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CONTENTS PAGE - TO FOLLOW


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FINISHED PRODUCTS

Guilt-free confectionery aimed at women Skinny Candy, a division of Glisten, has launched a new range of 99 calorie ‘guilt-free’ confectionery. Aimed at women aged between 20-45, the range comprises five products – two chocolate countlines, the ‘Chocstick’ and ‘Chocmaltie’, and three portion-sized bags of confectionery treats, ‘Fruity Bears’, ‘Cola Bottles’ and ‘Crispy Bubbles’. Skinny Candy is said to be the first confectionery brand to offer a 99 calorie range of chocolate countlines and bagged sweets, introducing an element of ‘permissible indulgence’ to the category. Skinny Candy is made with high-quality ingredients including natural fruit extracts and Belgian chocolate, and has been developed with a no-compromise focus on taste. Commenting on the launch, group marketing director for Glisten plc, Dave Coulson, said: “There is an increasing demand for low-calorie sweet treats that taste delicious and this is where Skinny Candy really delivers. The 99 calories claim is well understood by consumers and, combined with

the vibrant brand personality and delicious products, we believe this will be very appealing. “As a trendy brand with a niche cult following, we plan to take Skinny Candy ‘guilt free confectionery’ into the mainstream market,” said Coulson.

For up-to-the-minute confectionery industry news go to...

www.kennedysconfection.com

A fruit-based snack alternative The new PowerFruit Fruit supplement bars, from Powerfruits, offer a healthy alternative to sweet or calorific snacks. They are rich in health-boosting antioxidants and contain no sugar, so are also low in calories. PowerFruit Fruit supplement bars are made from 100% whole fruit, including the skin, pulp and pith – which means they also offer a good source of fibre The bars are available in three varieties. CherryFlex is made from Montmorency cherries – a variety of tart (sour) cherries that contain high levels of vitamins A, C and B6, plus potassium, calcium, magnesium, folic acid and iron, and important antioxidants including anthocyanins (the pigment that gives the cherries their deep, rich red colour). Wonderful Pomegranate is also rich in anthocyanins as well as ellagic acid (another type of antioxidant), vitamin C and potassium. Finally, Wild Blueberry contains 79% of your daily recommended intake of vitamin C, plus anthocyanins and 12%of your daily recommended intake of fibre. Each bar is said to be equivalent to consuming two portions of fruit and provides 46% of the daily recommended intake of vitamin C and 12% of the daily recommended intake of fibre. They contain 98 calories in a 25g bar.

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Tropical bars with Fairtrade and Organic credentials UK-based retailer, Boots, a pharmacyled health and beauty group, is to stock a range of bars from Fairtrade dried fruit company Tropical Wholefoods. The bars include Apricot & Kernel, Mango & Brazil and Pineapple & Cashew. All three are certified organic. The 40g bars are packed in eye catching bright packaging which highlights their high fruit content and the Fairtrade and Organic origin of the ingredients. Tropical Wholefoods marketing director, Kate Sebag said: "Each of the bars contains 35% dried fruits, blended with rainforest honey, and organic nuts and cereals, which are lightly baked in our factory. The bars are wheat-free, are low in saturated fat, and offer a good source of fibre."

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INGREDIENTS

Bake-stable fruit fillings for pastries Crispy pastry bars with fruit fillings are becoming increasingly popular with consumers as a healthy alternative to sweets. WILD can offer the food industry a range of bake-stable fillings that are said to be perfect for such applications. The volume of the snack bar segment in Europe is estimated at approximately 150,000 tons in 2008. In Western Europe, the average annual growth rate of the bar market is about 7% (source: WILD market research). According to a report from Global Business Insights in 2007, the market for bars across Europe will be worth 2.7 billion euros by 2010. To satisfy consumers’ expectations, the fruit preparation used must meet high requirements. WILD offers a solution for the technological challenge that bar manufacturers face. During the baking process, bakestable fillings will maintain their consistency and do not leak out. Even after baking they retain their fruity taste and soft texture, while the crust stays crispy, says the company. Due to the high Brix levels and the low pH value, the fruit fillings do not need any preservatives, and the shelf life of these preparations in the final product is between six and nine months. WILD offers bake-stable fillings in a variety of fruit combinations, in addition to the classic flavours of apple and strawberry. Orange/mango and other exotic flavours are particularly popular. Superfruits such as acerola-cherry, naturally rich in vitamin C, are also now being used in bake-stable fruit fillings. Each bar with this filling contains over 60 milligrams of natural vitamin C.

Innovative collagen formula for nutricosmetics

Extruded soy ingredients offer ‘healthy appeal’ to consumers

With its hydrolyzed collagen Peptan, Rousselot believes that it can offer an active ingredient that provides solutions to a wide range of consumer demands. Peptan hydrolyzed collagen plays a bioactive role in three specific areas: • Nutrition – 97% pure protein, Peptan Nutrition in diet bars and drinks can help to provide a feeling of fullness. It plays an important role in weight control and as part of a high protein diet. • Bone and joint health – various studies have demonstrated the beneficial effect of a regular intake of Peptan Health to maintain healthy bones and joints. • Healthy skin – similar to the skin’s natural collagen, Peptan Beauty is said to help keep skin soft and smooth and to fight signs of ageing. www.rousselot.com

Clextral has developed a range of extruded soy crisp products that allow snack and bakery manufacturers to enhance their products with the nutritional benefits of soy, in the form of ‘crunchy nuggets’ in breakfast snacks, granola mixes, nutrition bars, and specialty bakery products. Clextral

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markets the equipment and the expertise to put processors on the fast track to manufacturing proprietary soy inclusions with a variety of attributes (size, colour, density, texture) for many different products. A twin-screw extruder, for example, gently cooks and shapes the soy crisps in a continuous process while protecting the essential proteins, amino acids, and minerals that provide the health benefits, giving snacks a healthy appeal. Clextral’s pilot plants are equipped with small-scale pilot extruders for R&D and production twin screw extruders, dryers, and ancillary equipment dedicated to our customers’ product development and testing requirements. On-site process engineers and scientists assist in product development, product formulation and production platforms. www.clextral.com

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INGREDIENTS

Chocolate-based concepts Syral, a European supplier of starch-based ingredients, has developed various chocolate-based product concepts that combine both taste and health. Most recently it has introduced a chocolate mousse without any added sugars, a prebiotic instant cocoa with reduced sugar, as well as dark and milk chocolate bars without added sugar. In dark and milk chocolate, crystalline maltitol, Maltilite P300, is said to offer a good choice for replacing the sucrose, which is added to the recipe along with the cocoa mass and cocoa butter. In addition to ‘no added sugars’, dark chocolate is also ‘sugars-free’, which is not the case for milk chocolate because of the content in lactose coming from milk. These concepts require no changes of the manufacturing process. The chocolate is suitable for health-conscious consumers, particularly those who want to control their glycemia, due to the low sugar content and the low Glycemic Index of maltitol. Contrary to other polyols such as xylitol, sorbitol or erythritol, maltitol has no cooling effect in the mouth. High protein cereal bars, with at least 20% of energy coming from protein, as defined by EU regulation 1924/2006, can be formulated by using Meripro. Part of the glucose-fructose syrup and the cereals blends are substituted by vegetable proteins. This substitution does not affect the texture, hardness or the tasting panel evaluations. Products formulated with Meripro promote satiety, and, with a sugar content of 28%, they will carry a ‘high in sugars’ labelling together with the ‘high protein’ claim, which positions this bar in the field of sports nutrition. Syral proposes another concept of nutritional cereal bar, aimed at weight management and well-being. This product contains less sugars, has a high-fibre content and accompanied by a prebiotic claim is obtainable by using Maltilite maltitol syrup (content: 23%) in the recipe, as well as Actilight soluble fibres also known as fructo-oligosaccharides (content: 16.2%). The sugars content is only 4grams per 100grams. A prebiotic effect can also be claimed when consuming one bar (weighing 21 grams). The product has a positive effect on digestive comfort when eating two cereal bars.

Soy protein for chocolate inclusions Solbar Industries has recently introduced a series of new applications for its steam-textured product – soy filler in praline chocolate centres. Bontex is a key ingredient for bringing consumers excellent flavour as well as mouthfeel, with important nutritional properties. The advantages of Bontex lie in its organoleptic properties, health benefits and cost-savings, says the company. Bontex Soy-Chocolate Inclusions are designed for use in ‘chocolate centres’ which are typically filled with nuts of one kind or another. Unlike traditional textured soy flours, Bontex team-textured soy protein has none of the strong soy offflavours which occur with many soy products. It has important nutritional properties, is rich in protein and has a high protein digestibility score. www.solbar.com

Fibres offer multifunctional advantages S. Black has recently added CFF’s natural fibres to its ingredient portfolio. The product range includes wheat, bamboo, apple, oat and powdered cellulose fibres and are used in the food industry as texturising agents, carriers, anti-caking agents and flow aids as well as liquid binding agents. Combining soft sugar coatings, while simultaneously producing a stable barrier against oil and fat can be a difficult task because most pre-coating systems are based on water-soluble substances and therefore the residual moisture in the dragee, or the humidity in the air, can cause the pre-coating to become permeable. Sanacel wheat, however, is said to offer new possibilities while fulfiling the required quality standards. Typical product properties, such as taste and

Healthy Foods & Snacks Spring 2009

mouthfeel remain unchanged, while the pre-coating behaviour and barrier properties can be improved considerably. Sanacel wheat is practically insoluble by fats, oils and dilute solutions, but due to its slightly hydrophilic properties, it is suitable for application in hard sugar dragées with chocolate fillings, all kinds of soft sugar dragées as well as raisings and dried fruits. In addition, the nutritional value of the dragée (increase of fibre content, no realisable calories) is significantly increased through the application of Sanacel wheat. Gum drops are mainly made from gelatine and/or starch. Following the trend towards healthy nutrition, minerals and vitamins are often added to obtain an increase of nutritional value. A good way to combine the desired reduction of calorific value

with simultaneous fibre enrichment is offered by Sanacel wheat dietary fibre. During the production process, the fibres bind the moisture evenly within the gel in the gum drop, reducing the risk of drying out. The final product shows an improved texture and improves the chewing properties. In special applications, the fibres can be used for encapsulation processes and/or as carrier for flavours, which can then be incorporated in the gum drops. www.sblack.com

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INGREDIENTS

Low-cost SDC added to Ocean Spray range Ocean Spray’s Ingredient Technology Group has introduced a new sweetened dried cranberry (SDC) to its portfolio of dried fruit ingredients. The new Choice SDC is a low-cost option that is said to deliver the same quality as the Classic Soft & Moist SDC. Developed for food manufacturers wanting to improve the taste, appearance and nutritional profile of their products, the Choice SDC also meets demand for consistent, cost-effective, value-added ingredients. With the same functional benefits as other sweetened dried cranberries, Choice SDCs can add flavour, attractive points of colour and real fruit texture to baked goods, cereals, bars and trail mixes – without impacting processing. Choice contains the health benefits associated with cranberry, with high levels of bacteria-repelling proanthocyanidins and antioxidants, as well as the antiinflammatory flavonoid quercetin. Kristen Borsari, global senior marketing manager at Ocean Spray, said: “In today’s challenging market conditions, we believe manufacturers who can find new ways to meet consumer demand for high quality, healthy foods at

competitive prices will succeed. Our range of sweetened dried cranberries and BerryFusions Fruits gives everyone the opportunity to innovate with fruit. “Choice represents an evolution in the sweetened dried fruit category. We now offer SDCs at varying cuts, moisture contents and degrees of sweetness, to fit a wide range of applications. Our original SDC offered a tart flavour profile in a low moisture ingredient suitable for specific applications. Expanding the range, the hugely popular Soft & Moist dried cranberry broadened the product’s reach into a variety of functional food applications, adding premium value to trail mixes, baked goods and confectionery. Choice represents a move towards the next generation of SDC, delivering a competitive edge in an increasingly demanding marketplace, while providing all of the advantages of sweetened dried cranberries.” www.oceansprayitg.com

Freeze-dried and drum-dried pomegranate Known for their flared, spiky crown, leather-like skin, and antioxidant-rich, edible seeds called arils, the pomegranate originated in tropical Asia and has been cultivated in California for more than 200 years. Each fruit contains exactly 840 arils, compartmentalised between shiny, tough membranes that make the arils labour-intensive and time-consuming to remove. Freeze-Dried or Drum Dried Pomegranate products are now available from Van Drunen Farms (VDF) offering all the pomegranate taste without the hassle. Pomegranates are also one of the most nutritious fruits – high in vitamin C and potassium and a good source of fibre while also being low in calories. Pomegranates also contain high amounts of antioxidants which help protect the body and are credited with helping in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and certain types of cancers. VDF can offer the fruit in a variety of forms, including conventional and organic freeze-dried powder, freeze-dried arils, and drum-dried powder and flakes. Freeze-Dried Pomegranate arils are perfect as a garnish for a shot of colour, a flavour accent in salads, or for snacking, while Drum-Dried Pomegranate powders and flakes can be easily added to confectionery, teas, dry blends, and pet foods. www.vandrunenfarms.com

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Clean label textual ingredient National Starch Food Innovation has launched a high performance clean label ingredient for instant textural indulgence. Novation Indulge is a functional speciality starch said to enhance the textural quality of prepared foods. It allows for reduced oil, fat or cream content to create reduced or low-fat formulations with a luxurious texture and mouthfeel. Novation Indulge is a tapioca-based cold water swelling starch which also offers heat, acid and shear tolerance. Applications include ice cream and reduced fat dips, dressings, cheesecake toppings and smoothies. It imparts a creamy texture, enabling manufacturers to reduce milk-derived ingredients such as milk powder or milk proteins. Novation Indulge was developed for use in conjunction with the company’s other instant viscosifying starches, such as Novation 4300 and Novation 5300. The classification of Novation starches in the EU as ingredients not additives means manufacturers can benefit from a simple ‘starch’ ingredient label and can contribute to an additive-free product positioning.

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our creativity

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HEALTHY SNACK INGREDIENTS

Adding a ‘healthy halo’ to your snacks In today’s market it is often not good enough for snacks to just taste great. Consumers also want their snacks to be healthy and to provide them with a sense of indulgence. We find out how almonds can help manufacturers to achieve all of this

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ooking for the healthy option in snack foods has become so ingrained in consumers in the Western world that it is becoming automatic for many. Consumers know how to read a nutritional label, and know to avoid ‘empty carbs’; they know to go for foods that are unprocessed and whole and that don’t contain spoonfuls of added sugar, salt and artificial flavourings. However, at the same time, consumers coping with the realities of a recession increasingly feel as though some of the pleasure is being removed from their lives and they are searching for small ways of putting it back. Almonds, as a snack food ingredient, ‘tick all the boxes’ of health and convenience; and their taste and crunch add that all-important sense of luxury and indulgence. “The popularity of almonds with consumers is on the rise, particularly as a food that offers ‘healthy indulgence’. The creamy taste and the crunch of almonds provide the sensory satisfaction that consumers seek,” said Shirley Horn, senior director of Global Marketing and Communications at the Almond Board of California. ‘Food producers are increasingly using almonds to enhance products and push them into the ‘premium’ category with the added value of enhancing the product’s health and nutrition benefits. According to a recent Mintel GNPD analysis, in Europe the number of new almond nut snack introductions grew by approximately 350% from 2003 to 2008.” Just one example of the power of almonds as an ingredient is the recently found prebiotic properties of finely ground almonds. A study has shown that the lipids in almonds can feed the growth of ‘good’ bacteria, such as bifidobacteria, that

improve intestinal microbial balance, aid digestion and strengthen the immune system. Probiotics in diet drinks and yoghurts have been popular for a number of years, and increasingly manufacturers are exploiting the nutritional benefits of prebiotics by adding them to foods such as bread and cereal. Almonds offer a naturally occurring prebiotic effect that is on-trend. Add to this the fact that well-publicised scientific studies have shown that almonds can lower cholesterol levels and help maintain body weight, while providing high levels of antioxidants, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, zinc and vitamin E.

Heart health The growing body of scientific evidence on the health benefits of almonds has been much discussed. New research is uncovering other ways in which almonds promote heart health. A recent study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, has expanded upon previous cardiovascular research into almonds. The study investigated how the plant cell wall may impact on fats being absorbed into the body and the potential impact on acute changes in triglyceride levels. When these levels rise, there is an established link with a growing risk of developing heart disease. Study results suggested that an intact plant cell wall, as found in whole or partly masticated almonds, may impact how much and how quickly fat is released into the blood, contributing to a slower rise in blood triglyceride levels. Research shows that eating a handful of almonds (about 28g) daily may actually help lower LDL, or ‘bad’ cholesterol levels, as well as making consumers feel full, and reducing the likelihood of afternoon snacking on fatty foods, such as crisps.

Snacking with a healthy halo Snack producers choose almonds because of their taste and versatility. Finely ground, they add a rich, smooth texture and delicate fragrance to snacks, while chopped or whole they have a satisfying, creamy crunch and visual appeal. But crucially, the high nutrient density of almonds in relation to EU nutrition guidelines opens up a wealth of opportunities for manufacturers to feature this powerhouse ingredient in their products, adding a ‘healthy halo’ to their snack products, and giving consumers permission to treat themselves to a snack. www.almondsarein.com The Almond Board of California will exhibit at SnackEx 2009, which will be taking place from June 7 – 9 in Berlin, at the Estrel Exhibition and Convention Centre. Come to booth number 633 to discuss how almonds could add value to your products.

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www.AlmondsAreIn.com


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EQUIPMENT The CAO 3000-CHOC In-Line

Healthy Foods & Snacks reports on equipment developments which can help manufacturers to cost-effectively produce sugar-free alternatives, alongside their more traditional product offerings

Making sugar-free chocolate

an easy proposition W

ith more consumers looking for healthy alternatives to their favourite confectionery and snack products, confectionery companies are now looking for ways to cost-effectively produce sugar-free chocolate, alongside their traditional chocolate products. To help confectioners meet the demand for more healthy alternatives, Caotech has developed low-temperature versions of its most popular batch ball-mills – the CAO B2000 and the new CAO B3000. The low-temperature version of the CAO B2000 can reach a capacity up to 450 kg/hr, and the CAO B3000 can produce around 550 kg/hr. The temperature of the mass can be kept below 43ºC, which is a necessary requirement for many diet masses. In many cases processing diet masses with low-speed ball mills has an advantage over the traditional method of using five-roller refiners, especially when ingredients are used which are more or less elastic. The CAO B2000 ball mill is said to have a unique configuration between grinding shaft, grinding tank and grinding media that results in optimum grinding efficiency.

Sugar replacement The production of sugar-free chocolate sees traditional sugar (sucrose) being replaced with a sugar-free alternative. For example, to produce a dark sugar free chocolate coating maltitol is often used. Its mass has a high temperature stability. There is also a hydrous version which must be

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processed with a low temperature. Xylitol is also very often used as a sugar replacer, but is not recommended for use in chocolate as it has a negative effect on viscosity and is more expensive than maltitol.

The process To produce a dark, sugar-free, chocolate it is first necessary to mix the ingredients in a mixer. After this, refining takes place. If the mass is ground with a CAO B2000-CHOC and an end fineness of 20-22 micron is desired, a capacity of 500 kg/hr can be reached if 200um maltitol powder is used. If 90um powder is used then a capacity of up to 550-600 kg/hr can be reached with the same installation. If 35um powder is used a total capacity of around 900 kg/hr can be achieved. After the mass is ground it is will be transported to a buffer tank. From here the mass is moved, via a tempering unit, to a depositor. Any surplus mass goes back to the buffer tank via a de-crystallisator. The de-crystallisator plays an important role, as the mass which returns to the buffer tank should be fully de-crystallised. If this does not happen the crystals will grow in the tank and the mass will become very viscous. To achieve a high quality solid bar there are four critical process steps – grinding for the mouth feeling, tempering for a brittle product, and cooling and the temperature and humidity for a shiny product. www.caotech.com

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HEALTHY CONFECTIONERY

Making chocolate more appealing Today’s health conscious consumers want more from their chocolate than just a great taste...Healthy Foods & Snacks brings together some ideas which could make your chocolate offerings more attractive to this growing market sector

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cientific studies have now begun to unravel the mysteries surrounding the cocoa bean. For centuries it has been used for its medicinal and nutritional properties and has been exploited by traditional cultures. Much attention over recent years has been devoted to the role of the so-called polyphenols (cocoa flavanols) found in the cocoa bean. These antioxidants are thought to play a major role in several areas of human health – from cardiovascular health and immune response to brain function – while helping to protect the body against the damaging effects of free radicals. Barry Callebaut, inspired by the potential benefits of this remarkable plant, has devoted a great deal of energy and resources into unlocking the secrets of the cocoa bean and into developing ways to incorporate these benefits into chocolate. The flavanols found in the cocoa bean are, in fact, partially destroyed during the conventional chocolate-making process. The challenge for Barry Callebaut was to develop a production process which could preserve and enhance these components without compromising the taste and texture of chocolate. The result is ACTICOA, the first chocolate to guarantee a minimum polyphenol content and is now the richest source of antioxidants known to man. ACTICOA preserves up to 70% of the natural flavanol content of raw cocoa without the use of extracts, additives or other chemical substances. The results of the ACTICOA process are striking. It is the only chocolate that can guarantee a minimum flavanol content in dark chocolate (two times more than standard dark chocolate) and in milk chocolate (four times more than normal milk chocolate). Thanks to its high concentration of cocoa flavanols, ACTICOA cocoa and chocolate helps to restore the balance between antioxidants and free radicals in the human body. A recent study, conducted by the Queen Margaret University in Edinburgh, demonstrates that ACTICOA dark chocolate contributes to maintaining healthy blood pressure. This

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confirms the results of earlier studies. The daily consumption of a small portion – 17g of ACTICOA dark chocolate, which contains 500mg of cocoa flavanols – for two weeks helps maintain healthy blood pressure. ACTICOA chocolate is one of the world’s richest chocolate in cocoa flavanols, uniting both health and indulgence in a unique product. Many chocolate manufacturers exploit the nutritional effects of cocoa, making particular reference to the power of cocoa flavanols. However, many manufacturers neglect the fact that, though abundant in the raw cocoa bean, many of the nutritional benefits of the cocoa bean are destroyed during the various stages of the conventional chocolatemaking process. Between the fermentation and drying of raw cocoa and subsequent processing through alkalisation, roasting, liquor extraction and conching, up to 85% of the original flavanol content is lost, in many cases leaving less than 0.5% of the total amount in the final product.

Smart Crispys Dr. Suwelack’s new ACTICOA Crispy inclusions can add more to confectionery than just an intense cocoa flavour. The flavanols contained in just one serving unit are said to be capable of enhancing the cognitive performance by increasing the blood flow to the brain. Dr. Suwelack’s freeze-dried ACTICOA Crispy is produced using ACTICOA cocoa powder from Barry Callebaut. The ACTICOA method of production retains the flavanols, natural antioxidant substances, which are mostly lost during regular chocolate production. In addition to ACTICOA, Crispys contain skimmed milk powder, sugar and modified The antioxidant blend from WILD can be used in a range of chocolate products starch. The gentle with or without fruit filling freeze-drying method used by Dr. Suwelack

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HEALTHY CONFECTIONERY preserves the antioxidant substances, natural colour and taste of ACTICOA cocoa in the Crispys. Because of their grainy and firm structure ACTICOA Crispys are also said to be easy to dose. The taste is released with the first bite, adding interesting new flavour combinations and contrasts in recipes. Dr. Suwelack offers ACTICOA Crispy in two different sizes – from 1 to 4mm or 2 to 10mm. They are commonly used in fillings for chocolates or pralines. They can add an extra crunchy bite to Muesli bars; and can add a healthy touch of cocoa to cereals. ACTICOA Crispys can also create soft colour spots in ice- creams, desserts, muffins and sponge cakes. Their implementation in tea blends is especially innovative. The Crispys easily dissolve in hot water. Thanks to their full cocoa aroma they top off the taste and colour of tea blends. ACTICOA Crispy matches today’s trend for combining indulgence and healthy benefits. If implemented in the previously mentioned examples, the finished products will provide all the flavanols needed to have an extra antioxidant effect in the body. For example, a 30g muesli bar which has been enriched with 6% of ACTICOA Crispy contains 90mg flavanols. This provides 60% of the amount of flavanols that a person needs to increase the blood flow to the brain and to improve cognitive performance. On this basis, a health claim for the final product can be established, such as ‘One serving unit provides 60% of the antioxidants that helps to enhance your cognitive performance by increasing the blood flow to the brain’. Combined with other ACTICOA products further health claims are possible. Depending on the concentration of flavanols in the final product you will be able to claim various positive effects on the body.

Antioxidant powder blend We already know that chocolate products rich in antioxidants are becoming more popular because they combine pleasure and functional benefits. WILD can offer an alternative route to adding antioxidant benefits to chocolate, which has, traditionally, come almost exclusively from the cocoa bean. Current market data shows that consumers are growing increasingly fond of dark chocolate with a high antioxidant content. According to the Innova database, 22 new chocolates declaring antioxidants on the packaging were introduced in Europe in 2008, compared to a mere four In 2006. This growing demand is based primarily on the health benefits dark chocolate offers thanks to its naturally high antioxidant content. WILD can offer this natural, powdered ingredient blend with a high standardised polyphenol content to support this product trend. The antioxidant blend contains plant extracts from green and white tea as well as green rooibos and grape seeds. The high and standardised polyphenol content of these extracts has a naturally antioxidative effect. Polyphenols exist in plants as natural colourants, flavours or tannins, and are said to absorb free radicals in the human body. The antioxidant blend from WILD can be used in a range of chocolate products – whether for chocolate bars or pralines – with or without fruit filling. Naturally, dark chocolate suits best

Health Foods & Snacks Spring 2009

for an antioxidant chocolate concept. However, the existing polyphenol content in these products can be boosted even higher with the WILD’s antioxidant powder blend. In addition to the antioxidant powder blend, manufacturers can also benefit from other natural WILD ingredients like fruit powder or natural colourings and flavours that enhance the nutritional value of their products. The ingredient blend in powder form can be added to the chocolate mass and/or the filling, and it is possible to get up to 700mg of polyphenols in 100g of a filled chocolate bar. In such a concept, 200mg can been added to to the chocolate mass and 500mg can be added to a fruity cream filling. The antioxidant powder blend from WILD has no taste impact on the final chocolate product and offers another major advantage – because the powder dissolves completely, it can even be added after the conching process, says the company.

Time to consider a CBE With consumers increasing desire for more healthy offerings there has probably never been a better time to consider replacing some cocoa butter with a cocoa butter equivalent (CBE) such as ILLEXAO in chocolate recipes. ILLEXAO from AAK is exchangeable with cocoa butter in a 1:1 ratio without any change in quality as well as processing parameters. The ratio at which you want to add ILLEXAO can be anything between 1-100%. According to EU directive – 2000/36/EC – manufacturers can add CBE to a chocolate product in a ratio of up to 5% of the chocolate and still label it as ‘chocolate’. All it takes is the text ‘Contains vegetable fat in addition to cocoa butter’ close to the ingredients list as shown in the example below. ILLEXAO itself should be labelled in the ingredients list simply as ‘Vegetable fat’. Obviously this option is desirable where the word ‘chocolate’ is essential on the packaging and where considerable cost savings are needed at the same time. Including ILLEXAO in a ratio of more than 5% of the chocolate means that the product cannot be labelled as chocolate. On the other hand the only labelling required is ‘Vegetable fat’ in the ingredients list. This approach should be considered where ‘chocolate’ is not required on the labelling in e.g. countlines, pan coated products or other products sold mainly on the brand or price. Needless to say that choosing this option immediately yields tremendous cost savings on raw materials. ILLEXAO is also well suited for moulding, coating and as filling in filled products where a chocolaty center is required.

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Going nuts for sweet treats! Louise McKerchar, european marketing director at the American Peanut Council, explains the physical and economical flexibility of the peanut as well as its ability to respond to consumer trends

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he versatility of a food ingredient is often its most powerful asset due to the constantly evolving nature of consumer purchasing patterns. An ingredient that can offer health, taste, value and application in confectionery products provides manufacturers with a very beneficial tool. Peanuts have unlimited application potential and are currently being used in a surprising range of confectionery items. American peanuts in particular are recognised for their fresh ‘peanutty’ taste. Not only can they naturally enhance the flavour of popular treats, they provide a great source of energy and healthy fats. Peanuts also have a low glycaemic index (GI), which is linked to metabolic and cardiovascular health benefits. Once considered unhealthy due to a misconception over fat content, the genuine attributes of peanuts serve to correct this dated view and their popularity continues to gather speed. Peanuts are 100% natural and their inherent health attributes

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offer a convenient form of energy that satisfies consumers for longer. Their natural taste is distinctive, but will not mask that of any other ingredients. Importantly, their texture adds an extra dimension to standard confectionery items. The cost of an ingredient can dramatically affect its versatility in an application. Given the present challenging economic climate, cost-effective ingredients are in great demand. Less expensive than other nuts, peanuts are, therefore, more appealing than ever to manufacturers who aim to deliver not just on health, taste and quality, but also on value. In addition, the increasing trend of stay-at-home catering and cheap nights in can only benefit the confectionery industry. Offering an economical way to indulge after a dinner party or in front of a DVD, peanut confectionery offers a unique, high quality and indulgent snacking option. Taste and indulgence govern consumer choice for confectionery products. It is, therefore, essential that any confectionery item containing peanuts is able to offer a satisfying and tasty proposition that will entice consumers and offer enhanced appeal. Peanuts, which are a great snack when simply coated with yoghurt or covered with chocolate, can also be easily incorporated into chocolate bars, brittle and individual confectionery items. They can offer a fresh and unique taste and texture, as well as great value. Used in such applications – either blanched or roasted – peanuts offer an ideal ingredient to complement other sweet ingredients without affecting their taste. The process

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HEALTHY CONFECTIONERY tolerance of the peanut is another appealing attribute for manufacturers. American peanuts will work effectively with binding agents and will not lose their flavour over time.

Flour power Another, less commonly known but equally versatile peanut ingredient that can be used in the confectionery industry is peanut flour. Extracted from roasted peanuts, peanut flour normally contains around 50% protein. The most suitable applications for peanut flour within the confectionery sector are in peanut butter flavoured coatings or incorporated into peanut butter fillings and/or peanut butter flavoured frostings and icings. Peanut flour works well to control the fat migration of the high fat centres of these products. In addition, it is able to offer colour and flavour to the finished product. It also works well in cookies and dry bakery mixes, as well as other peanut butter flavoured baked goods. In the US, peanut flour is widely used in nutritional snack and diet bars to provide a peanut flavour, to modify texture and enhance the protein content. American peanuts are particularly renowned for their high quality and fresh flavour. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has studied peanuts from around the world, using trained flavour specialists and US and European consumer taste panels. Results have shown that American

peanuts consistently had the highest ‘peanutty’ flavour. Fundamentally, taste is the key to repeat purchase, and these results suggest that American peanuts, over any others, are more likely to enhance profitability. Further evidence showing that no off flavours were detected in American peanuts, only serves to add weight to this argument.

In a nutshell The flexibility of peanuts in confectionery applications proves to be limitless. Suitable for use in a wide range of sweet treats, peanuts tick all the boxes relating to today’s most prevalent consumer purchasing patterns: convenience, indulgence, health, taste and value. Confectionery manufacturers can confidently respond to modern trends with this great tasting and versatile ingredient, maximising production efficiency and the prospect of commercial success. www.peanutsusa.com The American Peanut Council is a trade association that represents all segments of the peanut industry. Members include peanut growers, peanut shellers, brokers, peanut product manufacturers and suppliers of goods and services. Peanuts have been grown commercially in the USA since the 1800’s and four basic types of peanuts are grown in the USA – Runner, Virginia, Spanish and Valencia. Each peanut is distinctive in size and flavour.


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HEALTHY CONFECTIONERY

Taste as well as function Although reduced-sugar and sugar-free confectionery is still a niche sector of the market, it has huge growth potential as long as the right taste and texture can be achieved

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lthough confectionery sales continue to grow in both the sugar and chocolate categories, it is perhaps not surprising that this growth rate has slowed over the last 12 months. Total confectionery sales grew by 5.9% in 2008, compared to a growth rate of 8.7% the previous year. Despite this slow down, the market value for confectionery as a whole is still estimated to be in the region of 50 billion US dollars. The slowest growing sector remains sugar confectionery. Chocolate and chewing gum continue to increase at similar rates. Reduced sugar and sugar-free confectionery is still a niche sector of the market. However, Mintel’s GNPD database states that 14% of launches in the last six months of 2008 had some form of reduced/low/no sugar claims in sugar confectionery. Chewing gum on the other hand is still dominated by the sugar-free positioning of products. When evaluating the positioning of non-gum confectionery, it still remains a product area where treats can be obtained with limited expense, therefore delivering a bit of ‘me time’ without putting excessive strains on the already stressed financial situation. But the question is why does a ‘healthier’ option not deliver the same treat? In fact, the ingredients and technology that are currently available are able to deliver products that provide the tastes and textures demanded whilst still supporting healthier positioning. In the past, confectionery has tended to be either standard sugar based or completely sugar-free. However, this no longer remains the only option as ‘reduced sugar’ products are also now at home on the confectionery shelves. In order to satisfy consumer demands, these products still need to deliver the overall sensations demanded from a confectionery product and most do this with much success. Developments and knowledge from ingredient suppliers can help manufacturers develop

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confectionery products with a healthier image. Products such as polydextrose, marketed by Danisco under the Litesse brand, can be utilised as a direct replacement for glucose syrups in many confectionery formulations with only minor adjustments to processing required to facilitate a reduced sugar positioning. Polydextrose levels in these products would also contribute towards dietary fibre levels, which still remain under consumed in this world of processed foods.

Xylitol in confectionery Xylitol is another ingredient that can be used in a variety of confectionery forms. Although it is primarily associated with dental benefits, there are other aspects to this ingredient that make it of interest for developments in confectionery formats. In its crystalline form, xylitol will exhibit a distinct cooling effect as the crystals dissolve. This can open up a new palette of flavour sensations which are controlled by the cooling impact of the product. Hard candies with a ‘standard’ glass structure combined with a crystallised xylitol section will exhibit a cool freshness as the xylitol dissolves, but will also give the impression of a heating sensation from the standard glass structure. With changes in perceived temperature, there can also be many potential flavours which can be combined to enhance the cold and hot nature of these products. This would also enable exciting products to be manufactured where taste is the prime driver for the purchase of the product, with the added benefit of being sugar reduced.

Changing legislation for health claims The legislation relating to health claims that are acceptable on foods are also a changing arena for confectionery manufacturers. The pending, so called ‘article 13 list’, which

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HEALTHY CONFECTIONERY will result in an approved ‘functional health claims’ list by January 2012, contains 4,185 claims for consideration. Only around 1,000 of these claims have not required further clarification, and even these will not have the evaluation completed until later this year. Other submissions are being evaluated under article 14 of the legislation – disease risk reduction claims. Overall, there will be considerable changes in the generally accepted health claims that can be made on products, including confectionery, as a result of this new legislation. Chewing gum is an area where products are often positioned as having ‘functional’ health benefits. These products are often associated with breath freshening, nasal decongestion and/or tooth cleaning functions, although still ostensibly being positioned as confectionery products. The common factor with many chewing gum products is that they are already mostly sugar-free. In global market terms, less than 10% of the total chewing gum market is based on sugar. In most instances these products have been developed to deliver the desired attributes of taste and texture to the consumer. These factors cannot be ignored when developing products. Just telling consumers how ‘healthy’ a product is will not encourage repeat purchases if the product does not match the expectations of the consumer. An appealing flavour and texture are the primary objective, and something that ingredient suppliers must also place at the top of the list of demands for their developments. As the impact of the claims legislation is realised in Europe, the market for foods making these claims will also change. A

recent review by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) resulted in the opinion that a claim that ‘xylitol chewing gum reduces the risk of caries in children’ would be acceptable. Submissions made have supported the use of this claim on chewing gum products sweetened with 100% xylitol and are based on data showing a consumption of 2-3g of chewing gum per day after meals. These levels of xylitol can readily be formulated into chewing gum. The taste and texture found in these products would also be acceptable to the consumer as it would match that of products already found on the market and accepted as a ‘standard’ product. Xylitol in chewing gum will also deliver the cooling impact that can be used to develop the flavour sensations desired by both adult and child consumers. A cooling effect has long been associated with mint based flavours, but fruit flavours often benefit from this cooling effect as well, which provides added freshness and juiciness to the flavour. Overall, despite the potential slow down in the growth of the confectionery market, there still remains a requirement to deliver tasty products that can improve the overall nutritional profile of the products. The essential area is that these healthier options can continue to satisfy the expectations of the consumers. These products need to be chosen primarily for their overall eating properties, and the marketing position as a healthier product would cement the choice for the consumer. Reducing sugar and calories should not – and does not – mean reducing enjoyment. www.danisco.com/sweeteners

WHEN REPLYING TO ADVERTISEMENTS, PLEASE MENTION

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HEALTHY CONFECTIONERY

Fudge after 2 months under ‘true light’ (lecithin samples on the left)

Replacing hardened fats and reducing rancidity and fat bloom Suzanne Callander examines a hard fat substitute which shows good results in confectionery applications

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ardened or hydrogenated fats have become less popular as health organisations warn consumers about the negative effect they have on the development of cardiovascular diseases. Today, governments are encouraging supermarkets and manufacturers to try to reduce or replace hardened fats in their recipes with oils. Soft confection such as fudge, toffee, caramels or chews contain fat. Hardened fats are better as they improve the body of the candy. Replacing them with oils, however, affects the eating sensation, quality and the shelf life of the finished product. Under the influence of light and oxygen, oils are very sensitive and will react (oxidation) and form rancid components. Fat bloom can occur when (butter) fat recrystallises at the surface of the candy. Confectionery has a typical shelf life of 12-18 months, but rancidity, fat bloom or oiling can ruin the product within three months.

Sucrose esters affects rancidity of confection By using Sucrosilk in confectionery, a delay of rancidity can be achieved. Sucrosilk is not an anti-oxidant but is a blend of selected sucrose esters, which are high-grade emulsifiers, on a carrier of powdered sugar. Sucrosilk ensures that the fat or oil is effectively encapsulated in the confection. UV light and oxygen cannot penetrate the candy matrix very well and the fat globules are protected from oxidation and the formation

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of rancid components. This same emulsifying which reduces the perspiration of oil to the surface, also reduces fat bloom.

Test results Sisterna, the manufacturer of Sucrosilk, conducted a test on its anti-rancid effect in fudge based on oil and butter fat. Reference fudges were produced with 0.2% lecithin – the most commonly used emulsifier in fudges. In the test samples, the lecithin was replaced with 0.4% Sucrosilk MP10 (effectively containing <0.05% sucrose esters). All fudges were stored and compared at intervals. After two months storage under special light conditions for inducing rancidity, strong rancid notes were sensed in the lecithin sample. In the GCMS analyses, the hexanal peak – a measure for rancidity – was far higher for the lecithin sample than for the Sucrosilk MP10 sample. The same result was found when stored under different conditions (dark, ambient, six months). Additionally, fat bloom was far less prominent in the Sucrosilk fudge compared to the reference. The Sucrosilk blend has been developed especially for confectionery to reduce stickiness, control sugar crystallisation and offer fat emulsification to prevent oozing. The blend eases handling in the factory, replacing the premixing job of sucrose esters with powder ingredients and it is easy to disperse, even in hot liquids. In some confectionery products, seeding sugar or fondant can be eliminated from the recipe because the powdered sugar in Sucrosilk could do the job of the seeding crystals. www.sisterna.com Sucrosilk is distributed in the UK by S.Black – www.sblack.com

Healthy Foods & Snacks Spring 2009


ads

24/11/08

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www.kennedys-books.co.uk

Technical books for the confectioner

Chocolate, Cocoa and Confectionery - Third Edition By Bernard Minifie Recognized as the industry standard, this definitive guide, with over 900 pages of information, provides a comprehensive review of chocolate and confectionery production and processing operations Order Code: AP-002 ISBN: 083421301X 1999, £142.50 (€192) Making Chocolates in the Factory By Robert Whitefield The purpose of his book is to help owners, managers and operators with practical advice on all aspects of running a factory and concentrates on the details of operating enrobers, moulding plants and dragée equipment Order Code: KEN-010 ISBN: 978-0-9558085-1-7 2008, 144 pages, £49 (€66) Formulation and Production of Chewing and Bubble Gum Edited by Douglas Fritz Douglas has many years of experience in the chewing gum sector and this essential book contains everything needed with contributions by some of the world?s leading experts. Order Code: KEN-011 ISBN: 978-0-9558085-2-4 2008, 303 pages, £115 (€155) Sugar Confectionery and Chocolate Manufacture By R. Lees and E.B. Jackson This book is one of the established reference sources for the confectionery industry. Written as a text book with basic recipes and methods for a wide range of confectionery. Now available in English and Spanish, Order Code: JAC-001E, English ed, January 1999, 379 pages, £95 (€128) Order Code: JAC-001S, Spanish ed, March 2008, £120 (€162) Sugar Confectionery Recipes and Methods Compiled by E.B. Jackson The book features hundreds of recipes and detailed methods for the production of all types of sugar candy, an essential reference source for all sugar confectionery manufacturers. Order Code: JAC-002 2002, 219 pages £99 (€134) Sugar Confectionery Manufacture - Second Edition Edited by E.B. Jackson A highly detailed book covering all aspects of raw materials, manufacturing processesand technical info for the production of sugar confectionery.

Included are high boiled sweets, caramels, toffees, gums, jellies, liquorice, pastes, aerated confectionery, tablets, lozenges, panning, chewing gums, countlines and cereal bars Order Code: AP-210 ISBN 9780834212978 1999, £146.50 (€162) Industrial Manufacture of Snack Foods By Dr Sergio O. Serna-Saldivar Dr Sergio O. Serna-Saldivar is the world’s leading expert on the snacks sector. Industrial Manufacture of Snack Foods is an essential resource for the industry, particularly for technicians and scientists involved in new product development. Order Code: KEN-013 ISBN 978-0-9558085-0-0 April 2008, 428 pages, £125 (€169) Application of Fats in Confectionery By Geoff Talbot Geoff, known as the Fat Consultant, is an internationallyrenowned specialist in confectionery fats and oils. This book represents the culmination of nearly 40 years in this sector, plugging a gaping hole in the existing literature. Order Code: KEN-012 ISBN 0-904725-11-1 2006, 215 pages, £98 (€132) Chocolates and Confections: Formula, Theory and Technique for the Artisan Confectioner by P Grewelling This comprehensive book combines artisan confectionery techniques with accessible explanations of the theory and science as well as formulas for use in production. Order Code: BS-823, ISBN: 978-0-7645-8844-0, March 2007, £39.99 (€54) The Science of Chocolate By Stephen Beckett The second edition of this best seller has been fully revised and updated describing the complete chocolate making process, from the growing of beans to the shop. Written for students and those training in the industry. Order Code: RSC-101 ISBN: 978-0-85404-970-7 2008, £24.95, (€33.50)

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MOOD FOOD

Mood food –

the latest trend? Ewa Hudson, industry analyst at Euromonitor International, discusses the latest consumer trend for food that feeds the mind!

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ecent scientific research has focused on understanding how changes in diet can enhance cognitive ability, protect the brain from damage and fight the effects of ageing. Studies conducted worldwide have shown that a balanced diet has the potential to alter brain health and mental function. In recent years manufacturers have launched foods and drinks aimed at making consumers happier, calmer and even more intelligent. Companies such as Unilever, Nestle and Yakult are focusing on better understanding the link between nutrition and the brain. The emerging cognitive functional category is progressively establishing itself as a whole new market, offering commercial opportunities. However, there is still a long way to go before such a category is widely acknowledged as well as regulated.

Benefiting from the market for brain food Despite the need for further research in this area, the cognitive functional category is set to become one of the hottest areas in the industry. Japan is by far the biggest market. Europe and Asia offer good prospects, with consumers interested in such developments as long as they are based on scientific findings. The US seems to be further behind, but its consumers are becoming increasingly interested. Overall, the category could be divided into three areas: • Energy boosting (eg guarana, caffeine, ginseng) • Brain function (eg omega-3, PS, GABA, creatine), • and Mood (eg green tea, tryptophan, GABA, ginkgo biloba). The market is currently focused on drinks. Leading beverage areas are teas and infusions, water-based drinks and energy drinks. In the dairy segment, omega-3 fortified yoghurts, milk and drinking yoghurts dominate. However, nearly all product categories have seen launches of products with mental function claims, including ice cream and confectionery (chocolate rich in omega-3 and B vitamins). Key ingredients in food products targeted at mental health are omega-3, ginkgo biloba and ginseng (linked to improved memory), soy lecithin and St John's wort (recognised as combating depression), and Co-enzyme Q10 (reported to help slow the progression of Parkinson's disease).

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Supplements for cognitive function According to Euromonitor International’s research, dietary supplements aimed at cognitive function are increasingly finding favour with consumers. Global value global sales of Co-enzyme Q10 have been impressive – increasing by 180% over 2002-2007 to reach 772 million US dollars in 2007. Sales of ginseng at global level also delivered a strong performance, hitting 1.1 billion US dollars in 2007 (up from 644 million US dollars in 2002), with Asia-Pacific accounting for a 66% share of the global market. Global sales of ginkgo biloba have increased by 40% since 2002, amounting to 663 million US dollars in 2007. With Western Europe and Asia-Pacific leading the way, with a 34% and 28% share respectively of the global market, sales of ginkgo biloba are expected to reach almost 800 million US dollars by 2012. Sales of St John’s wort increased by 11% over 2002-2007, reaching 210 million US dollars in 2007. Fish oils, well known for being one of the main sources of omega-3, are also on the increase thanks to the popularity of omega-3. Sales have increased by 112% since 2002, reaching almost U2 billion US dollars in 2007, and are expected to increase further as omega-3 becomes mainstream. Value sales of fish oils are predicted to reach 2.5 billion US dollars by 2012. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been linked to a wide range of health benefits – from heart, joint and cardiovascular health – to the healthy development of a baby during pregnancy. However, omega-3 is increasingly receiving attention for its reported positive effects on brain function. Improving learning and memory, fighting against depression and mood disorders,

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MOOD FOOD as well as schizophrenia and dementia, are just some of the health claims that have been recently attributed to the already famous fatty acids. Dietary deficiency of omega-3 fatty acids has been associated with risk of mental disorders such as attention deficit disorder, dyslexia, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, impaired learning and memory. Omega-3’s alleged role in cognitive development is already providing the ideal platform for the launch of omega-3 fortified products aimed at young children. Ageing baby-boomers are another ideal target group. This demographic segment is very concerned about declining cognitive function, memory loss and particularly progressive dementia and Alzheimer's, these concerns provide another fertile platform for the positioning of omega-3 fortified products. The overall outlook for omega-3 as a functional ingredient in foods and beverages is very positive. Euromonitor International predicts that global volumes of omega-3 could rise to 39,000 tonnes by 2012, increasing by 33% over the coming 5-year period.

New product developments Manufacturers are tapping into consumer anxiety to remain as alert as possible, with products aimed at cognitive function mushrooming over the past five years. In 2006 Unilever launched in the Netherlands Blue Band Idee! margarine, with fatty acids DHA, ALA and B vitamins, particularly recommended for the mental development of children. DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) is, in fact, reported to support the development of the brain, eyes and nervous system. In 2007 Unilever entered emerging markets by launching in Turkey ‘Amaze’, a range of snacks and flavoured milk drinks, aimed at 5-12-year-old schoolchildren. Each serving claims to provide ‘a third of the key nutrients needed for healthy mental development in an easily absorbed form’. Amaze is currently being released in India. Among the most interesting launches, in Norway, Pharmalogica, presented Smartfish, a range of fruit juices fortified with omega-3. Each of these ‘intelligent drinks’ combines a blend of fruit juices with marine oils, the source of essential fatty acids DPA, DHA and EPA. Each serving contains 705mg of omega-3, providing the daily needs of EPA and DHA. Pharmalogica’s latest launch is Smartweek, containing 225mg of DHA, 150mg of EPA and 75mg of DPA, and claiming to provide ‘five days worth of omega-3, seven if you are a kid’. In Canada, Neilson Dairy Oh! Partially Skimmed Milk claims to come from cows that are fed a diet formulated with DHA. In the UK, St Ivel’s Advance ‘clever milk’, fortified with omega-3, targets families with young children as it claims to help brain function, learning and concentration. Again in Canada, Loblaw’s President’s Choice ‘Oh Mega J’ was the first private label juice drink to contain the two omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA, to support normal development of the brain, eyes and nervous system. The industry worldwide has woken up to the trend and is

Healthy Foods & Snacks Spring 2009

heavily investing in research and innovation. In 2006 Nestlé announced investment of around 4 million US dollars a year over a 5-year period to investigate the role of nutrition in cognitive function and develop new products to boost brain power. The joint project with the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology will be focusing on three main research areas: the role of nutrition in cognitive development in children, the prevention of cognitive decline in the elderly, and the better understanding of the gut-brain axis. A key goal of the study will be to identify nutrients that can keep the brain fully fuelled, as the organ consumes around a quarter of the body’s energy, and during ageing the metabolism producing brain energy slows down, directly impacting cognitive function.

A regulatory minefield Foods boosting cognitive function and mood have massive potential, but more research will be needed to overcome regulatory barriers. Knowledge of so-called psychotropic ingredients (those that have the potential to affect mood and mental health) is increasing. The understanding of the cognitive effects of omega-3, phosphatidylserine (PS), creatine, Co-enzyme Q10, green tea, guarana, ginseng, cocoa polyphenols, folate, ginkgo biloba and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) is growing. However, as things currently stand, very few health claims in this area would gain approval under the new Nutrition and Health Claims Regulation, adopted by the European Council and Parliament in 2006 (which aims at ensuring that any claim made on a food label in the EU is accurate and substantiated) unless more investment is put into obtaining scientific validation for them. Under current rules for example, in the UK both Dairy Crest's advertisements for St Ivel Advance 'clever milk' with omega-3, and the Village Bakery's selenium- enriched ‘happy bread’, failed to pass examination by the UK Advertising Standards Authority, for claims not sufficiently supported by science. Despite all the hype, it seems that studies that conclusively demonstrate the benefits of omega-3 on behaviour do not currently exist, with evidence of the benefits of omega-3 consumption currently being limited to cardiovascular diseases. The emerging category of food for the brain is likely to become part of Western society’s preventative and holistic approach to health, but the role of government will be vital in making this possible. The way forward for brain foods is likely to be found in the alliance between manufacturers, government bodies and stakeholders (such as the Food Standards Agency, the Department of Health, the School Food Trust, the Mental Health Trust, in the UK). This would be a convenient situation for all parties – for the government, as the burden on the NHS and benefits system is reduced, and for food and drinks manufacturers, as new products are developed and new markets created. www.euromonitor.com

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DAIRY DRINKS

Healthy dairy drinks grow in popularity Dairy drinks that promote health continue to grow in popularity across the globe

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airy drink new product launches that promote a health benefit have been increasing in popularity, and now comprise over 70% of all dairy drinks products launched globally, according to statistics from Innova Food. Tim Van der Schraelen, BENEO-Orafti marketing and communication manager, explains further: “We have seen a growing emphasis on health in society as obesity becomes a global problem and although ‘convenience’ is still a major driver in the promotion of dairy drinks (17% of new products use it to sell the product), this has been overtaken in popularity by ‘health’ (both active and passive*) as the primary claim used to encourage sales, with 53% of the new products launched. With this in mind, we have seen an increase of over 90% in the number of dairy drink products brought to market that contain inulin and oligofructose over the last seven years. From small beginnings back in 2002, when only 15 dairy drinks contained this active food ingredient, 2008 saw 181 products brought to market globally that contained inulin and oligofructose.”

Still room for growth However, there is still room for growth. For drinks manufacturers wanting to include active food ingredients like Orafti inulin and oligofructose in products to make health and wellness claims, there is still a big opportunity. With the largest proportion of dairy drink innovations being carried out in Western Europe (28%) and Asia (24%), followed by Latin America (18%), it is interesting to note that North America is still in the lead in developing dairy drinks that contain inulin and oligofructose, with Asia close behind. 11% of dairy drinks on the market in North America contain this active food ingredient, as opposed to 9% in Asia and 7% in Western Europe. Consumers are becoming increasingly aware of specific health claims within the ‘wellbeing’ category and as such, shifting preferences can be seen in the number of new products

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launched bearing specific claims. Out of the 181 dairy drinks launched in 2008 that contained inulin and oligofructose, the highest proportion of health claims were to do with gut health, at 17%. This shows a considerable increase in understanding by consumers about the benefits of digestive health, as only 3% of products were launched with this health claim five years previously. Low fat and low sugar claims however, seem to be showing few signs of growth, remaining static at 10% and 2% of products launched in 2008 carrying these health benefits on their packaging, as opposed to 12% and 2% five years ago. “Increased consumer understanding of specific claims and what they can do for the promotion of health, combined with the tightening of EU legislation on health claim labelling, will continue to prove a challenge for food producers in 2009 and beyond,” said Van der Schraelen. “Following our own consumer research in December 2008, we have found that promoting the health benefits of a product does increase the appeal of established brands and generates added value. Apart from demonstrating the worth consumers place on health benefits in terms of monetary value, our recent international consumer study also found that there is a gap between interest levels in ingredients and the health benefits they offer. Although consumers might know the names of key ingredients such as vitamin C, calcium, wholegrain or prebiotics, they do not necessarily equate these names with the key health benefits the ingredients provide. By communicating more about the health benefits over and above the names of the ingredients included in the product, manufacturers can add significant value to already premium brands.” “Healthy dairy drinks make up the majority of new product development launches over recent years. Therefore it stands to reason that manufacturers who can tap into this sector with tailored health benefit messages that can be substantiated with scientific proof, will continue to see increased market development and penetration this year and beyond.” www.BENEO-Orafti.com * ’Health’ claims are broken down into two categories: health (active)’ and ‘health (passive)’. The former includes added calcium/fibre/iron and gut health claims and the latter includes reduced fat/sugar and organic categories.

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WHEY PROTEIN

The crispy whey to add protein Mark Neville, marketing manager of Dairy & Lifestyle Ingredients at Volac, discusses the nutritional advantages of whey protein

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he addition of protein to food as a functional ingredient is nothing new, given its significant health, as well as texturizing, benefits. Protein is a key food group required for repairing tissue and sustaining growth in the body, as well as providing energy and functioning in many other important biological processes. Several new vegetable-based sources of protein have appeared on the ingredients market in recent years, including potato, pea, and carob bean. Soy protein, of course, has been around for many years. However, for manufacturers interested in the nutritional and biological effects of protein in their product – such as a snack bar – whey protein, whether instantised, in concentrate or isolate form, has significant functional advantages over vegetable-based, and even other dairy equivalents such as casein. Whey protein naturally contains all of the essential amino acids and has the highest concentration of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs). Immediate availability of these BCAAs is vital, post exercise, to ensure rapid muscle recovery and therefore achieve maximum performance improvement. Its traditional popularity with sportspeople and athletes is not, therefore, surprising.

Extending its reach As with many ingredients and products that begin in the specialised sports market, however, whey protein, led by Volac, is extending its reach as its benefits become more widely recognised. Food manufacturers are now gaining a greater understanding of the diverse nutritional advantages of including whey protein in new products aimed at those who actively engage in fitness and health but who may not necessarily be serious bodybuilders or elite athletes, the so-called Active Nutrition Market. Equally, Volac has identified an opportunity for whey protein

Kennedy’s Confection Spring 2009

to be included in ‘food on the go’ products for time-poor consumers seeking a ‘quick nutrition-fix’. In theory, the average adult can get their daily RNI of protein (about 55g for men and 45g for women) by eating a healthy balanced diet. However, we are all aware that this isn’t going to be the case for many people, whether they are fussy teenagers, manic office workers eating on the move or elderly people who can no longer chew or digest several common sources of protein.

Protein in snack bars Specifically for snack bars, the addition of protein creates an interesting nutritional balance. Unlike traditional cereal, cereal bars are consumed without milk, and therefore lack the complementary protein for a ‘balanced meal’. Fortifying the nutrition in cereal bars with protein from milk (such as whey protein isolate) provides a total meal replacement on the go. Whilst whey protein has traditionally been added as a powdered ingredient, Volactive ProCrisp from Volac is a new type of whey protein application, specially developed for use in nutritional snack bars, including cereal bars. Available as small crisps, similar in texture to rice crispies (and acting in a similar way in the bar), ProCrisp can add to the texture of the cereal bar and can also provide aeration so a large sized bar can be offered with the same calorific value as a smaller bar. Crucially, ProCrisp has a dry, neutral taste, which does not interfere with the flavours of other ingredients and can easily be blended with cereals such as oats. ProCrisp can also be used to replace ingredients such as nuts for those who have a nut allergy or who want to reduce the calorific value of the bar, while retaining protein value. As the largest producer of nutritional whey protein in Europe and solely focused on dairy nutrition, Volac has developed an expertise in this field, producing whey protein with variants suitable for different nutritional needs. The full Volactive range is produced using gentle low temperature and pressure membrane filtration technology. This ensures that the protein remains, as far as possible, in its native state with all its nutritional components essentially intact, ie it is not heavily denatured. Combining this technology expertise with flexibility, agility and outstanding customer service, Volac is the whey protein supplier of choice. www.volac.com

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