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L I F E S T Y L E + FA S H I O N

VOLUME 3 | ISSUE 1 | FALL 2020


ON THE COVER PHOTO BY AMBER RITSCHEL “MASK UP” MASK DESIGNED BY SUMMER BECK

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KRNL OUR MISSION The mission of KRNL Lifestyle + Fashion is to promote the individuality, creativity and uniqueness of the University of Kentucky community through storytelling that utilizes all of our publishing platforms. KRNL Lifestyle + Fashion strives to bring awareness to the stories that inspire us — through art, human interest, enterprise, investigative, health and wellbeing or recreation — on and around campus and throughout our community. Whether through words or pictures, our diverse staff welcomes, embraces and invites all perspectives, allowing us to bring to life a variety of stories that we want to tell. Produced and distributed in the fall and spring semesters on the campus of the University of Kentucky and throughout the city of Lexington, KRNL Lifestyle + Fashion aspires to be an important voice for our community.

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LETTERS FROM THE EDITORS

RACH AEL R

After many Zoom calls, Slack messages and all the obstacles thrown at us by COVID-19, we are finally here. As the editor-in-chief, I am in awe of this team and how hard everyone has worked to produce a magazine during this unconventional time. Over the quarantine period, we had themed Zoom meetings, two-person shoots in the pouring rain and even self-timer lookbooks. You name it, we have tried it. Throughout my time in quarantine, I found my happiness doing Zoom calls with the staff and writing blog posts. I am incredibly thankful for this time with the staff, even if it wasn’t through traditional face-to-face collaborations. As difficult as this year has been, the overall mood at the KRNL office has been very upbeat and inspired. We have watched as our campus community has adapted throughout this challenging semester. Amid all the chaos one thing has stayed constant: our dedication to each other and to KRNL. For those not familiar

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with us, KRNL Lifestyle + Fashion is the University of Kentucky’s lifestyle and fashion magazine. We produce one magazine every semester but we produce online content as well. Throughout 2020, from the COVID-19 pandemic to the inspiring Black Lives Matter movement, we have produced non-stop content in order to motivate our readers to use their voices and instill change. Our main goal of this issue was to capture this moment in time. We wanted people to be able to look back and see the impact 2020 had on not just the UK campus but the entire Lexington community as well. As you can see from the mask photoshoot and the Memorial Hall mural and COVID-19 stories, we did just that. We hope you enjoy the issue as much as we enjoyed creating it. As you flip through the pages, I hope that you are able to reflect on this year and how it has shaped the world around us.


AKH IRA

As I look back on my three and a half years here at UK, I can’t help but think: What do I want to leave behind? There are some things I definitely wouldn’t mind parting with. The cross-campus trek to classes, the stress of impending deadlines, the endless stream of Zoom meetings. But at the same time, these are also things I don’t think I’m quite ready to let go of just yet. KRNL is also on that list. This past year has been unlike anything I had ever seen and certainly unlike anything I had ever planned. Despite that, many of us here at KRNL took this in stride. We didn’t allow challenging circumstances to stop us from pumping out content because we know that it’s our job to tell these stories, no matter how difficult. From the COVID-19 pandemic to the Black Lives Matter movement, we recognized the world as it changed and made it our

Life is supposed to come with unexpected things because they help us grow. Growth is exactly what I have seen in this magazine since my freshman year to now, despite the obstacles, and it has been amazing to be a part of it. I didn’t even know what Zoom was before quarantine, but it has become this magazine’s best friend. From two-hour Zoom meetings to 2000s-themed Zoom parties, this staff became closer and more willing to create content even better than before. Virtually working kept us busy and it is still keeping us hopeful. Not only did our time away from UK give us the time to improve our brand personality, social media and website but most importantly our knowledge of prominent issues such as the Black Lives Matter Movement, the LGTBQIA community and mental health. As someone so interested and in love with fashion, I didn’t realize how involved each of these topics

mission to bring these impactful stories to life. But we also recognized that the world still has lighter stories out there, even in times of crisis, so we featured these, too. As the lifestyle editor, I believe the stories we told in this magazine are reflective of the times. When I graduate in December, whether it be on a stage or via Zoom, I’ll be leaving behind this team of creative people. There are no words that can accurately sum up this experience, but this magazine can give a glimpse into what I mean. This magazine is a culmination of everything I’ve cared about and learned about over the years. It is a testament to not only my character development but the development of all the others involved in its making. With that said, I hope this magazine and the legacy we leave behind with it is something you find worthy of picking up again and again.

actually is with fashion, either in a positive or negative way. I knew it was my duty as the fashion editor to make sure important topics like these were relevant and heard in the fall 2020 issue. We hope these stories can touch and teach our readers on campus and among the Lexington community. We hope our Lexington map influences students to keep supporting local businesses during this pandemic and after. We hope our mask photoshoot encourages you that masks are cool, fashionable and necessary. Although this has not been the ideal year for everyone, I think we can all agree that we have learned a lot from it. I have only two semesters left with this incredible staff and hope to make the best out of it to produce a more beautiful magazine each time. I want to leave this university and city knowing I left some sort of footprint, and I know with KRNL I will.

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C O N CONTEN TENTS 08 16

The New Normal

Black Hair: Back to Their Roots

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Looking through Rosie-Colored Glasses

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Street Style

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Press Play

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POPS Resale

Homemade & Haute-ish


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Woodland Skate Park

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Telling the Write Story

This Family Means Business

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What Goes Around Comes LEXINGTON, KY Around

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1. CD Central 2. Sav's Restaurant & Gourmet Ice Cream 3. Wilson’s Grocery & Meats 4. The Kentucky Theatre Group 5. The Bar Complex 6. Pivot Brewing 7. JY Kitchen 8. POPS Resale 9. Rosebud Bar 10. Pies & Pints 11. The Burl 12. Institute 193 13. Pearl’s 14. Street Scene Vintage 15. Coffee Times 16. Bourbon n’ Toulouse 17. Bear & The Butcher 18. Wearhouse 19. North Lime Coffee & Donuts 20. Parkette Drive-In 21. JamesC Boutique 22. Honeywood 23. Smithtown Seafood 24. Wallace Station Deli 25. Windy Corner Market 26. Zim’s Cafe/The Thirsty Fox 27. Han Woo Ri 28. Varsity Print 29. Paisano’s Italian Restaurant & Lounge 30. Manchester Coffee Co.

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PHOTO BY MICHAEL CLUBB University of Kentucky students walk into the Gatton Student Center on Sunday, Aug. 16, 2020, in Lexington, Ky. In response to COVID-19, the university made wearing masks mandatory in public spaces.

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STORY

THE NEW NORMAL BY RACHAEL COURTNEY

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n early 2020, the coronavirus made its way worldwide, causing a shift in life as anyone had known it. Streets went quiet, businesses shut down, people fled indoors. Now in October, the “new normal” is still the new reality. This semester has gone down in history as one of the strangest semesters ever at the University of Kentucky. But one thing is for sure after this year — students can adapt to almost any situation. In March, UK sent all students home where they completed the rest of their semester’s coursework online to minimize the spread of COVID-19. With so much doubt and uncertainty, the spring semester was difficult for many students. Over the summer, questions of how the campus would open back up filled everyone’s mind. After a long and confusing summer, the fall semester started in mid-August. All students returning to campus for classes or housing were required to get a university-mandated COVID-19 test. According to UK’s online COVID-19 Data Dashboard, the university has given over 33,000 COVID-19 tests to students. The university emphasized other precautions including mandatory mask orders, social distancing guidelines and daily wellness checks.

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“If implementing masks is what keeps us on campus, then so be it. I am happy to do whatever it takes in order to stay on campus,” said Chloe Walker, a freshman from Mount Sterling, Ky. Professors had the option of teaching their classes virtually, in-person or in a hybrid style, meaning they meet both virtually and in-person. Out of the over 31,000 students enrolled at the university, 25,339 students are actually coming to campus during the week for in-person instruction, according to the COVID-19 Data Dashboard. Freshmen have been deeply affected by these new changes. “It’s been different from what I expected,

but I have still loved it. I haven’t minded online classes since there are perks to it with self-pacing and time management. I’m looking forward to a more traditional class structure in the future,” said John Schoening, a freshman from Dallas. The campus is usually buzzing with activities during the fall semester, filled with K Week for the new freshmen class, Greek life rush and football season in full swing. This year’s Greek life rush was primarily done online. Students in the Greek community have felt the impact of COVID-19 through virtual rush and little-to-no in-person contact. “I am very much an extrovert and I get my

PHOTO BY MARTHA MCHANEY A student sits at one of the campus canopies provided by the University of Kentucky on Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2020, in Lexington, Ky.and Thehere canopies were installed as part Cut line here and here and here and here.of UK’s social distancing measures in response to COVID-19. 10 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION


“I am happy to do whatever it takes in order to stay on campus.” – Chloe Walker

PHOTO PROVIDED BY CASEY SHELTON Allie Diggs and Casey Shelton move into the Pi Beta Phi sorority house for the school year while wearing masks on Monday, Aug. 10, 2020, in Lexington, Ky.

energy from going places and seeing people. With that being said, an online sorority recruitment and the online school haven’t been so great for me,” said Casey Shelton, a member of the Pi Beta Phi sorority. “Due to COVID-19, we haven’t been able to have guests in the sorority house, so it is hard for our friends seeing us in the house and not being able to visit.” UK Athletics have also been affected by pandemic-related changes on and off of campus. Football season started Sept. 26. Game attendance has been limited to 12,000 people, which is 20 percent of the stadium’s capacity. Tailgating at the stadium has been

banned, but some students are still tailgating off-campus. However, the university is partnering with Lexington Police to curb offcampus activity to help fight the spread of COVID-19. Everyone is still adjusting to the new normal. Navigating the changes resulting from the pandemic has been unusual and difficult for everyone at UK. It will be interesting to see how things change, or don’t change, in the spring semester. _____________________________________ For more information on COVID-19 data at the University of Kentucky, visit www.uky. edu/coronavirus/covid-19-data-dashboard. •

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LOOKING THROUGH ROSIE-COLORED GLASSES

BY ANNA BYERLEY PHOTOS BY ISAAC JANSSEN

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ith the height of state-mandated quarantines in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, everything seemed to stop for most people. But for UK alum and Kernelite Rosie Ecker, it was her time to be thrust into the limelight thanks to a feature by Humans of New York. HONY is a photoblog, ran by photographer Brandon Stanton, with over 20 million followers. Earlier this year, one of Ecker’s stories was featured in the HONY series #QuarantineStories. This series called for people to email in a story they wanted to be featured, and Ecker decided to submit an old story of hers. During her time at the Kentucky Kernel, Ecker wrote a story called “Dear Rosie” about how her dad has written her a letter every single day since she had left for a sleepaway summer camp in the fourth grade. The camp she went to, Camp Ernst, was just 30 minutes from her house, but her dad still wrote her letter after letter. “I didn’t realize they were a big deal until seventh grade when my friends would receive a few while they were gone. I received handfuls,” Ecker said. “Dear Rosie” was featured in the Kernel on Oct. 1, 2015. At the time, Chris Poore was the student publication’s 12 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION

director and told Ecker to write about her dad’s letters. “He couldn’t believe my dad wrote to me every day, and parents’ weekend was coming up, so we tried to connect the two,” Ecker said. When she sent this story to HONY, she did not expect to be featured. A few weeks later, she got a surprise. “I was in a meeting at work when it was posted. I quickly became useless because I started crying,” Ecker said. “People from everywhere in my life texted me, or put it on their Instagram story or shared it on their Facebook page. I couldn’t believe my dad and I were receiving so much love.” On April 14, Ecker’s pictures and story were the latest to join HONY’s collection. On Instagram, the post got over half a million likes. On Facebook, it got over a quarter million reactions, 10,000 comments and 10,000 shares. But according to Ecker’s dad, Buz, being featured by HONY meant nothing to him. “He had no idea what Humans of New York was but realized it was a big deal once he saw it on Facebook,” Ecker said. “He might tell you it didn’t affect him, but it did. Because after we got on Humans of New York, our vil-


Buz Ecker and his daughter, Rosie, pose outside of her childhood home on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020, in Terrace Park, Ohio. FALL 2020 | 13


Rosie Ecker and her father, Buz, share laughs while reminiscing on the hundreds of letters sent over the years on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020, in Terrace Park, Ohio.

“I wrote her every day, including letters beforehand, so that she would know how much she is loved right off the bat.” – Buz Ecker

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lage newsletter in Cincinnati wanted to publish a story about him and that was a very big deal to him.” Buz started writing letters to his daughter when she was in fourth grade to keep her company during camp. But it turned into so much more than that. “I wrote her every day, including letters beforehand, so that she would know how much she is loved right off the bat,” Buz said. “I always told her how much I loved her, then went into an episode of how much her mother irritated me by putting small cedar blocks in all my shoes, or one of the damn dogs escaped and I drove throughout the neighborhood, only to find the escaped one asleep on the couch.” Buz’ own mother also wrote him letters every day when he went to camp as a child. “I treasured receiving them each day, and I still have them. Plus, I knew that she had touched them, and now I had, so it meant a lot,” Buz said. Ecker thinks all parents should write their kids letters. “There’s something so special about receiving mail. Even more special when it’s from a loved one,” she said. Ecker isn’t the only one Buz writes to though. He


sends letters to all three of his children six days a week. “My favorite part of being a dad is writing letters to each kid every day, plus I’m almost guaranteed none of them will move back in with us,” Buz said. All of his letters are handwritten. He tries to write to a friend each day as well. And since the pandemic, he has started writing letters to nursing home residents in Cincinnati. He writes five letters a day, every day of the week. To date, he has sent over 655 letters to multiple nursing homes. Ecker’s story about her dad’s letters was just one of a handful she wrote during her time in college. She worked for the Kernel and KRNL all through her time at UK, from fall 2013 to December 2016. She had taken a tour of the Kernel when she was a senior in high school and even started working there before her first college classes. She started off as an advertising representative for the Kernel and sold ads for the paper. During her junior year, she was editor-in-chief for KRNL. Her senior year, she was managing editor for the Kernel for one semester before graduating early in December. Ecker said spending all four years of college at Kernel Media came with some great benefits. “I had my own little bubble of friends during college and really didn’t think I needed to meet more people. Working at the Kernel opened me up to different groups, different majors, different people, and thank goodness it did,” Ecker said. “I realized there were completely different communities all over UK, ones that made you see different perspectives or opened your mind a little. While the writing experience is great for a resume and will land you a job, the friendships and memories you can build with people unexpectedly is priceless.” Ecker’s time at the Kernel helped prepare her for her current job as a marketing consultant at UC Health in Cincinnati. “I 100 percent landed this job because of my writing experience at the Kernel,” Ecker said. “My boss brings it up all the time saying things like, ‘Well, think back to your Kernel days…’ or, ‘When you were working at the Kernel…’ I couldn’t believe how much it meant in the real world, my experience for both KRNL and the Kernel. It’s a big deal to say you wrote or were a part of your college newspaper.”

An average day for Ecker depends on several factors, which have been affected by COVID-19 and resulting hospital policy changes. She interviews current UC Health employees or patients and can write different things that help run the business’ communications. Her favorite part of the job is writing success stories about patients, which sometimes get covered on local or national news. Aside from working at UC Health, Ecker started her own organization called Queen Speak. According to its website, Ecker interviews women to “collect all the mistakes, all the tips, all the guidance from real-life women out there in the working world and to then share them to the women who could use a helping hand. Or to the women just getting started. Or even women who are just looking for an extra pep in their step.” Ecker started Queen Speak to give her something other than work to focus on.

Buz Ecker and his daughter, Rosie, carve pumpkins together in St. Thomas Episcopal Church in Terrace Park, Ohio, in 1999. “I looked around my life and realized how much support I’d received from women my entire life. I thought it would be interesting to start interviewing them, and other women I’ve never met, to get their advice documented,” she said. She advises students who want to start something of their own like Queen Speak to “just do it. You are smarter than you think.” “I was really fearful of what others would think, and I thought they would hope I would fail,” Ecker said. “But if it’s your project, under your own control, then can you fail?” • FALL 2020 | 15


C

urly, kinky, nappy. These are just some of the labels society has attached to Black hair over the years. Throughout history, Black hair has been stigmatized to the point that many Black people were either forced to or chose to alter their natural hair. Not only has this issue stirred high emotions, it has also led to movements, legislative policies and a push for a new national holiday. But what society says and thinks about Black hair can differ greatly from what Black people themselves feel. So what do Black people think of when they hear “Black hair”? To understand what Black hair is, one must first understand curl patterns. The curl chart uses both numbers and letters to differentiate the shapes hair naturally takes. This chart ranges from: 1a, 1b, 1c — fine straight to coarse straight 2a, 2b, 2c — slight waves to wide waves 3a, 3b, 3c — loose curls to corkscrew curls 4a, 4b, 4c — defined coils to indistinct coils Type 4 hair, known as afro-textured hair, is typically only seen among Black people. However, Black people can have other curl types. Type 3 hair is also strongly associated with the Black community, particularly in those of mixed races. For most Black people, this knowledge comes with a multitude of experiences and a story to tell with it. Ellen Smith, a recent UK graduate, has 3c hair herself, and she has been actively trying to learn more about her hair’s roots. “There’s just so many different textures within that whole diaspora of black and PHOTO BY ISAAC JANSSEN Mercy Kajo Evanson shows off her hair design on Friday, Sept. 25, 2020, in Lexington, Ky. 16 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION

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ACK BLACK HAIR:

TO THEIR ROOTS BY AKHIRA UMAR

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PHOTO BY ISAAC JANSSEN Genesis Lorjuste swings her hair on Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2020, in Lexington, Ky. This was Lorjuste’s first time having her 4c hair in passion twists. natural hair, and I think that’s the beauty of it,” Smith said. “Everyone has a different natural hair journey. It all depends on the person. And I think there’s a lot of history within black and natural hair as well, and learning about that is such a beautiful experience for everyone to explore.” Smith didn’t always embrace her natural hair though. She is biracial with a white mom and Black dad. This difference in race and, in turn, hair textures made for complications growing up. “God bless my mother, she just never knew how to do my hair,” Smith said. This, in combination with attending a predominantly white school, led to Smith’s struggles with selfconfidence. In middle school, she had gotten so tired of being the odd one out that she decided to relax, or chemically straighten, her hair. “My hair was beautiful and kids would still be like, ‘Why does your hair look like that? Why isn’t your hair straight?’ I think it’s those little comments that can have such a profound impact on kids,” Smith said. “During high school, there wasn’t any huge comment where I felt like I was being discriminated against for my hair, but it was always just that unconscious thought, just the surface level ‘I don’t look like these 18 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION

girls’ so I need to try to look like them as much as possible.” Though relaxing her hair was a temporary fix, Smith said at the moment she had much more confidence in herself. When UK sophomore Mercy Kajo Evanson thinks of Black hair, she thinks of “a little bit of self-hatred.” “When I was younger, a lot of my friends and cousins were trying to grow their hair out so they could flatiron it or perm it,” Evanson said, using the term perm in place of relax. “And I also saw hair in general as like a burden. Like the more hair you have, the more feminine you are. That’s just something that’s been in society forever. And with Black women, our hair, our kinks and curls, you don’t see the full length. And in a society where we’re often not valued as much made me feel not feminine enough and feel the pressure to flatiron it.” Evanson has 4c hair, the curliest of them all. As such, it can be hard to grow, maintain, and keep healthy. But instead of feeling judged by non-Black people, it was within the Black community that Evanson felt the most judged for her hair. So to fit in a bit more she had gone from proudly wearing her natural hair as a child to self-consciously getting


box braids and extensions. She believes some of the ideals Black people have regarding hair preference stem from racism and, consequently, colorism. UK senior Genesis Lorjuste subconsciously felt this same pressure within her own family. Her grandmother grew up in a fairly conservative town in Virginia where she felt her hair always had to be socially acceptable. Lorjuste believes this mentality transferred to her mom and now herself. She typically wears her 4c hair in protective styles like braids and weaves. “I feel like I don’t have the confidence to embrace my natural hair yet,” Lorjuste said. “I just never grew up with anyone having their hair natural or wearing their hair out.” Women aren’t the only ones who battle issues surrounding Black hair. Black men also face consequences for rocking their naturally curly locks. UK alum Savon Gray faced more than a blow to his ego when he was in high school. As valedictorian of his graduating class, Gray was a model student who never got in trouble. However, once he grew out his 3c hair passed his ears, he was breaking his school’s dress code. His options were to cut his hair or face in-school suspension until he did so. In the end, he cut his hair. “When you get older, you start realizing the rules kind of only apply to you,” Gray said, calling the

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experience traumatizing. If hair discrimination seems like it’s only a personal problem that affects self-esteem, this issue goes beyond the individual. It affects professional environments as well. There are many examples of how society’s dislike of Black hair can negatively affect opportunities for Black people. Smith, who models on occasion, said most of the photoshoots she’s been to don’t have hair stylists who are trained in Black hair. Evanson said if her curly baby hairs weren’t laid, or gelled down, her hair was deemed as messy. Lorjuste expressed her concern about appearing unprofessional during interviews if she has braids. Gray said that Black men are always expected to keep their hair short. “Society pretty much for my whole life has told me, ‘Hey, you want to get a job, you can’t have long, curly hair, even if it’s well-kept together,’” Gray said. “Don’t tell me what I can’t do with my own hair.” Experiences like these have led to legal action across the country. On July 3, 2019, California became the first state in the nation to make hair discrimination illegal by signing the CROWN Act into law. According to the CROWN Act website, “The CROWN Act, which stands for ‘Creating a Respectful and Open World for Natural hair,’ is a law that

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prohibits race-based hair discrimination, which is the denial of employment and educational opportunities because of hair texture or protective hairstyles including braids, locs, twists or bantu knots.” The CROWN Coalition self-proclaimed July 3 as National Crown Day to honor the occasion. Since then, six other states have passed the act. Kentucky is not one of them. Inspired by California passing the CROWN Act, Kentucky State Rep. Attica Scott took the first step in seeking Black hair liberation for the Bluegrass in the 2020 legislative session. House Bill 33 called to amend Kentucky Revised Statutes 344.010 to “provide definitions of ‘protective hairstyle’ and ‘race’ that include traits historically associated with race.” Scott is currently the only Black woman serving in Kentucky’s Congress. As such, she knows all too well the struggles that come with Black hair. “For so long, in order to be ‘accepted,’ whatever that meant, by society, I was wearing my hair straight,” Scott said. “I wanted to make sure my white coworkers and colleagues felt comfortable. It wasn’t even about me anymore. It was about how can other people accept me versus how am I accepting myself.” It wasn’t until she became an executive director in her late 20s/early 30s that Scott felt comfortable enough to stop straightening her hair. At that point, she also knew that she was in a position to encourage her employees to show up as their natural selves as well. “I want you to show up as your true, whole, authentic self because that’s how I’m showing up every single day,” Scott said. “People should be able to show up the way that they are. As long as I am being productive and getting the work done, you don’t need to worry about my hair, right? That’s the last thing that should be on your mind.” Leading up to the legislative session, Scott traveled around the state garnering support for the bill. She ended up with 19 co-sponsors, including white men and women. She said she was glad to have their support so their constituents could learn about the importance of fighting against

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PHOTO BY ISAAC JANSSEN

hair discrimination. However, by the end of the session, Scott’s bill was never heard. She believes “institutional, systemic racism” played a part in that. Even so, she plans to bring the bill back next year. “Natural hair may not be what you think is your issue, but it’s your friend’s issue, it might be your family member’s issue,” Scott said. “Somebody you work with is probably struggling with whether or not they want to do the big chop or whether or not they want to let their perm grow out, but they’re concerned you might judge them. So if you don’t speak up they’ll never know they’re safe in that environment.” In late September of this year, the


Mercy Kajo Evanson sits outside on Friday, Sept. 25, 2020, in Lexington, Ky.

U.S. House of Representatives passed the CROWN Act. If the bill is also passed by the Senate, it will become law. This will make hair discrimination illegal in all 50 states. On a smaller scale, hairdressers have also been helping Black people embrace their hair. Tyanah McNeil attended UK for two years before deciding to become a full-time hairstylist in July 2020. Like many other biracial Black girls, McNeil had to learn how to do her own hair when her white mother could not. She went through a relaxer and bleached hair phase, cutting her hair multiple times to get rid of the subsequent damage. However, it wasn’t until after she had done the big chop that she began doing hair.

“All hair is good hair. You should love yourself, love your hair and know that it’s yours.” – Tyanah McNeil FALL 2020 | 21


PHOTO BY ISAAC JANSSEN Ellen Smith’s 3c hair blows in the wind on Thursday, Oct. 1, 2020, in Lexington, Ky. 22 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION


She started braiding her own hair since most stylists won’t braid hair under four inches long. When she posted the results on social media, she had people lining up for her to do their hair. Since then, she has started her own website where clients, both men and women, can request a variety of styles. She also adopted a one-year plan to get 2530 clients at $3,700 a month in hopes of meeting an annual income of $44,000. In August, her first month going full-time, she exceeded her goal, making $5,000. Despite the economic opportunity hair provides her, McNeil said she does hair because she has a passion for it and she wants to help make others feel good. “It’s really like a trust thing because people come to you in like their most natural and vulnerable state, and they are trusting you with something that’s so valuable and something that’s been criticized so much,” McNeil said. “And they’re trusting you to care for it, and they’re trusting you to, you know, not judge them like they may get judged in society. And they’re trusting you to take the time and attention to care for their hair and, you know, make them feel beautiful and confident.” Former UK student and part-time barber Ahmad Cochrane feels much the same way. Though he only does hair on the side when he has time, his clients’ mental and emotional states come first. “Even if I receive the money for the service I did, I really like to see that I embrace people in their own skin and their own way, something that they were born with,” Cochrane said. “The only thing I did was kind of fix it a little bit to make it look neat and clean in a certain sense of what they like. It doesn’t necessarily have to be like universally clean. It’s however they want to look or feel special. That’s what I feel like the barber’s role in the world is to do because that can boost a lot of people’s energy to talk to a girl, to apply for a job, to anything. It gives another person the confidence to go out and appear and do something and feel safe and comfortable in their own skin.” After debating for over a year whether or not to do the big chop, Evanson decided to FALL 2020 | 23


PHOTO BY ISAAC JANSSEN Kentucky State Rep. Attica Scott combs through her hair on Friday, Sept. 25, 2020, in Louisville, Ky. Scott has been wearing locs for 10 years.

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cut off all her hair. She was tired of the constant pressure to change her 4c hair, but she had only ever seen looser type 3 hair accepted as natural. Despite the fear, she went for it. Now she says she never wants to go back. “Everyone was very encouraging. They made me love it more. They reassured me that, no, you still look feminine, you know? You still look good. You look great. And it was just really nice to hear it because I felt like it but I was scared that maybe that’s not what I’d be putting out,” Evanson said. “So I’m still learning that part, trying to appreciate every phase of my hair without feeling inferior. And I just feel like 4c kinky hair has just so many negative connotations to it. It’s just so hard to undo. It’s been embedded in society, in me, in the Black community, and I’m really trying to like untie it.” When Smith decided she was leaving her home state for college, she wanted to drastically change her relaxed hair. She felt inspired by natural hair YouTubers, thinking to herself that if they could do it then so could she. With that, she did the big chop, too. “When I say it was the most liberating experience I have ever had, it honestly was,” Smith said. “It was almost freeing in a way just because it was like all those history of just not feeling confident in yourself, not feeling beautiful enough, and then having those curls brought back my self-confidence. So ever since, I’ve been natural.” Not only has Smith embraced her natural hair, she has modeled with it, too. In September 2020, she was named as one of five women to vie for the cover of the 2021 Hooters Calendar. Smith believes that representation at every level matters. After Gray’s row with his high school, he stopped cutting his hair upon graduating and again after job interviews during his junior year at UK. He now sports locs and a beard, both of which were frowned upon at his alma mater. “I feel confident. I feel better when my hair is long. I feel powerful. And it’s probably because I’m making the decision to keep my hair long and not having to cut it because someone’s telling me to,” Gray said. “If you can’t control your hair, what can you control?” Despite struggling to embrace her natural 4c hair, Lorjuste still encourages others to


PHOTO BY AMBER RITSCHEL Savon Gray poses for a photo with his 3c hair in locs on Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2020, in Lexington, Ky. appreciate their own. “If you are confident, continue that and encourage others to be confident and proud of their natural hair. And for those who feel like they haven’t reached that confidence yet, just realize that you’re you and you really can’t change that,” Lorjuste said. “It’s just going to be that way, so you need to accept it and don’t let society try to get you to change it.” What Black people want is for their hair to stop being marginalized and oppressed. They don’t want their hair

to cause controversy or discomfort. At the same time, they don’t want to have to conform to Eurocentric beauty standards. Black people just want their Black hair to be accepted just as any other hair is. “All hair is good hair,” McNeil said. “No matter what type of hair you have, no matter what it’s been through, no matter the background of your hair or what you’ve heard from other people about your hair. All hair is good hair. You should love yourself, love your hair and know that it’s yours.” •

FALL 2020 | 25


STREET STYLE BY RACHEL PORTER

S

ome people are either dreading the upcoming colder months or counting down the days. For those who are dreading it, fashion is here to the rescue. Being on a college campus, brands like North Face, Patagonia and Columbia are seen everywhere. At times, it can look like a sea of winter coat madness where style may seem lost. To help our readers utilize their fall and winter wardrobe staples, we produced looks that provide the heat in both ways. To uphold current trends but also reuse what has been in our closet for years, we worked with Macy’s, a national department store chain, and Wearhouse, a local vintage store. We wanted to show how incorporating new and old pieces can really help an outfit come together that still speaks and caters to one’s style. An item does not have to be worn a certain way just because so many people own it. Something as simple as a full zip or hood on/off can make the difference in an outfit. And through the help of accessories, a look can transform. “Jackets are super simple now but the silhouettes take you back to the ‘80s, ‘90s. The vintage style is coming across again,” said Macy’s stylist Jennifer Maggard. We were inspired by New York City street style and wanted to create an urban feel that does not seem attainable at times in a college town in Kentucky. Hopefully, you can see that it is. A location or group of people should not affect what you wear this fall and winter, nor ever. Be excited to drag out the pieces you typically aren’t excited for; they have been waiting to feel new again.

26 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION


MACY’S FREE PEOPLE CARGO PANTS | 22 WEARHOUSE VINTAGE AZTEC FLEECE JACKET | 42 PHOTO BY AMBER RITSCHEL

FALL 2020 | 27


MACY’S FREE PEOPLE CARGO PANTS | 22 OVERSIZED TAN JACKET | 99 WEARHOUSE MIAMI HEAT SNAPBACK | 42 PHOTO BY AMBER RITSCHEL


MACY’S WOMEN’S SPORTSWEAR HOODED JACKET | 34 PHOTO BY AMBER RITSCHEL FALL 2020 | 29


WEARHOUSE VINTAGE SILK MARLINS JACKET | 34 PHOTO BY AMBER RITSCHEL

30 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION


MACY’S FREE PEOPLE CARGO PANTS | 22 WEARHOUSE VINTAGE AZTEC FLEECE JACKET | 42 PHOTO BY AMBER RITSCHEL

FALL 2020 | 31


PHOTO BY AMBER RITSCHEL

32 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION


PHOTO BY KENDALL BORON

FALL 2020 | 33


POPS

SPONSORED CONTENT

PHOTO BY JOSH MOTT 34 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION

POPS RESALE BY RAYLEIGH DEATON Newer isn’t always better. Just ask Dan Shorr. Since 1996, Shorr and his wife Sharon have owned and operated POPS Resale, a hub for all things retro — clothing, records, collectibles and anything else the old-school enthusiast could possibly want. Walking into the Leestown Road store is like stepping into a time machine, the black and white tile floors contrasting brightly painted walls decorated with vintage posters and vinyl record covers. Racks of records stretch the length of the building. Unique vintage and second-hand clothing pieces bought from locals are sold at thrift store prices. “The goal was to sell Previously Owned Products, hence the POPS,” Shorr said. “This would be an opportunity to offer high quality used goods at reasonable prices.” The thriving resale shop has been a testament to Sharon since she died in 2016. Shorr continues to run the store along with Junior, the three-legged shop dog/greeting committee. POPS Resale also has a full calendar of sales and events that ensure its stock is always changing. The shop’s Facebook page is constantly updated with pictures of newly offered records and CDs. Throughout the year, the shop participates in Record Store Day, a nation-wide event for independently owned record stores that often include live performances, cookouts and large groups of music enthusiasts who support their local businesses. However, this year, Record Store Day on Oct. 24 will look a little different at POPS. Patrons will be able to register for a time slot beforehand to ensure social distancing while still celebrating the culture of music and supporting the shop. It is evident that Shorr is passionate about what he does, striving to provide quality products at affordable prices. “We believe in giving the maximum value for every dollar you spend,” he said. “It is our philosophy that if we offer great deals and treat folks right, they’ll keep coming back. It’s been working well so far.” More than the inventory he sells, however, Shorr is passionate about the customers who walk through the POPS Resale door, and that passion influences his philosophy for life. “Treat everyone as you would like to be treated,” Shorr said, “and it will return to you many times.” •


PRESS PLAY

FALL 2020 KRNL PLAYLIST

SELF-QUARANTINE TRACKS

TITLE

ARTIST

GENRE

SNOWCHILD

THE WEEKND

ALT. R&B

BABYDOLL

DOMINIC FIKE

ALT. HIP HOP

CALIFORNIA

THE LAGOONS

ALT. INDIE

ZIMT

LISSA

POOLSIDE

THE ANXIETY, WILLOW, TYLER COLE

FIGURES, A REPRISE

JESSIE REYEZ, DANIEL CAESAR

CYANIDE

DANIEL CASEAR

BEEN THAT WAY

BRYSON TILLER

GARDEN (SAY IT LIKE DAT)

SZA

DANCING QUEEN

ABBA

DISCO

EMILY

TWO FRIENDS, JAMES DELANEY

DANCE POP

NO NEW FRIENDS

LABRINTH, SIA, DIPLO

EDM

JUICY

DOJA CAT

POP

PRETTY PLEASE

DUA LIPA

PARADISE

BAZZI

DITCH

GUS DAPPERTON

I WANNA GET BETTER

BLEACHERS

ORANGE SODA

BABY KEEM

HIP HOP/TRAP

THRU THE NIGHT

JACK HARLOW, BRYSON TILLER

HIP HOP

YESSIRSKIII

LIL UZI VERT, 21 SAVAGE

PUNK RAP/EMO RAP

IT’S ALL FADING TO BLACK

XXXTENTACION, BLINK-182

LIL THING

KNOX FORTUNE

BAD RELIGION

FRANK OCEAN

FAVORITE

LEON THOMAS, BUDDY

SWEEP ME OFF MY FEET

POND

ROCK

SARA

FLEETWOOD MAC

POP ROCK/FOLK ROCK

CONTEMPORARY R&B

INDIE POP

R&B

FALL 2020 | 35


PHOTO PROVIDED BY KRISTINA TIDABACK Kristina Tidaback’s poses for her portrait on Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2020, in Chicago, Ill. 36 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION


HOMEMADE &

HAUTE-ISH BY ARIZZONA ALBRIGHT

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ith the help of Pinterest, YouTube and now TikTok, do-it-yourself, or DIY, activities have become a popular trend in projects for both profit and recreation. DIY fashion is the art of modifying and creating your own clothing and accessories. This grew in popularity due to the rise in TikTok trends and tutorials and the unforeseen increase in free-time due to COVID-19 quarantining. For Kristina Tidaback, a December 2019 graduate from the University of Kentucky, her DIY interests have been geared toward thrift fashion. “I’ve always been interested in it,” Tidaback said. “I loved thrifting when I was little, and before I could drive to a Goodwill, I would want to go cut up a pair of jeans and make my own shorts and that sort of thing.” Thrifting-based fashion accounts have turned Instagram into a small-business hotspot. For Tidaback, combining thrift shopping with DIY fashion is how her small-business journey began in the fall of 2019. Tidaback found a UK T-shirt and turned it into a halter top. The attention it received inspired her to improve her sewing skills and build a small business in DIY fashion. “I had just made myself a shirt for a game day and then a bunch of people were really, really into it and kept asking me like where I got it or if I can make them one,” she said. “I never expected it to turn into a job at all, but I’m happy it is because I like doing it a lot, and I like people wearing my stuff.” On Tidaback’s business Instagram account, @KampusKustoms, she offers styles like lace-up, halter, crop, cinched, bleached and grommet-sides on tees, sweatshirts and flannels.

Although this has become a recent hobby for many, some have used their entrepreneurship and creativity to set the stage for the sudden DIY fashion trends way before the pandemic. Emily Highley, a sophomore at Morehead State University, started her DIY business with one specialty item but has expanded it into so much more. “The first thing I did was like vinyl stickers for cars and laptops and that kind of thing,” Highley said. “And then I went into putting those on different products like cups and tumblers and shirts.” It wasn’t until her junior year of highschool that Highley was able to grow a small business from her creations. Accessories — such as earrings, scrunchies and headbands — are some of Highley’s recent specialties. “I did a huge thing of scrunchies for a while like when scrunchies were really hot, kind of like how earrings are super trendy right now. That’s where I’m focusing on,” she said. Highley turned her talent into a business through her Instagram account, @stickersandsuch2, to sell her products on a more organized platform. Aside from being a creative outlet, DIY has also helped assist front-line workers. Highley used her talents for good during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic. “I took a break for about a month or two as the pandemic was happening. For that month or two, I made the headbands with buttons for nurses,” Highley said. “I made over 500 of those and sent those out.” Both Tidaback and Highley implement their personalities into the pieces they sell. They take custom order requests FALL 2020 | 37


PHOTO PROVIDED BY EMILY HIGHLEY Earrings are one of many DIY products Emily Highley creates on Wednesday, June 17, 2020, in Owingsville, Ky.

PHOTO BY AMBER RITSCHEL Kristina Tidaback’s DIY tailgating fashion is modeled on Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2020, in Lexington, Ky.

38 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION

through their business Instagram accounts to better serve their consumers, and the possibilities are endless. “I feel like a lot of the pieces reflect my personality … in the design or maybe with the colors that I pick,” Highley said. “I just try to make little things that I think I will like and then hope other people will like them as well.” Tidaback makes her work distinct by using personalized labels from an Etsy shop with her Kampus Kustoms logo. The girls find inspiration easily. For Highley, this started at a young age. “I had a kid-sized sewing machine and would sew with my grandma,” Highley said. “I really learned how to sew when I started working in the theatre department in high school. I would help make costumes and things like that!” For Tidaback, ideas pop up randomly. “I would say sometimes I’ll just think of things and I don’t know if … I have seen it somewhere, and that’s why it’s just coming to me,” Tidaback said. “Like, the laceup-sides tees, one day I just thought about it … and just made it.” One lace-up tee Tidaback sold over the summer was a Cubs baseball club tee. It was blue with spiral-patterned bleach streaks. The bottom side-seams on both sides


“You can definitely feel proud of your work, and you feel so much more productive and happy after you’ve done something.” – Emily Highley

were cut and had adjustable lacing. The lace detail matched the red of the words on the shirt. She has also sold a lot of bleached tees and sweatshirts as well. “I think with the pandemic, everyone has wanted comfy loungewear,” Tidaback said. Even with all the styles that Tidaback sells, she said, “I don’t necessarily have a favorite, but I love trying out new designs and seeing how I can transform something! I also love seeing how excited customers get about it.” Highley appreciates her followers’ input because they are her customers, and she always tries to keep fresh trends on her page. “I get a lot of creativity and inspiration from their suggestions,” she said. Before DIY fashion, most consumers purchased items they deemed good enough to add to a wardrobe without altering the piece. Secondhand clothing, let alone DIY, has been frowned upon by mainstream consumers in the past. Social media helped to show the fashion-conscious that there are ways to modify their wardrobe affordably and creatively. During quarantine, DIY fashion flooded social media.

“I think people are getting more comfortable with the idea of secondhand clothing and doing stuff yourself,” Tidaback said. The excitement that comes with making clothing unique and personable has shifted society’s thoughts toward secondhand shopping. “I like the idea that you’re wearing something that no one else has,” Tidaback said. “I think it’s like a cheaper way to do things. You don’t have to go buy something super expensive, and it’s one-of-a-kind.” Tidaback’s clothes can range from a $28 cropped tee to a $55 bleached hoodie. As for DIY fashion, it does not have to be a secondhandpurchase that kick-starts the journey. Finding ways to create something from nothing is a hobby that anyone can try at home. “You can definitely feel proud of your work, and you feel so much more productive and happy after you’ve done something,” Highley said. “So, especially while you have time right now, definitely try new things, try to create something. You don’t have to try to make money off of it. It’d be better to find it now and create a passion for it.” • FALL 2020 | 39


PHOTO BY ISAAC JANSSEN Memorial Hall stands as a landmark for University of Kentucky students on Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2020, in Lexington, Ky.

MORE 40 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION

T H A N A

MURAL BY AKHIRA UMAR


A

fter years of protests and debates, the mural in Memorial Hall is about to come down. On June 5, University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto announced the immediate removal of Ann Rice O’Hanlon’s 1934 mural. The artwork displays the artist’s perspective on the evolution of Kentucky. What has sparked decades of debate is O’Hanlon’s depictions of Black and Native American people. While the mural depicts white people dancing, picnicking and

riding trains, enslaved Black people are playing music for the white people, working the field and being corralled onto one section of the train, presumably headed to the auction block. The sole Native American reference is a man peering at a white woman from behind a tree, tomahawk in hand, looking ready to strike. Many students, particularly Black students, have been disturbed by the mural’s presence in Memorial Hall. To them, the decision to remove it was a no-brainer. “We go to a college where there’s a lot of wellrounded individuals, especially Black individuals. So when you have a mural that captures Black people in a more, I guess, diminishing light then that kind of sets the tone for ‘What was the university thinking?’” said Gabe Savage, president of UK’s Black Student Union. “It shows the degradation of Black people in America. So I think it was just like a very unsettling sight for me.” Students have been calling for the mural’s removal through protests, sit-ins and in-person discussions with UK administration. One such student was Rockia Harris, a 2017 UK graduate, Louisiana State University doctoral student and the current vice president of LSU’s Black Graduate and Professional Student Association. When UK announced plans for the removal on Instagram, Harris was one of many who spoke out. “We protested so long for this. We had town hall meetings for this and multiple racial incidents on campus. Finally UK,” Harris commented. Senior Liz Smith was another student who supported the mural’s removal on UK’s Instagram post. “As a white student, having that mural on campus doesn’t affect me in the way it could students of color, but knowing it was there every day when I went to my lecture in Memorial, it creates this air of ‘It’s OK,’” Smith said. “I cannot imagine how Black students, especially descendants of slaves, would feel going to class there. No student should feel uncomfortable, unsafe or lesser than on our campus.” UK has responded to protests in recent years by covering the mural, commissioning art to give the mural “context” and relocating mandatory courses out of Memorial Hall. However, for many, these actions were never enough because the issue was not just the mural itself but the insinuation of complacent racism on UK’s campus. During her time at UK, Harris said she faced racism first-hand when she was called the n-word in passing. While Harris was directed to mental health services for her trauma, she said disciplinary action was never taken. Though Harris said the incident wasn’t properly addressed, it pushed her toward race, gender and sexuality research, and she used the experience in her personal statement for her doctoral program. FALL 2020 | 41


PHOTO BY JOEL REPOLEY Ann Rice O’Hanlan’s 1934 fresco is displayed inside Memorial Hall on Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015, in Lexington, Ky. The mural has caused controversy for many years. “There’s a thing that people have to see Black trauma in order to believe it more or sympathize more, and I don’t know what the breaking point of that is because while you’re seeing our trauma, we’re being re-traumatized in the same sense,” Harris said. While Savage has not had the same experience at UK, he can empathize. “Race-based issues are definitely a problem. You know, one time is way too many,” Savage said. “And I know that there are many, many other people who are definitely not comfortable. They’ve had way worse experiences than I have. It’s not just about me. It’s about the whole community.” When announcing the mural’s removal, President Capilouto recounted the horror he felt after watching George Floyd’s death, although UK spokesperson Jay Blanton said that the decision to take it down was made from a “culmination of things.” Savage is skeptical of UK’s motives. “They decided after the Black Lives Matter movement became a ‘trend’ that they should’ve taken matters into 42 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION

their own hands and gave students what they wanted. But I really think that if the Black Lives Matter hadn’t become like a big trend, our voices still would’ve not been heard,” Savage said. Although she wants to be optimistic, Harris isn’t fully convinced about the integrity behind UK’s decision either. “It shouldn’t have to get to this point where Black Lives Matter movement is at a peak again for you to really recognize that this is not making students feel comfortable. And I know my generation wasn’t the first to protest it,” Harris said. “I know people who were there in ‘08, ‘07 who protested it. I know people who were there in the late ‘90s who protested it. And so it’s like, why has this been a continuous thing for your Black and brown students and you’re just now doing something?” According to Blanton, the removal announcement was just the first step of many in the university’s effort to reconcile with its community of color. The university has created a multi-million dollar Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) Implementation Plan. “I think you see in the aftermath of that one decision


point there has been an effort to start probably the most comprehensive initiative of the history of the university, that I know of at least, to try to tackle many of these challenges and issues we have had,” Blanton said. “All that’s been outlined since the mural, which I think underscores the commitment that the institution has. That’s not to say that we don’t have to commit to thoughtful and urgent action—we do. That’s not to say we haven’t made mistakes— we have. There are still gaps that need to be addressed. I think progress has been made, I think sometimes more progress than is always talked about, but that shouldn’t diminish the fact that there’s still a lot of work that needs to be done.” Savage’s main concern is not the mural itself but how its removal will lead to other efforts for a more diverse and inclusive campus. “It’s going to take way more than just removing a painting to actually tackle issues like bias, the lack of diversity, stuff like that. It’s going to take a lot more effort and a lot more tangible action plans to actually make some sort of real effort for students after us,” Savage said. “If we want

“It’s going to take way more than just removing a painting to actually tackle issues like bias, the lack of diversity, stuff like that.” – Gabe Savage FALL 2020 | 43


The installation of Karyn Olivier’s work “Witness” in the Memorial Hall vestibule was completed on Thursday, Aug. 16, 2018, in Lexington, Ky. Karyn Olivier was an artist chosen by the UK Memorial Hall art committee to create an artwork that adds context to Ann Rice O’Hanlon’s 1934 mural. PHOTO BY ARDEN BARNES

FALL 2020 | 44

to make actual change, the things that we do now need to be able to affect our future and not just our present.” An action plan is exactly what Karyn Olivier thinks UK neglected to put in place after the August 2018 completion of her art piece “Witness” that was supposed to be a companion piece for the mural. On Memorial Hall’s vestibule, Olivier displaced the Black and Native American figures from the mural and put them against a gold-leaf background, making them appear as “celestial beings.” However, she knew when her piece was commissioned that it alone wasn’t going to resolve issues surrounding the mural, and she had warned the university of that. “I was hoping it could kind of allow us to kind of deal with the tough questions and kind of go into the racism, the democracy, the frightening history,” Olivier said. “But I don’t want to act like an artwork can do all that. An artwork can be a catalyst with say a scholar, with say a social justice worker. It is one avenue that could’ve been used. Like literally use it. And that to me seemed like it wasn’t used.” Since her piece was meant to complement the mural, Olivier believes removing the mural would effectively silence her own piece. If the mural goes, she wants “Witness” to go also. But she does not believe removing these art pieces will solve any real issues. Olivier and Christopher Finan, the executive director of the National Coalition Against Censorship, penned open letters to UK denouncing the mural’s removal. Finan also believes the fault with the mural lies with the university. To him, the university is neglecting to address the bigger racial issues on campus. “If we’re ever going to solve the problems of racial injustice in this country, it’s going to depend on being able to have these often painful conversations in which Black students and white students have an opportunity to find some common ground and understand each other,” Finan said. “And they may not agree, even at the end of the day there still may be this debate, but we have to have conversation, and that’s what education’s all about. So to have the University of Kentucky, the major higher education institution in the state, trying to basically get itself off the hook by removing this work, we think it would be a tragedy.”


PHOTO BY NATALIE PARKS Students stand during the town hall for minority issues, hosted by the Black Student Advisory Council, on Monday, Apr. 1, 2019, in Lexington, Ky.

While Blanton agrees that the university may not have done enough to facilitate dialogue after “Witness” was finished, he said the administration discovered continuously reinterpreting the mural would be difficult, especially with rotating groups of students. Although the university announced intentions to remove the mural, the end of September saw no finalized plans for doing so, due partially to a lawsuit the university is fighting from those who want it to remain. Among the opposition to the removal are Kentucky author Wendell Berry and his wife Tanya, a niece of the mural’s artist, who joined a lawsuit to stop the removal of the mural and, subsequently, Olivier’s “Witness.” In the lawsuit, an expert on historic preservation claimed the removal of the mural to be risky, possibly leading to its destruction. The university has filed for a motion to dismiss the lawsuit and continue plans for the removal. “We believe in order to move forward on these really important issues around diversity and equity and

inclusivity, we have to take some action with respect to the mural,” Blanton said. “Removing a piece of art or putting it in another context is not the same as erasing history. So we have a fundamental disagreement, but I hope it’s a respectful disagreement.” Harris believes tangible action is something the university failed to provide during her time at UK, but she feels it may be more important and necessary now more than ever. “As students and as faculty and staff, we need to make sure we always find ways to hold our peers accountable. Just because you’re now tenured or the dean of this or the provost of that doesn’t mean your culture competency is at its best,” Harris said. “I think if you’re pushing for diversity, how dare you not make sure your campus is all-around culturally competent and prepared for these conversations or prepared to interact with people from everywhere. Like you can’t pride yourself on diversity if you’re not really pushing that real vision.” • FALL 2020 | 45


THE UNTOLD STORIES OF

WOODLAND

Lorraine Fay and Mara Lara show their skateboards at Woodland Skate Park on Thursday, Aug. 13, 2020, in Lexington, Ky. 46 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION


S K AT E PA R K

BY ALLIE DIGGS | PHOTOS BY ISAAC JANSSEN

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aughter, the hum of voices, the rolling of wheels on the pavement, and loud pops and claps of wooden boards on metal rails. Off East Main Street and Kentucky Avenue lies the Woodland Skate Park. The 12,000 square foot park features ramps, platforms, pipes and a bowl. Cracks in the pavement and remnants of sandblasted graffiti cover the area. It’s worn and shows its age of 21 years. A variety of people of all ages and skill levels circle the park. The far-right side of the park contains the new skaters who are practicing tricks, learning their footing on the board and figuring out how to effectively push. The left side is where the more seasoned skaters sit to rehydrate, talk and cheer others on. “Skateboarding saved us … it stopped us from going down a dark path,” said Brody Morken, who has been skating at Woodland for eight years. Repetition, confidence, focus and forceful falls are seen in the center of the park. This is where skaters must tuck away any fear they have of becoming injured. The more a skater hesitates, the more injury they will cause themselves or others. “The only thing that humbles us is the concrete. Everyone falls,” Morken said. “Skateboarding is really hard to learn. It’s no joke.” While skating has been associated with negative stereotypes, the skaters at Woodland said the sport has had a good influence in their lives. “I have slept here, skated here and I’ve met some of the greatest people of my life here,” Noah LeMaster said. LeMaster, also known as “Gerbil,” is passionate about his community. As a “product of this park,” he began skating at 10 years old. He would get dropped off at the park to skate during his mom’s nine- to 12-hour work shifts and considered the park like a daycare. Gerbil has a strong connection with Woodland

FALL 2020 | 47


Noah “Gerbil” LeMaster sips on a beer at Woodland Skate Park on Thursday, Aug. 13, 2020, in Lexington, Ky. 48 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION


and is concerned for its future. “People need to know and understand the skate community is dying and people need to invest into it,” he said. The skater persona has been taken over by fashion brands such as Zumiez and Vans, causing local skate shops to close. Previously, these shops held skate competitions at Woodland, but now events are scarce. Although fewer planned events happen at Woodland, the skaters still frequently go to the park. Mara Lara and her friend, Lorraine Fay, said that they immediately felt a sense of community at Woodland even though they had just begun their skating careers this summer. “I was just coming out to the park for quarantine and stuff and it looked so fun. I just started to spend all my time watching them, and then I was like, wow, I wanna do that. They’re all having such a good time,” Fay said. The new skaters have noticed some issues with the skate park. The girls pointed out that the tennis courts at Woodland Park have much brighter and nicer lights than the skate park. One of the skate park’s lights is burnt out. The timer on the lights is broken as well, so the skaters are, in a sense, required to maintain the park, or skating could potentially become dangerous at night. The Woodland skater community seems unsure of how to fix the issues with the park but expressed their hope about it being remodeled and expanded one day. “The park isn’t the best, but the people at Woodland are,” Morken said. The Woodland skaters have a tight sense of community. Inspired by his passion for Woodland’s community, Jake Reese, a senior digital media and design major at the University of Kentucky, created a documentary called “Woodland Souls” for one of his classes. “I had always wanted to show people why I’ve continued to go to Woodland for almost 10 years now, so I decided to shoot my little doc,” Reese said. “I’ve always skated at Woodland, and it’s been

so kind to me.” His documentary, which can be viewed on YouTube, demonstrates the skaters’ shared love for Woodland and the friendships it has created. “I’m incredibly close to the community and I know almost everyone there, so I figured it would be right to express my gratitude for the park,” Reese said. Reid Smalls, a longtime supporter of Woodland, is currently the vice president of Friends for Skateparks, a nonprofit organization. He is an advocate for skating, being a skater himself for over 30 years.

“I have slept here, skated here and I’ve met some of the greatest people of my life here.” – Noah “Gerbil”

LeMaster

Friends for Skateparks works to raise awareness for Woodland Skate Park and improve its facilities. The nonprofit hopes to bring back skating competitions in the future for the sake of small skating businesses and the community at Woodland. Morken, Gerbil, Lara, Fay, Smalls and Reese all share a personal connection with Woodland and hope to continue to see it grow and improve. “Woodland has changed for the better over time,” Reese said. “It was super rough around the edges but now it’s finally becoming a place where anyone is welcome.” •

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MASK UP B U T M A K E I T FA S H I O N BY RACHAEL COURTNEY

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he inspiration behind this shoot was to create a dream effect by playing with colored lighting and glittery makeup. Instead of showcasing clothes from local vendors, we chose to showcase two student mask makers. Beth Eversman, a junior at the University of Kentucky, started making masks in April. “Initially, it was just to fill the need that the pandemic brought on, but quickly realizing masks were not going away anytime soon, I wanted to be able to have it add to my style/ OOTD rather than sticking out and highlighting the fact this is the state we are living in,” Eversman said. She chose to use masks that have lots of colors and trendy patterns for the shoot. Summer Beck, a senior at UK, started making masks in March. She started by making masks to donate to essential workers who desperately needed more personal protective equipment. “I knew there were so many people losing their jobs or being called in for long shifts as essential workers. I just wanted people to have access to any small amount of protection I could offer,” Beck said. “I have made close to 500 masks at this point.” Beck donated three shimmery masks for the shoot. A key element to this shoot was the makeup. We had UK senior and makeup artist Myo Zan create eye looks that went with each of the masks. “I wanted an eye look that would add to how cute the masks were, not to distract from them,” Zan said. “Right now is the time to experiment with eye looks since it’s basically the only facial feature others can see. You should have fun with it.” To best protect our fellow students, we took the necessary safety precautions during the shoot. Our photographers shot the models by having different timeslots for each shoot. 50 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION


MASK DESIGNED BY BETH EVERSMAN PHOTO BY AMBER RITSCHEL FALL 2020 | 51


MASK DESIGNED BY SUMMER BECK PHOTO BY AMBER RITSCHEL


MASK DESIGNED BY SUMMER BECK PHOTO BY AMBER RITSCHEL FALL 2020 | 53


MASK DESIGNED BY SUMMER BECK PHOTO BY AMBER RITSCHEL 54 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION


MASK DESIGNED BY BETH EVERSMAN PHOTO BY ISAAC JANSSEN


MASK DESIGNED BY BETH EVERSMAN PHOTO BY ISAAC JANSSEN


MASK DESIGNED BY BETH EVERSMAN PHOTO BY ISAAC JANSSEN


TELLING THE WRITE STORY BY MIRELLE TAYLOR

Writing a novel is famously difficult. But several UK students have endured the process. From a nursing student co-authoring a historical piece, a political science major exploring self-worth, a natural resources and environmental science graduate working on a young adult science fiction sequel, to a four-time published author returning to school to further his passion, here are four stories of our own student authors.

EMILY JORDAN | “Everything is nothing until it’s something.” While sitting in front of the TV one day, Emily Jordan heard this provocative question arise: Can women actually lead in a time of war? Taken aback but genuinely curious, she asked her father, an established military history author, to tell her about the women who have led in war. To both of their surprise, he had no answer. So began the search for the “War Queens: Extraordinary Women Who Ruled the Battlefield.” Published in March of this year by Diversion Books, “War Queens” is a military history book that shows just how strongly women have indeed led in times of war. Jordan began work on the book when she was still in high school. Six years later as a senior nursing student, she reflects on the journey. Jordan and her dad, Jonathan Jordan, compiled a list of books consisting of potential war queens and read them one by one, highlighting key points. Jordan said that creating a storyline during this was crucial because it was 58 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION

easy to get sidetracked. They then took turns writing the chapters, with Jordan herself focusing more on women leaders of ancient times. Jordan and her father reached out to experts who were able to help with hard-to-find information that ultimately brought accurate representation to their stories. With all the challenges that come with trying to get a book published, Jordan said the most surprising aspect was the difficulty in getting the topic of their book published in its particular genre. This is primarily due to the specific demographic of military history. “There are times where you need to look at your content and say, ‘What can be compromised’ — because you want the story out there so bad — ‘and what just can’t?’ because then that just makes it a new story,” Jordan said of having to comply with the genre standards. While some details did have to change to appeal more to the audience, specifically the cover art and title, Jordan


PHOTO PROVIDED BY HANNAH PHILLIPS Emily Jordan sits with her book “War Queens” in Lexington, Ky., in 2020.

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said the colorful language of the interior got to remain and she whole-heartedly believes in the content. Jordan and her dad wrote about these women as authentically as possible, including the good and bad. “This book is bringing to light a lot of stories that girls don’t get to read about growing up,” Jordan said. “There’s so many different examples of the most incredible things you can do as a woman, but each of these women brings something different about, whether it’s confidence and ferocity or compassion, and we don’t even like to hide the parts that people didn’t like.” Jordan said that besides the trouble with getting the book picked up by publishers, there were also times during the writing process in which she questioned her ability to produce something so daunting. But her father’s support kept her going. As far as encouragement and words of wisdom for others, Jordan said it is as simple and cheesy as believing in yourself. She said that you must believe in each part of what you do and have confidence in it. “You wouldn’t have written it down if you didn’t have something to say,” Jordan said, “and I believe that’s a human right of yours to have something to say and to want to share that with people, so hold on to that.” OLIVIA ANTIGUA | “Am I a secondary character in my own life story?” – “Defining Piper”

“Defining Piper” is a coming-of-age novel by Olivia Antigua.

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For Olivia Antigua, a UK political science major, it started with a high school creative writing class project. The goal was to complete the school edition of NaNoWriMo, also known as National Novel Writing Month. This involved writing a story of 10-20,000 words. However, with the encouragement of a friend, it turned into an entire 500+ page coming-of-age story, “Defining Piper,” published in December 2016. Although beginning as a class assignment, Antigua’s book was something much more for her. At the time, she had just experienced a move from Kentucky to Florida and used her writing to deal with the transition. “I was trying to struggle and figure out how to make friends again, how to adjust to school and I really channeled some of my thoughts into a different character and sometimes I would say the best and worst of me I find scattered throughout my characters,” Antigua said. “I wrote for my own mental health and I learned a lot about myself from that process.” Being in high school and having never written something of that caliber, Antigua said the process was a little scattered. She started by mapping out her story on a whiteboard. Antigua said it was a lot of starting and stopping as she tried to combat writer’s block. The issue was mostly know-


PHOTO BY RYDER NOAH FROM Olivia Antigua smiles under her mask for a photo on Friday, Sept. 25, 2020, in Lexington, Ky. ing where she wanted to go but not how she wanted to get there. To work around this, Antigua said, “I was a person who would sometimes write other short stories and take a break from my main piece because it would give me a different creative outlook.” After spending almost two years on the book and doing her own editing with Grammarly, Antigua decided it was finally time to publish. Along with many writers who have either struggled with traditional publishing or simply didn’t want to deal with it, she used Amazon Publishing, which she said was surprisingly simple. Antigua said she would have done a few things differently if she had written the book when she was older. She wishes she had researched mental health more to dive deeper into the issues surrounding it. Now a mental health advocate, she knows how to “walk that space more respectfully.” She also said she would have more deeply developed racial issues. That was a part of her identity that she had yet to explore. It wasn’t until college and recent events that she reflected on her childhood and gained a deeper understanding of that part of herself, she said. “Finding Piper” meant so much to Antigua that she got

a tattoo which says “main character,” referencing her favorite quote from the book. “I was always doubting my role in the world and writing it reminds me that I’m allowed to put myself first, to forgive myself, make mistakes and remind myself with my own self-worth and self-importance. And I learned that through that writing process, and this is a reminder of it, and it also is a reminder of what I accomplished,” Antigua said. For anyone else wanting to have an experience like this for themselves, Antigua said, “Just go out, do it. See what you want, see if you can find that story that you’re passionate about, and then try to work through the process.” SAM MARTIN | “It’s like my life’s body of work, which is so strange ‘cause I’m like a child.”

UK graduate Sam Martin has been writing for years. With a degree in natural resources and environmental science, it may seem surprising that her life’s dream is to write, but her creative writing minor shows more of who she is. FALL 2020 | 61


“Latium” is a young adult science fiction novel by Sam Martin. With seven books written, one of which is published and its sequel in the process, Martin has been doing well to make this dream come true. While managing to keep her straight As, Martin spent most of her time in her college classes working on stories. “I would go to class and I would sit there and I would be in class, but I was literally always outlining or writing some scene that I was thinking of or sort of brainstorming,” she said, joking that no one should do the same. Martin’s book, “Latium,” was published when she was 21, but the writing process began when she was 14. The book went through many rewrites and was picked up and dropped throughout those years. This also gave Martin a familiarity with her characters that not all authors have. “The nice thing about that is that I know these characters inside and out so I don’t have to worry so much about developing them and thinking about how they would react in a certain situation,” Martin said. The familiarity helped Martin’s ability to write a charac-

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ter arc. Martin said the plot will reveal itself if you write the characters for long enough. Martin said that getting published all begins with writing a query letter. The query letter provides all different aspects of a story that a publisher would need to know including a hook, why they should care and a biography of the author. Once Martin was picked up by a publisher, 50/50 Press, the work continued with three rounds of editing. The first dealt with story development, the second focused on dialogue and flow, while the third corrected any typos or grammar mistakes. Explaining that her publishers requested some added story components and a rethink of one of the relationships, Martin said, “What you send to your agent or publisher will literally never see the light of day because they are going to want to make so many changes to it.” Currently, Martin is the coordinator for an entertainment media company called Frolic, based in Los Angeles. She also writes for the popular chat fiction app Hooked. Since moving to LA, Martin has picked up some useful writing habits. One is a living outline made of sticky notes on her wall which makes the story easier to visualize and swiftly change. Though, outlining is not where Martin starts. She explained how a lot of her stories begin in just the first scene. Once that is completed, she will then try at an outline. If the outline is not working, she will keep writing the story and see what happens. It is important that the writing not feel made up, otherwise, she said she is doing it wrong. “It almost feels like I’m just recording what happened and it feels natural to the world and it feels natural to the characters,” Martin said. With the experience that Martin has had with the publishing industry, she has some invaluable takeaways. “My advice for any creative writing students is take peer reviews with a grain of salt because while it can be helpful to be in a workshop-type environment with your peers, it also can harm you if you try to take everyone’s advice or if you take everyone’s advice as equally valuable,” she said. “Especially when you get established, your agent’s opinion is important, your editor’s opinion is important, but definitely do not let anything that anyone says to you in one of those seminars discourage you from writing.”


“... I believe that’s a human right of yours to have something to say and to want to share that with people, so hold on to that.” PHOTO PROVIDED BY SAM MARTIN

– Emily Jordan

Sam Martin poses with her book “Latium” on Friday, Oct. 2, 2020, in Los Angeles. MARTY ANDERSON II “I liked what I was doing, and I thought, you know, I’m actually going to have something to my name.”

Marty Anderson’s journey toward authorship is a little different than most. Growing up, he never imagined he would have four published books and instead began college at Lexington Community College, now known as Bluegrass Community and Technical College, expecting to be a video game developer. Anderson’s first novel came about after discovering he had no passion for coding. Dropping his first coding class and computer-focused major, he picked up English based on how much he loved

FALL 2020 | 63


to read and complete creative writing assignments year or early 2021. Anderson also faced the struggles of traditional growing up. He graduated from Lexington Community College publishing. Wanting to have his work in the world with an Associate of Arts in 2000. In 2017, Ander- and be able to hold it, he turned to independent son returned to school to complete his Bachelor of publishing. While this brings along its own strugArts in English after realizing his connection to story- gles, specifically with promoting the book, Andertelling. He is set to graduate from UK in December son thought of a way to get his book circulating. At that time, Anderson was working at a library. 2020. “I would publish, you know, get something in print, “After I finished college, I always thought that I was going to do something important with my life and I would take it to work and then say, ‘Would you and I was going to take an unconventional course put this on the shelf? Would you put this in the collecin life. I mean, I don’t know how to explain it other- tion?’ And they always did,” he said. This meant a lot to Anderson as his books repwise, but I wanted to do something and I thought, what is something that I could do immediately and I resent life and soul to him. His ultimate goal is to thought, I think I can write a novel,” Anderson said. inspire emotion in anyone who reads them. “I mean, you’re taking something of yourself and From there, Anderson began in 2001 with the not just writing something that first scene of “The Muriad” and I’m indifferent about. I have to spent the next three years writinvest something of myself and ing his book by hand. it’s not just my time that I’m inHe said outlining is not somevesting,” Anderson said. “I’m thing that he does. The coninvesting of my heart, my mind, cept of imagining the entire my experiences, the sorrows that storyline before beginning can I’ve had, the joys that I’ve had, be a bit overwhelming. Instead, the things I love, the things I dishe creates landmarks along the like. All of those things go into way and makes notes on how it, and how can you not feel? It he would like to reach them. does become something like a “I resisted looking to the child.” end of the story or to think or Anderson had many suggesto imagine myself having fintions for fellow writers including ished it because I thought, that reading classics and writing all seems too far away and I’ll get characters with defining qualidiscouraged if I try to look over ties. He also stressed that stories the horizon because it will al“The Muriad” is one of four pubare structural, not formulaic. But ways seem too far away,” Anlished books by Marty Anderson II. his greatest piece of advice is to derson said. “What I need to do is just to look at what I’m doing presently or what persevere. Writing is difficult and you will face obis in the immediate future in the story and to not, stacles, he said, but if it is something in your heart that you want to write, you must do it. you know, think too much or at all about the end.” Anderson also said that you should begin writThis does not mean he doesn’t put emphasis on the end. The end is actually his favorite part to write. ing where you feel most comfortable, whether on a “The end is the summation of everything. It’s small scale or a massive one like himself. “I started big,” Anderson said. “That’s either a virwhere you show the reason why you’ve written,” he tue or a weakness of mine, and I had written nothing said. “It ties everything together.” Anderson’s books, including some not yet pub- except papers for school before I started a novel, so lished, cover quite a wide range of genres, from I didn’t start just writing short stories. I went big or fantasy, to coming-of-age, to a children’s novel. He I didn’t go at all, and so wherever the person feels has even written a collection of four feature-length comfortable beginning, begin there, begin with screenplays, expected to be published later this something you believe is worthy.” •

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PHOTO BY RYDER NOAH FROM Marty Anderson II strikes a pose on Friday, Sept. 25, 2020, in Lexington, Ky. 65 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION


Corey Maple and Hannah Maple stand inside Wilson’s Grocery on Monday, Sept. 28, 2020, in Lexington, Ky. 66 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION


THIS FAMILY MEANS

BUSINESS BY MIRELLE TAYLOR PHOTOS BY ISAAC JANSSEN

W

hile Maple & J and Wilson’s Grocery & Meats are unique from the other, both businesses gather inspiration from the same place. Going on six years in operation, Maple & J specializes in durable bangles. Decades-old Wilson’s, having new owners and a remodel, aims at providing customers with nostalgia. There is a reason for the businesses’ connection: the same family runs them. Twins Corey Maple and Cara Hochhalter each have a local business with their respective spouses. Cara and her husband, AJ, created Maple & J, while Corey and his wife, Hannah, bought and reinvented Wilson’s. — Maple & J: Never Take it Off — For Maple & J, it all started about five-and-a-half years ago. While watching the television show “Shark Tank,” an idea popped into Cara’s head. With her jewelry-loving grandmother in mind, Cara said she wanted to start a business making baby bangles. Baby bangles are very meaningful to Cara. She still owns hers from her childhood and had witnessed their significance to children in China while living there for a time, she said. Interestingly, the market for baby bangles in the U.S. was sparse, with the only options being too expensive or bad quality, Cara said. So, she decided to create a sturdy but beautiful product that never has to be taken off and can be passed down through generations. At this point, Cara and AJ were married with two FALL 2020 | 67


Cara Hochhalter, AJ Hochhalter, Corey Maple and Hannah Maple spend time together in their neighborhood on Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2020, in Lexington, Ky. children — there are now four — named Maple and Justice. And so, Maple & J got its name. The rest was not so easy, Cara said. It took her about six months to a year to really get going. “It’s scary and nerve-wracking to go out on something that you believe in, but you don’t know if anyone else is going to have that vision and passion that you have,” Cara said. AJ has been fully supportive from the beginning, she said, giving her motivation when she couldn’t find it. With Cara’s vision and AJ’s creativity in marketing, Maple & J became what it is today, a business that now makes different forms of jewelry, no longer just baby bangles, to share with loved ones. Cara said that Maple & J helps create connections. Maple & J supplies the jewelry, the people who wear it create the meaning, and Cara said that providing this avenue for sentimentalism is an amazing experience. 68 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION

While Maple & J does not have a physical location at the moment, there are pop-up shops to look out for and an easily navigable website, www.mapleandj.com, to check out all of the jewelry now available. Wilson’s: Your Nostalgic Neighborhood Grocery Store Originally built in the 1920s and adopting the current name in the ‘80s, the Cramer Avenue grocery store has long been the pride of its neighborhood. Corey and Hannah only came to own it two years ago. After moving to the same neighborhood as the Hochhalters, where Wilson’s is located, the Maples said they quickly learned what a gem the store was. Not long after, the owner approached them about buying the store, having known about some of Corey’s other business ventures. Recognizing Wilson’s for the institution that it is, Corey and Hannah said they jumped on the


opportunity, hoping to further enhance Wilson’s role in the community. Corey said it is cool to be the current steward of the store, contributing to its historical significance. Wilson’s is unique to other groceries. When the Maples became owners, they said they wanted to make it a place that inspired community. Their goal is not to compete with chain groceries but rather to provide a nostalgic experience that bigger stores cannot. “It’s really cool to see kids, like Cara’s kids and neighborhood kids, ride their bikes up to Wilson’s to buy candy, like that’s going to be ingrained in them. They’re going to be adults and think back on their first experiences of independence,” Hannah said. As a neighborhood grocery and deli, Wilson’s offers food, ingredients and an atmosphere that encourages those who visit to slow down and be present, Hannah said. Customers leave Wilson’s inspired to get creative and make meals with loved ones that will lead to lasting memories. — It’s in the Family — Cara and Corey grew up traveling across the country in a camper-trailer with their parents, following jobs for their father, who was a jockey, and living in different state parks. “They were a humble family that spent so much

“I want my kids to see, too, that they can work hard to follow their dreams.” – Hannah Maple

Cara Hochhalter shows off her Maple & J rings on Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2020, in Lexington, Ky.


quality time together, and they had two really loving, joyful parents that I think created this legacy of selflessness and love and joy,” Hannah said of her husband’s family. The unique bond that was instilled in the Maple twins transferred to their spouses and now their own children. Adding to Cara and AJ’s four kids, Hannah and Corey have three of their own. Hannah said time together with the whole family is fun, chaotic and silly. With their strong bond and professional success, the Maples and Hochhalters have become a tightly knit entrepreneur family. “It’s an overall theme we have got going on, our businesses. We’re all entangled in a good way, in a natural

way,” Cara said. Having this relationship allows for the Maples and Hochhalters to professionally counsel each other. Each side has their fair share of business experience, and they are able to learn from one another and provide feedback. The two teams support each other as much as they can. In addition to their everyday Wilson’s purchases, Cara and AJ bring family from out of town to eat from the deli at Wilson’s. Hannah and Corey both wear their Maple & J bangles, promoting them to those who notice and gifting them to those who are special in their lives. As for the future, a Maple & J pop-up shop at Wilson’s may just be in the works.

Cara Hochhalter and AJ Hochhalter pose together for their photo on Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2020, in Lexington, Ky. 70 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION


Corey Maple and Hannah Maple stand outside the Wilson’s storefront on Monday, Sept. 28, 2020, in Lexington, Ky.

The family aspect of these businesses means more than just the four working together. All of the children between the two couples take part. Whether it’s taking promotional photos, dreaming of working at Wilson’s, sporting Maple & J bangles or just being around the everyday work, the businesses are just as much a part of the children’s lives. AJ said that because the children have always been involved, they’ll be able to see how the businesses were used to create lasting memories when they get older. That, to him, is the best part of having a family business. “Because it is a family business, you get to incorporate your family into it,” AJ said. But, it’s not always so seamless. Sometimes a line must be drawn so that business doesn’t overpower family. Corey said that when he is at home with his wife and children, that is where his mind needs to be, not thinking about the theoretical fires that need to be put out

at work. “It’s being aware that that’s a constant struggle and just exercising your mind to say, ‘Hey, let’s put the phone away for a little while,’ so that my kids don’t see me always looking down at my phone. I want them to see me looking at them or talking to them,” Corey said. The family members describe themselves as hardworking people. A lot of their pride and self-worth come from their businesses but also from their family. With this comes leaving behind a legacy to instill good and find happiness. “I want my kids to see, too, that they can work hard to follow their dreams,” Hannah said. “So, I want to show them that I’m working and that we do find purpose in what we do, and I want to set that example. But you do have to really find a healthy balance because you don’t want to show them that life is all about work.” • FALL 2020 | 71


CARPE DENIM A FINAL FAREWELL FROM OUR KRNL L+F SENIORS

AKHIRA Coming from a small Kentucky town, I had always looked forward to moving to the city. But once I found myself at UK, I had come to miss the tranquility of having a horse farm as my backyard neighbor instead of bustling campus life. When I saw what I call this “hall of trees” on move-in day my freshman year, I instantly fell in love. It was a little piece of home right outside my dorm’s doors. Though it’s not a social hub or even a place people usually sit down, I always enjoyed my walks through here. Shrouded in shade, little squirrels and chipmunks run from trunk to trunk across the walkways, giving way to crossing students but still living in

72 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION

their own world. Sometimes life makes you feel like you have to speed through it. It’s all about advancement: through college, through careers, through achievement. But every once in a while it’s nice to just slow down, stop and breathe. That’s what places like this, Maxwell Place and the (nowdestroyed) Kirwan-Blanding Residence Hall Complex did for me. These little retreats brought me peace in an otherwise chaotic college atmosphere. Though I know the campus will grow and change as I and everyone else will, I hope green spaces like this continue to provide safe places to just be.


PHOTO BY AMBER RITSCHEL FALL 2020 | 73


KENDALL Although I might be biased, no place has anything on the Studio Art and Visual Studies (SAVS) Building. This building is home to many of my favorite studio classes and professors. It has always been a getaway and a place to get lost in whatever medium it might be. Looking back, there is something rewarding about seeing where I am now compared to a few short years ago. Growing up, I knew I was interested in pursuing art and design, but I never knew where that would lead me. I always thought it was more of a hobby, if anything. Now, as a senior at UK, I reflect back on my time and have a unique appreciation for what I discovered while here. KRNL opened my eyes to other students who like to think big. This organization has taught me aspects of design I never would have expected, all while being alongside a great group of people. I learned that hobbies can turn into my passions, which can turn into work. It took time to figure out where my interests and skills intersect, but everyone always has time to change their minds. With that said, this is the time to experiment and discover. With only a semester left in my college career, thinking about leaving KRNL is difficult, but I cannot wait to see where it’s headed.

PHOTO BY AMBER RITSCHEL 74 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION


PHOTO BY AMBER RITSCHEL

ARIZZONA The feeling of strolling around campus, backpack on, earbuds in, is one I’ll definitely miss. One particular path I loved taking was toward Memorial Hall, usually on my way either to Erikson Hall for my merchandising classes or to McVey Hall for the KRNL office. The world seems to stand still at the corner of Prall and South Limestone, waiting for the crosswalk signal. For my mornings, it’s usually the last place I’ll be where I don’t have to think about all the work I have to do. Seeing Memorial Hall on my journey to campus is sort of

a reminder to take a breath and prepare for another day. It’s a reminder of my own journey as a student at UK. It’s a symbol of the university and is one of growth and change. UK’s campus has an indescribable feeling. It’s been home for me, on and off, for over three years. As a senior graduating in December, the idea that my journey is coming to an end at UK has hit me hard. I’m thankful I was able to capture some final moments in one of my most memorable spots on campus. FALL 2020 | 75


PHOTO BY ISAAC JANSSEN

NICO Throughout my time here at the University of Kentucky, I would find comfort here at the top floor parking garage of Rose Street. There was nothing that could beat overlooking the Willy T library after a long day. Upon sitting and admiring, I think about how I’ve made many memories and have experienced personal growth here at UK, which I’m thankful for. Being with KRNL helped me realize that there are so many creative people, and in the future of fashion, you’ll always be working alongside creative minds. I want to thank everyone who has helped and challenged me to better myself through the years. Although I may leave Kentucky after graduation, Lexington will always be my second home. I wish the best for all seniors going forth from here. We’ll be the change we want to see in the world. 76 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION


PHOTO BY AMBER RITSCHEL

MIRELLE My time in college has brought with it some of the most drastic changes of my life. It was certainly a time for self-discovery. Through two schools and seven majors, I’ve searched hard for myself and always been bothered by my uncertainty. After my freshman year, I transferred from Western Kentucky University to the University of Kentucky. I began my life at UK with little knowledge about the campus, definitely having no idea about the amphitheater behind Memorial Hall. There’s something about the Amphitheater that feels magical to me. It may simply be the familiarity I

experience from its resemblance to a favorite spot on WKU’s campus, or it may be the juxtaposed charm of it, with old stone and lively greenery intermingling. The first time I saw the amphitheater, I stumbled upon it while leaving an exam late at night. Seeing it in the dark with the campus nearly asleep was so serene. It transported me to a moment outside of myself, grounding me in my surroundings and reminding me that there’s so much more to life than what I know and experience. It showed me that there’s a lot to find, even right next to me, and selfdiscovery is a part of that. • FALL 2020 | 77


PHOTO BY ISAAC JANSSEN The Domestic sells vintage and modern items in Lexington, Ky., on Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020. 78 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION


WHAT GOES

AROUND COMES AROUND R E S U R FA C I N G C L A S S I C FA S H I O N T R E N D S

BY MADISON CECIL

F

ashion repeats itself and, more often than not, these trends will make their way into your closet. Who knew your mom’s old jeans would become your new favorite pair? Think of the fashion trends from when your parents were on campus compared to now. Designers and stylists love to bring a mix of fresh and classic looks when creating what this season’s trends will be. With the rise of vintage and thrift shopping and major social media focus on celebrities like Hailey Bieber, Dua Lipa and Harry Styles, recreating these looks can be easy. You can even find most of these pieces stored away in your mom’s old high school memories box. It is common for trends to resurface and have their 15 minutes of fame. Those bell-bottom jeans you saw in the spring of 2019 did not live past two seasons. However, you will often come across a fashion revival that sticks around for a while. For example, vintage rock band graphic T-shirts are a must-have in every closet. While graphic tees and bell-bottom jeans are just a couple of the monumental fashion comebacks that have been seen already, here is a compiled list of fashion pieces 2020 has seen that have totally been the center of attention before.

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THE DOMESTIC LORD JOHN RED SUNGLASSES | 12 MUSE T-SHIRT | 12 70S JEAN JACKET | 68 PHOTO BY RYDER NOAH FROM

PHOTO BY ISAAC JANSSEN A close-up of Levi denim on Thursday, Oct. 1, 2020, in Lexington, Ky.

THE REIGN OF LEVI DENIM Popularly worn in the ‘60s but making an appearance in almost every decade since, Levi denim has been a big trend this year. Celebrities like Sofia Richie and Kendall Jenner are serving looks in this comeback piece. However, we can’t give all the credit to these icons for their everyday stunting. Celebrities like Marilyn Monroe and James Dean are whom we can thank for this. Levi denim is one of the major comeback trends that can be counted on to last a while. This trend has caught many eyes lately for its easy pairing to create any aesthetic. Dressed up with pieces like halter tops or dressed down for a casual outing with sneakers and a graphic tee, you can’t go wrong investing in a pair of Levi’s. Levi’s are known for their flattering look on every body type. Kenzie Barzey, a 22-year-old Kentucky smallbusiness owner, has recently created her brand finding vintage Levi denim, then creating a one-of-a-kind look by hand cutting and distressing each pair. In June 2019, Barzey created @good.findz, an Instagram account selling vintage denim. This led to 80 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION

the establishment of her official business website, www.shopgoodfindz.com, in 2020. Since then, her wares have been selling out within minutes. “My business primarily focuses on distressed vintage denim from the ‘60s to the early 2000s,” Barzey said. “It started as a hobby because I didn’t really like the way any shorts looked on me, but vintage denim is super flattering. My friends began asking me to make them pairs, so I randomly decided to make an Instagram account, and it took off from there.” And the popularity of Barzey’s vintage denim has only grown since then. “It took about two months for my products to start selling out within minutes. As my page has grown, things have continued to sell fast, and now, I usually sell out in seconds,” Barzey said. “I am pretty sure this is because of my photo quality, how I model the products to show how flattering they are, the distressing and more. It’s everything together and not just one thing alone that helps me sell quick.”


EVERYTHING ‘70S This fashion season is without a doubt giving off “That ‘70s Show” vibes. From lounge sets to bikinis, people want everything in every color tie-dye. Tie-dye is an easy-to-create and easy-to-find trend. It has made a comeback thanks to the popular app TikTok. Influencers like Addison Rae and the D’Amelio sisters, Dixie and Charli, create content regularly wearing these designs. “I like to wear things that represent my energy and how I want to portray myself to others,” said Carmen Valenzuela, a student at the University of Kentucky, about how these ‘70s trends are starting to appear in her closet. “I envision each color as a trait of mine,” Valenzuela said. “Bubbly being made of shades of blue, friendliness

in shades of pink and lilac, and high energy as brighter colors. I’ve been trying to incorporate more whimsical trends in my style as opposed to solid pieces.” White disco booties are back and better than ever, too. These shoes are easy to dress up or down. They add spunk and draw attention to any outfit they are paired with. Think of ‘70s icons like Jackie Burkhart and Daphne when imagining the next boots and mini skirt outfit to wear. And what are boots without bootcut bottoms? “I recently got a pair of Lily Pulitzer bootcut pants. Lily Pulitzer can be more on the preppy side, but with the bootcut style and the floral print design it is showing more of a ‘70s vibe,” Valenzuela said.

PHOTO BY ISAAC JANSSEN The Domestic’s wall of consignment items on display on Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020, in Lexington, Ky.

ACCESSORIZE: ‘90S EDITION We can’t forget about accessories. Scrunchies and bandanas are two of the most popular hairpieces in today’s trends. Most of the inspiration for these pieces can be found in ‘90s trends. Scrunchies are commonly known for their connection to the recent “VSCO girl” trend, a girl who wears an oversized T-shirt with a matching scrunchie on her wrist and carries a Hydroflask water bottle. However, scrunchies are formerly known for being worn by ‘90s TV show icons like Topanga in “Boy Meets World” and are guaranteed

to add sass to any outfit. On the other hand, ‘90s singer Aaliyah could always be relied upon to show how to style a hair bandana. Do not miss out on these simple ways to spice up those everyday hair looks. You can also shoot for the Justin Timberlake and Emma Chamberlain vibe by rocking small color-tint sunglasses. These glasses add exactly what you need to every outfit and totally give off those ‘90s vibes. Made in pretty much any shape and color, these are perfect finishing touches on any outfit. FALL 2020 | 81


‘00S GOLD JEWELRY Classic gold jewelry is all the rage in today’s fashion world. Celebs like Bella Hadid, A$AP Rocky and Rihanna stunt everything from layered gold chains to stacked rings and even chunky gold hoops. While looking to them for inspiration now, we can’t forget who originally made these pieces a go-to look. “Jewelry is something I’ve always been super obsessed with,” said UK student Sophie Humphreys. “I usually find myself drawn to gold jewelry because of its classic look and how well it holds up for everyday wear. I usually go for simple pieces that can be paired with a variety of outfits.” Humphreys wears three stackable chains around

her neck as her daily style: a dainty high-neck chain, mid-chest level “2001” necklace for her birth year, and another mid-chest level chunky lock necklace. Some of the most popular 2000s celebrities like Missy Elliot and 50 Cent incorporated gold jewelry in every outfit they wore. This fashion trend never really died but now has become the center of attention. “Necklaces are my favorite type of gold accessories. It can add so much to a plain outfit. I usually find myself looking at Kylie Jenner and Travis Scott for inspiration. A chunky gold necklace is always my go-to,” Humphreys said.

PHOTO BY ISAAC JANSSEN The Domestic sells a colorful array of items in Lexington, Ky., on Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020. 82 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION


PHOTO BY RYDER NOAH FROM THE DOMESTIC 70S JEAN JACKET | 68 PHOTO BY ISAAC JANSSEN

The Domestic sells vintage sunglasses among other accessories in Lexington, Ky., on Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020.

Y2K NEON COLORS Neutral, dark and dusty pastels colors have dominated the fashion industry for the past couple years, but neon colors have returned. Colors like hot pink, lime green, lemon and glowing orange are popping up in every store. “We have definitely seen a renewed interest in neon colors lately when it comes to graphic tees. Bright colors and all-over prints are probably the most sought after T-shirts,” said HEX Vintage Store manager Candace Reichbach. HEX Vintage Store, in association with The Domestic, is a locally owned store based in Lexington, Ky. While HEX is known for its wide variety of vintage style pieces, The Domestic also offers countless

modern finds. Their inventory can be found in-store, through their websites, www.thedomestic.com and www.hexlifestyle.com, or through their Instagrams, @_the_domestic and @hex_vintagethreads. These highlighter shades that can be remembered from years like 2007, circa Jersey Shore and way before then on MTV, are coming for the crown. While originally sought for their bold and outrageous look, this time around is different. Many stylists and designers are using these bright pieces mixed with shades of beige and cream to standout and update otherwise basic looks. Balancing these bright colors with neutral accessories is the best way to take this fashion trend for a test ride.

This has not been the start to the decade everyone imagined, but that has not dulled the fashion industry. The year 2020 has been unprecedented but not for fashion — because everything old is new again. • FALL 2020 | 83


THE POWER OF POSTING BY AMBER HARRIS | PHOTOS BY AMBER RITSCHEL

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ho do social media users look to for fashion and lifestyle inspiration? The answer, often, is social media influencers. Fortunately, there are plenty of local influencers to follow. Influencers like UK freshman Shandin Muldrow consider social media an art form that they like to showcase themselves on. Better known as @shandinx on Instagram, with over 4,000 followers, Muldrow sets an example for young men on how to style, create and wear fashionable pieces. “I started to get into fashion around my sophomore year, 15 years old, and realized I actually loved it. I started to post majority outfit pictures,” Muldrow said. He only has one man to thank for being his fashion inspiration and role model, and that is Kanye West. “He’s the main reason I considered getting into fashion. Kanye West’s confidence and style inspired me. The way he mixed high fashion and streetwear pieces was interesting to me,” Muldrow said. “Kanye West totally changed the way the world views fashion. Now, streetwear is high fashion. Seeing a Black man be confident in himself and maneuver through the fashion world is what made me think, ‘Hey, I can do this too.’

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“I think most men don’t display their fashion sense as proudly as I do simply because they aren’t confident in themselves,” Muldrow said. “Lots of men are honestly very self-conscious and are afraid of trying new things and pushing limits because of what other people will think. I’m not scared to try something new, nor do I care what others think.” On Muldrow’s Instagram, he has the ability to mix prints and patterns as well as accessorize his streetwear outfits, no matter the shoes or jewelry. “Most of the time I dress comfortably. I also love to dress up when I’m going out,” Muldrow said. “I love taking streetwear and adding some sort of luxury element or feel to the outfit. I just think it elevates and adds layers to a look.” Muldrow said that he has been influenced by other male fashion icons such as Alton Mason, Dapper Dan, Travis Scott and A$AP Rocky as well when it comes to trying to find male fashion inspiration for his personal style. “Every time I went somewhere, I was always the best dressed. Senior year in high school, I won the best dressed superlative,” Muldrow said. “I used to just think my passion for fashion stopped at simply wearing clothes. But as I got older I realized that I loved fashion


Shandin Muldrow highlights his personal style on Friday, Sept. 18, 2020, in Lexington, Ky.

@shandinx

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@helloellianamarie_ Elliana “Elli” Vincent smiles for a photo on Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020, in Lexington, Ky. and that I wanted this to be my career.” For now, Muldrow takes time to focus on his Instagram but not to the extreme like some influencers. Muldrow explained that not much planning goes into his own Instagram, and when it comes to content preparation, he is not organized. He only posts when the time is right for him or when he feels that it is necessary. He can go months without posting, but recently he’s been trying to post weekly. “I keep my audience engaged by trying to be consistent with posts and giving them quality outfits,” Muldrow said. “I have 4000-plus followers because I know most of them 86 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION

personally. A good portion of my followers are also small influencers in fashion that I’ve networked with through Instagram.” Another Lexington influencer driven by her passions is Elliana “Elli” Vincent, better known as @helloellianamarie_ on Instagram. Elli is a video editor, stylist and content creator who likes to make videos about fashion and productivity for her YouTube channel, Instagram and TikTok accounts. On her Instagram, she posts reviews of skincare products, thrifting vlogs, daily outfits inspirations and more. When it comes to blogging, her content is diverse.


“My senior year of high school, I started my blog, and it’s what led me to now,” Elli said. “I started writing in general because of a breakup I went through in high school. Basically, the dude said he woke up one day and didn’t like me anymore, and so I started writing breakup articles to kind of find this closure for myself.” After writing and publishing “To the Boy Who Fell Out of Love With Me” on Odyssey, Elli realized she was capable of writing and having an impact on people who were willing to listen to her. She said she decided to find inspiration for her content and start capturing it. “My inspiration for my posts comes from other creators I follow; I have a folder on [Instagram] that’s filled with photoshoot inspo,” Elli said. Her essentials to create content are her iPhone and tripod. To edit her photos, she uses the Lightroom CC app and the Tezza app. Once Elli is able to capture the right picture and post it, the work does not stop there. She said she wants to make sure that her 3,000-plus followers are engaging with the content she posts. With the help of some special features, Elli likes to watch her post analytics every two weeks in order to see what her audience liked out of everything she posted during that time. “I like to create content I know my followers will most likely watch. So since my audience is mostly college girls, I’ll create content that’s relevant to them,” she said. “Also, asking people ‘call to action’ questions helped my engagement.” When it comes to sponsored Instagram posts featuring a brand, the work tends to be more complex, Elli said. For paid influencers, they are now representing a brand. There are a couple of things influencers need to look for before participating in a sponsored post with a brand. “I look at the contract with the brand because most brands have certain guidelines and requirements they want you to create within,” she said. “Also, I research hashtags that are required for this post and see what other influencers have created in the past. Oh, and Pinterest, Pinterest is my girl whenever I’m planning a sponsored shoot.” This past summer, Elli worked with a cold-pressed juice brand called Simplicity, or @simplicityjuice on Instagram. Since Elli promotes nutrition, productivity and wellness on her Instagram, she said she believed Simplicity was ideal for her to work with. Elli said she was able to promote the company by simply sitting in front of the camera and talking with her audience about what juice she was most excited to try and explain why. She has also worked with a small brand called Palette, better known as @palettemrkt on Instagram.

Elliana “Elli” Vincent shares her lifestyle via Instagram in Lexington, Ky., on Monday, Sept. 28, 2020.

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@ivette_araiza

Ivette Araiza shows her makeup look on Sunday, Sept. 20, 2020, in Lexington, Ky. 88 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION


Palette is a marketplace where people can connect to receive and recommend hemp products, skincare solutions and curated art. When it comes to advice for those who want to become social media influencers and have no clue where to start, even though Elli is a full-time student, she suggests that full-time involvement in every single aspect of social media is the key. She said she believes the more effort into an individual’s own work, the better. “My best advice for anyone who wants to become more involved in social media is to not go two days without doing any work, ” Elli said. “Do some research, follow people that have the same or close to the same amount of followers as you do, and befriend them. Comment on their stuff and build connections.” Influencers aren’t just limited to using social media as a hobby. It can also turn into a successful business. Ivette Araiza, better known as @ivette_araiza on Instagram, is a Lexington native, social media influencer and makeup artist. Araiza offers her 185,000 followers colorful makeup ideas in videos that capture her process from bare skin to a full face of makeup as she shows viewers what products she uses. She started creating and posting her makeup looks in 2017 on her social media platforms. “I’m a self-taught makeup artist. What inspired me was watching all makeup artist[s] on YouTube doing makeup videos,” Araiza said. Araiza said she is not afraid to incorporate bright and bold colors and illustrations when it comes to her makeup looks, such as yellow and purple flowers on her eyelids, a smoky eye with glitter, bold filled-in brows or dramatic lashes. Araiza is also a makeup creator. She had the opportunity to work with one of her favorite brand, YL Cosmetics, also known as @ylcosmeticsllc on Instagram. This collaboration was for her 35-shade eyeshadow palette, Ivette Araiza x ylcosmetics, which retails for $34.99, while her eyelashes retail for $13.99 and come in six different styles. In addition to her official MUA Instagram, Araiza also a personal page, @araiza_ivette98, and a boutique page, @araiza_boutique. While her personal page only has a handful of photos of herself and 5,000-plus followers, Araiza’s boutique page offers her 17,000-plus followers different

clothing items they can purchase on her website, www.araizasboutique.com. She also has 61,000plus followers on her YouTube channel where she posts makeup and lifestyle videos, all offered in Spanish. A simple Instagram post does not always show the hard work and time put into it. There is a lot of work when it comes to creating content and keeping an audience engaged, she said. Araiza said she works to make sure that the content for her Instagram is something her followers want or is something that is trending. She also works on engagement with her thousands of followers, which took years to build. She said she is always on the hunt for inspiration.

“Don’t do it for the money or for followers. Do it because it comes from inside your heart.” – Ivette Araiza Just as easily as social media can be a helpful and positive environment, it can also be brutal. “Being in this platform is not easy because you receive a lot of hate, mean comments,” she said. But most of the time, she believes the good outweighs the bad. As for future makeup artists that want to build a social media platform or simply just want to get started in the makeup industry, Araiza said passion is what drives her to keep creating. “Don’t do it for money or for followers,” she said. “Do it because it comes from inside your heart.” •

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1. CD Central 2. Sav's Restaurant & Gourmet Ice Cream 3. Wilson’s Grocery & Meats 4. The Kentucky Theatre Group 5. The Bar Complex 6. Pivot Brewing 7. JY Kitchen 8. POPS Resale 9. Rosebud Bar 10. Pies & Pints 11. The Burl 12. Institute 193 13. Pearl’s 14. Street Scene Vintage 15. Coffee Times 16. Bourbon n’ Toulouse 17. Bear & The Butcher 18. Wearhouse 19. North Lime Coffee & Donuts 20. Parkette Drive-In 21. JamesC Boutique 22. Honeywood 23. Smithtown Seafood 24. Wallace Station Deli 25. Windy Corner Market 26. Zim’s Cafe/The Thirsty Fox 27. Han Woo Ri 28. Varsity Print 29. Paisano’s Italian Restaurant & Lounge 30. Manchester Coffee Co.


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1. CD Central

11. The Burl

21. JamesC Boutique

2. Sav’s Restaurant and Gourmet Ice Cream

12. Institute 193

22. Honeywood

3. Wilson’s Grocery & MEATS

13. Pearl’s

23. Smithtown Seafood

4. The Kentucky Theatre Group

14. Street Scene Vintage

24. Wallace Station Deli

5. The Bar Complex

15. Coffee Times

25. Windy Corner Market

377 S Limestone St. P: (859) 233-3472

630 E Main St. P: (859) 785-1635 (Outdoor Dining & Takeout)

1010 Cramer Ave. P: (859) 266-4531

214 E Main St. P: (859) 231-6997

224 E Main St. P: (859) 255-1551

6. Pivot Brewing

375 Thompson Road P: (859) 447-8166

193 N Limestone St. P: (859) 421-6470

133 N Limestone P: (859) 309-0321 (Outdoor Dining, Takeout and Delivery)

2575 Regency Road P: (859) 260-1578

2571 Regency Road P: (859) 277-9140 (Curbside)

836 Euclid Ave. (Suite 107) P: (859) 469-9374

110 Summit at Fritz Farm (Suite 140) P: (859) 469-8234 (Dine-In, Outdoor Dining and Curbside)

501 W Sixth St. P: (859) 303-4100 (Dine-In, Outdoor Dining and Curbside)

3854 Old Frankfort Pike Versailles, KY P: (859) 846-5161 (Outdoor Dining, Curbside)

4595 Bryan Station Road P: (859) 294-9338 (Outdoor Dining and Curbside)

16. Bourbon n’ Toulouse

26. Zim’s Cafe/The Thirsty Fox

17. Bear & The Butcher

27. Han Woo Ri

8. POPS Resale

18. Wearhouse

28. Varsity Print

9. Rosebud Bar

19. North Lime Coffee & Donuts

29. Paisano’s Italian Restaurant & Lounge

1400 Delaware Ave. P: (859) 285-6778 (Outdoor Dining, Curbside and Delivery)

7. JY Kitchen

1006 Delaware Ave. P: (859) 474-0277 (Takeout and Delivery)

1423 Leestown Road P: (859) 254-7677

121 N Mill St. P: (859) 254-1907

10. Pies & Pints

401 W Main St. (Suite 106) P: (859) 231-7437 (Dine-In, Takeout and Delivery)

829 Euclid Ave. P: (859) 335-0300 (Curbside, Delivery and Catering)

815 Euclid Ave. P: (859) 469-9188 (Dine-In, Curbside and Delivery) 941 National Ave. (Suite 120) P: (859) 354-9484

575 N Limestone St. P: (859) 414-6654 (Takeout)

20. Parkette Drive-In 1230 E New Circle Road P: (859) 254-8723

215 W Main St. (Suite 25) P: (859) 785-3690 (Dine-In, Outdoor Dining and Curbside) 371 S Limestone St. (Suite 111) P: (859) 258-2208 (Dine-In and Takeout)

728 National Ave. P: (859) 368-9152

2417 Nicholasville Road P: (859) 227-5321 (Dine-In, Takeout and Delivery)

30. Manchester Coffee Co.

903 Manchester St. P: (859) 317-9092 (Dine-In and Takeout)


WHO WE ARE Our publication is our heart and joy, but it is only a small part of who we are. Now that you’ve read our stories and seen our photo shoots, it’s time you learn a bit more about what goes into KRNL Lifestyle + Fashion. Our lead stylist, Catie Archambeau, wants you to know just what this team means to her.

F

or many, there can be a looming lack of inspiration on a college campus. When I began my freshman year, I felt deeply disconnected from the fashion community. Perhaps I missed getting ready for high school every day or seeking outfit inspiration from back home in downtown Detroit, but it hit me quite hard. I realized that I needed something more than just casually flipping through online catalogs or attending textile class to spark my inspiration and creative bones. That “more” aspect that I longed for was KRNL L+F, and fitting enough, that’s exactly what KRNL is — more. More creatives collaborating together; more diversity in a college organization; more friends, mentors, teachers and learners; more of our youth putting our words together to fight against our world’s injustice; more days filled with laughter and a sense of pride over the hard work and dedication we put into this very

organization and publication. When I leave the University of Kentucky, I will leave knowing that I was involved in something much bigger than myself. I was part of a group made up of the coolest and most devoted students you’d have ever met, students that have strived to provide people with anything from capsule wardrobe tips to instructions on how to vote. As the lead stylist, KRNL L+F has equipped me with an advanced set of skills that I will further develop and utilize in my future career. However, more importantly, it has equipped me with invaluable experience in the fashion field that I would have lacked if I didn’t stumble upon the KRNL website during my freshman year. I am undeniably indebted to KRNL L+F for all that it has offered me and will continue to offer me throughout my experience at UK.

T O L E A R N M O R E A B O U T K R N L L + F, V I S I T O U R W E B S I T E W W W . K R N L M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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OUR CONTENT DOESN’T STOP HERE. READ OUR BLOGS, LISTEN TO OUR PODCASTS AND VIEW OUR MOST RECENT YOUTUBE VIDEOS FOR MORE.

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THE STIGMAS SURROUNDING MENTAL HEALTH AND MENTAL ILLNESSES BY KAITLYN SKAGGS Slowly but surely, taking care of yourself and your own mental health has become more mainstream. Eventually, I hope that one day it will become widely accepted. Until then, the fact of the matter is there’s an elephant or two in the room: the stigmas behind mental illnesses and mental health in general... READ MORE AT WWW.KRNLMAGAZINE.COM/BLOG

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LUXURY BRANDS ARE CREATING AND SELLING DESIGNER PPE BY RANA ALSOUFI The role personal protective equipment (PPE) plays in our day-to-day lives has become increasingly prominent throughout these past months. During this time, I have seen almost every kind of face-covering imaginable; from custom-printed face masks that show an image of the wearer’s real smile to embroidered gaiters, people have been incorporating all kinds of fun and unique designs in their PPE in order to make protecting ourselves from the spread of a dangerous virus feel less like a chore...

COURTESY OF COLLINA STRADA

READ MORE AT WWW.KRNLMAGAZINE.COM/BLOG

3

HOW TO OVERCOME ZOOM FATIGUE BY JAY WILLIAMS Whether you’re on campus or away from campus this semester, most of us have at least one class online. I’ve noticed in recent weeks since school started that attending class is quite boring. There isn’t the opportunity to see friends or organically make new ones as we would if we were physically in class... READ MORE AT WWW.KRNLMAGAZINE.COM/BLOG FALL 2020 | 95


CON CONTRIBUTORS TRIBU TORS RACHAEL COURTNEY EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

AKHIRA UMAR LIFESTYLE + COPY EDITOR

KENDALL BORON CREATIVE DIRECTOR

RACHEL PORTER FASHION EDITOR

LAUREN SUCHANEK HEAD OF DIGITAL

NICO TORRES MANAGING EDITOR

ISAAC JANSSEN LEAD PHOTOGRAPHER

ALLIE DIGGS PHOTOSHOOT COORDINATOR

CATIE ARCHAMBEAU LEAD STYLIST

AMBER RITSCHEL ASST. LEAD PHOTOGRAPHER

MIRELLE TAYLOR ONLINE CONTENT EDITOR

ARIZZONA ALBRIGHT CONTENT EDITOR

RAYLEIGH DEATON ONLINE LIFESTYLE EDITOR

MYA LACLAIR LEAD DESIGNER

JACK MORGAN STYLIST

WRITERS RACHAEL COURTNEY AKHIRA UMAR RACHEL PORTER ARIZZONA ALBRIGHT MADISON CECIL ANNA BYERLEY AMBER HARRIS ALLIE DIGGS MIRELLE TAYLOR CATIE ARCHAMBEAU RAYLEIGH DEATON

PHOTOGRAPHERS RYDER NOAH FROM MARTHA MCHANEY KENDALL BORON

DESIGNERS MYA LACLAIR RYDER NOAH FROM LAURIE JONHATAN

CONTENT TEAM MADISON DUNHAM ANNA BYERLEY ARIZZONA ALBRIGHT

BEHIND-THE-SCENES MAY MAY BARTON RYAN CRAIG ANDREA GIUSTI DAVID STEPHENSON

COORDINATORS JALEN HOLDER ASA PHILLIPS

STYLISTS RACHEL PORTER JACK MORGAN

WEB TEAM LAUREN SUCHANEK ABBY BUEHNER


PHOTOSHOOT SPONSORS STREET STYLE

KRNL SPONSORS POPS RESALE 1423 LEESTOWN RD. LEXINGTON, KY 40511 (859) 254-7677 WWW.POPSRESALE.COM

LIFESTYLE VENDORS THE DOMESTIC

MODELS

ALANNAH MOLENDA TYRIQ DUCKWYLER ALEXIS HILL MEGAN FARRAR ABBIE NEIHEISEL ARIZZONA ALBRIGHT KARA SMITH AMBER RITSCHEL

LOCATION LEXINGTON PUBLIC LIBRARY GARAGE 317 S BROADWAY GARAGE VENDORS WEARHOUSE MACY’S

MASK UP

LOCATION LEXINGTON MASK DESIGNERS BETH EVERSMAN (@loudmouthstitching) SUMMER BECK (@lilly.tru_) MAKEUP ARTIST MYO ZAN

SENIOR SHOOT

LOCATION SAVS BUILDING MEMORIAL HALL ROSE STREET PARKING GARAGE UK COLLEGE OF LAW UNIVERSITY FLATS

All prices are subject to change without notice. While the KRNL staff makes every effort to provide the most accurate, up-to-date information, occasionally one or more items may be mispriced. In the event a product is listed at an incorrect price due to typographical, photographic or technical error in pricing information received from our suppliers, merchants have the right to refuse the sale of the product listed at the incorrect price.

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INTERESTED IN MODELING FOR US IN THE SPRING 2021 ISSUE?

CONTACT US AT KRNLMAGAZINE@KYKERNEL.COM

MODEL CALL


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L I F E S T Y L E + FA S H I O N V O L U M E 3 | I S S U E 1 | FA L L 2 0 2 0

A NATIONAL AWARD-WINNING DIVISION OF KERNEL MEDIA UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY 338 MCVEY HALL LEXINGTON, KY 40506 WWW.KRNLMAGAZINE.COM FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM @KRNL_LF LIKE US ON FACEBOOK @KRNLLF CONTACT US KRNLMAGAZINE@KYKERNEL.COM 859.257.6524

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Profile for Kentucky Kernel

KRNL Lifestyle + Fashion Fall 2020 Magazine  

University of Kentucky's student-run fashion + lifestyle magazine | Fall 2020

KRNL Lifestyle + Fashion Fall 2020 Magazine  

University of Kentucky's student-run fashion + lifestyle magazine | Fall 2020

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