where needed, taking to heart the promise given in the Bible that “the Lord loves a cheerful giver.” Percussionaire, local maker of ventilators, played a supportS a n d p o i n tM a g a zi n e . co m S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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ing role not just in our own community, but beyond, as ventilators throughout the country—and world—were suddenly in short supply. “Last year,” said Mark Baille, president and CEO, “we produced 800 ventilators. In April and May, we’ve done 4,000.” The ventilators have gone out all over the country, including 1,000 that went to California, an emergency effort that included Daher, who provided their Kodiak aircraft to fly a load of ventilators into Sacramento. Diedrich Coffee Roasters also stepped in to create stands for the ventilators, while Encoder provided Percussionaire with extra people and did other work on the company’s behalf. Local machine shops built parts, “and people in the community provided masks and PPE to our workers,” said Baille. “This was a community effort.” That effort didn’t overlook the local community. “I offered to provide 20 ventilators at no charge to Bonner General Health in the event they need them,” said Baille, “and I’ll keep my promise.” The company made similar offers to Kootenai Hospital in Coeur d’Alene, and to the Newport Hospital, along with

LEFT: SCOTT PORTER AT SANDPOINT SUPER DRUG. COURTESY PHOTO ABOVE: KIM BRACKETT AND NORA AND CHAD MORRISON HAND OUT MEALS FOR NORTH SUMMIT CHURCH. STAFF PHOTO

offering 100 free ventilators to the state of Idaho. “We’ve had a lot of successes,” said Baille, who added that company founder Dr. Forrest Bird would undoubtedly be proud of the work they’re doing. “Our goal is to keep saving lives.” There have been many more acts of giving and kindness in our local community, even at the individual level, from the anonymous individual who left rolls of toilet paper at every door of a senior housing community, to Melissa Balch Irish, who organized a program for other locals to “adopt” a Sandpoint High School senior, in order to provide an alternative way to celebrate their graduations. Television star Mr. Rogers shared his mother’s advice that in times of crisis, “Look for the helpers.” In Sandpoint, as well as throughout northern Idaho, one doesn’t have to look far.

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ON THE FRONT LINES OF A PANDEMIC, STAFF AT BONNER GENERAL HOPE FOR THE BEST, PREPARE FOR THE WORST

I

by Carrie Scozzaro

magine you can see dark clouds roiling on the horizon, hear the storm growling as the weather shifts menacingly. You are in the storm’s path, yet you do not know where, when, or how hard it will hit. What you do know is that it’s your job to protect your community regardless of the unknowns. You’re scared, frankly, including for your own safety and that of your loved ones, but you know you’re not alone; your team is all-in. Yet even as you hunker down, double-checking all you’ve done to prepare, you’re witnessing the storm’s onslaught in other areas, hoping you will be spared the worst of it. So you go over your list one more time. And then you wait. “My biggest concern was (and is) how fast things could ramp up and overwhelm our hospital,” said Curtis Johnson, director of facilities for Bonner General Health. Johnson is part of a dynamic team spearheading response efforts to the novel coronavirus—COVID-19—that has transfixed the world since early 2020. “Personally, I was worried that my loved ones would contract

the virus and I wouldn’t be able to say goodbye before they passed,” admits Johnson. “If I was exposed to the virus I wasn’t sure if I would be able to go home, so our family was making contingency plans for healthy family members to live together and for me to self-quarantine.” Putting aside personal worries goes with the job, however. And the job was a big one. Bonner General Health is a rural, 25-bed hospital serving a county of just under 46,000 people. But that county is also a mecca for tourists; visitors can swell the population to over 130,000 during peak summer months. Bryce Cordle, nurse manager of the medical-surgical unit, remembers discussing with his nursing team the frightening reality of caring for patients suffering from a potentially highly contagious and fatal disease. They were stoic, telling him, “’Bryce, we are nurses. We take care of sick people every day. This is what we do. Bring it on.’” “It’s not that they thought they were invincible,” said Cordle,

ABOVE: DOCTORS FROM THE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT GATHER OUTSIDE NEAR ONE OF THE TENTS SET UP TO PROVIDE VIRUS TESTING. RIGHT: COMMUNITY MEMBERS CREATED A SIGN FOR THE HOSPITAL. BGH PHOTOS

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f eature s “but that they recognized the responsibility that comes with being a health care professional and were ready to meet the challenge presented by COVID-19, even if the circumstances were not ideal.” In addition to being a previously unknown disease with implications for treatment, prevention, protection and more, nationwide equipment shortages and rampant misinformation has made responding to the virus that much more difficult. “With very little known about the virus we were making sure we were prepared for the worst and at the same time hoping for the best,” said Johnson. That simply-stated, two-pronged approach would guide BGH through several intense months of modifying facilities and procedures, mobilizing support and educating themselves and the community—efforts that continue to this day. Although they had been meeting about the coronavirus for a little while, said hospital CEO Sheryl Rickard, the hospital formalized a response team on February 26. On the same day the Center for Disease Control sounded the alarm, BGH activated their Incident Command team, representing such areas as hospital administration, clinical operations, nursing, emergency medicine, public information, facilities and infection prevention. “The Incident Command team is responsible for monitoring the situation, educating staff, monitoring the inventory of personal protective equipment (PPE) and working closely with community partners, including Panhandle Health District,” said Rickard, who said the hospital has a robust emergency preparedness program. “There was already a structure in place and we all knew our roles,” she added, noting that put BGH ahead of other facilities. “This has given us a chance to use the skills and knowledge that we have been practicing.”

Since then, they have spent weeks reviewing policies; evaluating services and staffing; generating restrictions, protections and screening; and revamping communication amongst staff and with the community, said Rickard. One of the first changes at BGH was readily visible from the outside—an outdoor testing site—while inside, adaptations involved everything from facilities to protocol to staffing. The emergency care unit was the first to get anterooms where staff could safely go through the lengthy process of putting on and taking off the masks, gowns and other PPE necessary to protect themselves and prevent incidental spread to others. BGH added isolation rooms in several units, including emergency, the 6-bed intensive care unit and obstetrics. They also built a COVID-19 isolation “pod” in their 18-bed medical-surgical unit that could house six patients and developed a “surge” plan should the need arise. Although much of the press has focused on intensive care, said Cordle, 80 percent of virus patients hospitalized nationwide were being treated in med-surg units, according to the American Nurses Association. Access to accurate data in a rapidly evolving environment has been essential to their decision-making process, said many BGH staff members interviewed for this article. “Guiding a hospital and a community through this is kind of like using a mud puddle for a crystal ball, because so much is still unknown about COVID-19,” said Cordle. “We are constantly making new decisions, discussing new ideas and addressing or readdressing problems as current information changes,” he said. “As health care leaders and professionals we have a strong responsibility to ensure our decisions are based on the best science and math available, and not on emotion.”

LEFT: THE COMMUNITY PROVIDED THOUSANDS OF CLOTH MASKS FOR USE IN THE HOSPITAL. BELOW: WORKERS IN THE HOSPITAL’S SEROLOGY LAB. BGH PHOTOS

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EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT DOCTOR STACY GOOD IS SUITED UP IN FULL PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT. BGH PHOTO

Emotions were—understandably—running high in the earliest stages of virus awareness, said Curtis, who as facilities director has another concern on his list: staff security. During the first few weeks there were a couple encounters with people who wanted to get tested and couldn’t, said Curtis. “We would have loved to test all of Bonner County, but the tests weren’t available and the labs were overwhelmed,” said Curtis. “Encounters like this take de-escalation skills and discussion (so we are) able to reach an understanding with the concerned patients.” Although BGH staff never found themselves confronted by protesters like in other parts of the country, they’re acutely

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aware of a small but vocal minority who oppose stay-at-home orders, contact tracing and the efficacy of vaccinations. Overall, however, the community response has been phenomenal, said Cordle. “People have volunteered to sew masks and gowns, built face shields on 3D printers and brought in boxes and boxes of gloves and other PPE.” Testing and PPE were and still are two priorities for BGH staff, especially as nationwide shortages remain unaddressed. BGH can now do two more types of testing in-house, said lab manager Cherie Proctor. A nasal swab is done to test for the active virus, while blood is drawn to test for antibodies, indicating possible past exposure. Proctor explained that active virus testing does have drawbacks. “In some people, the virus can only be found for a few days at the beginning of the infection, so the test might not find the virus if the swab is taken more than a few days after the illness starts.” In other cases, people may be no longer contagious yet still test positive for the virus, she said, adding some of the supplies required for testing are still scarce. On the other hand, the antibody test BGH is using has a 99.63 percent rate for specificity and reliability, and is more reliable than similar antibody tests on the general market. Both tests were FDA approved in April, and Bonner General was the first hospital in Idaho to provide rapid testing for the virus. PPE has been another hot button issue, forcing many healthcare providers to consider alternatives.

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Clinical Education Specialist Trina Kennedy was tasked with researching, along with communicating and educating staff about, PPE, including investigating the previously unthinkable reuse of respirators and gowns. She made several instructional videos for staff, stopping by often to check in with people. “More often than not, I found many staff simply have the need to talk through their fears about this virus and how it could potentially affect their families and/or themselves,” said Kennedy. Communicating with patients also presented unique challenges. “It became important to limit contact as much as possible to as few people as possible throughout our [emergency] department,” said Proctor, as evidence mounted that exposure time to the virus increases the likelihood of contracting the disease. Although they tried radios, BGH staff realized something more interactive would be better. Proctor turned to Sandpoint High School, where she used to work. They donated five iPads with which staff can communicate through Facetime. “These allow us to limit the exposure to a smaller number of people who care for sick patients,” she said. While the number of patients who tested positive for coronavirus was small—only seven to date—staff took a proactive approach to communication in other ways, too. Several emergency room doctors—Vince Huntsberger, Ben Good, Stacey Good and Hans Hurt—went on air with Bob Witte at KPND, as well as on KRFY, to educate the public about the disease and what BGH was doing to help protect the community. “As a community hospital we are always participating in outreach efforts,” said Marian Martin, whose titles include trauma program manager and nurse manager in the emergency department.

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Outreach, said Martin, “also allows the community to know we are taking this seriously and are prepared.” For example, emergency room staff regularly train for disasters such as a train accident, mass shooting, fire and even pandemics. “Two of our physicians have military experience and others have had training in larger facilities,” said Martin, who along with another nurse has trained at the Center for Domestic Preparedness with Homeland Security. “We are all part of the community and care about our neighbors, friends and potential patients in the county,” she said. Community connectedness has made cutting services extremely difficult, but necessary, said Rickard, who notes that all hospitals are struggling with lower revenue, especially due to discontinuation of elective procedures as recommended by the CDC. “The decision to close departments was extremely difficult because we understand how important those services are to our community and how important these jobs were to our staff,” said Rickard. “We recognized that in order to continue to provide our core services, we needed to scale back on some of the outpatient services that didn’t support themselves financially.” Closures include BGH’s Cardiac Rehab Unit, Home Health Services, Wound Care Center, Diabetes Education and the gift shop, as well as suspending the planned remodel of the emergency department and paving the parking lot. “Those projects will be on hold until we have a better idea of what the future brings,” said Rickard. The future regarding the virus may be uncertain, but the outlook of BGH staff and their preparedness is not. “We haven’t been hit with a big wave of patients yet,” said Cordle, “(and) maybe we never will. If we do, we have a plan, and we will keep adjusting it as we must to ensure we are here for our community, just like our community has been here for us.”

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DURING WORLD WAR II, SANDPOINT'S COMMUNITY HALL WAS A CENTER OF ACTIVITY. PHOTO COURTESY BONNER COUNTY HISTORY MUSEUM

within these walls

The lively history of the Sandpoint Community Hall by Jennifer Lamont Leo

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or 84 years, the Sandpoint Community Hall has greeted motorists as they swing north into town from the Long Bridge. Seated on her green lawn across from the county courthouse, the rustic log building seems to say to visitors, “Welcome,” and to locals, “Welcome home.” Yet today her rooms stand quiet, and virtually empty. Here in the spring of 2020, a pandemic rages. We are cautioned to maintain social distance, to stay isolated in our homes. It seems strange, therefore, to talk about a structure whose sole purpose is to bring people together. But these aren’t the first challenging times the Community Hall has witnessed. In 1935, under the shadow of the Great Depression, the local Boy Scouts struggled to find meeting spaces big enough to accommodate the three Sandpoint troops. The Sandpoint community rallied around the prospect of building a “log cabin” to be used not only for scout meetings, but other functions as well. Funds from the Idaho Emergency Relief Administration and the Works Progress Administration, combined with donations from local residents and the city of Sandpoint, brought the project to life. According to a 1986 Daily Bee article, “Local architect H. L. Mountjoy drew plans for a building of peeled tamarack logs topped with a hand-split shake roof. The logs came from Humbird Lumber Co. lands, apparently without charge. Relief funds paid for labor, with the [building] committee having to cover only the cost of the foreman.” In June 1936 the facility opened its doors to the community with a lively celebration that included speeches, entertainment and dancing. Just a few years later, the U. S. entered World War II and Farragut Naval Training Station was built in Bayview. In 1942

the Community Hall was rented to the YMCA for one dollar a year, to use as a United Services Organization club, a recreational space for service membrs stationed at Farragut. Staffed by local volunteers, the U.S.O. provided dances, movies and other social events for the troops, and was a friendly place to have a cup of coffee or write a letter home. An annex was added to the south end of the building in 1944. After the war, the hall reverted to use by many local clubs and organizations, including the Boy Scouts, who maintain a permanent meeting room in the annex. For many years, the Sandpoint Civic Club took the lead in raising funds to fix the roof, replace the hardwood flooring, modernize the kitchen and update the furnishings. The city of Sandpoint renovated the hall, modernized the restrooms, paved parking spaces and developed the landscaping. In 1984, Kip Smith of Sandpoint, an Eagle Scout from Troop 111, undertook the building of a ramp for handicap access. His project included developing the plans and collecting donations of money, labor and supplies such as concrete, rebar, topsoil and grass seed. The project was a success. Smith died in 2006, and a flag and flagpole were dedicated to his memory in 2007. The Sandpoint Community Hall was placed on the National Registry of Historic Places in 1986. As we drive past, let’s remember its proud history as a “home away from home” for those who served our country. Let’s be grateful for its current purpose as a place to conduct business, contra dance and even hash out our differences at town meetings. And let’s look forward to the day, coming soon, when the epidemic has passed, when she’ll fling open her doors and gather us under her roof once more. S a n d p o i n tM a g a zi n e . co m S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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Hope’s Premier Full Service Marina Located in Ellisport Bay on beautiful Lake Pend Oreille in scenic Hope, Idaho. Hope’s premier full service marina offering accessory room, full service shop, and docking facilities. Our sales department represents Wooldridge Boats, Honda Motors and Volvo/Penta engines and we offer customer service like no other marina on the lake.

Other services include: showers, laundromat, boat rentals,

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HOPE MARINE SERVICES On site dock and ramp service Complete marine upholstery department Volvo Penta - Honda Marine - Indmar authorized repair center • Servicing most makes and models • • •

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InLorem theipsum spirit of adventure:

ACTIVITY LINE-UP

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guided recreation to brighten your summer in sandpoint by Cameron Rasmusson

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ummertime in Sandpoint—there’s nothing quite like it. When the sun warms the Lake Pend Oreille waters, there’s an outdoor adventure to tickle just about anyone’s fancy. Indeed, the number of options for outdoor recreation can be a little overwhelming. Fortunately there are plenty of helpful resources and local businesses ready to provide guidance. Whether you’re looking to find a new hobby or want new insight into a favorite activity, there’s someone ready to point you in the right direction.

TREE TO TREE ADVENTURES IN ATHOL OFFERS ELEVATED CHALLENGE COURSES (SHOWN ABOVE) AND ZIP LINES FOR BOTH ADULTS AND CHILDREN. COURTESY PHOTO

ZIP LINING Wind in your hair and butterflies in your stomach are the primary sensations as you blast down a zip line. With its rugged mountains and rock S a n d p o i n tM a g a zi n e . co m S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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formations, North Idaho is an ideal location to get the most out of the adrenaline rush. For those aiming to live life on the fast line, the greater Sandpoint area offers a few options. Tree to Tree Adventures (www.TreetoTreeIdaho.com) in Athol features zip lines, nets, Tarzan swings and more, all designed in a progressive difficulty system to challenge a full range of skill levels. With a full selection of adult and kid courses, it’s a perfect choice for a family day trip. If you’re planning on hitting up those terrific Schweitzer Mountain Resort views this summer, you can also fit some zip lining into your summer adventure itinerary. The resort offers a base fee for one ride or an unlimited fun pass to the zip lines, climbing wall and trampoline. And with two lines running parallel to each other, you can enjoy the trip down with a friend or family member by your side.

E-BIKING Enjoying the beautiful North Idaho mountain views from the saddle of an e-bike is an experience like no other. It gets you out on some of the world’s best mountain biking trails while helping less experienced riders deal with the dynamic terrain. Schweitzer Mountain Resort (www.Schweitzer.com) began offering hosted e-bike tours through its robust trail system in 2018. Both exciting and educational, the tours take riders on a 10- to 12-mile loop through varied trails, while the host points out Schweitzer’s distinctive locations, flora and fauna. Starting in the afternoon every day of the summer season, the guided tours are a great introduction to both the Schweitzer trails and an exciting recreation technology.

WAKEBOARDING AND WATER SKIING These are among the most exciting and visually dynamic water sports around. When you see an expert twisting and turning 52

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behind a speedboat, it’s guaranteed to leave an impression. Feeling motivated to drop a few jaws? This summer is the perfect time to get your feet wet. In Sandpoint, there’s probably no better-established business for water sport lessons than Action Water Sports. The business is owned by brothers Nate and Pat Holland, both born and raised in Sandpoint, and avid recreationists. Both were members of the U.S. Snowboarding Team. Pat has a World Cup podium, while Nate is an eight-time X-Games gold medalist, and a three-time Olympian. Together they have over 20 years of combined watersports instruction as U.S. Coast Guard certified captains. Located in the heart of downtown Sandpoint, Action Water Sports offers hour-long, half-day, and full-day lesson packages that include all equipment, instructor time and fuel for up to six people. The business’ Ski 200 and G-Series boats feature the perfect hull shape for ideal wakeboarding and water skiing. For those who have already mastered skiing or wakeboarding, rentals are available at Hope Marina, Sandpoint Marine & Motorsports, Sandpoint Watersports, and others.

SAILING There’s a big lake out there just waiting for you to explore it. Why not cast off using a discipline passed down over thousands of years? Sailing is a hands-on, tactile approach to making the most of Lake Pend Oreille. And while learning the ropes, so to speak, can appear daunting, there’s a robust local community that welcomes beginners. One good approach is to look up the Sandpoint Sailing Association. This local club works in conjunction with the Sandpoint Parks and Recreation Department to offer courses for beginner and advanced sailors alike. Club members are happy to provide pointers, and membership comes with a suite of perks, including special events and supervised access to the

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At Hope Marina Join us at The Floating Restaurant For: Lunch, Dinner and Sunday Brunch

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LEFT TO RIGHT: E-BIKES AT SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN RESORT OFFER A NEW WAY TO ACCESS SPECTACULAR TERRAIN. ACTION WATER SPORTS WILL HELP YOU STAND ON THOSE SKIS. CLOUD NINE SAIL CHARTERS EXPLORES LAKE PEND OREILLE. ALL COURTESY PHOTOS

club’s fleet of 14-foot boats. Looking for an on-demand option to get out on the water? Try a skippered cruise with Cloud Nine Sail Charters (www.CloudNineSailCharters.com). Cloud Nine was started by Bruce Robertson, a commercial licensed captain (a Six-Pac in sailing lingo) who has frequently served as Commodore of the Sandpoint Sailing Association. “Our mission,” he wrote, “is to provide unparalleled chartered sailing adventures that immerse our guests in the beauty of Lake Pend Oreille, and the memory-making power of nature.” Departing from the Hope Marina for evening and weekend cruises, Cloud Nine offers two-hour excursions for up to six guests. A typical two-hour cruise is enough to make the most of the lake and learn the sailing basics if you want to advance your lake-faring skills.

FISHING The local fishing community is as strong as a recreational scene gets. A chartered fishing guide’s expertise will help you jump both feet first into this multi-generational tradition. Long Drift Outfitters (www. LongDriftOutfitters.com), for instance, offers guided fly fishing and float tours of the Kootenai River. Owners Aaron and Rachel Gordon grew up with a

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ABOVE: WESTERN PLEASURE GUEST RANCH HAS DECADES OF EXPERIENCE GUIDING RIDERS INTO OUR BEAUTIFUL BACKCOUNTRY. RIGHT: LONG DRIFT OUTFITTERS WILL PROVIDE LUNCH AND GEAR FOR YOUR EXPERIENCE IN IDAHO FISHING DELIGHTS. BOTH COURTESY PHOTOS

love of the water and fishing. After coming to Idaho 13 years ago, Aaron spent summers as a guide on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River and the main Salmon, along with the Lochsa and Coeur d’Alene rivers. In 2017, after finding and restoring a McKenzie River wooden drift boat, they opened Long Drift Outfitters. With a deep knowledge of the river’s most secluded, peaceful spots, and a knack for instructing fishers of all skill levels, Long Drift Outfitters promises a great day out on the water. Better

yet, they take care of the lunch and fishing gear. Just make sure you have a current fishing license and are wearing weatherappropriate clothing, and you’re good to go. If you’re looking for Lake Pend Oreille’s trophy rainbow and mackinaw trout, check out Eagle Charters, Go Fish! Charters, Hope Marina, Lake Pend Oreille Idaho Club, Pend Oreille Charters, Scenic Bay Marina, Seagull Charters, or go north to

208.265.BOAT (2628) www.biglakerecreation.com

• Summerize & Winterize • Boat Service & Maintenance • Exterior & Interior Cleaning • Delivery/Pick Up • Lakeside Service Calls • Indoor & Outdoor Storage • Full Concierge Program S a n d p o i n tM a g a zi n e . co m S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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HORSEBACK RIDING There is perhaps no more iconic western image in the popular imagination than the horseback rider. It embodies the spirit of adventure and excitement that many people seek when they visit the Inland Northwest. Luckily, North Idaho has visitors and locals alike covered when it comes to honing your equestrian skills. If a full ranch retreat is your goal, you can’t do much better in the North Idaho area than Western Pleasure Guest Ranch (www. WesternPleasureRanch.com). For 100 years and seven generations, the Woods family has lived on and worked the land which now hosts the guest ranch, which was started in 1991. Primarily a cattle ranch, Janice Woods Schoonover and her husband Roley are the hosts of the guest ranch. The ranch offers everything from two-hour rides in the spring and summer to multiday, all-inclusive getaways. You can count on comfortable ranch lodgings in their rooms and cabins, three delicious western meals a day and, of course, plenty of horseback riding each day of your stay. And just when you’re ready to pack it in, the ranch has you covered with evening entertainment. If your preferred way to experience summertime at Schweitzer Mountain is from the back of a horse, you’re in luck there, too. Mountain Horse Adventures works with Schweitzer Mountain Resort to offer horseback rides through some of North Idaho’s most beautiful scenery. Count on two hours of shady forests and sunny clearings as you enjoy the spectacular views of Lake Pend Oreille. That just skims the surface of the many ways to get the most of summertime Sandpoint from a friendly, helping hand.

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Village LEFT: PARENTS COLLABORATE IN A WORKSHOP. BELOW: JEANNIE HUNTER WORKS WITH PARENTS ON AN EXERCISE FOR THE READY! FOR KINDERGARTEN WORKSHOP. PHOTOS BY LISA GERBER

TO PREPARE CHILDREN FOR SCHOOL, LIFE & THEIR FUTURE by Lisa Gerber

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hen you gaze into a newborn’s eyes, do you ever wonder what is happening inside their head? It turns out, a lot. From the moment they are born until age five, brain development is the fastest and busiest it will be during their lifetime. Between the ages of one and three, 86 billion neurons inside that little brain are busy creating pathways and making connections. Maybe that explains their look of wonder! By the age of three, if those connections aren’t used and reinforced, they are lost. The best way to strengthen those connections is through positive and supportive experiences. Experiences literally shape young brains. And like an old dog with her tricks, it’s much harder to repair poor connections later. In other words, those first five years are pretty crucial to human development. This is a pretty weighty thing to hear if you are raising children. The responsibility is already overwhelming, and what

if you say or do the wrong thing? Will they be talking to their psychologist about it 20 years from now? It turns out, as hard as parenting might seem, there are some simple tenets to keep in mind to ensure your child is prepared for school, life and their future. What’s more, our local community has programs and tools to offer support.

WHY IT MATTERS Children enter kindergarten at varying degrees of readiness, according to Sandpoint High School teacher and workshop director Jeannie Hunter. They could be at reading level for age three or reading level for age eight, or anywhere in between. That’s a big gap, and imagine being the child at the younger end of that spectrum. Seeing others around them excelling at tasks that they struggle with impacts a child’s self-confidence and makes it far more likely they won’t be able to catch up. Studies S a n d p o i n tM a g a zi n e . co m S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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show if children aren’t proficient by third grade, they are more likely to drop out of school. Because an educated workforce is also a better paid workforce, the effects of early childhood learning ripple out into the community.

EARLY CHILDCARE = EARLY CHILDHOOD LEARNING According to United Way, quality early childhood learning improves the baby’s cognitive, social and character skills, making sure they are ready for kindergarten. From there, the trajectory is set. A positive pattern of experiences at a young age strengthens the brain’s development. Reading, singing and positive social interaction do wonders to reinforce those connections in that beautiful baby’s brain.

COMMUNITY PROGRAMS If the critical importance of this early childhood learning seems daunting for young parents, there is help available. In fact, the education advocacy group Panhandle Alliance for Education funds several programs to support parents and give them the tools they need to set their children up for success,

from birth through the school years. PAFE helps ensure that every baby born at Bonner General receives a gift bag with a baby’s first book and information on reading to children. Right at birth, parents are invited to attend their first of 15 READY! for Kindergarten workshops that PAFE provides several times yearly. This free program for parents focuses on three crucial areas of child development: literacy, math and reasoning, and social and emotional development. Parents learn benchmarks for their children and simple tools to incorporate into their daily routine to ensure their child is ready for kindergarten. Shannon Werner attended all 15 workshops. “As a new mom, I needed something to help me prepare the boys for school and to make learning fun, so they didn’t feel like they were at school. Now they are in high school and have excellent study habits and enjoy reading for fun.” First graders receive a plush puppy reading companion, and Adoption Day every year is exciting. Kids use their reading log to track how often they read to their pup with a goal of 20 minutes a day. As they earn points for more reading, they win prizes and treats for their puppy. Jagger Lindgren loved reading to his puppy. Now in fifth grade, he is excelling in school and has aspirations to be an

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environmental biologist someday. Head Start and Early Head Start are federally funded programs to support low-income families and provide quality childcare.

BUSINESSES HELP, TOO The way families look and operate has changed over the centuries. Now, in the majority of households, both parents work. Employees who feel supported in their childcare are more likely to be more productive and to stay with their employers. Through these public and private partnerships, we can level the playing field for our youth and create a more prosperous future for our community. The earlier we invest, the more significant the benefit to our community. Numerous studies estimate the return on investment in early childcare in the range of $4 to $13 for every dollar invested. This is reflected in tax revenue saved, healthcare, prisons and special education costs. We have the power to make change now in a significant way. It really does take a village to raise a child.

JAGGER LINDGREN READS JUST FOR FUN. PHOTO BY LACEY LINDGREN

More information on the Panhandle Alliance for Education’s programs is available at www.ReadySandpoint.org.

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usic is powerful. Just a few beats of the drum sets our toes tapping. A familiar refrain invokes memories, instantly transporting us to distant times and places. Studies have shown animals are impacted by music too; dogs in kennels, apparently, are calmed by soft rock and reggae. Who hasn’t looked back on their life and wished they’d learned a musical instrument (or been glad they had)? But where do the things that make music come from? Factories, for the most part, in an industry hovering above $7 billion in 2018. The largest consumers? Hobbyists, around 63 percent. And although digital instruments are gaining market share, percussive and especially stringed instruments make up the bulk of consumer interest. No wonder. Pop culture has made strumming a guitar ubiquitous for any Hollywood hero although guitars are only one of many, many string instruments. There are actually three

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categories: harps (a descendant of ancient lyres); zithers, including pianos; and lutes, which includes guitars. Variations on the lute can be found in some fashion the world over, from the European mandolin and Russian balalaika to the Indian sitar and Middle Eastern oud. They appear in every kind of music, which on American radio stations ranges from bluegrass banjo to country fiddle and orchestral violins and cellos to the newly-popularized ukulele. Stringed instrument makers, along with those who do repairs, are known as luthiers; locally they are a close-knit community where clients become friends and jam sessions with the outpouring of one’s labor is the norm. “We all more or less know each other,” said Dave Powell, who joined brother Tony to create Tonedevil Guitars around 12 years ago. Growing up in a somewhat musical family—their mother played the saxophone in the Rose Bowl Parade and also played piano—the Powell brothers maintained an interest in music

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Sandpoint’s niche industry of craft musical instrument makers

ABOVE: TONEDEVIL’S S-12 DELUXE MODEL SYMPHONY HARP GUITAR, FEATURING A FIGURED REDWOOD TOP, AND MORNING GLORY FRET BOARD INLAY CREATED BY LOCAL ARTIST LIZ SEDLER; HER LAST WORK BEFORE HER DEATH. COURTESY PHOTO

beyond high school. Dave went into software, busking in his spare time, while brother Tony took up instrument-making and repair in 1999. He apprenticed with Arvid Lundin, a secondgeneration repairer of bowed instruments and longtime fiddler who often plays with the Celtic-inspired band, Deep Roots. In 2004, Dave asked for a harp guitar and Tony obliged, launching a Sandpoint-based company that would produce the first harp guitars in America in more than 100 years. Harp guitars look and sound distinct. They have a second set of strings that float or are unfretted, thus pluckable like a harp versus strummed. They typically have a second “neck” to which the additional strings are attached, like the S12, S18 and S20 models Tonedevil makes, so-named for the number of strings. Tonedevil is one of a cluster of Sandpoint luthiers that in-

cludes guitar makers Vance Bergeson and Joel Keefe Shoemaker and violin-makers Ryan Soltis and Mark Weber. Devin Price and Tyler Joersz grew up in Sandpoint yet have since relocated to Hawaii with TYDE music, their ukulele business. Musician Steve Wilburn, who owns Wilburn’s Custom Shop, and Fiddlin’ Red Simpson, who also owns a repair shop in town, both make instruments, as does logger-turned-luthier Steven Weill. S aSnadnpdopionitnMtM a gaagzai zi n en.ec.oco mm SSAAN NDDPPOOIINNTTM MAG AGAAZZIIN NEE

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“That’s one of the highlights, in my opinion, is when you tune it for the very first time,” said Dave. “Not only is it a work of art, it also makes art.” ABOVE: DAVE AND TONY POWELL ON A 10-CITY MUSIC TOUR TO CHINA IN 2017 TO PROMOTE THEIR GUITARS. BELOW: CRAFTING AN INSTRUMENT IS PAINSTAKING WORK, AS TONY SHOWS WHEN CHECKING THE PROGRESS, OR CHISELING OUT TONE BARS ON A HARP GUITAR. COURTESY PHOTOS

Weill is part of the legacy of Sandpoint-area luthiers, which dates to the ‘70s when Robert Lee “Bob” Givens came to town with his mandolin-making skills. Weill, who met Givens in 1979, worked for Givens on and off, learning the trade. He started Givens Legacy Mandolins two years after Givens’ passing in 1992. Now, he builds mandolins after the Givens model, guitars after the Martin style, and is currently working on a Stradivarian cello, said Weill, who also builds some of his own design. “The reason you got that tradition [of crediting the original designer] is it gives the consumer a good idea of the tone,” Weill said. In addition to Givens, other ’70s-era Sandpoint luthiers include Bob Brook and Seattle-based Steven Andersen, as well as Franklin Guitar Company founder Nick Kukich, who arrived with Laurence Ostrow, creator of “The Guitars Friend,” a catalog of musical instruments in calligraphic writing accompanied by pen-and-ink illustrations. Kukich revived interest in the Martin OM (orchestra model) guitar and sourced some of his own wood from the local forest. Spruce, explains Weill, is the preferred wood for soundboards and is favored for its coloration and wood grain, workability and its tone. Weill harvests local Engelmann spruce, which is similar to German spruce, for use on instrument tops.

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The Powells, who know and admire Weill, source specialty woods from a friend of Weill’s and western red cedar from Rathdrum, where they once used their father’s tractor to harvest logs from Lundin’s property. “It’s interesting that luthiery requires some of the biggest tools and some of the smallest tools,” said Dave. The tools they use in the shop are a mixture of standard woodworking tools—routers, saws, drill presses—and those of their own design, said the brothers, who take turns narrating how their harp guitars are created. Dave typically starts with an AutoCad design, followed by wood selection, cutting and assembling pieces. “Once it’s together, it’s no longer a tree,” said Dave. Their Sandpoint-area shop is full of instruments in various states of assembly, including their first “kit” harp guitar and a new harp ukulele they’re working on. Clamped into place while the glue dries, the child-size looking tenor instrument has many more hours until it’s a bona fide instrument. “That’s one of the highlights, in my opinion, is when you tune it for the very first time,” said Dave. “Not only is it a work of art, it also makes art.”

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Ready to Go exploRinG? G e t o u t t h e r e , w i t h l o c a l g u i d e b o o ks t o s h o w yo u t h e way !

Packed with history, lore and guides, a bible of information for our lake • $26

Geological field guide to the gigantic floods … that originated right here! • $26

Guide to 100-plus trails, including the Cabinet Mountain Wilderness • $16.50

Take a lush photographic journey around the remarkable International Selkirk Loop. Map and delightful narrative, too. • New price! $24

Definitive guide to more than 170 hikes and rides in the the Selkirks • $19.50

Comprehensive climbing guide with detailed route maps and descriptions • $17.50

Get’em at Vanderford’s Books • Corner Book Store • Bonners Books • other fine retailers. Or order online and browse terrific history, memoirs and writings from regional authors.

www.KeokeeBooks.com • 208-263-3573 • 405 Church Street, Sandpoint

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NEW LOCATION... SAME

AGENTS

402 Cedar St. Sandpoint, ID 83864 208.255.7772 info@realmidaho.com

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LIVE AS BIG AS THE LAKE.

Life at Seasons at Sandpoint is as big as the 86,000-acre Lake Pend Oreille, as high as its winding forest paths, and as long as the ski runs down the renowned Schweitzer Mountain. Outside magazine wrote that Sandpoint has “the most enviable outdoor recreation,” and the town lives true to that claim.

FOR MORE INFO: SEASONS@SANDPOINT.COM

Teague Mullen 208.255.6650 teague.realm@gmail.com

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Tom Puckett 208.255.8269 puckett.tom@gmail.com

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OUR COMMUNITY 7BTV is a proud supporter of the Panida Theater. We’re in this together, Sandpoint. The beautiful historic Panida Theater has served as an anchor of stability and a beacon of hope throughout Bonner County history, providing a gathering place that enriches the community - both culturally and economically. While we are practicing social distancing guidelines to curb the spread of the virus, it’s important to remember the uphill battle for our nonprofit organizations. As our community comes together, the Panida Theater also needs our help to keep the heart of our community beating and stable during this dark time. Please show your love and support for the Panida through gift certificates, financial contributions, and memberships. These are a few ways we can help. Please visit www.panida.org/support for more information. 7BTV 208-263-7288 105 S. 3rd Ave., Sandpoint, ID 83864

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building a future

psni raisinginfunds for facility kindness the community

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Panhandle Special Needs, Inc. is raising $1 million for a new facility by Lyndsie Kiebert

PSNI STAFF AND SUPPORTERS SPOKE AT THE STATE CAPITOL ON BEHALF OF SENATE EDUCATION BILL 1330, SUPPORTING IDAHO RESIDENTS WITH SIGNIFICANT DISABILITIES. PSNI PHOTO

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ommunity support has always been at the core of what enables Panhandle Special Needs, Inc. to provide vital services to local people with disabilities. Jim Knight, who served as director of the organization in its early years, knew this in 1980—just five years into PSNI’s now long and lasting legacy. Upon accepting a $1,000 donation from employees of General Telephone and Electronics, Knight raved in a Sandpoint Daily Bee article that the contribution would “go a long ways” and noted that the nonprofit’s facility “only grows with gifts. “A lot of what we get accomplished is

through donations like this,” Knight said in 1980. Flash forward to 2020, and PSNI’s accomplishments are many. By serving the disabled community, the organization has found ways to make the community at large a more vibrant and inclusive place. In order to continue that vital work, though, PSNI is making a call for donations to fund a new facility. According to Executive Director Trinity Nicholson, PSNI’s client load has doubled in the past four years, making physical growth— in the form of a new building—a pressing necessity. She said their goal is to raise $1 million. “We have painted, expanded, remodeled,

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TOP: FINDLAY CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE RAM IN POST FALLS MADE A $2,000 DONATION TO PSNI THIS SPRING. LOWER PHOTO: PSNI CLIENTS PREPPING THE GREENHOUSE FOR THEIR SPRING PLANTING OF HANGING BASKETS. PSNI PHOTOS

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rearranged, redesigned, refashioned and and finally have just outgrown our space,” she said. PSNI is currently located at 1424 N. Boyer in Sandpoint. In concrete terms, Nicholson said PSNI needs more bathrooms, a larger kitchen, classrooms that can accommodate larger groups, and upgrades such as carpet, lighting and improved accessibility in order to continue offering a high caliber of services to clients. She said more outdoor space and parking is another goal, as well as to be located near adequate busing routes to ensure safety for clients who use mass transit. “With a new building will come the ability to maintain a healthy and safe environment that can accommodate the growing needs of our community, but more importantly, it will allow us to create a training environment that is conducive for all disabilities,” Nicholson said. “Adequate space and lighting can make a big difference when working with individuals who have sensory issues, and maintaining a learning-friendly environment is critical to our mission.” That mission includes providing a variety of opportunities such as employment services and job skills training for both adults and high schoolers; centerbased training, which provides more severely disabled clients additional work experience from within PSNI before pursuing jobs in the community; life skills training, which helps develop the skills needed for clients to live on their own; adult day services, meant to support clients with the most significant disabilities and those who are aging; and also a retail greenhouse and thrift store—the Cottage, right next door to PSNI—to provide clients employment training and opportunities to interact with the community. Nicholson said PSNI helps 30 to 40 people a year secure local employment. She said 70 people currently participate in PSNI’s life skills training program, which includes classes tackling a plethora of everyday feats. “All of these classes have small vic-

tories—learning to navigate SPOT bus [routes], mastering new recipes, opening a checking account, making new friends, learning to shop, improving your health and much more,” she said. A cornerstone of PSNI’s original mission rings true 45 years after the nonprofit’s inception: to foster independence. “Some of our most rewarding work comes by helping people move into their own apartments or successfully continue living independently. This is the ‘holy grail’ to many individuals here at PSNI,” Nicholson said. “When someone moves into their own apartment the entire facility gets excited, as it can take two to four years to prepare for this. We have a welcoming committee, so to speak, that makes a housewarming care package for the person, many clients volunteer to help with the actual move, and we help our clients furnish their new pad with items from the Cottage that they can purchase through a payment plan.” That celebration of independence wouldn’t be possible without consistent financial support from the community, for which Nicholson said she and her entire staff are incredibly grateful. “We so appreciate all the support we have received thus far and give a big shout out to all of our long-time supporters who donate every year,” she said. As for contributions made specifically to fund a new PSNI building, the total was nearly $97,000 in late March thanks to hefty contributions from the late Tom Kelsey Jr., Jim and Kim Marley, Spokane Teachers Credit Union, the Equinox Foundation, Integrated Personnel Inc., Richard Wilfert, Findlay of Post Falls, A Shear Inspiration Hair Styling and an anonymous donor. Those interested in learning more about PSNI, touring the facilities, joining the fundraising team, or making a donation can reach Nicholson at 208-263-7022 or trinity@panhandlespecialneeds.org. Donations to PSNI can also be made online at www.PanhandleSpecialNeeds.org.

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Simply sandpoint BUSINESSES IN SANDPOINT, IDAHO

Looking for a particular business? For an online directory of businesses in Sandpoint, go to our website—Sandpoint Online Business Directory www.sptmag.com/businessdir

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Good Works kindness in the community elks 100th birthday

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A CENTURY OF

AT LEFT: A GROUP OF PAST EXALTED RULERS TAKEN ON PER/OLDTIMERS NIGHT. THIS GROUP PERFORMED THE LODGE MEETING, RECOGNIZING MEMBERSHIP MILESTONES. BELOW: A PRESENTATION TO NORTH IDAHO MOUNTAIN SPORTS EDUCATION FUND OF AN ELKS GRANT TO SUPPORT YOUTH SNOW SKI CLASSES FOR THOSE IN NEED, 2013. COURTESY PHOTOS

Elks Club celebrates its 100th birthday by Sandy Compton

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he Sandpoint Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks Lodge 1376—the 1376th formed after the founding of the Elks in 1868—was conceived in 1919 and born in 1920. The first gathering was a huge confab held Thursday, November 6, 1919, but the charter didn’t become official until July, 1920. That’s about the human gestation period, but the November 7 Pend Oreille Review opined, “the infant (lodge) stands, full of life and pep with a mouthful of teeth.” Ahh, literary license. Three hundred Elks came by special trains from Spokane, Wallace, Kellogg, Coeur d’Alene and Missoula to witness and officiate at the 1919 ceremony. Eighty “Bulls” already living around Sandpoint had recruited 99 “fawns,” who were “put through the tortures at the Liberty Theater.” What those tortures were is hard to say, but the survival rate seems very high. The charter of Lodge 1376, dated July 8, 1920, hangs just to the left of the front door of the Elks Lodge at their

golf course on Highway 200 east of Sandpoint. Carefully calligraphed into the margins of the certificate are the names of 171 original members, in somewhat alphabetical order. Beginning with J.R. Adamo and concluding with F.K. Yokum, the list includes names connected intractably with the formation of Sandpoint and Bonner County: Wendle, McFarland, Derr, Humbird, Himes, Neiman, Stackhouse, Piatt and Jennestad. Hundreds of names more familiar to newer generations have been added—Hall, Bopp, Moore, Parker, Evans, Parkins, Hadley, Brisboy, Brown and many more than we have room for—and scores of good deeds have been done. Incoming Exalted Ruler Linda Tatlock—who is likely BPOE 1376’s 100th leader—notes that in the past century, the Sandpoint Elks have given over $3 million back to local causes through the various local and national programs of the BPOE. “The four philosophical legs an Elk stands on,” Sandpoint businessman Dick Larson explained, “are fidelity, charity, jusS a n d p o i n tM a g a zi n e . co m S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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tice and brotherly love.” Larson followed his dad into the Elks in 1973 at age 21. He notes that Lodge 1376 has kept those traditions faithfully over the century, serving youth with programs like Elks Scholarships, Elk Students of the Month, the Elks National Hoop Shoot and 4-H. The Elks support and honor our military with Elks Veterans Services. Lodge 1376 also supports Idaho Elks Rehab Project, which has been active since 1947. Elks members also played Santa Claus to disadvantaged kids for decades, beginning in 1925. The original meeting place for Lodge 1376 was the Knights of Pythias Hall at Main and Second, with many events held

in other Sandpoint locations, as well. In April, 1925, the club presented a play—“A Pair of Sixes”—at the nearly brand new high school auditorium at the corner of Pine and Euclid. The program contained not only a business directory of sponsors, but the train schedule and emergency contact information, a public service in itself. The Lodge got a home of its own in 1937, when it moved north into a brand new building on Second, which now houses Jalapeno’s and several other businesses. It was the center of the Sandpoint Elks’ world for 62 years, and housed much more than just the Elks. “The building downtown was available for lots of different

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elks 100th birthday kindness in the community

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PHOTOS CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: ELKS PARADE THROUGH DOWNTOWN SANDPOINT. NEWLY INSTALLED MEMBERS IN FRONT, SURROUNDED BY LODGE OFFICERS, FOLLOWING INITIATION. A QUIET AFTERNOON ON THE GOLF COURSE, THE SANDPOINT ELKS GOLF CART DRILL TEAM HAVE LONG BEEN A FEATURE OF SANDPOINT’S 4TH OF JULY PARADE. COURTESY PHOTOS

uses,” Larson said. “It was part of our service to the community.” The Elks hosted Kiwanis Club, Rotary, Boy Scout meetings and many public events: crab feeds, dances, the Rude Boys’ Ball, class reunions and the annual “Shut-In Dinner,” a Thanksgiving season feast for folks who have a hard time getting out. The basement held a small bowling alley and a boxing ring for youth. “When Jeff McCracken was training there,” Larson said, “the boxing bag hung right below our pinochle table, and he shook the floor.” The Elks didn’t always own the golf course, but it has been there nearly as long as Lodge 1376 has existed. The course was built in 1925 by the private Sandpoint Golf Club on land donated by Humbird Lumber Company. The Club sold memberships to Sandpoint businessmen to finance construction. In 1948, the Club approached the Elks and offered to sell the course. A ballot was held and golfers prevailed over non-golfers by about a 25 percent majority. Ten years later, the A-frame clubhouse many still remember was built, which also ended up serving as the Elks Lodge for a short time. The downtown building was sold in 1999 and the new lodge—with attached clubhouse—located just past the intersection of Highways 95 and 200, was dedicated in

December of 2000. The move to the golf course wasn’t an easily made decision. Many were against it, including Larson, who resigned in protest. Brotherhood, however, prevailed. ”My friends wouldn’t let me quit, and paid my dues for a while,” he said with a grin. In 1995, the national Elks organization voted to accept female members. Sandpoint’s first female Elk was Nancy Hadley, whose dad Leo was one of the most active members in the middle years of the 1900s. BPOE 1376 now has 376 active members. To celebrate the beginning of their second century in Sandpoint, they are working with the Bonner County History Museum to create a Sandpoint Elks display at the Lodge. Tatlock notes that they have delayed the public opening until August 8 in response to the COVID-19 crisis. A more private celebration—Elks members only—will be held later in the year. In the tradition of a century of public service, BPOE Lodge 1376 is still available for public events at very reasonable rates, with catering and bar service available as well. The golf course, open for public play, is managed by Russ Brisboy. Most importantly, the good works of BPOE 1376 continue.

KAYAKS, PADDLE BOARDS, WAKEBOARDS, WATER SKIS, SURFBOARDS & ACCESSORIES

www.AlpineShopSandpoint.com TWO LOCATIONS

Schweitzer Mountain in the Village 208.255.1660

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rocks rocks

FEATURES

HIKING

Somewhere between

&

ROCK SCRAMBLING ADDS CHALLENGE TO OUTDOOR EXCURSIONS by Lyndsie Kiebert

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he sun is hot on your back as you make the final ascent. Feet find new rock, and leaning forward, so do your hands. Knees bent, nearly in a crawl, rough granite and green moss disappear behind you with each step. Soon, the horizon reappears and you’re able to stand up straight, finally at the top: Packsaddle Peak, looking out at Lake Pend Oreille from behind the Green Monarchs. That final stretch of trail required something different than simply hiking, but without demanding any serious climbing gear or skill. The final stretch required rock scrambling: a form of mountain travel where one must use both their feet and hands to reach their destination.

A fine line

The Mountaineers climbing club out of Seattle defines alpine rock scrambling as “off-trail trips, often on snow or rock, with a ‘non-technical’ summit as a destination,” going on to define ‘non-technical’ summits as ones where complex climbing gear is not needed in order to achieve safe practices. “However, [scrambling] can mean negotiating lower angle rock, traveling through talus and scree, crossing streams, fighting one’s way through dense brush, and walking on snow-covered slopes,” the definition continues. Locally born-and-raised backpacking enthusiast Kyrik White said it’s important to know the line between climbing and scrambling. “Climbing is going to be done on your vertical rock faces. Scrambling is going to be done on mostly rocky and very steep inclines, but it’s not going to be vertical,” he said. White emphasized the differences between free solo climbing, traditional climbing—also known as “trad climbing”—and scrambling. Free soloing is when a climber tackles a vertical, technical route without the use of ropes or protective equipment. Trad climbers do use harnesses 74 74

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CLIMBING

A HIKER ON THE SELKIRK CREST, JUST NORTH OF JERU PEAK OVERLOOKING FAULT LAKE BASIN: HUNT PEAK, MCCORMICK RIDGE, GUNSIGHT PEAK ARE VISIBLE. PHOTO BY WOODS WHEATCROFT

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F EAT UR E S FEATURES

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: LANDON OTIS ON TOP OF HARRISON PEAK, LOOKING SOUTH ALONG THE SELKIRK CREST AND DOWN AT HARRISON LAKE. PHOTO BY DON OTIS. SUZANNE WALDRUP SCRAMBLES OVER ROCKS AT FAULT LAKE. PHOTO BY WOODS WHEATCROFT. HIKER AT CHIMNEY ROCK. PHOTO BY DOUG MARSHALL. CAMPERS AT FAULT LAKE. PHOTO BY WOODS WHEATCROFT

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rock scrambling and ropes, also tackling vertical terrain. Scrambling is

scrambling regions won’t boast ridges and slopes

meant for non-vertical areas where a fall might still

with views into deep valleys and ravines.

hurt, but is unlikely to be fatal. “I would hate for people to ... think free soloing is something normal people do—it’s not,” White said. “Trad climbing requires ropes because the route is too dangerous without them and a fall could be fatal. In scrambling, a fall isn’t going to kill you.”

Where to scramble Very rarely will a local guidebook feature locations dedicated specifically to rock scrambling. However, the activity can often be incorporated into treks on regular trails. For instance, North Idaho trails often lead to mountain lakes, where the shorelines are peppered with large granite boulders—perfect for scrambling. Sandy Compton, longtime program coordinator

In an area where outdoor recreational opportunities abound, why not try the free-spirited and physically challenging activity of rock scrambling?

“I enjoy it because it’s fun and exhilarating, and you don’t need a bunch of equipment to do it,” Compton said, though admitting that at times—especially on descents—he’s found himself in rather “hairy” situations. “[It’s] very much Type II fun,” Compton said, referencing the different classifications of fun typically used within the recreation community. “Type II fun”

Kootenai Falls in Montana, the rocky ledges around

refers to excursions that were miserable in the mo-

Gold Hill and Green Bay, and the top of the Mickin-

ment, but actually enjoyable once the adventurer has

nick trail in Sandpoint as some great locations to do

some time to reflect. White agreed—part of the fun with scrambling,

terrain in the Selkirk Mountains, particularly the off-

when compared to trad climbing, is the lack of gear

trail traverses along the Selkirk Crest.

needed to participate.

The most tempting scrambling areas can often be found just off established trails. When accessing

“[With] scrambling, you just go,” he said. For Hicks, rock scrambling provides a fun, new

these areas, use caution and leave no trace.

challenge for everyone in her family, setting it apart

A prepared scrambler

from hiking.

Though rock scrambling doesn’t require ropes or harnesses, it’s important to choose attire suitable for the terrain. Compton said he prefers “stout boots or hiking shoes with good soles for gripping.” He said gloves are a good idea for people with tender fingers, and long pants for those with easily abraded knees. Local photographer Fiona Hicks said she prefers to wear lightweight hiking shoes while rock scrambling.

F E AT U RE S

‘Very much Type II fun’

for Friends of Scotchman Peaks Wilderness, named

some scrambling. He also noted that there is ideal

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“As a family we are always on the lookout for rocks to climb on and scramble up because it’s so fun,” she said. Hicks said everyone in her family is able to find a way to participate in a scramble, no matter their different skill levels. “I think scrambling is a great way to develop self-awareness and confidence in what your body is capable of,” she said.

BELOW: CHILDREN ENJOY NAVIGATING THE AREA’S ROCKY HEART, LIKE HERE AT CLIFF LAKE. PHOTO BY FIONA HICKS

“I think it’s important to be able to feel the rock as much as possible through your footwear,” Hicks said, adding that her children often scramble barefoot. Regardless of footwear, Compton said perhaps the best way to be a prepared scrambler is to plan a descent route. “Going up can seem easy,” he said. “Going down via the same route is often more challenging, so it’s good to think about your return route before you start up.” Scramblers would also be wise to consider their relationship with heights before hitting the trail. Though scrambling should not be done on vertical surfaces, that doesn’t mean some mountainous S a n d p o i n tM a g a zi n e . co m S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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readingthe R rocks

FEATURES

BENEATH THE BEAUTY, A STORY WAITS TO BE TOLD by Charles Mortensen

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t is difficult to imagine that this peaceful and soothing spot where the Clark Fork River meets Lake Pend Oreille was ground zero for what is one of the planet’s most epic geologic cataclysms. The phenomenon is so difficult to imagine that even the scientific establishment did not accept it as fact for some 40 years after it was first theorized by geologist J Harlen Bretz in the 1920s. Between about 15,000 and 13,000 years ago, during the last ice age, a massive lobe of ice flowing south from British Columbia along the Purcell Trench between the Selkirk and Cabinet Mountains filled the basin of Lake Pend Oreille and plugged the Clark Fork river valley, damming the flow of the Clark Fork River and creating an enormous lake known as Glacial Lake Missoula. With no outlet, the lake grew over decades, until the pressure of so much backed-up water actually lifted and cracked the glacial plug, resulting in a catastrophic flood that emptied the lake in a matter of days. The flood sent a volume of water ten times the combined flow of all rivers on Earth through Idaho, Washington and Oregon at highway speeds, scouring the land, depositing the sand and gravels of the Rathdrum aquifer, transforming the landscape across Washington state, and forming the Columbia River bar at the mouth of that river in the Pacific Ocean. The ice continued to flow in and plug the Clark Fork, repeating the cycle of lake fill and catastrophic flooding dozens of times until the ice age waned.

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e

ROCKS reading the rocks

This is the epic story of regional geology that locals probably know best, but it’s not the only story waiting to be told. Harlen Bretz’s original theory about the Glacial Lake Missoula Floods—or the Spokane Floods, as they are also known—was based on what he observed of the landscape in eastern Washington— giant ripple marks, sand bars, pot holes, cataracts and channels that seemed to indicate evidence of an enormous, fast-flowing river that washed across a broad area of eastern Washington and down the Columbia River valley. It seemed inconceivable, but that’s pretty much what happened. The problem was that nobody yet knew where all the water came from. It wasn’t until further research revealed evidence such as layers of lake sediments in areas of western Montana where no present lakes exist, and evidence of former lakeshores high up in the mountains of Montana and Idaho, that geologists came to realize there had once been an enormous lake that occupied a big chunk of western Montana. That, together with evidence of the Purcell lobe of continental ice that acted as a dam, provided the source of the floods.

There are several areas in and around Sandpoint where we can see evidence of the floods. Adjacent to U.S. Highway 2, a short drive west of Dover, there is a large sand and gravel pit that extends a significant distance up the flank of the mountains to the north. These sands and gravels were deposited when water from Glacial Lake Missoula came crashing down the Pend Oreille River valley. Many are familiar with an area further south, along Highway 95 just north of Athol (locals call it Granite Hill) where the road dips dramatically and cell phone coverage is marginal. That dip is the Hoodoo Channel, where some of the flood waters coming from the main outburst point at Bayview traveled across Farragut State Park towards Spirit Lake and then northward through the Hoodoo Valley into the Pend Oreille Valley. Flood deposits form the natural dam that created Spirit Lake, as well as other area lakes to the south, including Hayden and Coeur d’Alene. The flood deposits east of Spirit Lake exhibit giant ripple marks created by the flood current. Farragut State Park includes many features left by the floods and information about these is available at the Visitor Center. The Rathdrum aquifer, a primary source of water for the

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EAT ATU URE RES S FFE

ABOVE: 10,000+ YEARS AGO, A LOBE OF THE CORDELLIAN ICE SHEET PUSHED ITS WAY INTO THIS PEACEFUL VALLEY. ALMOST EVERYTHING IN THIS PHOTO WOULD HAVE BEEN UNDER ICE THAT WAS 2,500 FEET HIGH; JUST THE TOPS OF THE MOUNTAINS WOULD HAVE RISEN ABOVE IT. PHOTO BY COREY VOGEL

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F EAT UR E S FEATURES Spokane area, comprises a thick layer of sand and gravel deposited as flood waters made their way westward from Bayview across eastern Washington. There are also good local examples of the continental glaciation that created Glacial Lake Missoula. If you take a walk at Pine Street Woods, for example, you’ll likely notice randomly strewn boulders and cobbles on the ground surface in the meadow. These are part of the glacial till—a jumble of rock, sand, silt and clay—that was dropped into place by the Purcell glacial lobe and now blankets the hill. A pond you might happen upon in a little hollow somewhere in the woods could very well be a depression created by a remnant piece of ice that melted in place as glacial meltwaters deposited outwash around it, and a huge boulder sitting incongruously in the middle of a field likely was dropped from the ice as continental glaciation retreated at the end of the ice age or was stuck in an iceberg carried with the waters from the epic floods. A short distance east of Clark Fork, a rock outcropping along Highway 200 was gouged by rocks entrained in glacial ice that held back the waters of Glacial Lake Missoula as it squeezed into the Clark Fork Valley, leaving a groove in the bedrock and scratches from the stones in the ice. On a good day, from a vantage point looking at the finger of the Bitterroot mountains that cradles the south side of the Clark Fork River, ancient strandlines, where the waves of the dammed lake crashed onto former shorelines, can be seen high up on the sides of the mountains. As for Glacial Lake Missoula, Sandpoint residents are familiar with the notoriously poor-draining soil in their back yards that results from the dense clays just below the top soil. Those are lake bed sediments and they extend well north into the Selle Valley. One can imagine the boundaries of the lake expanding northward as the lobe of continental ice retreated at the end of the last ice age. Who knows, maybe the ice cantilevered over the lake bed and calved dramatically into the water in a dance of death. What about the rocks and the mountains? Standing just about anywhere in Sandpoint or the Selle Valley to the north, one can look west to the Selkirk Mountains and east to the Cabinet Mountains on either side of the Purcell Trench, the long broad valley extending to the north that the ice lobe helped shape. The rocks of both ranges are very different, but they are closely related structurally and the Purcell trench is the linchpin. The predominant rocks of the Cabinet Mountains comprise thick layers of sedimentary rocks altered by heat and pressure and known as the Belt formations, or the Belt Supergroup metasediments. These were deposited in shallow seas and lakes more than a billion years ago during Precambrian time. This was before animals evolved, so you won’t find fossils of critters in these rocks, but some exhibit well-preserved mud cracks and ripple marks, and others exhibit fossils of blue-green algae known as stromatolites. On the other side of the Trench, the Selkirk Mountains are predominantly made up of granite that rose as magma from the depths about 70 to 80 million years ago during the Cretaceous, when dinosaurs roamed the Earth. Rock climbers on Chimney

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TOP: BIKES PAUSE ATOP CLIFTY PEAK OVERLOOKING THE PURCELL TRENCH. PHOTO BY CHARLES MORTENSEN. ABOVE: GLACIERS GOUGED SCRATCH MARKS INTO THE ROCK THAT ARE VISIBLE TODAY ALONG HIGHWAY 200. PHOTO BY CHARLES MORTENSEN. BELOW: ANCIENT STRANDLINES MARKING THE VARIOUS LEVELS OF GLACIAL LAKE MISSOULA MARK THE BITTERROOT MOUNTAINS JUST OUTSIDE OF CLARK FORK. U.S.F.S. PHOTO FROM THE COREY VOGEL COLLECTION.

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Rock on the Selkirk Crest get great hand holds on this granite and mountain bikers and hikers through Pine Street Woods or Syringa Heights will find themselves curling their way around knobs of younger Eocene granite as they find purchase on the glacial till that partially covers it. That granite formed a few million years after a giant meteorite killed off all the dinosaurs, except the birds. Metamorphic rocks—that is, rocks that have been utterly transformed from their original character by heat and pressure—are also present in the Selkirks. A beautiful exposure of these can be seen in large road cuts on U.S. Highway 2 between Sandpoint and Priest River, and hikers will encounter them on the Mickinnick Trail, just northeast of Sandpoint. Some of these rocks are more than 2.5 billion years old. So, how did sediments deposited in a shallow sea billions of years ago end up as rock layers tilted at odd angles high up in the Cabinet Mountains, and how do they relate to the Selkirk Mountains and the Purcell Trench? It’s a long story. The origin of the metamorphic rocks like those we see in the roadcut between Sandpoint and Priest River is not firmly established, but given their old age it is reasonable to assume they represent what geologists call basement rocks. These are the rocks that formed before most other rocks we see on the planet, and they generally occur beneath other rocks we see at the surface. It’s likely that sediments that formed the Belt formations more than a billion years ago were eroded from these basement rocks during the creation of the basin in which the sediments accumulated. How this basin formed is unclear to geologists. Some believe it formed in an oceanic basin that widened slowly as the North American continent split apart; others hypothesize that it was created by a meteorite explosion that left a giant crater. Later, about 800 million years ago, the North American continent did split in the vicinity of Idaho’s western border via plate tectonics, carrying the western piece along with the likely source rock of the Belt sediments off to Siberia. Had humans been around then, they might have surfed off the beaches of Spokane. A lot of time passed after all that, during which plate tectonics pieced together the Earth’s land masses into a supercontinent known as Pangea, and then promptly broke it all apart. Then, about 80 million years ago, the Pacific plate bashed into the western margin of North America, which was not too far west of present day Idaho, and dove under the North American plate, causing magma that became the granite of the Selkirk mountains—known to geologists as the Kaniksu Batholith—to rise through the existing rock during the formation of the Rocky Mountains. As the Selkirks rose, the granite lifted and cracked

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the overlying Belt formations, which slid off the eastern flank of the Selkirks and moved east along a fault, the Purcell Trench, forming the Cabinet Mountains. Yes, the rock of the Cabinet Mountains once rested on top of the rock that forms our portion of the Selkirk range. Speaking of geologic faults, the one that created the Purcell Trench is certainly not the only one in the area. There are several that crisscross the trench and extend beneath Lake Pend Oreille and into the mountains. The Pack River Fault, which roughly parallels the river along its course out of the Selkirks and across Selle Valley, is one of several similar faults, the best known of which is perhaps the Hope Fault. The Hope Fault forms the abrupt topographical transition between the Clark Fork valley and the Cabinet Mountains in the area of Hope and Clark Fork and extends northward under the lake and into the Selkirk Mountains, where it, or one of its offshoots, weakened the granite, thus easing alpine glaciation’s erosional efforts in forming the basin that holds Fault Lake. Similarly, it’s no coincidence that the Pack River closely follows the Pack River Fault as it flows out of the Selkirks. These faults are not necessarily related to the Purcell Trench fault that sent the Cabinet Mountains off to the east. Some geologists speculate that they may be a northern expression of ongoing continental extension caused by movement along the contact between the Pacific and North American plates which is slowly breaking apart the western U. S. It is thought that the deep basin of Lake Pend Oreille may be an expression of this extensional dynamic. There is debate as to the age of all these faults but, for sure, at least some of them are still active. Active faults are where earthquakes come from and Sandpoint experienced a few memorable ones in 2015, the epicenters of which were somewhere beneath Lake Pend Oreille, likely along the Hope fault or an associated fault. There was no major damage, but lamps swung, chairs rocked, and a loud booming was heard in the east. There are many stories in the local rocks and they are all epic beyond belief. The older ones developed over millions and billions of years and the latest chapter about the floods happened in the blink of a geologic eye. The result is a landscape that is beautiful beyond measure. And, while the stories are far beyond skin deep, their clues are there on the surface open to those curious enough to look for them during their wanderings along the lake and adventures in the mountains. Charles Mortensen, owner of Sandpoint’s Syringa Cyclery, holds a master’s degree in geology. SSaannd d ppooiinntM tM aaggaazi e ..co zinne com m SSA AN NDDPPOOIIN NTTM MAG AGA AZZIIN NEE

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F E AT U RE S

Five Feet From a

MILLION DOLLARS Bonner County’s Mining History by Cate Huisman

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f ever there was a behavior that testified to the optimism of the human species, prospecting has to be it. “Out of 1,000 mineral occurrences, only two or three become good,” noted Compton White Jr., who owned one of Bonner County’s few profitable mines. “Most prospectors think they’re five feet from a million dollars, when they’re really a million feet from five dollars.” At the turn of the 20th century, a man could come here with enough money to buy supplies for a season and spend the next several months at a lonely cabin engaged in hard physical labor, providing himself with a pile of rocks. (The historical record features few women who were so devoted to this undertaking.) If he could get the rocks out of this remote country for processing, they might produce enough silver or lead to cover his costs. If not, and if the man were as good at buoyant argument as he was at hard physical labor, he could find optimistic investors both nearby and distant to support him through another round of the same. One person in the Priest Lake district found a more reliable formula for success: Leonard Paul started his business in a log

cabin in Coolin in 1906. “Around the time that I opened my store, there were mines scattered all over this area,” Paul told an interviewer years later. “I listened to their stories and sold them supplies, but I didn’t invest one cent with them. They came up here by the dozens. Each one convinced they were going to make a fortune from old Mother Earth. A few of them did, but it wasn’t through the sale of ore. It was through the sale of stock to suckers who had more money than sense.” Over the next hundred years, the Leonard Paul store inventory changed, but it stayed in business until 2018. Mines around Priest Lake, in contrast, barely got into business at all, with one exception: the legendary Continental Mine. Its owner, Albert Klockmann, had heard from a local Indian that the Indian’s ancestors had found material to make rifle bullets “from an immense outcrop of lead on the summit of the hills back of Priest Lake.” His search for and ultimate claim on this outcrop produced the tales of winter hardship and efforts to stave off claim jumpers that made the mine legendary. It also led him to his equally legendary business partner. Klockmann first met Billy Houston while hiking into the San dpoin tM a g a zi n e . co m S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E nd ntM ne

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claim one spring, when he saw “a walking object” in the distance that eventually resolved itself into “a man clad entirely in caribou hides.” Houston had spent the winter protecting the claim while surviving on nothing but thenabundant caribou for food, clothing and shelter. It took him a year to recover from the physical effects of this ordeal, but then he joined Klockmann in the Continental enterprise. “We always thought him a little queer in some ways afterwards,” wrote Klockmann in his diary, “but we prospected and roamed the hills together from that day on until he died.” At an altitude of 6,000 feet, the Continental is a long way from anywhere even now, and as Houston demonstrated, winters were long and appalling. “The costs of getting provisions and supplies up to the mine were enormous,” recalled Klockmann. But he got acquainted with “some rich lumber men,” suggesting to them that profits from the visible resources of the area could be used to extract the hidden ones as well. By 1912, a mill, power plant and sawmill had been erected at the remote site. In its best years, the Continental employed more than 100 people. According to one study, between 1904 and 1971 it produced 600,000 tons of ore that gave up 160 ounces of gold, 1,326,223 ounces of silver, 122,250 pounds of copper, 62,313,000 pounds of lead, and 196,590 pounds of zinc. But despite all it produced, Klockmann once admitted that the only clear profit he ever made on it was from the fees he received when he leased it out to another operation. Somewhat closer to civilization and to the crucial support of the railroad, the Clark Fork Mining District was home to the Hope, Lawrence and Whitedelph mines, all of which were going concerns with their own mills in the 1920s. Compton White Sr. had been involved in the relatively conserva84

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tive businesses of logging, farming and ranching until a vein of galena was found on his property in 1925. This vein ultimately became a part of the Whitedelph, the largest mine in the district. It produced lead and some silver for 30 years along with enough wealth to support multiple generations of public servants—White and his son, Compton White Jr., both served in the U.S. Congress, and Comp Jr.’s grandson, Ryan White, is now deputy chief of staff to Idaho’s Senator Jim Risch. The Whitedelph also achieved a modicum of notoriety because its riches were rumored to have been miraculously revealed when a tree blew over in a windstorm. While the tree in question did, in fact, fall over, the vein thus exposed was soon abandoned. The Whitedelph’s success was a product of the abundance in two other veins. But the legend has outlived the mine. Prospectors with fewer reliable options were also busy further down the lake. At Talache, the Little Joe Vein produced first gold and then silver— enough to support a community with a store and a school before the bottom fell out of the silver market. This was more than could be said for the brief but spectacular failure at Garfield Bay, where James McNicholas arrived in

Colorful Characters The Mountain Chief Mine above Upper Priest Lake is remembered primarily for the characters associated with it, who might be assumed to be more typical than unusual in an occupation that attracted distinctive individuals. Jared Mitchell claimed the mine in 1903 and worked it until his death in 1919, rowing 30 miles to Leonard Paul’s store in Coolin for supplies every couple of months. He never made enough money to go to a reunion of his Civil War buddies back East, so Paul paid to send him. In gratitude, he gave Paul stock in his mine, and Paul had the good sense never to assume it was worth anything. After Mitchell’s death, the claim passed to Ellen Baker, whose pervasive belief in the area’s mineral potential was remarkable even for prospectors of the time. Ellen had been through two husbands and raised ten children (five by each), and she was then running the Savoy Hotel in Priest River. She had a lifelong interest in prospecting and had made several claims, intending eventually to strike it rich. She died after suffering a cerebral hemorrhage while hiking into the Mountain Chief in 1922, when she was 83 years old.

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Most prospectors think they’re five feet from a million dollars, when they’re really a million feet from five dollars.”

OPENING PAGE: BRUCE USHER SETS UP A MAGNIFICENT “SELFIE” IN A LOCAL MINE NOW CLOSED TO THE PUBLIC. ABOVE, LEFT: MINERS IN CLARK FORK IN THE FIRST HALF OF THE 20TH CENTURY. PHOTO COURTESY HAYS CHEVRON. ABOVE: JUST INSIDE THE AUXOR MINE. PHOTO BY MARY FRANZEL. BELOW: BACK IN THE DAY, THE AUXOR MINE AND BUNKHOUSE. PHOTO COURTESY KERMIT KIEBERT

1908 fresh from a previous failure in Oregon. His Midas Galena Mining Company bought up claims, built a concentrator, and advertised around the lake to bring people to an opening celebration at his newly built Midas Inn. But no records exist to show there was ever any production from the company. By 1912, McNicholas seemed to owe everyone money. He ended up in jail (apparently some of his business associates in Oregon had not been paid either). All that’s left of his venture is Midas Drive, a road that still climbs the hillside west of the bay. Numerous real estate signs and utility posts suggest that other kinds of prospectors are looking for other kinds of investment these days. Although the boom ended a century ago, mining has continued, its viability varying with commodity prices. The county’s rough remoteness remains a factor. “The Auxor Mine was clear back away from anyplace,” said Kermit Kiebert of the mine that members of his family worked off and on from the 1920s through the 1980s. As a technical report from the 1960s describes it, “Roughness of terrain, short snow-free season and drainage problems have … hindered exploration and development.” Kiebert’s description of the location is less prosaic: “I was plowing snow on the 4th of July.” The mine never provided much for his family. “But there was ore there, and we got some gold and silver and lead. We sold some gold for $700 an ounce. Then it dropped down and wasn’t profitable at all.” When commodity prices were high enough, improving transportation options and evolving mining technology continued to spawn optimism. “Revival of Mining in Pend Oreille District Forecast” was a headline in the Sandpoint News Bulletin in October of 1968. The article pointed out that silver and lead prices had recovered from the lows of earlier decades. As silver went up to nearly $118 an ounce in 1980, mines around Blacktail Mountain like the Iron Mask and the Blue Bird saw new activity. Twenty years later the work had been abandoned, as silver had plunged back closer to $6 an ounce. In the years since the boom, Bonner County has been logged, farmed and populated. Now it attracts outdoor enthusiasts who have more interest in keeping its untrammeled mountains pristine than in extracting minerals from them. But the land around the historic mines is far from pristine. Spewing from the mouth of the legendary Continental are piles of waste that started leaching toxic substances into Blue Joe Creek when they were first pulled out of the mountainside decades ago. Reclamation has required the combined efforts S a n d p o i n tM a g a zi n e . co m S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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Rock Creek Mine Still in Courts

ABOVE: CLARK FORK MINERS OUTSIDE THE LAWRENCE MINE. PHOTO COURTESY COREY VOGEL BELOW: MOST LOCAL MINES TODAY HAVE BEEN CLOSED OFF TO UNWARY VISITORS AS THE AIR IS OFTEN BAD AND NOT FIT TO BREATHE, AND THE ROCK IS UNSTABLE. PHOTO BY MARY FRANZEL

of the U.S. Forest Service, Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, Soil Conservation Service, University of Idaho and even the Idaho National Guard. Similar but smaller efforts have been necessary for the remains of numerous smaller mines, the cleanup likely costing more than most (mines) ever produced. Black Rock, on the Pend d’Oreille Bay Trail, is another unwanted legacy, left behind by the area’s only smelter. In only two years of contentious operation between 1907 and 1909, the Panhandle Smelting & Refining Co. managed to generate waste that is now eating up $800,000 in EPA cleanup funding. It has been leaching lead into the lake since it was built. But new laws are designed to minimize such pollution, and humans are ever hopeful, and mining persists. As the snow melted this spring, drilling was set to begin anew in the Auxor Basin. With modern technology, it’s easier for today’s prospectors to know when they really are just five feet from a million dollars. Perhaps the next boom is just around the corner. 86

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Back in the 1980s, the mining company ASARCO filed a permit to develop two underground copper and silver mines in the Cabinet Mountains Wilderness area of northwestern Montana, known as the Rock Creek Mine. In 1976, a group of local Montana residents formed the Cabinet Resource Group to discuss ways to legally protect wildlife and the water quality of area streams and rivers and in the early 1980s they participated in developing an Environmental Impact Statement for both mines. In 1996, the Rock Creek Alliance was established as a split-off group to focus specifically on the Rock Creek Mine. The goal was to ensure that mining of metals from the proposed Rock Creek Mine were extracted in a manner best suited to protect water quality and wildlife. These and other conservation partners have led the fight in the courts to protect the area’s natural resources ever since. There have been five corporate owners of the Rock Creek Mine over the years; currently Hecla Mining, based out of Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, is the owner. A variety of decisions from various agencies and courts have advanced and then halted the mine from proceeding in the years since the first proposal. Most recently, the Montana Department of Environmental Quality enforced the Montana Bad Actors Law against Hecla’s President, Phillips Baker Jr. in 2018; Baker was formerly with Pegasus Gold Corp, which went bankrupt in 1988, leaving massive cleanup bills at its Montana mines. The state asks that Hecla pay more than $35 million to clean up past mines before pursuing more development in the state. Baker sued the DEQ, the agency counter-sued, and Hecla’s suit was dismissed. Hecla continues with lawsuits to overturn the ruling. Baker is also the chairman of the National Mining Association. A court ruling also found that the Rock Creek Mine would violate the Montana Clean Water Act by dewatering and degrading the St. Paul drainage, Chicago Creek and the East Fork of the Bull River. This ruling is being challenged in the Montana Supreme Court. Mine effluent flowing into the Clark Fork River upstream from Lake Pend Oreille is a major concern for some Idaho residents. Federal agencies have also been challenged on protection of endangered bull trout and grizzlies. The agencies have to prove in court that they have properly considered the mine’s effect on threatened species.

-Kathi Slora

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AT LEFT: KIDS LOVE SCRAMBLING AROUND THE LOCAL ROCKS, ESPECIALLY THOSE AT GROUSE CREEK FALLS. PHOTO BY FIONA HICKS BOTTOM: A HIKER EXPLORES A GRANITE BASIN IN THE SELKIRKS. PHOTO BY LAURA ROADY

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CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT PAGE: SWIMMING AT GROUSE CREEK FALLS. PHOTO BY FIONA HICKS. CLIMBER AARON HANSON READIES TO EXPLORE THE EAST SIDE OF CHIMNEY ROCK, A NEW CLIMB SINCE PART OF THE FACE FELL OFF IN 2012. PHOTO BY WINTER RAMOS. THE CRYSTAL CLEAR WATERS OF A POOL AT CHAR FALLS. PHOTO BY KEVIN DAVIS. A SOLITARY GOAT IS CAPTURED AT THE APEX OF THE TRAIL TO SCOTCHMAN PEAK. PHOTO BY CAREN BAYS. AARON HANSON TACKLES THE STEEP FACE OF CHIMNEY ROCK, THE MOST DIFFICULT CLIMB IN IDAHO. PHOTO BY WINTER RAMOS.

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: ROCKY CLIFF JUMPER AT GREEN BAY. PHOTO BY PATRICK ORTON. HIKERS AT LUNCH PEAK. PHOTO BY WOODS WHEATCROFT. ROCK CLIMBER ON LAKE PEND OREILLE. PHOTO BY PATRICK ORTON

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How Long Have We Been Fighting To Protect Our Lake From a Monster Mine? Hint: 1995 was a bad year in

now be going full bore, releasing its toxic runoff the national news. Locally and metals-laden water too. That’s when the first towards our Lake every mining company, ASARCO, single day. launched its serious run But mining compaat exploiting the Cabinet nies have deep pockets, so we need Mountain Wilderness Area. deep resolve. Their goal, build a monster mine under And the continued support of everyone this pristine land that would generate 100 who loves our unique Lake. Please, become million tons of waste piled right beside the an RCA member, write your representative, Clark Fork River. The main tributary to donate money, visit our website, like us on Lake Pend Oreille! Facebook and follow us on Instagram. And that’s when we stepped in to preYes, it seems like this struggle has been vent them. going on a long time but consider this: Now—a quarter of a century, dozens of If built, such a mine would lawsuits, and four mining comcontinue to damage both the panies later—the fight goes on. Wilderness and Lake in perpeBut Lake Pend Oreille remains tuity. In other words, virtually unscathed. forever. Had we, and several others, rock creek alliance Now that is a long time. not resisted, the mine would

rockcreekalliance.org • 208-610-4896

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NEW DEVELOPMENT SETS THE TONE FOR AFFORDABLE FUTURE

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by Cameron Rasmusson

THE DEVELOPMENT JUST OFF DIVISION FEATURES A BLOCK OF HOUSES ON SMALL LOTS; THE 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH HOUSES ARE 864 SQ. FT. PHOTO BY DOUG MARSHALL

curious sight greeted passersby early last year just off Division Avenue. For years, the lot located at the corner of Division and Walnut Street stood vacant. All that changed in 2019, when construction crews turned out to break ground on a new housing project. Notable for their smaller lot sizes and overall footprints, the houses represented something of a change for Sandpoint housing, targeting a sub-$250,000 value currently in short supply. That project, which is heading toward completion this summer, encapsulates a question that has long dogged public officials and private developers alike: How do you make Sandpoint affordable for people across all income levels? According to City Administrator Jennifer Stapleton, it’s a question the city is focused on answering as Sandpoint continues to grow at hitherto unprecedented rates. “I think we’re starting to see a new wave of developers coming in with creative solutions,” she said. For many Sandpoint residents, home ownership is a longtime dream. But with housing prices on the rise and worker wages largely stagnant, it’s an increasingly distant one. The American Community Survey from the U.S. Census Bureau indicates that the median home value in Sandpoint is $380,948. According to 2016 data from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the average value of a three-bedroom home is $281,298. That’s a far sight higher than the nationwide median home value of $226,800, according to Zillow. That’s a problem for low-income and lower-middle-income earners, whose economic clout has barely budged over the past 40 years. According to Pew Research Center, while paychecks are larger than they were in 1978, the purchasing power of those paychecks is functionally the same once inflation is factored in. “In fact, in real terms average hourly earnings peaked more than 45 years ago: The $4.03-an-hour rate recorded in January 1973 had the same purchasing power that $23.68 would today,” Pew Research Center reports. Yet the average sales price of a house in 1973 was, according to the U.S. Census, around $34,000. When planning the Walnut development, owner Chris Chambers and builder Colin Burnett of Idagon had those statisS a n d p o i n tM a g a zi n e . co m S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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JEREMY BROWN Realtor®

208.953.SOLD(7653) www.northidaho-realestate.com SEVERAL OF THE HOUSES IN THE WALNUT DEVELOPMENT INCLUDE A ONE BEDROOM, ONE BATH ACCESSORY APARTMENT ABOVE THE GARAGE. STAFF PHOTO

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tics at the forefront of their minds. From the beginning, they planned the housing development to target a final price tag that would play well with a teacher’s salary. “We knew that we could build affordable housing, or at least as affordable as it gets in Sandpoint,” Chambers said. But it was a long road to get to that point. Chambers acquired the property in 2019 after managing the real estate listing for many years. Prior to the purchase, it was owned by the Vanderpas family, a clan with long historic ties to the Sandpoint community. When the property went unpurchased for years, Chambers decided to scoop it up himself in the hope of unlocking its hidden potential. “You kind of fall in love with your listings, and it just makes so much sense that someone should do something with it,” Chambers said. Chambers approached the folks at Idagon in pursuit of getting the development off the ground. His contractor choice was a calculated one. According to Chambers, Idagon has grown into one of

the most reliable builders in the region, possessing the infrastructure, experience and capacity to drive down the final cost. “You have to go with someone that has the knowledge of how to keep costs down,” Chambers said. Upon assessing the property, the Idagon team concluded that the project goals were well within sight. From the property’s location to its size to the project scope, everything came together to deliver 10 affordable homes. “If the logistics weren’t right it would have been a pain in the butt, but the location is important,” Burnett said. “Everything came together.” The next choice was to determine the type of housing. While the team calculated that they could construct between 24 and 26 condos or apartments, they ultimately went with houses targeting a variety of price points. Six of the 10 homes included garages and accessory apartments. The idea, Chambers and Burnett shared, was to give the homeowner some options. For instance, they

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could use the 410-square-foot apartment to house an aging parent looking to get closer to the family. Or they could rent it out for some additional monthly income, taking a welcome chunk out of that new mortgage. Construction on the Walnut project began in summer 2019. It progressed steadily throughout the year and into 2020, which finds the homes nearing completion. Buyers have already lined up for each unit, meaning that once the final touches are applied, North Sandpoint will have a brand new neighborhood. It’s also indicative of the demand in the community for affordably priced homes. According to Stapleton, the Walnut project is just one way the market is beginning to respond to a demand for more affordable homes. The city is in talks with several developers who are bringing creative solutions to the need within the community.

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“Several developments are coming down the pipeline that are targeting that single-family home price range, but there are also some multi-family projects coming as well,” she said. For its part, the city has done its best to assist developers toward that goal. One way was by reducing minimum standards for allowable lot sizes. A smaller footprint for each individual housing unit means a smaller purchase price for prospective homeowners at the end of the process. “That allows for a project to pencil in that lower-$200,000 price range,” Stapleton said. It’s a partnership that developers like Chambers and Burnett appreciated as they advanced toward the finish line. From the beginning, the relationship between public agencies and private enterprise was keyed toward efficiency and cooperation. “I would give [the city] a positive review,” Burnett said.

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We knew that we could build affordable housing, or at least as affordable as it gets in Sandpoint,” Chambers said.

“They all did their jobs well and found a use for a lot that has been vacant for 25plus years.” If the COVID-19 crisis of 2020 changes the calculus at all for city officials, it only underscores the need for affordable housing in Sandpoint, Stapleton said. In fact, once the crisis subsides, it could accelerate an already blazing growth rate for Sandpoint. Over the past decade, Sandpoint has become a haven for professionals working from home or teleworking for out-of-state companies. With the COVID-19 crisis forcing businesses around the country to move toward a work-from-home model, it’s possible that some of those emergency arrangements may become permanent. And many of those workers may look toward communities like Sandpoint as they seek a different lifestyle. “We’re absolutely anticipating that,” Stapleton said. “Obviously we have the quality of life in spades here. And with our fiber backbone, we have the levels of service we need for people to work from home.” Only time will tell what the coming years will do to housing demands in Sandpoint. But for the present, city officials and developers are looking toward innovative ways to bolster home availability for middle-class buyers. After all, so many hopes are tied up in owning a home. It’s the classic American dream: a chance to build memories and livelihood that reverberate through generations. As private investors and public officials contemplate the future, they hope to help make that dream come true for a new generation. 96

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www.TSSIR.com

Here is a rare opportunity to own the historic Sam Owen Hope Home along with private deeded access to Lake Pend Oreille! This classic 3 bedroom 2 bath home with a main floor master has been completely remodeled. Beautiful hardwood floors and vertical grain fir interior trim woodwork throughout with a bright country kitchen. There is a three season porch, fireplace with built in book shelves in the main living room and a reading den off the south west corner with lots of windows for natural light. Enjoy the large deck with full southern exposure and amazing views of the largest lake in Idaho. In addition to the one car attached garage and full basement there is a two car insulated detached garage which could make a great studio apartment. This home will not last at only $499,000! Call Rich @ 208-290-290-2895 to schedule an appointment.

This craftsman 4 bedroom, 3 bath home was built by the owner/builder in 2017 with 3016 sq ft of finished living space. The main floor has an open floor plan with a Gourmet kitchen, center island & breakfast bar, custom Maple wood cabinets, handcrafted cement kitchen counters, vertical grain Fir trim along with Birch hardwood flooring throughout the first floor. Main floor master bedroom & en-suite bath with French doors leading to a wrap around deck with T&G cedar ceilings overlooking Chuck’s Slough which is great for canoeing & kayaking!. Lower level has an additional + - 1300 sq ft with one bedroom, living room, kitchenette, bathroom, storage room along with a separate entrance. Sellers VRBO income in 2019 was 15K. The lower level would make the perfect mother in-law apartment! $559,000

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BEST VALUE WATER VIEW HOME SITE ON MOOSE MOUNTAIN! Rare opportunity to purchase this estate parcel overlooking the largest lake in Idaho. This building site has amazing views of the Green Monarch Mountains to the east and Lake Pend Oreille to the west. The home site has been parked out and the driveway and building pad are in just waiting for you to build your dream home. This is a great price for this lot which has all underground utilities including natural gas to the property road. The Idaho Club is a gated community which features the only Jack Nicklaus Signature Golf Course in the state of Idaho. This property is centrally located and it’s only 15 minutes from downtown Sandpoint, 30 minutes to Schweitzer Mountain Ski Resort and 10 minutes to Lake Pend Oreille. Seller financing available! $379,000

Rich Curtis, associate broker, REALTOR® Luz Ossa, REALTOR® 208.290.2895 208.610.9977 richard.curtis@sothebysrealty.com luz.ossa@sothebysrealty.com © MMVII Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Claude Monet’s “Marine View With a Sunset,” used with permission. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated, Except Offices Owned And Operated By NRT Incorporated. Sandpoint office: 208-263-5101, 200 Main Street, Sandpoint, ID 83864.

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www.TSSIR.com

One of the rare large acreage parcels still available with spectacular water views of the Pend Oreille River in Bonner County. This 287 acre parcel has total seclusion for private living or a family compound with end of the road privacy! The 287 acres are made up of five parcels. Owner financing is available for a qualified buyer. $3,500,000. Call Rich 208-290-2895

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This is a private large lot and has unobstructed views of Lake Pend Oreille with full southern exposure and easy access off a paved road on Moose Mountain. The building site is gently sloped surrounded by mature trees for privacy and has great views of the Green Monarch Mountains and the driveway is already in down to the building pad. The Idaho Club is a gated community which features the only Jack Nicklaus Signature Golf Course in the state of Idaho. This property is centrally located only 15 minutes from downtown Sandpoint, 30 minutes to Schweitzer Mountain Ski Resort and 15 minutes to Lake Pend Oreille. The new club house is open. Come and see why Sandpoint was voted the best small town in America! Don’t miss this great opportunity to be a part of The Idaho Club! $309,000 Call Rich @ 208-290-2895

This Moose Mountain home site has great western exposure with views of Lake Pend Oreille, Schweitzer Ski Resort and incredible sunsets! This 1.1 acre parcel is easily accessed from the up hill side off of S Idaho Club Drive with a nice level benched area for easy building. The power, water, sewer, and natural gas lines are in the street and border this home site. The new club house is now complete and this is a great opportunity to be part of The Idaho Club with the only Jack Nicklaus Signature Golf course in Idaho. Also you are just minutes to Sandpoint, Lake Pend Oreille, Schweitzer Ski Resort and thousands of acres of public lands! $279,000. Call Rich @ 208-290-2895

Salishan Point

Now offering this secondary waterfront lot in this Premier Gated Waterfront community on the Pend O’reille River! Just through the gated entry, this 1.16 acre parcel is ready for your new home! Nestled in the exquisite neighborhood of Salishan Point where residents enjoy one of the finest private waterfront communities in North Idaho. Complete with marina, beach, pavilion, playground, and bathrooms on over 2.8 acres of common area. These lots have paved roads, power to each lot and a community water system already in place. Each owner will be assigned a boat slip by the HOA after closing. $139,000.

Now offering a creekside home site with river views in this Premier Gated Waterfront Community on the Pend O’reille River! Just through the gated entry Salishan Point amenities come with marina, beach, pavilion, playground, and bathrooms on over 2.8 acres of common area. These lots have paved roads, power to each lot and a community water system already in place. Each owner will be assigned a boat slip by the HOA after closing. Salishan Point is located close to Schweitzer Mountain, Sandpoint and thousands of acres of public lands. $169,000.

Sandy Beach Estates

Level waterfront building home sites with your own private sandy beach on Lake Cocolalla. These lots come with community water and sewer along with under ground power is to all the lots. For those who are looking for the benefits of a smaller lake, this body of water is great for all water sports and fishing. This 9 lot waterfront community comes with its own common area and green space for additional recreational activities. Just a short scenic drive to Schweitzer Mountain Ski Resort and minutes from downtown Sandpoint and Lake Pend Oreille. Owner financing available for qualified buyers. Lots prices starting at $399,000 and only 5 lots remaining! Call Rich @ 208-290-2895 for details.

Here are two level waterfront lots on Cocolalla Creek and three 10 acre parcels with views of Lake Cocolalla for sale. One of the waterfront parcels has over 500 feet of frontage with a 40 X 50 heated shop with a single wide mobile home with power and a shared well. The shop has already been plumbed for a bathroom. Live in the mobile while you build your dream home overlooking this year round creek. The second waterfront lot has over 700 feet of Creek frontage and is on a shared well. Also available are three 10 acre parcels which are gently sloped with mature trees and views of the lake. Owner financing available with 25% down! Call Rich for pricing and details. 208-290-2895. 

© MMVII Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Claude Monet’s “Marine View With a Sunset,” used with permission. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated, Except Offices Owned And Operated By NRT Incorporated. Sandpoint office: 208-263-5101, 200 Main Street, Sandpoint, ID 83864.

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SUSTAINABLE and in tune with

NATURE EARTH BERM DESIGN STILL HOLDS APPEAL by Carol Curtis

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n the ’60s and ’70s, new arrivals to Bonner County often and some intrinsic safety features from natural disasters, the brought with them ideas of moving “back to the land,” earth berm style remains more unique than mainstream after seeking with Its S architectural fundamentals, nonetheless, C aUsustainable S T O M lifestyle H O M that E S was | RinEtune MO D E L S | many A D Ddecades. ITION nature. These people would often buy property and offer an aesthetic fit that works well in a rural area, where move into a camper or tent or simple, one-room cabin while encouraging wildlife visitors is common. they built the home they planned to live in. And those homes The concept of an earth berm home focuses on the earth, they built often incorporated their ideals of sustainability and soil, or sod being in contact with the structure, to provide natural appeal, relying on non-traditional construction methsignificant thermal insulation, and it does not require that the ods to achieve those goals. From yurts to straw bale housing to home be exclusively underground. One famous book, written rammed earth walls, a variety of homes began to appear. And by a local about earth berm design, was “The $50 and Up Unone of the most popular was the earth berm. derground House Book,” by Mike Oehler, who lived in BoundFor all its inherent practicality, such as excellent insulation ary County. He is considered an early adopter who helped using thermal mass; blending with nature; built-in cost savings; many a person visualize how they might leave their urban S a n d p o i n tM a g a zi n e . co m S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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PREVIOUS PAGE: A BIRD’S EYE VIEW SHOWS HOW THIS HOME WAS BUILT INTO A CREATED HILLSIDE IN ORDER TO ACHIEVE ENERGY EFFICIENCY. COURTESY PHOTO. FACING PAGE: THE OPEN PLAN OF THE LIVING AREA ALLOWS FOR GREATER ENERGY EFFICIENCY. COURTESY PHOTO.

and suburban landscape and return back to the land. Earth berm shelters are one of the oldest types of shelters, and routinely come back on the radar as people seek a low cost, practical adaptation of embracing nature to regulate the temperature of their home, saving money and energy. In the early ’80s, one such couple set off from Wisconsin to follow their dream and build an earth berm home for their young family. Like so many dreamers who came west, they had a vision, and ended up on Upper Pack River Road—a location where many began their local story. With kids in tow, Ed and Bonnie Worzala (now Chambers) found a 21-acre parcel with the Pack River running through it. Bonnie shared that she and Ed had grown up in Wisconsin, where the weather is extremely cold in the winter, and expensive to heat. Ed was a concrete specialist and had recently participated in the new trend of building earth sheltered homes. So when the decision was made to relocate

to Idaho in 1983, they chose an earth berm home, so they could experience an alternative style home. The property was flat so they excavated and created a berm which was supported by steel beams. The home faced south to maximize the light in almost every room. “The main living spaces (the great room and three bedrooms) were placed along the south wall so you didn’t even notice you are underground,” said Bonnie. “We placed the laundry-room, the master walk-in closet, two bathrooms and a fourth game-room/ theater room along the back wall as those were least affected by lack of light. Rocks were handpicked from our riverfront to create two floor-to-ceiling rock fireplaces that were beautiful and provided our heat, one in the great-room and the second in the master bedroom.” Since the property had a slight decline towards the south, it was tucked into the north side of the slope, and they pushed the

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dirt up over the roof to create the berm. The roof eventually grew in and wildlife felt comfortable walking their new bridge to nowhere, providing elevated expansive views. The location also took advantage of the mountain views and privacy from the road to the west, lending itself to experience all types of wildlife seen in the area. Bonnie said that wildlife had no hesitation in walking over the roof as the family saw many tracks, including cougar. She shared that one funny incident occurred late at night when someone, presumably a neighbor kid, drove their snowmobile over the top of the house. When the Worzala’s kids were very young, they would sled down the back of the house from the roof. The home has high ceilings and an open spacious oor plan in the main kitchen, dining, and living room. This building approach allowed for extremely low heating bills while the design allowed for abundant

The experience, knowledge and proven results To turn your dream into a reality. 208.255.7340 | barryfishercustomhomes.com | Sandpoint, Idaho S a n d p o i n tM a g a zi n e . co m S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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TOP: THE PACK RIVER BERM HOUSE IS UNIQUE NOT JUST FOR ITS CONSTRUCTION STYLE, BUT ALSO FOR ITS TENNIS COURT. LEFT: ON THE UPPER PACK, THE VIEWS ARE ENDLESS. ABOVE: BATHROOMS IN THE HOUSE WERE PLACED IN THE WINDOWLESS ROOMS TO THE BACK. COURTESY PHOTOS

natural light. Originally, it was drawn with the home separate from the garage in one continuous curved berm. But they quickly realized there was a fairly large unused space in between that still had to be filled with dirt. So instead, they made the structure continuous, a decision they never regretted. The property is also unique in that it has a tennis court. Tennis was one of the family’s main activities in Wisconsin, and they wanted to continue playing and teaching the kids without driving to town. The professional coating proved to be the biggest investment. They did have some issues with elk and moose hanging out on it. But the location was ideal. “In addition to wanting the privacy and views, we had young children to consider, so good 104

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access to town in case of emergency was a big deal,” said Bonnie. “The roads to the property are highway/county maintained and relatively flat, a big plus in Idaho. When we built in 1984 Pack River Road was gravel but has since been paved, making it an even easier commute to town.” Over time the family grew and changed and, after Ed died the home sat empty. Bonnie decided to put the house on the market. “It’s very peaceful,” Bonnie said. “We saw lots of wildlife and we loved our Pack River frontage.” She has no regrets over building and living in such a unique home that afforded their young family a lifestyle like no other. “I don’t think we would have done anything differently,” she said. “We loved it the way it was.”

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Quartet

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A SURPRISING

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SOON-TO-BE BREW PUB, SANDPOINT’S OLD FEDERAL BUILDING HAS SISTERS THROUGHOUT THE U.S. by Trish Gannon

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SANDPOINT, IDAHO

hen Mickey and Duffey Mahoney purchased the First American Title Company building on Second Avenue in Sandpoint last year, they knew they were buying something unique. Built in 1928 with a $70,000 appropriation, its Spanish Colonial Revival style design mixed with Italian Renaissance Revival style construction served first as a federal building and post office, became the public library in 1967, and was sold to the title company in 2000. But in researching the building in pursuit of a historically accurate remodel of the place into their new brewpub, the brothers discovered it was not quite as unique as first thought—an identical building still serves as a post office in Sayre, Pennsylvania. “I think all I did was Google “Spanish colonial revival post office” and the Sayre post office was the first thing to come up,” said Mickey. According to Jim Nobles, founder of the Sayre Historical Society, it was Oct. 21, 1929 when the Sayre Post Office opened its doors, just a month before Black Friday and the beginning of the Great Depression. Located at Desmond and Hayden Streets, the initial appropriation for the building was $100,000, and plans for its construction began back in 1914. But World War I intervened and, according to a 1928 article in the Wilkes-Barre Record, “The sense... was that the government at Washington needed the money for more urgent affairs.” Like the building in Sandpoint, Sayre’s federal building housed other federal offices along with the post office. Local history buff Steve Garvan pointed the way to yet another identical post office when he discovered an old postcard while traveling. Located at 7 Bridge St. in Bellows Falls, Vermont, this post office was built in 1930 and was S a n d p o i n tM a g a zi n e . co m S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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designed “in a blend of Spanish Colonial Revival and Georgian Revival style,” according to the paperwork for its inclusion in the Bellows Falls Downtown Historic District, and is considered its most “architecturally distinctive building.” The application further notes: “A local story—undoubtedly apocryphal—alleges the plans of this building were actually intended for a post office in Santa Fe, New Mexico but somehow were misdirected to Bellows Falls.” The cost for this building was also $100,000. In Bellows Falls, the windows above the upper catwalk have now been bricked over. None of the post offices in Sante Fe look anything like our building here, but head a little further south and east (about 700 miles in fact), and you’ll find yourself at 100 N. Mickinney St. in Mexia, Texas... where the fourth of this quartet of original post offices lives today. Jackye Penney, the postmaster, still has the original plans for the building, which opened in September of 1931—again, at a cost of $100,000. The Mexia Weekly Herald reported, “Thousands of people saw one of the finest postoffices in Texas when the new federal building was formerly (sic) opened Tuesday...”. It may no longer be one of the finest, as Penney reports that the interior is beginning to crumble, but like its trio of sisters it still boasts a striking, twin-entry facade, red tile roof, iron balconies, and arched windows separated by gargoyles. The buildings are believed to have been designed by W.D. Lovell, a Minneapolis architect who worked in the office of the Supervising Architect to the Secretary of the Treasury. A bevy of these designers developed a portfolio of building plans that could be used by communities when constructing an array of federally funded buildings. So there may well be more than just this quartet of post offices built following Lovell’s vision, but Sandpoint remains distinct in at least one respect: it was the first.

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SAYRE, PENNSYLVANIA

BELLOWS FALLS, VERMONT

MEXIA, TEXAS

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SANDPOINT, IDAHO PREVIOUS PAGE: THE FORMER SANDPOINT FEDERAL BUILDING WHEN IT SERVED AS FIRST AMERICAN TITLE. PHOTO BY IAN POELLET AND USED UNDER GNU FREE LICENSE FROM WIKIMEDIA COMMONS.

SAYRE, PENNSYLVANIA ABOVE, TOP: THE POST OFFICE IN SAYRE HAS BRICKED UP ITS UPPER WINDOWS. PHOTO BY MIKE FRANTZ

BELLOWS FALLS, VERMONT ABOVE, MIDDLE: FOLKS IN BELLOWS FALLS BELIEVED THEIR BUILDING HAD ACTUALLY BEEN INTENDED FOR SANTA FE. PHOTO BY BEYOND MY KEN AND USED UNDER GNU FREE LICENSE FROM WIKIMEDIA COMMONS.

MEXIA, TEXAS ABOVE, BOTTOM: ONLY THE FLAGPOLE IN FRONT HINTS THAT THE POST OFFICE IN MEXIA IS NOT OUR OWN FAMILIAR SANDPOINT BUILDING. PHOTO BY POSTMASTER JACKYE PENNEY

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We have already had people and businesses step up to volunteer money, labor, and equipment to make this Field of Dreams something special,” said Geiger.

The land has been vacant ever since. Ponderay is also located tantalizingly close to Lake Pend Oreille, but busy Montana Rail Link tracks separate the town from the waterfront. Unfortunately, the tracks haven’t stopped people from walking across, many times hauling their bikes. Until recently, there were a few trails and a road or two on the lake side of the tracks. But with the development of the Pend d’Oreille Bay Trail in 2010, there are more and more people illegally and dangerously crossing. These were two expensive opportunities facing Ponderay.

Next steps Sandpoint and Ponderay had collaborated in an attempt to pass a 1 percent tax in 2008. It failed because voters didn’t understand where the money would go and there was no organized effort to get the voters out, Geiger said. “There was no solid business plan.” Sandpoint passed its own 1 percent tax four years ago. Those funds helped construct new grandstands at Memorial Field as well as fund upgrades to some of the city parks. That tax sunsets next year but there is a good chance it may be proposed for renewal. Geiger still had his notes from the failed 1 percent push and made a point to revisit his friends who were apprehensive about the tax last time. “There was definitely a renewed interest in recreational opportunities and making Ponderay better but no business owner was excited about an increase in their taxes,” he said. Geiger interviewed business leaders in both communities to see if the 1 percent tax had chased Sandpoint shoppers out of town or if Ponderay had seen a bump in business from shoppers fleeing the 1 percent increase.

There was no impact at all The Ponderay City Council decided a proposal for a 1 percent sales tax increase needed to be directed, have a sunset clause, and only be levied on the first $1,000 of any single purchase. After personally talking to anyone who would listen, holding a few open houses, and making sure the voters were informed and energized, the matter was put on the November 5 ballot last year. It passed by one vote. It needed 60 percent to pass and the 109 yes votes to the 72 no votes made the percentage 60.2 percent. The city is projecting it will raise around $2 million a year from the 1 percent tax over the next five years. The receipts from the first month were $150,000, which puts it pretty close. The challenge now is to make sure to maximize the tax dollars and to seek opportunities for matching grants.

Field of Dreams ABOVE: THE PEND D’OREILLE BAY TRAIL, WINDING ALONG THE LAKESIDE, IS AN ASSET THAT PONDERAY WILL SOON BE ABLE TO ACCESS DIRECTLY. STAFF PHOTOS

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The city is developing a phased plan that includes both local and regional sports, and recreation amenities, including indoor and outdoor team sport fields with artificial turf for soccer and softball, and indoor and outdoor courts for sports such as volleyball, basketball, pickleball, and tennis, along with picnic areas, a

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playground, and an outdoor amphitheater. Ponderay already has a $400,000 LOR Foundation grant in hand for the field. “We have already had people and businesses step up to volunteer money, labor, and equipment to make this Field of Dreams something special,” said Geiger.

Lake access “We are a city on the lake with no public access,” Geiger said. The Montana Rail Link tracks have proven to be an impediment to growth and access to the lake for Ponderay. With tax money coming in and the hope of matching funds, the council is now looking at conceptual drawings of what a $10 million underpass might look like. The concrete structure will be deep enough, wide enough, and long enough for pedestrian traffic as well as emergency vehicles. The Pend d’Oreille Bay Trail is very popular but currently there is no way for EMTs to access the trail unless they go to the trailhead located in Sandpoint. The vast majority of the three-mile trail is located in Ponderay. The city has already purchased the 6.5 acres behind the Hoot Owl that lines up with the underpass entrance. That land has been the home of Ponderay’s Neighbor Days and has given many a glimpse of what is to come. Geiger sees the Ponderay entrance becoming the most popular entrance to the trail upon completion. There will be ample parking and perhaps even a coffee shop there. More immediately, the city is eyeing a few parcels of land for acquisition next to the lake that will help keep part of the Pend d’Oreille Bay trail a greenspace and primitive, he said. The Ponderay City Council is ramping up the next stage in Ponderay’s development. It is easy to bet the Google list of things to do in Ponderay will list a Field of Dreams and lake access in the next few years. “And don’t forget, we also have the top dog park in the country,” Geiger said. Learn more at www.POBtrail.org and www.CityofPonderay.org

Award-winning

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NOT EVEN A PANDEMIC CAN DROP PRICES

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ou’d think a global pandemic that upended the nation’s economy and left tens of millions of Americans unemployed would have an effect on the Sandpoint area’s real estate market. It’s been on fire for years, with year-after-year price increases and a dwindling inventory that leave potential buyers with fewer options. But it’s pretty much business as usual—or even more business than usual—for our local real estate market. Its superhero strength is supported in the numbers: residential sales in the Sandpoint area from September 10, 2019, through April 20, 2020, totaled 331; that’s nearly equal to the number of sales in the previous year’s time period of 338. It’s rather remarkable considering the upheaval this year, when social distancing and face masks gave home sellers and buyers momentary pause. According to Tia Eagle with Realm Partners, president of the Selkirk Association of Realtors, real estate prices in the area are likely to tick their way still higher. “As long as the interest rates stay low and the inventory is as low as we’ve seen, we’ll continue to see a steady market that may have a gradual increase.” It doesn’t take much research on the internet to discover on websites such as Realtor.com or Zillow.com that Sandpoint’s real estate market is a pricey one. The hottest-selling homes are anything under $400,000 (a stretch to find nowadays, with the average sales price coming in at a whopping $463,000); that’s a 13 percent

increase over the previous year. Buyers can find relief in one market that’s cooling off a bit—the areas of Priest River and Priest Lake posted notable decreases in number of sales and average sales price. As for Sandpoint, Eagle explains that the lack of inventory could see some relief soon. “There are some great developments in the works for Sandpoint, and the price points range anywhere from trying to provide affordable housing all the way to luxury waterfront condos. We have some plans in the works for the Whiskey Jack area, there’s a great development off the Elks golf course, one coming soon to where the old field campus was, and another one a little further up on North Boyer.” In the meantime, as buyers await those new homes, today’s sellers are at an advantage. “It’s a seller’s market, especially for those who bought four to five years ago. Those are the sellers that are going to see huge returns with selling their homes and with the equity, and have the potential to upgrade to a larger home or one with more property. They’ll have more buying power.” Only time will tell how the COVID-19 situation plays on the real estate market—but all indications appear that it will only make Sandpoint a more desirable place to live. “We anticipate that our last quarter of the year will be our busiest as we’re likely to see people from highly populated areas moving into our oasis to get away from their current situation,” said Eagle.

-Beth Hawkins

- For The Art Of The Build -

Dan Fogarty GREAT NORTHERN BUILDER

- Custom Homes Since 1981 -

208.263.5546

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market watch

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re a l e stat e

Selkirk Multiple Listing Service Real Estate Market Trends Vacant Land—Bonner County

residential sales—All Areas Sold Listings

2019

2020

631

588

2019

2020

Sold Listings

208

225

8

$29,813,050

$36,107,679

21

% Inc/Decr -7

% Inc/Decr

Volume - Sold Listings

$236,937,039

$239,045,603

1

Volume - Sold Listings

Median Price

$305,500

$335,000

10

Median Price

$89,400

$94,000

5

8

Average Sales Price

$143,331

$141,598

-1

Average Days on Market

185

214

16

Average Sales Price

$375,494

$406,540

Average Days on Market

131

105

-20

Residential Sales—Schweitzer

Sandpoint City 2019

2020

% Inc/Decr

2019

2020

% Inc/Decr

Sold Listings

100

94

-6

Sold Listings

26

33

27

Volume - Sold Listings

$35,170,628

$36,287,885

3

Volume - Sold Listings

$8,362,300

$12,722,100

52

Median Price

$287,175

$322,500

12

Median Price

$297,500

$332,000

12

Average Sales Price

$351,706

$386,041

10

Average Sales Price

$321,626

$385,518

20

Average Days on Market

122

80

Average Days on Market

115

84

-27

2019

2020

-34

Residential Sales—All Lakefront

Sandpoint Area

2019

2020

-2

Sold Listings

100

80

-20 -23

% Inc/Decr

331

% Inc/Decr

Sold Listings

338

Volume - Sold Listings

$138,424,130

$153,388,601

11

Volume - Sold Listings

$66,740,289

$51,482,385

Median Price

$325,000

$370,000

14

Median Price

$520,500

$533,500

2

$667,402

$643,529

-4

134

116

-13

Average Sales Price

$409,538

$463,409

13

Average Sales Price

Average Days on Market

141

97

-31

Average Days on Market

Residential sales by area based on information from the Selkirk MLS©© for the period of September 20, 2018 to April 20, 2019 versus September 10, 2019 to April 20, 2020. Real estate stats for Bonner and Boundary counties. Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed.

FULL SERVICE BUILDING SUPPLY CENTER TRUSTED | KNOWLEDGEABLE | RESPECTED | EXPERIENCED

www.SandpointBuildingSupply.com 208-263-5119 | 800-881-7380 477421 Highway 95 North • Ponderay, Idaho 83852

Building On Service

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n at i v es + newcom ers

Building Services in Sandpoint, Idaho

For more builders and builder services throughout Sandpoint and North Idaho, visit SandpointOnline.com's business directory.

Looking for

BUILDING SERVICES? FIND PROVIDERS, FROM ARCHITECTS AND CONTRACTORS TO PLUMBERS AND ELECTRICIANS... AND MORE. d e s i g n . bu ild . t im b er fr a m in g

collinbeggs.com

Sandpoint, idaho

208. 290.8020

Bringing Your Ideas to Life • • • •

SANDPOINT ONLINE BUSINESS DIRECTORY WWW.SPTMAG.COM/BUILDINGSERVICES

- For The Art Of The Build -

Handmade Fine Furniture Custom Designed Built-Ins Heirloom Quality Craftsmanship Guaranteed for Life

BRAD HANSON SelkirkCraftsman@gmail.com 208-610-3954 • Showroom in Sandpoint

SelkirkCraftsmanFurniture.com glass-act-sandmg-june13.v2.pdf

1

4/25/13

4:22 PM

Dan Fogarty

GREAT NORTHERN BUILDER - Custom Homes Since 1981 C

M

Y

208-610-1200

CM

www.sandpointwindowcleaning.com

MY

CY

CMY

208.263.5546

K

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| www.greatnorthernbuilder.com

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introducing locals |

nati ves + n e wcom e rs

NATIVES Newcomers

S

&

by Marianne Love

ometimes it’s hard to tell who loves Sandpoint more: the natives or the newcomers. The comparison means little, however. As is customary, this issue’s Natives and Newcomers could all go on at length, describing their passion for the place they call home. Whether here just a few months or a lifetime, their common love for Sandpoint, its lifestyle and its people runs as deep as beautiful Lake Pend Oreille—immeasurable at times.

Glenn Lefebvre

Native

G

Store provided a foundation for his continued work in the business world. “I still think a lot of Mr. Larson,” he says, “and will always be thankful for what I learned.” Later, a stint with Bat Waves/Alpine Surf Wear, in Wallace, provided an outlet for his graphic arts skills and a chance to help influence the early days of the Hiawatha biking trail. Nowadays, Lefebvre, who’s also

ive him a rod, some tackle, a lake and a boat, and Glenn Lefebvre considers himself in heaven. Fishing Mirror Lake or other area lakes with family tops this 54-year-old Sandpoint High grad’s favorite pastimes. “The hobby occupying most of my time, thoughts and money is fishing—all forms of fishing,” Lefebvre says. “Fly fishing is my favorite, but there’s a lot of love for trolling on a little lake on a summer day.” That passion makes sense for a guy working behind the fishing counter at North 40 and serving as Panhandle Trout Unlimited’s bull-trout education coordinator. Childhood memories include screaming at/with crows as a toddler living on Sixth Avenue. The experience set off a life of loving birds. Lefebvre and Lincoln School classmate Gary Bloxom found endless ways to entertain themselves, including their made-up game called Lost Little Kids. “We would act like we were lost and wander around the neighborhood aimlessly and bewildered,” he recalls. In another neighborhood off from Main Street, Lefebvre took daily trips to a nearby store with his sister and a quarter in his pocket for candy, always leading to sticky fingers. Tagging along on fishing trips with uncles and his dad hatched his present passion. Lefebvre’s first “real” job at Sandpoint’s Larson’s Clothing S a n d p o i n tM a g a zi n e . co m S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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n at i v es + newcom ers worked as a deejay, prefers the simple life as a father and grandfather with a firm belief in humor. “I’m always peppering the day with humor,” he said. “I think people need to relax and laugh more. I’m generally happy. Maybe that can be annoying to some, but they are probably grumps.” Q. Describe a memorable lifetime event. A. Watching Jeff McCracken fight boxing champ Tommy Hearns in 1982. Our family and friends were pretty excited to watch on the Elks Club big screen TV as our hometown fighter took on Hearns. Jeff was TKO’d in the 8th round, but we were all so proud of him. Q. What are some highlights of your family history here? A. My father coached boxing at the Elks and the Giants pony league baseball team, on which I later played. I think we had the same tattered gold and blue jerseys, too. My mom and dad tended bar at the old Elks, which was a setting for many of my life memories. Q. What do you think is the prettiest place in the area? A. Upper Pack River and access to lakes like the Beehives and Harrison. The river itself is beautiful and holds some of the best views of the Selkirks anywhere. It still feels wild, even though it’s only a few miles from town. Q. What is your advice for transplants? A. Enjoy Sandpoint for what it is. Don’t rush. Breathe. Soak it in. You’re in Sandpoint; relax. Don’t try changing things. We already have enough of that as it is.

Gina Pucci-Deprez didn’t have to imagine. She lived that life, thanks to a convenient proximity to her grandparents’ farm and a close-knit family. “Both sets of grandparents were nearby,” she said. “I was lucky to be able to truly know them.” That childhood bond with 18 cousins, their kids and even grandkids has remained strong, as has her appreciation for a lifetime in her hometown.

Gina Pucci-Deprez Native

I

magine a childhood of carefree summers, spent with cousins playing in barns, riding horses or motorcycles on 600 acres, or enjoying Garfield Bay swimming area just a short bike ride away.

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n at i v es + newcom ers “It’s been quite an evolution for Sandpoint and the surrounding areas,” said PucciDeprez, a 56-year-old dental assistant, “but with these changes I still wouldn’t want to be anywhere else or raise a family anywhere else.” Family and outdoor enjoyment still serve as her foremost interests. Her immediate family includes husband Mike Deprez, two sons and a busy, high-school-aged daughter. Gina also helps with daycare for her grandkids. Leisure time means active time—jogging, walking, skiing, hiking, or biking. She once rode her bike from Oceanside, California, to Annapolis, Maryland, with three friends and a support crew in the Race Across America, raising money for autism awareness in the area. Overall, she said, it’s been a wonderful life enjoying the area that molded her. “I’m passionate about sharing this area with my family,” she said, “and passing on its history and all that it has to offer to my kids and grandkids.”

A. While we all appreciate and benefit from growth in the community, please remember that you moved here for a reason and help retain that quality you saw.

Katlyn Krystinak Newcomer

Q. Describe a memorable lifetime event. A. Completion of the bypass... they could not have done a better job. The bridge wall landscaping is beautiful, especially spring and summer, and the Sand Creek walkway is utilized 100 times over comparatively to what was accessible previously. Q. What are some highlights of your family history here? A. My parents’ [Skip and Nancy Pucci’s] immersion into volunteering when I was young was a great influence on me. My father and our family have been involved with a lot of area construction—multiple schools, banks, fire stations, the CDA Resort, the Power House, convenience stores, Hidden Lakes Clubhouse and many, many residential homes. We are very proud of those buildings and the still strong relationships with those families and owners. Q. What do you think is the prettiest place in the area? A. Probably Switchback 7 coming off from Schweitzer. You can’t beat that view after a great day on the mountain. Q. What is your advice for transplants?

Tune in to Sandpoint Non-commercial Community radio

L

Strategically designed. Results-driven.

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Th e R E S T of the story

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Media + marketing.

M A R K E T I N G

We publish Sandpoint Magazine, the town portal SandpointOnline.com, and books as Keokee Books. Here’s the rest of the story. We also provide print + web design and development services for more than 300 regional companies and groups. Need marketing help? Call us!

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W

hen Chicago native Katlyn Krystinak arrived in Sandpoint on Halloween Day, 2018, she hit the ground running. A Laughing Dog Brewing tap room manager and Keller Williams licensed Realtor, she also serves as vice president of Leadership Sandpoint. “I look forward to raising funds for community nonprofits while honing in on my leadership skills and diving deeply into the community,” said Krystinak, 35, a University of Iowa communications studies grad. Sandpoint seemed the perfect fit for this outdoor enthusiast seeking a significant career and life change. After her twin sister Kelly, a local educator, moved here five years ago, Krystinak visited, skied during winters, and realized the area’s year-round outdoor opportunities. “I decided to move somewhere that I would like to vacation,” she says. “It was time to start enjoying life every single day.” With days off spent adventuring outdoors, Krystinak’s typical workday schedule involves coffee, breakfast, quiet meditation, working in Coeur d’Alene, Sandpoint, or Ponderay, then meeting friends or maybe

introducing locals | hiking and almost always cooking dinner with her sister. “[I am] early to bed,” she says, “so that I am ready to be up early the next day and to conquer the world.” Goal setting comes naturally for Krystinak, who delights in pushing herself outside her comfort zone and in plotting out a family-oriented future. “I live to camp and set a goal of 10 nights in a tent in a one-year time,” she said. “I intend to live every day working hard at being a strong, successful woman so that when I have a family of my own, I can provide the type of life I had growing up.” Q. How did you learn about Sandpoint? A. My sister was moving here five or six years ago with her boyfriend. I was confused. “Why are you moving to Idaho?” I asked. She told me it’s a secret place that has it all. I didn’t believe her until I saw her photos. Then I had to come! Q. What are the trade-offs for moving here? A. Small-town living is kind of like high school. Everyone knows your business. On the good side, genuinely down-to-earth, good people, who care about taking the time

nati ves + n e wcom e rs

to have a conversation and to help others. Q. Complete this sentence: You know you’re at home in Sandpoint when... A. ... I drive across the Long Bridge, roll down the windows and take a deep breath. Q. What do you tell folks back home about where you’ve moved? A. I tell them I live in “vacation land” and to come visit. If they want to escape the hustle and bustle and material lifestyle, come to Sandpoint. Take a breath of fresh mountain air, sip some Evans Brothers Coffee or Laughing Dog beer, and enjoy the daily life instead of trying to escape.

Sean Medley Newcomer

W

hen he’s not cooking soups, breakfasts, or preparing food for the hot bar at Winter Ridge deli, Sean Medley can be found reading, watching sports, or enjoying the outdoors with his young son Logan. “I love all sports,” he said. “I’m hoping to get into some fishing here and anything outdoors.”

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n at i v es + newcom ers Still, life was a bit unsettled when he first moved here in June, 2019 from Central Point, Oregon. “I found a job right away,” Medley, 48, says, “but had to stay in an Airbnb and a hotel before I finally found my place. “Mary Willkos, my ‘first meet’ in Sandpoint, hosted the Airbnb where I stayed,” he added. “She was a wonderful lady.” Medley has lived on both coasts and in the Midwest. “I was born in Detroit,” he said. “My mom worked at the hospital and my dad owned a jewelry store.” At 12, he moved to Maryland and soon thereafter to the Conejo Valley in Southern California. While living in Oregon, Medley earned certification as a wildland firefighter. His career has also included plastic fabrication and restaurant management.

Medley is grateful that when his exwife and he chose a place where they could share in rearing their son, Sandpoint got the nod. “The friendliness and tight community feel of this place has been wonderful to experience,” he said. “I absolutely love Sandpoint.”

Q. How did you learn about Sandpoint? A. Through my ex-wife and her knowledge of Idaho. I came to Idaho to visit her friends and family for the first time about eight years ago. It was going to be Moscow or Sandpoint; we thankfully chose Sandpoint. Q. What are the trade-offs for moving here? A. I left an area that had a lot of crime, allowing me to escape those urban dilemmas by having great outdoor things to do. All trade-offs have been positive (even cold temps don’t bother me). Being so far from the ocean is the only “negative.” I’ve been blessed to live close to the ocean since I was 14. Q. Complete this sentence: You know you’re at home in Sandpoint when... A. ...you run into friends and coworkers wherever you go. I’m really enjoying the small town, community-based environment. Q. What do you tell friends back home about where you’ve moved? A. It’s cold! It’s beautiful here and quiet.

Sandpoint is just the Start ...of an amazing 280-mile scenic loop. It’s North America’s only 2-state, 2-country scenic byway!

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THE INTERNATIONAL

SELKIRK LOOP 888-823-2626

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LODGING

sandpoint

Spa or Sauna

Pool on site

Restaurant

Bar or Lounge

54

x

x

x

x

21

x

x

19

x

x

60

x

69

x

25

x

250

x

x

50

x

x

70

x

x

x

208-263-3194 or 800-635-2534

Daugherty Management

x

x

208-263-1212

Dover Bay Bungalows

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

208-263-5383

Lodge at Sandpoint 208-263-2211

Northern Quest Casino

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

877.871.6772

Pend Oreille Shores Resort 208-264-5828

Selkirk Lodge

x

x

208-265-0257 or 877-487-4643

Sleep's Cabins

4

208-255-2122

Twin Cedars Camping and Vacation Rentals 208-920-1910

8

x

White Pine Lodge

26

x

208-265-0257 or 877-487-4643

Sandpoint’s luxury vacation home rentals, with properties on the lake and the mountain. See ad, page 5. www.DM-Vacations.com

Free breakfast with waffles, 24-hour hot tub, free wireless internet. Family suites. Schweitzer ski packages. At the base of Schweitzer Mountain, two miles from Lake Pend Oreille.

208-263-2210

Hotel Ruby

Downtown Sandpoint on the lake. Indoor pool, sauna, fitness room, hot tub. All rooms with lake view. Dine at Trinity at City Beach. Also 22-site RV park. www.BestWesternEdgewater.com

Waterfront bungalows at Dover Bay in Marina Village. Fully furnished, lake and mountain views. Fitness center, marina, hiking/biking trails. See ad, page 4. www.DoverBayBungalows.com

208-263-5493

FairBridge Inn & Suites

TWIN CEDARS CAMPING AND VACATION RENTALS, TIPI ON THE LAKE.

Meeting Rooms

No. of Units Best Western Edgewater Resort

Kitchen

SLEEP'S CABINS VACATION RENTAL CABIN ON THE LAKE.

DAUGHERTY MANAGEMENT VACATION RENTAL HOME ON THE LAKE IN SANDPOINT

x

x

x

x

x

New pool, hot tubs, pet-friendly, complimentary continental breakfast, bicycles, BluRay players/ movies & WiFi, hot tub rooms, athletic center. Accommodations for weddings, retreats and banquets. Lakeside with swimming and docks. Views of lake and mountains for an unforgettable Idaho vacation. www.LodgeAtSandpoint.com Northern Quest Resort and Casino is the Inland Nortwest’s only AAA-Rated 4-Diamond Casino Resort. Complimentary WiFi, valet and overnight parking. www.NorthernQuest.com Fully furnished condos and on-site athletic club on Lake Pend Oreille. Stay and play packages. See ad, page 41. www.POSResort.com Mountain accommodations, stay-and-play packages. Spectacular mountain and lake views. Outdoor heated pool and hot tubs. See ad on back cover. www.Schweitzer.com Sleep's Cabins have been a beloved part of the community and a landmark on Lake Pend Oreille since the 1930s. Perfect for family vacations. See ad page 44. www.SleepsCabins.com Owner-managed vacation rental homes and camping cabin; RV sites on Lake Pend Oreille and in the Selle Valley; tipi on beach (open year round). Horse/dog friendly. www.TwinCedarsSandpoint.com

x

New accommodations, stay-and-play packages. Spectacular mountain & lake views. Outdoor hot tubs, access to heated pool. See ad back cover. www.Schweitzer.com

S a nd p o i ntM a g a zi ne . co m S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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RUN N ING

A

Restaurant in

Interesting

TIMES U

by Beth Hawkins & Trish Gannon

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nprecedented challenges have impacted our restaurant industry like never before, as the coronavirus snuffed out in-person dining this spring. In these “interesting times” we now live in, local restaurateurs have struggled to survive. As the state of Idaho continues to balance the reopening of businesses while maintaining safety protocols to stem the spread of the COVID-19 virus, we look at how our area eateries have responded and can respond in the future to the times we live in. For Meggie Foust, who owns the Sweet Lou’s restaurants in Ponderay and Coeur d’Alene with her husband Chad, the key to survival was learning to adapt—and quickly. “In January, I wouldn’t have imagined all that we have been through taking place. But it’s impossible to stay in the game if you’re just waiting for things to go back to normal,” she said. “You have to change your business model to be in line with current events—even at a moment’s notice.” When take-out was the only option, Sweet Lou’s as a company streamlined some of their processes, which included adding parking spots allocated for take-out only and investing in tablets that allow customers to pay from their cars. Foust sees this option for customers as a somewhat permanent one: “Takeout will continue to be a larger part of the business than ever before. We are learning as we go and see this as an area of opportunity for growth.” Jeff Nizzoli, who owns Eichardt’s on Cedar Street, was another restaurateur who thought outside the box on the take-out only program. “I took a look at the contacts on my phone to see where they lived,” he said, and soon after was offering a weekly “meal

delivery” service in certain Sandpoint areas. He would send out a text message to those on his list of the night’s two dinner options, and customers would text back their order. Then Nizzoli and other staff would drive out to a pre-arranged pick-up place where customers would stop by—generally on foot— and pick up their orders. One of those pick-up spots was the parking area for Missi Balison Fitness, just outside of town on the corner of Gooby and Upland. “I love that they did that,” said Balison, who was a customer every week of the service. “It was such a cool thing. Everybody did a good job giving each other space, but it also recreated for us a sense of community”—something missing when everyone was staying home. “I’m kind of missing it now!” she added. MickDuff’s managed to branch out during the pandemic closures. The Sandpoint brewery donated around 100 gallons of date-coded beer to Mill Town Distillery, the only farm-based craft distillery in Idaho, located near Dover. Owners Bryan Egland and Victor and Jessie Vachon turned that alcohol (along with other donations) into First Response Hand Sanitizer, created from a World Health Organization recipe. Litehouse Foods donated bottles for the product, as hand sanitizer became impossible to find in local stores. When the Hoot Owl restaurant had to close, owner Wendy Sater, with her daughter Savannah Mort, continued their regular practice of providing a soup kitchen to the neighborhood. Using the restaurant food that would otherwise have spoiled, the pair served up 180 meals for takeout on the first night,

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: TRINITY AT CITY BEACH HAS REDUCED TABLE SEATING BOTH INSIDE AND OUT. PHOTO BY DOUG MARSHALL. JEFF NIZZOLI OF EICHARDT’S MAKING A RURAL DELIVERY TO DIANE RINCK DURING THE PANDEMIC. EVANS BROTHERS HAS EXPANDED THEIR OUTDOOR SEATING. STAFF PHOTOS

S a n d p o i n tM a g a zi n e . co m S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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AFTER SHUTTING DOWN FOR TWO MONTHS, TRINITY AT CITY BEACH IS ONCE AGAIN SERVING GUESTS AT THEIR LAKESIDE LOCATION. PHOTO BY DOUG MARSHALL

and a breakfast takeout for 275. The Eureka Institute partnered with Sandpoint Curry, Eichardt’s and Matchwood Brewing to provide free meals three times a week, paid for by nearly 100 community members, a dozen local businesses and with grants from Innovia and the Idaho Community Foundation. Trinity at City Beach was one of the first local restaurants to close at the onset of the pandemic. On March 19, owner Justin Dick wrote on the restaurant’s Facebook page, “Like a coward, I have been waiting for our federal, state and/or local leadership to make the decision for me. That did not happen and it behooves me to make the ethical decision to close my doors for the safety of our customers, staff and my family.” He went on to explain that his decision was driven by the knowledge that “several employees, including myself, have children with compromised immune systems,” and that “we as an industry are disrupting the supply chain to the grocery stores and to the hospitals.” It was a risky choice, but Dick said he had “made peace with that. There is no amount of money that

will repair my heart if I were to lose a family member, an employee, or a customer.” It was two months before the restaurant would open its doors again, with a heartfelt “OMG have we missed you all!” message on its Facebook page. Dick is adhering strictly to reopening guidelines, recommending that diners make a reservation given the more limited seating options available due to social distancing; they have reduced tables both indoors and out by 50 percent. All front-of-house staff, they added, will be wearing masks. These examples—and there are dozens of others—highlight two traits that help local restaurants succeed whether there’s a pandemic or not: service to the community, and the flexibility to be able to roll with the punches. Someone who has seen decades of restaurants come and go—by his tally, 310 total from 1984 to 2010 in Sandpoint, Sagle, Garfield Bay and Hope—is longtime restaurateur Barney Ballard. In partnership with his wife, Carol, he ran The Cupboard, started Tango Cafe, was a partner in Ivano’s when it moved to its First Avenue location and opened Dock of the

SANDPOINT’S PREMIER

CRAFT BEER STORE OVER 300 BEERS IN STOCK 12 ROTATING BEER TAPS MEATS & ARTISANAL CHEESE 208-597-7096 WWW.IDAHOPOURAUTHORITY.COM • 203 CEDAR STREET DOWNTOWN SANDPOINT, ID 126

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Bay in Hope. (You can thank the Ballards for the most unique urinal in North Idaho.) He’s now retired, but has keen insight into what it takes for restaurants to stay afloat. In these new and unusual times, struggling restaurant owners might want to heed his sage advice... and it’s blunt. “What I think this whole thing (the pandemic) will do, is there will be some restaurants that have to go by the wayside. I say that because naturally there’s going to be fewer customers.” But Ballard insists that restaurant owners have the ability to make changes, and up their chances of survival in these leaner days. ”The little things are going to be really important to who survives. How the outside of the building looks, how clean the bathrooms are, it indicates the care level and sanitation, and it’s a welcoming aspect to the restaurant. Then, of course, the food and service are important.” For starters, owners can focus on the basics. “Step outside, look at your building, look at your restaurant, see it through a customer’s eyes.” More room for improvement, according to Ballard, starts with first impressions. “The other thing that gets missed, is once that customer has arrived, you want them to immediately feel welcomed. I think some places miss the boat.” He said this sets the entire tone, and when things are done right, it shows. “If you have a person who has greeted you and made you feel

welcome, then that’s the other important feeling of ‘I’m being taken care of.’ When you sit down, you’re positively engaged. All of the nice things will hit you—the art on the wall and the cleanliness. Then you can experience the food.” Ballard goes on to say that restaurants should emphasize their strong points. “Hit the things you do well, and make little variations.” One of those little variations is visible in how local restaurants and eateries are now working to expand their dining spaces by reaching into the outdoors as much as they can. The city of Sandpoint is helping in that effort by removing some of the restrictions that had been placed on the use of sidewalks outside of businesses, making it easier for some restaurants to be able to provide additional seating there. A sense of community is stronger in difficult times, and it’s no different with restaurants. Sharing the experience with other restaurant owners in the area helped Foust get through the darkest of days. “We rode this wave together. We’ve shared ideas, plans and even to-go boxes when we were in a pinch. “It’s a lesson that goes back to elementary school ... teams are always stronger when you’re working together. We definitely became a strong team of independent business owners and I hope we continue sharing tricks of the trade for years to come.”

Restaurant & Catering serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 150+ bottles of wine • 100 different beers Gas • propane • showers • ice • convenience store 1587 Rapid Lightning Rd, Sandpoint, ID • (208) 263-2409 • VISIT US on S a n d p o i n tM a g a zi n e . co m S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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mess TEXAS …

Don’t with

It’s Texas style—you go to the counter, look at the menu, pick what you want, get your sides, go sit down, and eat.”

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Get authentic barbecue in Idaho! by Beth Hawkins

G

as up the car and hit the road for a true Texas-style barbecue experience. But instead of driving south 1,500 miles to the Lone Star State, head north 40some miles to Moyie Springs. It’s the unlikely home of the all-new Old West Texas Smokehouse Pit BBQ and Steakhouse—a place that will lure barbecue aficionados in the restaurant’s homage to slow-smoked meats. The restaurant is part of The Hemlocks RV park and motel complex that dates back to the ‘50s—all of which is now under the ownership of native Texan Johnney Walker (nope, not making this up). With 40 years of experience in the catering and restaurant industry under his belt, Walker’s got the chops to take on head pitmaster duties. “All of the meats are smoked daily from 12 to 14 hours,” Walker said. “We slow smoke it over mesquite or hickory to give you real Texas barbecue.” Take note, before venturing to Old West Texas, that there are two distinct dining experiences to choose from: “The front half is the barbecue part,” Walker said. “It’s Texas style—you go to the counter, look at the menu, pick what you want, get your sides, go sit down and eat.” Plate options include sandwiches, ribs, brisket and more. There will be iced beer, as well as wine and more, and it’s open Tuesday through Saturday from 11 a.m. until they run out. The back of the restaurant is a traditional steakhouse

with choice cuts. “It has that old-school steakhouse feel with dark woods, and in the kitchen is an Argentine grill where all of our steaks are live-fired,” Walker said. Two types of beef will be offered: prime dry-aged, as well as beef that’s locally raised. All of the seafood—a selection of halibut, salmon and more—are flown in fresh from Alaska. It’s open Friday through Sunday from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. As of mid June, Walker was busy putting the final touches on an outdoor log pavilion with tables so guests can enjoy their meal outside, a small stage for music performances, and perhaps most intriguing—a whole hog cooker. “It’s a 4’ by 8’ pit, so when we have special events, we’re going to be cooking a whole hog,” Walker said. “It’s not every weekend, it’s just something special. It will be ready the next day when everybody’s listening to the band. (The meat is) tender and juicy, but you have to tend it for 12 to 14 hours.” To kick off the opening of the Old West Texas Smokehouse Pit BBQ and Steakhouse, Walker is hosting a July Fourth grand opening party starting at noon with free barbecue and beer ‘til it runs out. “That will get people hooked,” Walker said. Come on up, y’all! Old West is located at 73400 Highway 2, Moyie Springs, Id. 208-267-4363.

ABOVE: THERE ARE TWO DINING AREAS AT OLD WEST TEXAS, THE PIT BBQ AND THE STEAKHOUSE. FACING PAGE AND RIGHT: MIXED BARBECUE BY THE POUND INCLUDES MESQUITE-SMOKED BRISKET, GERMAN SAUSAGE AND PULLED PORK.

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Game CHANGING THE

New restaurant opens at Idaho Club by Beth Hawkins

G

ood things come to those who wait … and patience is deliciously rewarded now that the doors have opened at The Idaho Club’s modern-rustic, 7,500-square-foot clubhouse with its stunning new restaurant. At last, more than a decade after the previous clubhouse burned down, golfers and visitors alike can enjoy a fine meal at The Idaho Club, or even just sip a cold brew in the adjacent bar and grill while overlooking the Jack Nicklaus-designed golf course and its tranquil Pack River setting. The Idaho Club’s managing member Bill Haberman emphasizes that the restaurant, along with the bar and grill, are fully open to the public, and everyone in the community is welcome to experience fine dining and relaxing in the new clubhouse. The golf course is also open to the public after 10:30 a.m. every day, with earlier tee times reserved for members. There’s definitely enough space for everyone. The main restaurant dining room is a show-stopper, situated between a gorgeous rock masonry fireplace and a wall of windows that take full advantage of the spectacular views. Located in the east end of the clubhouse, it seats up to 95 guests. The bar and grill area can accommodate an additional 45 people, and the outside deck, which is partially covered, seats another 50. Richard Nakatani, who formerly managed banquet and

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E ATS + D R I N KS LEFT, TOP: THE CLUBHOUSE RESTAURANT OFFERS EXPANSIVE VIEWS. LEFT, BELOW: THE ENTRANCE TO THE CLUBHOUSE, WITH THE RESTAURANT DINING AREA LOCATED BEYOND THE FIREPLACE. COURTESY PHOTOS

Cafe • Grocery • Beer & Wine THERE'S NO PLACE LIKE Hope

group business at Schweitzer Mountain Resort, was hired as chef to head up the new restaurant. An Americana-inspired menu with hearty options aims to draw in not only hungry golfers after finishing up their games, but also enhance the restaurant’s status as a go-to destination for foodies and guests seeking a fine dining experience. “The menu consists of primarily steak, regional seafood, salad, pub favorites, and weekly specials,” Haberman said, adding that the final tweaks to the menu are still being determined, but they plan to have some regional and big-game items on occasion. “There is also a bar menu which is a limited version of the dinner menu, with a selection of burgers, sandwiches, salads and appetizers.” Haberman said that plans are for the restaurant to be fully open July 1. It’s welcome news for golfers and other community members who have missed the opportunity to brunch or dine while overlooking the unparalleled scenery of the lower Pack River. He reiterates it is their hope that the entire local community takes full advantage of the new clubhouse, and said The Idaho Club plans to host a variety of business functions, charity events, weddings and other local events.

Come on out for great food, amazing views and a community vibe.

LOCAL EVENTS TRIVIA NIGHT TACO WEDNESDAYS HAPPY HOUR

Every 3rd Tuesday

208.264.0539

www.davisgrocery.com

floater

NEWLY REMODELED FRESH SEAFOOD • AGED BEEF LOCAL FRESH INGREDIENTS

208 264-5311

CRAFT BEER, WINE, EATERY, EVENTS, LIVE MUSIC

SANDPOINT, COEUR D’ALENE, & NEW! SPOKANE WONDER BUILDING 524 CHURCH ST, SANDPOINT 504 E SHERMAN AVE, COEUR D’ALENE WONDER MARKET, 821 W MALLON AVE, SPOKANE

HOPEFLOATINGRESTAURANT.COM S a n d p o i n tM a g a zi n e . co m S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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DISH

the local

T

he Sandpoint area’s restaurant scene is as delicious, inventive, and forward-thinking as ever! Proof of that is found no further than the enhanced new name for Di Luna’s Long Weekend Cafe and Gift Shop, 207 Cedar St. It’s a reflection of the cafe’s new days of operation, Friday through Sunday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Monday from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., as well as the expanded gift shop offering items “from the practical to the ridiculous.” Owner Karen Forsythe has not only been busy enhancing the gift shop, but also creating mouthwatering additions to the lunch menu including shrimp tacos, roasted veggie pitas,

veggie burgers crafted with housemade falafel, salmon with a honey-berry sauce, and a Greek chicken sandwich. Mmmm … where do we possibly start? And on sunny days this summer, you’ll find the Di Luna’s staff grilling out in front of the restaurant. “It’s real street food!” she said of the outdoor venture. Forsythe made some process changes, as well, in light of the Covid-19 protocols. “We have changed the way the customer order is taken; now you order at the front counter where we have a plexiglass window between customers and servers, plus all menus, tables, chairs, salt and pepper shakers, etc., are sanitized between customers.” Tables are spaced with a

Serving dinner 7 nights a week Reservations Recommended

NeW Location... your happy place Air Roasted Organic Coffee Beans Espresso Blended Drinks Deli Foods Free WiFi

208.265.2000

41 Lakeshore Drive, Sagle www.41SouthSandpoint.com

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FRESH GREENS FROM THE FLOATING RESTAURANT. MUSHROOM SWISS BURGER AT SWEET LOU’S, SERVED WITH HAND-CUT FRENCH FRIES. THE BEET AND ARUGULA SALAD AT MATCHWOOD BREWING COMPANY GOES HAND-IN-HAND WITH A GLASS OF SEASONAL GOSÉ ... OR JUST STICK WITH THE POPULAR NEW ENGLAND HAZY IPA (AT RIGHT). COURTESY PHOTOS

minimum of six feet distance between them, and Forsythe is mindful of having minimal interaction between the staff and the customers—which isn’t so easy for this community-minded business owner. “It’s contrary to what the hospitality business is all about.” One block away at The Fat Pig, 301 Cedar St., owner and chef Brett Mullinder has rolled out the summer menu—sure to please the restaurant’s longtime fans and newcomers alike. “We’re keeping some of the old classics like the fast food burger, the bang bang cauliflower salad, and the ramen noodle bowl, plus new additions like a Caribbean pork stew with

basmati and crispy yams, a turkey pastrami sandwich that’s of course smoked in house, Mongolian beef lettuce wraps, a tofu bahn mi sandwich, and more.” The downtown restaurant is kicking off a Patio Music Series in July, taking place on what Mullinder describes as a “kick-ass patio in general.” With ambient lights and a charming street scene that’s just steps from Jeff Jones Town Square with its summer fountain, The Fat Pig’s patio is definitely one of Sandpoint’s liveliest dining locations. In response to the virus situation, Mullinder said the restaurant offers a sanitizing station that’s set up for the public,

ALL NATURAL!

July thru Octo ber is

Huckleberry Season!

Local Natural Delicious

Winter Ridge Natural Foods is your onestop-shop to support your healthy lifestyle.

Locally Picked Huckleberries! Enjoy one of our many Huckleberry products at the Pantry:

Organic Produce Salad Bar Deli Hot Food Bar Local Grass-Fed Meats and Dairy Extensive Wellness and Beauty Departments Exclusive Wines and Cheeses Beer and Kombucha on Tap Robust Bulk Items Healthy On-The-Go Foods And So Much More.

Pies | Danishes | Bread | Muffins Jams | Ice Cream | Milk Shakes

all made fresh in our bakery!

703 Lake Street at Boyer St Sandpoint, ID

(208) 265-8135 www.WinterRidgeFoods.com

S a n d p o i n tM a g a zi n e . co m S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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and also continues to offer curbside meals to go. “For social distancing, the tables are spaced out, there’s contact sanitation of everything in general, and no sick staff are allowed to work.” Huge kudos go out to Sandpoint’s Matchwood Brewing, 513 Oak St., which garnered some much-deserved applause from readers who were polled by The Inlander—a weekly Spokane newspaper. “Matchwood was voted Best New Brewery in North Idaho in 2019 by more than 5,000 Inlander readers,” said Matchwood co-owner Andrea Marcoccio, who adds that the brewery is fast becoming a go-to for all types of folks and events. “Our space is the perfect spot for family gatherings, celebrations, and community events.” Matchwood’s entire kitchen team collaborated on the new summer menu that launched in early June, and includes a mouthwatering assortment of options. Highlights include

ceviche tacos, made with flash-poached shrimp soaked in a citrus blend, and mixed with cucumber, tomato, onions, and cilantro on three flour tortillas topped with shredded cabbage and chipotle sauce. For those in search of a favorite new hearty summer salad, fill up with the Southwest quinoa salad featuring a zesty blend of quinoa, black beans, fresh veggies, and dressed greens in a Southwest lime vinaigrette and topped with cojita cheese and bell peppers. (Marcoccio offers a pro tip: add avocado!) And what’s summer without a pile of ribs? Matchwood serves up a half-rack of St. Louis-style pork ribs that are seasoned, slow braised, grilled, and finished with a house barbecue sauce and served with a side of jicama slaw. Finally, the new Sloppy Joe nachos are a savory pile of satisfaction with Woods ground beef and a tangy Sloppy Joe sauce served over

Seasonal Pub Fare with a Unique Twist Summer Hours Mon-Sat 11:30am to 10:00pm 301 Cedar St., Suite 102 208.265.PORK

usic io M PatS eriesNights ay

www.sandpointfatpig.com

d 00 : nes Wed6:00-9ugust -A y l u J

FAMILY FRIENDLY • OUTDOOR SEATING FULL BAR

(208) 263-2995

www.sandpointjalapenos.com 314 N. Second Ave.

Natural beer, food & fun! Rice crusts & soy cheese now available

Come visit us today at one of our two locations: Family Friendly Brewpub

312 N First Ave.

Beer Hall & Brewery

220 Cedar St.

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•Delivery •Sandwiches •Calzones •Specialty Salads •Homemade Dough •Beer/Wine •Take & Bakes

The Carolyn

215 S. 2nd Ave.

263-9321

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E ATS + D R I N KS FROM LEFT: MILLER’S COUNTRY STORE SERVES DAILY PANINI SPECIALS. DILUNA’S USES WHAT’S IN SEASON LOCALLY FOR THE FARMERS’ MARKET BENEDICT. A NEW ADDITION ON THE FAT PIG’S SUMMER MENU IS THE TOFU BAHN MI SANDWICH, FEATURING MARINATED TOFU WITH VEGGIES AND A SPICY AIOLI SAUCE ON A FRENCH ROLL. COURTESY PHOTOS

fresh tortilla chips and topped with Matchwood’s beer cheese, plus sour cream, chipotle sauce, and green onions. They’re also available in a vegetarian format as ‘Sloppy Len’ nachos ... made with lentils, of course! And for those sticking to the tried-andtrue favorites, top picks include the classic burger, the mac and cheese bites and the housemade beer pretzel. Wash it all down with the brewery’s fine selection of handcrafted beers, including the new Gosé—a beer that’s sour with a strong lemon flavor and hints of Indian coriander. Matchwood’s Marcoccio is grateful for the brewery’s large indoor and outdoor seating areas to ensure a safe environment for both customers and staff. “It allows us to practice social distancing and all other sanitization best practices,” she said. “We are actively practicing risk reduction and community wellness measures to ensure the safety of our guests and team.”

Sweet Lou’s, 477272 Highway 95 in Ponderay, was also bestowed an honor recently—named “Best Burger” in 2019 from the Sandpoint Living Finest 2019 awards. Co-owner Meggie Foust explains that the business was honored to receive the award, and is “plugging away and keeping ahead of the times” to continue serving the greater Sandpoint area— as well as their second restaurant in Coeur d’Alene. If you’re ready to try a famous Sweet Lou’s burger, try going over the top with the mushroom Swiss burger—with a ground, certified-Angus-beef patty topped with sauteed mushroom, melted Swiss cheese, lettuce, tomato, and onions. Burgers are served with delicious hand-cut French fries accompanied with their homemade fry sauce; or get a side of house-fried chips. Foust said they’re working on some new menu items, and also has “heard rumors” about the beloved Pend Oreille Plate appetizer

coffee with your pastry purchase!

Breads Scones Pastries Cookies Pies Cinnamon Rolls Coffee Teas Canned Goods Spices Beans Rice Pasta Flour Nuts Dried Fruit Christian Books Housewares

Hours:

M-F 8:30-5:30 Join us on

208-263-9446

1326 Baldy Mtn. Rd. Sandpoint, ID 83864 . www.millerscountrystoresandpoint.com S a n d p o i n tM a g a zi n e . co m S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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making a comeback. Stay tuned! The restaurant is currently limiting their seating capacity, and front-of-house employees wear masks. “We are double sanitizing every touchable surface, menus, pens, and we now have payment available via your cell phones so if customers are more comfortable paying that way, that is possible too,” Foust said. “We’ve improved our online ordering system and added two parking spots specifically for take-out. We are adapting with the times and hoping to make our customers as safe and comfortable as possible.” The Floating Restaurant, 47392 Highway 200 in Hope, is a summer season draw for foodies stopping in by boat or by car.

With sunsets that are awe-inspiring and a menu that embraces summer’s bounty, there’s hardly a more perfect setting for a delicious meal. Chef and owner Elissa Robbins is facing this year’s challenging environment by reinventing her menu. In particular, the inconsistent supply chain for meats this season has shifted her reliance to a regional source. “We’ve been able to secure Snake River Farms Wagyu beef for a menu item,” she said. “This beef steak has outstanding flavor and a meltin-your-mouth, buttery texture.” Her restaurant’s challenges are definitely a diner’s gain! “Seafood is plentiful, so as usual we feature daily additions of fresh fish. And our homemade huckleberry pie and smoked onion salad dressing continue to

Serving Breakfast and Lunch Daily.

102 N 1st Ave, Sandpoint 208-265-4311 Spudsonline.com

family owned f o r

Ivano’s Ristorante 208.263.0211 102 S.1st Ave Sandpoint, ID

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Ivano’s Del Lago -seasonal-

208.264.0466 1267 Peninsula Rd Hope, ID

SINCE 1994

Ivano’s Catering 208.610.6415

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E ATS + D R I N KS THE SLOW-SMOKED BABY BACK RIBS AT SWEET LOU’S ARE CARAMELIZED WITH YOUR CHOICE OF BARBECUE SAUCE—HOUSE OR BOURBON. PIZZA AT THE FLOATING RESTAURANT. DI LUNA’S SHRIMP TACOS ARE MADE WITH SUSTAINABLY HARVESTED RED SHRIMP FROM ARGENTINA, AND SERVED WITH A MANGO SLAW AND BLACK BEAN SALAD. THE FAT PIG BURGER FEATURES A SMASHED PATTY, TOPPED WITH MUENSTER CHEESE, VEGGIES, AND SPECIAL FAT PIG SAUCE. COURTESY PHOTOS

be favorites.” To comply with the current state health recommendations, nearly half of the tables indoors and outdoors have been removed. “This still leaves us with two spacious outdoor patios and an open air dining room for the security of our guests. We have made modifications where advised—sheet menus, disposable condiments, extra precautions for sanitation, and we will be wearing masks until otherwise advised by Panhandle Health.” That being said, Robbins said the restaurant appreciates reservations for dinner, since the number of tables have been reduced.

serving you 7 days a week at two locations!

Sweet Lou’s Restaurant & Bar Hwy 95 N Ponderay | 208.263.1381

Come hungry, Stay late, Eat well! www.sweetlousidaho.com

Sweet Lou’s Restaurant & TAP HOUSE 601 Front Ave. 208.667.1170 | DOWNTOWN Cda

S a n d p o i n tM a g a zi n e . co m S A N D P O I N T M AG A Z I N E

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Downtown drinks

Sandpoint

Dining Map 17

4

13 To Bonners Ferry & Canada

2 10 18

Davis Grocery & Mercantile

6

Miller’s Country Store & Deli

7

Pack River Store

8

Winter Ridge Natural Foods

9

Beet & Basil

10 Chimney Rock at Schweitzer 11

Di Luna’s Long Weekend Café and Gift Shop

12

The Fat Pig

Sand Creek Byway

Visitor Center

Larch

SA

N

The Idaho Club

Bonner General Health

Poplar

Old West Texas Smokehouse Pit BBQ And Steakhouse

Jalapeño’s Restaurant

Main

Cedar

22 Second Avenue Pizza 23 Eichardt’s Pub & Grill 24 Matchwood Brewing Co.

26 Laughing Dog Brewing

Church

27 Idaho Pour Authority 28 Mickduff ’s Brewing Co.

Beer Hall & Brewery

29 Pend d'Oreille Winery

Boyer Ave.

Brewpub

24 1

Cedar St.

12

Town Square

21

25

3

16

Panida Theater

Bridge St.

City Beach

19

9

Lake St.

8

To Dover & Priest River

Cedar St. Bridge

11 27

Pine St.

S. Fourth Ave.

Division St.

Pine

N

E

29

Main

Farmin Park

Oak

25 Mickduff ’s Brewing Co.

28 23

Fourth Ave.

19 Spuds Waterfront Grill 20 Sweet Lou’s

Bonner General Health

Fifth Ave.

Alder

18 Sky House At Schweitzer

Third Ave.

16 Ivano’s Ristorante

W

K

Healing Garden

15 Forty-One South

21

CR

Fir

14 The Clubhouse Restaurant at

17

D

EE

13 The Floating Restaurant

Elks Golf Course

Pend d’Oreille Bay Trail

Clark Fork Pantry

5

First Ave.

Monarch Mountain Coffee

6 Baldy Mountain Rd.

Second Ave.

3 4

Bonner Mall

S. Second Ave.

Mojo Coyote at Schweitzer

Kootenai Cut-off Rd. 26

PARKING

2

Schweitzer Cut-off Rd.

Boyer Ave.

Evans Brothers Coffee

Division St.

1

To Hope & Clark Fork

20

LAKE PEND OREILLE

To Schweitzer Mtn. Resort

5 14 7

22

Marina

To Sagle & Coeur d’Alene

S

15

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G G I DE IDNI N TIENRV I EUW Restaurant index by type of cuisine Locate by number on dining map

COFFEE & CAFES EVANS BROTHERS COFFEE

PACK RIVER STORE

01

1587 Rapid Lightning Rd. A country store with gourmet fare, serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Grab ‘n’ go burritos and salads, grocery necessities, plus a chef’s menu featuring weekly specials and more. Open daily. 208-263-2409 www.PackRiverStore.com

MOJO COYOTE AT SCHWEITZER 02

WINTER RIDGE NATURAL FOODS 08

10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. Enjoy a fresh Evans Brothers espresso and treat your sweet tooth to a warm scone. Fresh-baked pastries, breakfast burritos and lunch specials. Fine selection of beer and wine. 208-2553037 www.Schweitzer.com

703 Lake St. A natural foods grocery store with in-house deli, bakery, meat department, organic produce department and hot food bar with indoor seating. Open daily, 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. 208-265-8135 www.WinterRidgeFoods.com

MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE 03 119 N. First Ave. Sandpoint’s original coffee roastery and coffeehouse, now located in the heart of downtown on First Avenue! Premium micro-batch always-organic beans. Open daily. www.MonarchMountainCoffee.com

ECLECTIC/FINE DINING BEET & BASIL

CLARK FORK PANTRY

09

105 S. First Avenue. Specializing in global street food with a local flair, Beet & Basil serves delicious unique options for vegetarians, vegans, meat lovers and those with dietary restrictions. Waterfront patio seating in a beautiful garden setting. Open Tuesday-Saturday 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. 208-920-6144 www.BeetandBasil.net

DELICATESSENS & MARKETS

CHIMNEY ROCK AT SCHWEITZER 10

04

204 E 4th St., Clark Fork. All-natural, made-from-scratch baked goods, homemade soups and sandwiches, on freshly baked bread, made to order from the deli. Wide selection of bulk foods, snacks, spices and gift items. Monday through Saturday, 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., closed Sunday. 208-2661300 www.clarkforkpantry.com

10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. Fireplaces, comfortable seating in the bar, and diverse cuisine. Enjoy an extensive menu including high-quality steaks, hearty pasta, scrumptious salads and exquisite seafood. Open daily inside the Selkirk Lodge at Schweitzer. 208-255-3071. www.Schweitzer.com

DAVIS GROCERY & MERCANTILE 05

DI LUNA’S LONG WEEKEND CAFÉ 11 AND GIFT SHOP

620 Wellington Pl., Hope. Cafe and coffee shop with fresh-made pastries, sandwiches, and gluten-free options. Full-service grocery store supplies local produce, meats, wine and beer, and handcrafted goods to the Hope community. Open daily. 208-264-0539 www.DavisGroceryinHope.com

MILLER’S COUNTRY STORE & DELI

207 Cedar St. American bistro café offering regional, sustainable foods including hand-cut steaks, homemade soups and vegetarian cuisine, plus eclectic gifts available for sale. Open Friday-Monday. 208-263-0846 www.DiLunas.com

06

1326 Baldy Mountain Rd. Wholesome goodness with a selection of fine deli meats and cheeses, bulk food items, pie fillings, and delicious fresh-baked pies, breads and pastries - plus soup and sandwiches, take-home dinners, and soft-serve ice cream. Inside and outside seating. Open Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 208-263-9446. www.MillersCountryStoreSandpoint.com

Dining Guide_pg138-141.indd 139

07

524 Church St. Located in downtown Sandpoint’s historic Granary Arts District. Enjoy exceptional coffees and espresso, including the popular Headwall Espresso Blend. Locally baked pastries, breakfast burritos and more. Open daily. 208-265-5553 www.EvansBrothersCoffee.com

THE FAT PIG 301 Cedar St. Suite 102. Refreshing twists on classic pub fare with a complete vegetarian menu offered for lunch and dinner. Enjoy an extensive draft beer selection in a warm pub environment with a rotating wine list. Summer hours are Monday through Saturday. Reservations recommended. 208-265-PORK (7675) www.SandpointFatPig.com SandpointMagazine.com

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Eats eats &Drinks | Local Dining Guide

drinks

THE FLOATING RESTAURANT

SPUDS WATERFRONT GRILL

13

102 S. First Ave. On Sand Creek overlooking the marina. Spuds is a landmark restaurant in Sandpoint since 1995. Spuds creates everything from scratch, from soups and elaborate baked potatoes, to loaded salads, unique sandwiches and desserts. Serving breakfast and lunch daily. 208-265-4311

THE CLUBHOUSE RESTAURANT 14 AT THE IDAHO CLUB

SWEET LOU’S RESTAURANT

FORTY-ONE SOUTH

15

41 Lakeshore Dr., Sagle. South end of the Long Bridge. Waterfront dining in an elegant lodge setting; exquisite service paired with innovative cuisine make for one of North Idaho’s premier dining experiences. Open 7 nights a week for dinner. 208-265-2000. www.41SouthSandpoint.com

IVANO’S RISTORANTE

ETHNIC JALAPEÑOS RESTAURANT

16

73400 Highway 2, Moyie Springs. Authentic slow-smoked Texas barbecue restaurant and steakhouse at The Hemlocks, featuring ribs, sandwiches, brisket, fine steaks, fresh seafood and more. Open daily. 208-267-4363 www.OldWestTexasBBQ.com

SKY HOUSE AT SCHWEITZER

SANDPOINT M A G A Z I N E

Dining Guide_pg138-141.indd 140

SECOND AVENUE PIZZA

22

314 N. Second Ave. A Sandpoint favorite for over 20 years offering both traditional and Americanized Mexican dishes in a fun, family-friendly atmosphere. Full bar, patio seating, banquet facilities, gluten-free menu and quick to-go menu offer something for everyone. 208-263-2995 www.sandpointjalapenos.com

PUB-STYLE

EICHARDT’S PUB & GRILL

23

212 Cedar St. Relaxing pub and grill mixes casual dining with seriously good food. Completely family friendly. More than a dozen beers on tap, good wines and live music. Upstairs game room with fireplace. Locally supported and nationally recognized since 1994. Open daily at 11:30 a.m. 208-263-4005. www.EichardtsPub.com

18

10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. Ride the chairlift or hike your way up to the Sky House for a lunch experience unlike any other. Featuring a chefinspired menu from locally sourced, farm-fresh ingredients. Open during the summer season at Schweitzer. 208-263-9555. www.schweitzer.com

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21

314 N. Second Ave. A Sandpoint favorite for over 20 years offering both traditional and Americanized Mexican dishes in a fun, family-friendly atmosphere. Full bar, patio seating, banquet facilities, glutenfree menu, quick to-go menu, indoor waterfall and fish tank offer something for everyone. 208-263-2995. www.SandpointJalapenos.com

102 S. First Avenue. Family-owned trattoria serves refined Italian dishes & fine wines in a rustic, romantic atmosphere. Garden patio dining, full bar, and gluten-free options. Convenient take-out, hot or take-andbake. Catering available for large and small parties. Open 4:30 p.m. daily until close. 208-263-0211 www.IvanosRestaurant.com

OLD WEST TEXAS SMOKEHOUSE 17 PIT BBQ AND STEAKHOUSE

20

477272 U.S. Highway 95 in Ponderay. Open every day, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Terrific traditional and regional fare. Serving hand-cut steaks, freshly ground burgers, wild salmon and smoked ribs. Family-friendly environment. Full bar. A second location is open in Coeur d’Alene. 208-263-1381. www.SweetLousIdaho.com

151 Clubhouse Way. Stunning new clubhouse restaurant with fine dining and bar. Americana menu features steak, regional seafood, salad, pub favorites, and weekly specials. Bar menu includes burgers, sandwiches, salads, and appetizers. Open daily; public welcome. www.TheIdahoClub.com.

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19

47392 Highway 200 in Hope, at Hope Marina. Dine indoors in the beautiful dining room, or outdoors on the covered and open patios. Regional, handmade fare, fresh seafood, and local products. Enjoy the views and that “on the lake” experience. Lunch, dinner, Sunday brunch. 208-264-5311 www.HopeFloatingRestaurant.com

for a complete guide to local dining in sandpoint, visit our website at www.sandpointonline.com AT RIGHT, TOP TO BOTTOM: PACK RIVER STORE, EICHARDT'S PUB, MICKDUFF'S AND JALAPEÑOS RESTAURANT.

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G G I DE IDNI N TIENRV I EUW 24

MATCHWOOD BREWING CO.

513 Oak St. in the Granary District. Experience Sandpoint’s newest brewery featuring six beers on tap, fresh-made pasties, appetizers, burgers, and more. Indoor and outdoor seating; community room upstairs is great for large gatherings. Open daily, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. 208-718-2739 www.MatchwoodBrewing.com

MICKDUFF’S BREWING CO. BREWPUB

25

312 N. First Ave. Handcrafted ales in a family-friendly downtown atmosphere, brewing natural ales and root beer. Menu includes traditional and updated pub fare – gourmet hamburgers, sandwiches and handcrafted soups. 208-255-4351. www.MickDuffs.com

LAUGHING DOG BREWING

26

805 Schweitzer Plaza Dr., Ponderay. The dog-friendly taproom is open and offers a variety of locally crafted beers. Stop by and taste the delicious huckleberry cream ale, and a wide selection of beers on tap. 208263-9222 www.LaughingDogBrewing.com

TAVERNS, BREWERIES AND WINERIES IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY

27

203 Cedar Street. Sandpoint’s premium craft beer store with 16 rotating craft beer taps and 300 bottled beers in stock. Also serving hard ciders, wine by the glass, gourmet cheeses and meats. Glassware, T-shirts, and other gift ideas available. Open daily. 208-5977096 www.IdahoPourAuthority.com

MICKDUFF’S BREWING CO. BEER HALL & BREWERY

28

220 Cedar St. Family-friendly brewery tasting room boasts 16 taps, local bar art, free popcorn and weekly entertainment. Beer Hall has a beer for every taste. 21 years or older for live music on Friday and Saturday nights. (check website) Open daily. 208-2096700 www.MickDuffs.com

PEND D' OREILLE WINERY

29

301 Cedar St. Locally made wines, tasting room, house-made appetizers, live music, local art installations, and refillable wine growlers, located in the renovated and historic Belwood 301 Building. Open daily 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. 208-265-8545 www.POWine.com

SandpointMagazine.com SandpointMagazine.com

Dining Guide_pg138-141.indd 141

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Advertiser index

advertiser INDEX 7B TV Hesstronics

66

A Glass Act

116

All Seasons Garden & Floral 54 Alpine Shop

20, 73

Ameriprise Financial

70

Anderson’s Autobody

121

ArtWorks Gallery

4

Barry Fisher Custom Homes 103 Beet & Basil

137

Evergreen Realty

6

Evergreen Realty - Charesse Moore IBC Farmers Insurance- Matthew MacNeill Agency 23 Fat Pig, The Finan McDonald

134 15, 17

Sandpoint Reader

14

Lewis and Hawn Sleep Solutions

24

Sandpoint Super Drug

Litehouse Foods

34

Sandpoint Waldorf School 15

Matchwood Brewing

131

Mickduff’s Brewing Company 134 Miller’s Country Store

135

102

Satisfaction Painting

113

Schweitzer Mountain Resort BC Second Avenue Pizza

134

53, 131

Monarch Marble & Granite 97

Selkirk Craftsman Furniture 116

Fogarty Construction

116

Monarch Mountain Coffee 132

Selle Valley Construction

Forty-One South

132

Mountain West Bank

Skywalker Tree Care

94

118

North 40 Outfitters

Sleep’s Cabins

44

Spears Insurance

53

Floating Restaurant

33 3

2

Beyond Hope Resort

47

Greasy Fingers Bikes

Big Lake Recreation

55

Guaranteed Rate

26

Northland Cable

113

Hallans Gallery

54

Northwest Autobody

118

Bonner County Fairgrounds 42

Heartwood Center

48

Northwest Handmade

36

Bonner General Health

25

Hemlocks, The

72

Northwest Self Storage

122

Sweet Lou’s Restaurant

Cedar Street Bridge

39

Hope Marina

50

Pack River Store

127

Taylor Insurance

21

Hotel Ruby

48

Panhandle Animal Shelter 58

The Local Pages

121

I Saw Something Shiny

40

Panhandle Special Needs

Timberframes

Boden Architecture

Century 21 Riverstone Century 21 Riverstone Carol Curtis Clark Fork Pantry CO-Op Country Store

109 14 133 18

Idagon Idaho Club

105 30

Pend d’Oreille Winery

53

22 136

119

International Selkirk Loop 122

Realm Realty

Connie Scherr Artist

Ivano’s Ristorante

Realm Realty - Jeremy Brown 94

Dana Construction

100

Davis Grocery

131

DiLuna’s Café

126

DM Vacation Rentals Dover Bay Eichardt’s Brewpub ELTC

5 4 136 38

Evans Brothers Coffee Eve’s Leaves

131

JEP Designs Keokee Books

134 54 63, 142

Keokee media + marketing 120 KPND Radio

70

KRFY Radio

120

Lake Pend Oreille Cruises 23 Laughing Dog Brewing

41

Lewis and Hawn Dentistry 12

17

95, 116

Tomlinson Sandpoint Sotheby’s - Chris Chambers 1

Innovia Foundation

Jalapeño’s Restaurant

by Collin Beggs

Professional Electrology Center

Community Assistance League Bizarre Bazaar 41 Dan Fogarty Construction 114

56 137

Toad Alley

126

136

136

Super 1 Foods

Pend Oreille Shores Resort 41

Idaho Pour Authority

54

Spuds Waterfront Grill

Refined Aesthetics Remax in Action

70 64, 65

23 9

ReStore Habitat For Humanity 58 Rock Creek Alliance

91

Sandpoint Building Supply 115

118

Tomlinson Sandpoint Sotheby’s - Cindy Bond

IFC

Tomlinson Sandpoint Sotheby’s 59 - Karin Wickham Tomlinson Sandpoint Sotheby’s 98-99 - Rich Curtis Wildflower Day Spa Willamette Valley Bank

35 110

Sandpoint Elks

29

Winter Ridge Natural Foods 133

Sandpoint Momentum

69

Wrenco Arms

58

Sandpoint Movers

13

YMCA

22

Sandpoint Optometry

33

Go Exploring with Keokee Guide Books www.KeokeeBooks.com NEW D E ITION

$26

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l ocal b u s i ne s s

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Mark e t pl ac e

market PLACE Alpine Motors Your Buick, GMC truck dealer. New and used sales and leasing. Full service, parts and body shop. Highway 95 N., Ponderay, 208-263-2118, 1-800-430-5050. www.AlpineMotors.net

Keokee A marketing communications firm

providing web design, hosting, search engine optimization and marketing, graphic design, editorial, media consultation and more. 405 Church St., 208.263.3573. www.keokee.com

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Shop Sandpoint Go to www.shopsandpoint. com, for local web links to trusted services, merchants, artists, craftspeople, farmers and green building. Write your own reviews in the new SandpointBlog. Fun reading, recycling, and more!

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Logo artwork

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Apr 11, 2016

Apr 11, 2016

Jul 17, 2017

Apr 19

Oct 6, 2016

Logo Volunteer United…

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Promotional Material … Mar 27

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Debra MayTownsend 9, 2016 Jun 15

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Apr 19, 2017

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Sep 21, 2016

Database Documents Mar 1, 2016

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8 Directory

19

Sandpoint Community Resource Center provides

an extensive website offering information about how to receive help in areas as diverse as healthcare, housing, utilities, and clothing, while also connecting those who want to help with groups in need of volunteers. There is even an option to register your organization’s need for volunteer support. Learn more about it at www.sandpointcommunityresource.com 208-920-1840.

CFCGJul email logo.jpg 17, 2017 May 9, 2016

VIP logo v4_no tag lin… Apr 19, 2017

logo.JPG

4x5 logo.jpg

4 Postcards_files

SPINPAGEIDEAS.pdf

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SCRC logo 300 ppi.jpg

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Documents Feb 8, 2016

reverse logo outlines.jpg Sep 21, 2016

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Volunteer United Agen…

Jan 25, 2017

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Challenges 4 Postcards…

May 19, 2017

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Donor mailing list Nov 7, 2016

5

4x5 logo (1).pdf Sep 21, 2016 20

Advisory Board Mtg. … Nov 6, 2017

19

Grant Information Aug 10

3

webmail.css 15

Apr 26, 2017 Grants Committee Jul 17, 2017

CB Tans & Lashes is your premier source for sunless tanning, eyelash extensions and now nails and pedis! NEW Salon location at 302 S First Ste C (below Urgent Care) 208.610.7612 or book online at www.tansandlashes.com

Pacific Office Automati…

Second Quarter SPIN (…

Aug 10

Nov 9, 2017

Suite 208 and storage …

styles.css

Some Tips for Register… May 22, 2017

Suite 208 and storage …

Challenges 4 Postcards…

Jun 14, 2017

Apr 19

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Branding Email.docx Helpful Resource Documents

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webmail(1).css

Advisory Board Mtg. …

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Sandpoint FREE classified ads. Got something to sell? Looking for good deals, a place to rent, a job, a ride share… or even looking for love? Post for free, or browse hundreds of ads in Sandpoint’s own version of Craigslist. Go to www.SandpointClassifieds.com Subscribe to Sandpoint Magazine! Sure, you can read it all online. But that hardly holds a candle to the real-life, hardcopy magazine! Published twice yearly, in November and May; subscriptions are just $12. Subscribe at www.sandpointmagazine. com or call 208-263-3573 ext 0.

Vanderford’s Offering the latest books and novels, office supplies, machine supplies and free delivery in Sandpoint. Order online. 201 Cedar St.,

Elite Tire & Suspension in Ponderay is

your locally owned and trusted shop for tires, suspension work and alignment. 800 Kootenai Cutoff Rd. Ponderay, ID 83852 Call Bill at 208-265-3603, visit our website at www.elitetireandsuspension.com or follow us on Facebook.

Sandpoint Super Drug The Center for Functional Nutrition offers a full line of clinical nutrition products including Klaire, Thorne, Pure, Ortho Molecular, and Apex. 604 N. 5th Avenue.

208-263-2417. www.Vanderfords.com

ADVERTISING INFORMATION Get current rate sheet on our website www.SandpointMagazine.com or call

208-263-3573 and talk to Sales Director Clint Nicholson (ext. 123; email clint@keokee.com).

SandpointMagazine.com

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sandpoint of view

A Hometown by Annie Pflueger

Hero

Terry Huggins is keeping it clean

A

pproximately seven years ago, Terry Huggins suffered a severe physical reaction to medication that left him with significant disabilities and he was told he might never walk again. But despite the odds and his doctor’s negative prognosis, he fought hard and the affliction never put a damper on his desire and ambition to make our Idaho home a better place. Yes, this area is renowned for its rugged beauty and outdoor opportunities, but what truly makes this the best place in the world to live is the people who live here. And Terry's story is just one of thousands. If you live in Boundary County, or visit the Bonners Ferry area often, you likely already know Terry, who is truly one of the most likable, kind and friendly people you could ever meet. Recently, at a local eatery, nearly every person who walked through the door greeted Terry and his wife Sue with sincere enthusiasm and admiration. Born and raised in Bonners Ferry, Terry worked much of his life as a firefighter for the Forest Service. When not working, he enjoyed donating his time to those in need by providing them with firewood to keep warm during the winter months. Terry knows the back roads, hills and mountains surrounding Boundary County better than most. An avid outdoorsman, scuba diver and nature lover, you will often find him on the banks of the Kootenai River relaxing with his favorite pastime, fishing. Terry and Sue love to camp, but their camping trips are a

144

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little more remarkable than most. Terry will spend countless hours scouring the roads, stream banks and lakes collecting trash others have sadly left behind. Upon arrival home, his pickup truck will have mounds of bags filled with garbage and miscellaneous rubbish. He then takes it one step further. Terry meticulously combs through every single piece of trash, sorts them into recycle and waste and hauls it back to the landfill. Large discarded items such as sofas, recliners, tires and barbecues have been removed from our countryside thanks to his efforts. Small items such as cans, bottles, cigarettes, needles and other drug paraphernalia are also among the items Terry has helped to remove from our environment. With the help of cell phone tracking, Terry walked an astounding 580 miles picking up litter along the back roads from March through November in 2019. He loves to remain active and outdoors, enjoying the beauty of North Idaho and if he can help maintain that beauty, he is truly happy and satisfied. He genuinely loves nature and desires to give back any way he can. He feels picking up litter is a small role he can play in helping keep our living world a better place for all to enjoy. Terry Huggins is a true Idaho hero. I am so very proud to know him and call him a friend. His can-do attitude despite the difficulties he has faced epitomize the character of so many who call northern Idaho home.

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Charesse Moore Sandpoint’s Full-Time Top Producing Agent*

Cell 208.255.6060

321 N. First Ave., | Sandpoint, ID 83864

• Knowledge • Experience • Dedication • Results • Marketing

*Based on Selkrirk MLS data for 2004-2020

TOTALLY RENOVATED HOME WITH LAKE VIEWS

AMAZING 4,300 SF home with 4 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, family room with a second kitchen; allows for a separate living area. Wood flooring, rock fireplace, large windows for natural tight, granite counters, double islands allowing more than one cook in the kitchen! 3-car garage, landscaped, mature trees and sprinkler system. $975,500 #20200702

HOME WITH 2 SHOPS AND YEAR-ROUND CREEK

CUSTOM HOME, two insulated shops, greenhouse and year-round creek on 2 sides! 3,900 sf, 4 bed, 4 bath, wood-burning fireplace, office, chef’s kitchen with eating bar and open to the dining area. In-floor heat, wonderful backyard, 2-car garage with walk-in storage room. Nearby beach with boat launch and recreational public lands. $619,000 # 20201264

HOME IN DESIRABLE GATED COMMUNITY

1,880 SF, 3 BEDROOM home with the master and master bath on the main, 2.5 bath, kitchen with pantry and pull out drawers. Vaulted ceilings, tall windows for natural lighting, second level loft/family room, in-floor heat, private courtyard and 2-car garage. $366,000 #20200776

WATERFRONT ESTATE WITH 183’ OF SHORELINE

WATERFRONT ESTATE on nearly 10 level acres with expansive water views (4 parcels): a stunning home, 183’ of shoreline, boat dock and five-bay garage/shop (71’x32’). Desirable area just half a mile to Sandpoint! Timber design with dramatic living room, stunning kitchen, master suite and more. Exceptional home and property! $4,400,000 #20200591

LODGE HOME WITH 4-CAR GARAGE ON 15 ACRES (THREE 5 ACRE PARCELS)

BEAUTIFUL LODGE HOME with a 4-car garage situated on 15 treed acres (3 parcels!). Updated home featuring a gourmet kitchen w/granite counters, open living room, cozy rock accented fireplace, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths (tile showers & floors). Natural spring fed pond & borders 100s of acres of timber land w/trails to Round Lake & 1,000s of acres of public land! 20’x16’ shop w/power & gazebo. $624,900 #20200191

WATERFRONT PARCEL + 3.55 ACRE PARCEL

TWO PARCELS - A Waterfront parcel and a 3.55 acre parcel with Hays Creek flowing through and old growth trees. The 3.55 acres slopes with several beautiful building sites including a lake view site. Parcels are divided by RR tracks with an crossing easement. Level beachfront with expansive views of the lake & the mountains. Owner may carry! $225,000 #20200971

PRIME SOUTH SANDPOINT LOCATION!

2 SWISS TIMBER FRAMED FURNISHED CHALET HOMES

SOUTH SANDPOINT within walking distance to downtown! Alluring front yard, professionally landscaped, fenced back yard with a workshop shed & space for relaxation. 4 bedrooms (one on the main level), family room, living room & 2.5 bathrooms. Garage shop and covered parking carport. Walk to Lake Pend Oreille, downtown Sandpoint, Memorial Field, restaurants, coffee shops, and breweries. $399,000 #20201249

IN-TOWN 3 bedroom, 3 bathroom, open floor plan, wood-burning fireplace, vaulted ceilings, wrap-around deck, hot tub, outdoor kitchenette, landscaped, rock fountain waterfall and water feature and 2-car garage. 1 bedroom, 1 bath studio! One block from the lake! $875,000 #20192616

Tour all properties at www.Evergreen-Realty.com SMS20Cover4Pages.indd 147

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Profile for Keokee :: media + marketing

Sandpoint Magazine Summer 2020  

A Century of Giving, Showing the Way, Building Small

Sandpoint Magazine Summer 2020  

A Century of Giving, Showing the Way, Building Small

Profile for keokee

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