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Charter schools got most of the headlines, but the 2017 General Assembly passed dozens of bills that will affect public schools, students and public school employees During its 2017 Regular Session, the Kentucky General Assembly passed 45 bills that will affect Kentucky’s public schools, public school employees and the children and families they serve. Those that included “emergency provisions” in their language went into effect the moment the governor signed them. Those dates vary and will be noted below. Unlkess otherwise noted all other newly-enacted legislation goes into effect on June 29, 2017. Senate Bill 1 contained an emergency clause. Its provisions took effect April 10. SB 1 gives local school districts greater control over teacher evaluations, makes dramatic changes to the accountability system and establishes a new framework by which state standards for each grade level will be reviewed. The Act also does away with program reviews. However, because it is late in the school year Commissioner Pruitt recognizes that considerable work already has been done on the 2016-17 program reviews. He encouraged districts to submit online any work that already has been completed for the 2016-17 program reviews, “to honor the work of students and staff.” But no school will be penalized for not submitting a program review for 2016-17, and program reviews will not be included in this year’s accountability formula.

Other notable Senate Bills

Senate Bill 50 requires each local school district to establish a calendar committee, determines membership for the committee, defines a variable student instructional year, establishes school calendar adoption procedures and requires the media be notified of school board meetings about the school calendar. SB 50 also provides that districts adopting a school calendar with the first student attendance day no earlier than the Monday closest to August 26 may use a variable student instructional year. Senate Bill 117 includes definitions for “provisional certificates,” “professional certificates,” and “college or university work of graduate grade.” It allows a veteran with a bachelor’s degree in any area to be issued a provisional teaching certificate if other criteria are met. It requires a passing score on the GRE or its equivalent for certification of a person with a degree in a field other than education to teach in elementary, middle, or secondary programs. Senate Bill 159 requires all public high school students to pass a civics test in order to receive a regular diploma, with 100 questions drawn from the test administered by the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services. Senate Bill 236 requires that school

superintendents conduct a background check of child abuse and neglect records maintained by CHFS when considering employment decisions. This provision goes into effect on July 1.

Notable House Bills

House Bill 3 eliminates the prevailing wage across the Commonwealth. This bill had an emergency clause and went into effect on January 9. House Bill 33 requires the Cabinet for Health and Family Services, if granted custody of a child, to notify the child’s school of persons authorized to contact the child or remove the child from school grounds. HB 33 contains an emergency clause; it took effect April 10. House Bill 128 requires the Kentucky Board of Education to promulgate administrative regulations to establish an elective social studies course on the Hebrew Scriptures, Old Testament of the Bible, the New Testament, or a combination of the Hebrew Scriptures and the New Testament. House Bill 180 defines “fictive kin” to mean an individual who is not related by birth, adoption, or marriage to a child, but who has an emotionally significant relationship with the child. Recognizes fictive kin as a placement for a child by CHFS and establishes that CHFS may approve fictive kin as a placement. House Bill 206 establishes the Dual Credit Scholarship Program and defines terms for the program. It designates the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (KHEAA) to administer the program and provides Kentucky Educational Excellence Scholarship (KEES) funds to students enrolled in a registered apprenticeship program. House Bill 241 prohibits a coach from returning a student to play who is diagnosed with a concussion, prohibits a student from returning to play if no physician or licensed provider is available to conduct the required concussion evaluation, and prohibits a student

who does not receive the required evaluation from returning to play in a subsequent practice or competition unless written clearance from a physician is provided. House Bill 253 requires unannounced visits, if necessary, to the residence or location where reported child abuse or neglect has occurred, as well as ongoing unannounced visits until the welfare of a child has been safeguarded. It requires schools or child-care providers to allow access to a child who is subject to an investigation without parental consent. House Bill 269 allows relatives who are currently ineligible for employment in a school district to serve as substitutes for a certified or classified employee under certain conditions. House Bill 471 amends the 2016-2018 executive branch biennial budget and includes three provisions impacting elementary and secondary education funding: • Allows unexpended Support Education Excellence in Kentucky (SEEK) funds to be carried forward to the 2017-2018 fiscal year to be utilized for pupil transportation; • Sets restrictions on the use of capital outlay; and • Provides charter school financing language. This bill also allows TRS to pay the dependent subsidy for retirees under age 65. Because these changes were made to the existing budget, they will expire when the budget expires on June 30, 2018. House Bill 520 establishes charter schools in Kentucky, prohibits full-time virtual charter schools, and allows charters to begin operating during the 2017-18 school year. The Act empowers multiple charter school authorizers, including local boards of education, collaboratives of local boards of education, and the mayors of Louisville and Lexington. The Kentucky Board of Education must promulgate administrative regulations to guide the student application, lottery, and enrollment processes for charter schools. HB 520 exempts charter schools from all statutes and administrative regulations applicable to the state board, a local school district, or a school, but requires that charter schools adhere to the same health, safety, civil rights, and disability rights requirements as public schools. House Bill 522 allows a state agency child who is at least 17 years old to seek a high school equivalency diploma. House Bill 524 renders “promoting human trafficking involving commercial sexual activity” as a criminal offense against a minor if the victim is under 18. It requires public schools to display the National Human Trafficking Reporting Hotline, and adds specific injuries to a child under 12 to the definition of “serious physical injury.”


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Terrilyn Fleming is KEA’s 2018 Teacher of the Year

Terrilyn Fleming is the 2018 recipient of the KEA Award for Teaching Excellence. Fleming, who is theatre director at the J. Graham Brown School in Louisville and represents JCTA on the KEA Board of Directors, was presented with the award on opening night of the 145th KEA Delegate Assembly. The KEA Award for Teaching Excellence recognizes, rewards and promotes excellence in teaching and advocacy for the profession. It also honors public education and the dedicated members of the KEA. The award is presented jointly by the National Education Association (NEA) and

the NEA Foundation for the Improvement of Education, with additional support from Horace Mann Educators Corporation and I CAN Learn® Education Systems. As KEA’s honored recipient, Fleming received $1,000 and a commemorative plaque and will represent KEA at the annual NEA Foundation’s Salute to Excellence in Education Gala in Washington next February. As KEA’s Teacher of the Year, Fleming will be awarded the California Casualty Award for Teaching Excellence, and be nominated for the NEA Foundation’s highest honor, the NEA Member Benefits Award for Teaching Excellence.

Frankie Langdon is KEA’s 2018 ESP of the Year

NEA ESP Director at Large Matthew Powell, of Graves County, and Stephanie Winkler, the KEA President, presented the 2018 KEA ESP of the Year Award to Frankie Langdon, President of Fayette County ESPA, at the 145th KEA Delegate Assembly April 5 in Louisville.

Frankie Langdon, a Media Specialist for the Fayette County Schools and President of Fayette County Education Support Professionals Association (FCESPA), is KEA’s 2018 Education Support Professional of the Year. Langdon has worked in Fayette County as a paraeducator and media specialist since 1995. She was elected president of FCESPA in 2014 and immediately led a successful effort to prevent Fayette County from privatizing its custodial jobs. She also represents ESPs on the Kentucky Group Health Insurance Board. During negotiations with former Fayette County Superintendent Tom Shelton and other school district officials, Langdon displayed a gift for

developing relationships and building consensus. She now serves on the FCPS custodial task force, along with the school district’s chief operating officer and its principals. Langdon has been especially active in promoting membership growth in FCESPA. She established the association’s first online presence and created a new network of association representatives and new committees to address local priority issues. As KEA’s ESP of the Year, Langdon received $1,000 and automatically is nominated for the 2018 NEA Education Support Professional of the Year Award, which will be presented in March, 2018 at the NEA ESP Conference.

Robin Brown re-elected NEA Director; Lucretia Starnes elected new Ethnic Minority Director Delegates to the 145th KEA Delegate Assembly in Louisville re-elected Robin Brown, a second grade teacher at Murray Elementary School in the Murray Independent School District, to one of KEA’s two seats on the NEA Board of Directors. Brown, who has been a KEA member since he began his teaching career 21 years ago, was first elected by the KEA Board of Directors to fill an unexpired term. He has now won election to a full three-year term of his own. Brown previously served as an association representative, and as president

of Murray EA. He has represented First District on the KEA Compliance/ Constitution Committee since 2010. Delegates also elected Lucretia Starnes, a teacher at Bardstown High School, to the position of Ethnic Minority Director at Large on the KEA Board of Directors. Teaching is a second career for Starnes, who earned her teaching certificate from the University of Louisville in 2009 and has taught at BHS since 2010. Starnes has Master’s Degrees in Special Education and Organizational Leadership and is working on a Master’s in Business Administration.

KEA Retired honors former House Speaker Jody Richards

KEA Retired member Brenda McGown presents to former House Speaker Jody Richards the KEA-R Award for Distinguished Service to Public Education.

At its annual meeting in Louisville on April 5, KEA Retired presented an award to former House Speaker Jody Richards for distinguished service to public education. The Bowling Green Democrat, who has represented Kentucky’s 20th House District for more than 40 years, has long been a passionate advocate for public education. Richards, who first ran in 1975 and was the longest-serving Speaker of the House (1995-2009) in the state’s history, said “The reason I ran was to try to do what I could to help education in this Commonwealth. I want to provide the very best education for all students in Kentucky.” Richards was particularly outspoken

Kentucky Education Association

during the March 3 House floor debate on charter schools. Prior to the award presentation, KEA-R members watched a video of that speech, which concluded with Richards’ colleagues giving him a standing ovation. Tom Denton, President of KEA Retired and a former vice president of KEA, said, “Throughout my 37 years of association history there has been one constant, one force in Frankfort that we knew we could rely on: Representative Jody Richards’ unwavering support for public education. He has been and continues to be a champion for students, families and public school employees.”

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The 2016-2017 class of KEA Fellows ‘graduated’ at DA 145; Apply for 2017-2018 class at KEA.org after May 18 KEA President Stephanie Winkler and former KEA Vice President Lisa Petrey-Kirk created the KEA Fellows Program in 2013 to foster and mentor emerging leaders in the Association. Fellows are mentored by members of the KEA Executive Committee and are immersed in learning the duties and

responsibilities of KEA leadership. During their year in the program Fellows attend local, state, and national association events in order to study leadership styles, and they have opportunities to foster and develop those styles. The KEA Fellows Class of 2016-17 is the fourth Fellows class and, like the others, they had their “graduation” at the Delegate Assembly. KEA President Stephanie Winkler introduced the group and, after each member of the class spoke, they offered the delegates a PowerPoint presentation on their experiences. Becoming a KEA Fellow involves a commitment not only of spirit but of time. Go to KEA.org after May 18 to download the application for the 2017-2018 Fellows class. You’ll find it under the “members” tab. The 2016-2017 KEA Fellows are, starting with the front row, from left to right: Denise Gray, Fayette County; Brooke Rudd, Marshall County; Martha Reasoner, Todd County; Diane Poindexter, Cumberland County; Emily Shell, Fayette County; Carrie Caples, Christian County; and Misha Hall, Letcher County. In the back row are: Skylar Nunley, Student Program President-Elect; Elizabeth Waymeyer, Covington Independent; Michael Robinson, Hardin County; Leanna Hammons, Knox County; and Freddie Napier, Pike County. Not pictured is Sue Sweeny, of Owen County, who was unable to attend the assembly.

Four 2017 Dodson-Perkins scholarship winners introduced at DA The KEA MOVE Committee is responsible for selecting the winners of the Marvin DodsonCarl Perkins Scholarships each year. MOVE Committee Chair Jessica Page presented scholarship award checks to four of the recipients on April 6 at the 2017 KEA Delegate Assembly in Louisville. Honored at the DA were: Jeff Eddy, Destini Baker and Shaleigha Richard of Kentucky State University; and Ava Herms of Eastern Kentucky University. The five other winners were student teaching and could not be present to accept their awards in person. They are: Alexandria Miller, Transylvania University;

KEA NEWS

Volume 53, Issue 4 May 2017 Stephanie Winkler President Eddie Campbell Vice President Mary Ruble Executive Director Charles Main Editor Periodical postage paid at Williamsport, PA. KEA News is published four times a year, in September, November, March and May, by the Kentucky Education Association, 401 Capitol Avenue, Frankfort, KY 40601. Phone 800-231-4532. KEA News is the official publi­ cation of KEA and reaches all KEA members. The annual subscription rate to members is $1.50, included in annual dues. The subscription rate to others is $5. ISSN 0164-3959 Postmaster: Send address changes to KEA News, 401 Capitol Avenue Frankfort, KY 40601

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Alexis Shelburne, Georgetown College; Abbi Rogers, Murray State University at Madisonville; and Megan Thomas and Michael Westerman, Murray State University at Hopkinsville. The Dodson-Perkins scholarships are given to members of the KEA Student Program who are juniors, seniors, MAT candidates or post baccalaureate students seeking a first-time teaching endorsement in a Kentucky college or university. KEA considers these scholarships to be an investment in the future of the teaching profession in the Commonwealth. Many past recipients of the Dodson-Perkins scholarship awards have gone on to become KEA leaders at the local, district and state Association levels.

Four winners of the 2017 Dodson-Perkins KEA Scholarships received their award checks from MOVE Committee Chair Jessica Page (in center, in the picture above) at the 145th KEA Delegate Assembly April 6 in Louisville. They are (left to right, above) Jeff Eddy, Destini Baker and Shaleigha Richard, Kentucky State University; and Ava Herms, of Eastern Kentucky University.

Meet the new leaders of the KEA SP

The KEA Student Program’s new officers for the 2017-2018 school year are (from left to right): Skylar Nunley, Murray State University Paducah Campus, President; Cameo Kendrick, University of Kentucky, Ethnic Minority Representative; Daniel Brunston, West Kentucky CTC, Political Action & Information Chair; Shaleigha Richard, Kentucky State University, Secretary/Historian; Michael Weaver, KSU, PresidentElect; and Brook Bell, Eastern Kentucky University, Outreach Chair. Kendrick, Brunston, Richard, Weaver and Bell were elected last month at the KEA SP State Student Assembly in Lexington. Nunley was elected PresidentElect at the 2016 Assembly.

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Weaver will serve in that capacity in the coming year and then as President in the 20182019 school year.

Kentucky Education Association


4 Registration is Open for KEA’s 2017 Local Presidents+Next Generation Leaders Like any member organization, the health and vitality of KEA depends on the engagement of its members and on the strength and vision of its leaders. This is especially true at the local level, where good leaders know the most important thing they will ever do is identify and prepare their replacements. That’s why KEA is offering the 2017 Local Presidents + Next Generation Leaders training event July 16-17-18 at the Clarion Hotel, 1950 Newtown Pike, in Lexington. 2017 Local Presidents + Next Generation Leaders combines the best of KEA’s highly successful Local Presidents Training and Emerging Leaders Training. Everything about this conference is designed to help local association presidents build and maintain the strongest possible local association for your members—one that will thrive and succeed long after we retire. KEA President Stephanie Winkler and Vice President Eddie Campbell urge ALL local presidents to attend this training, and to bring along another local member who has the interest, vision and energy necessary to be the “next generation” leader in the local. Training components and sessions will be based on the NEA Leadership Competencies: advocacy; business; communication; governance and leadership; leading our professions; and organizing. These competencies are a

vehicle to support continuous learning and are intended to be broadly applicable across the organization for KEA and its members. The competencies support the notion that leadership development is a journey, not an event. This conference will provide tools necessary to create and maintain a strong local. Michelle Porter, of Green County EA, who attended Local President’s training last year, said, “I’ve been involved in leadership at different levels for years, but there is just so much to do to keep a local strong. The KEA training is invaluable. I’ll be there again this year.” Lisa Poor, of Campbell County EA, said “It was like whoever planned the sessions read my mind! I learned something extremely valuable at each one. My folder was crammed with tips and notes by the time we were finished. So many questions were answered right away. And when the more experienced presidents in the sessions identified the newbies, like me, they completely geared the session toward our specific situations, such as how big our locals were, our relationships with our boards of education, our goals,

and so on. I also benefited by just meeting other presidents and networking. I became more acquainted with the other locals in my region, and we were able to share information,” Poor added. KEA will provide two nights’ lodging (on the 16th and 17th) for all participants, as well as breakfast and lunch on the 17th and 18th. KEA will not pay mileage or for evening meals for participants, but is encouraging locals and districts associations to do so. Register now at www.KEA.org. (This conference is limited to the local president and one additional member from the local.)

USDOE budget proposed by Trump takes public school spending back to pre-NCLB levels The budget proposal for Fiscal Year 2018 that President Donald Trump released in March includes devastating cuts to U.S. Department of Education funding. Trump’s budget slashes funding by $9 billion (a 13.5% cut) which would set education funding (excluding Pell Grants) back to pre-2002 levels—in other words, before the passage of No Child Left Behind. While the initial budget offering leaves out many details, the details that were offered with the President’s budget proposal included many that seem intended to undermine public education. Specifically, the plan adds: $1.4 billion for “school choice,” with plans to ramp up to $20 billion over time; $1 billion for Title I portability; $250 million for a new private school voucher program; and a $168 million increase for charter schools.

Meanwhile, the budget eliminates the supporting effective instruction teacher training state grant program (Title II), after-school programs, and student grant aid. It also

crush the dreams of students and deprive millions of opportunities. “Educators believe a great public education is critical to ensuring student opportunity and success. Sadly, the Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos scheme to take taxpayer dollars from public schools to fund private school vouchers is misguided and cuts Pell Grant funding, TRIO, would harm our students. GEAR UP, and work student Vouchers do not work, they aid. undermine accountability to NEA President Lily Eskelsen parents and taxpayers, and Garcia released the following they have failed to provide statement on President Trump’s opportunity to all of our budget proposal: students. “The priorities Donald Trump “More to the point, the Trumpoutlined in his budget are DeVos budget would take an reckless and wrong for ax to important education students and families. If programs for students, enacted, the Trump budget will including eliminating after-

Kentucky Education Association

May 2017

school programs, and other student enrichment programs. In real life, these cuts mean students are robbed of the tools and supports they need to get ahead. “Trump’s budget also undermines our core values by depleting public education while wasting taxpayer money to implement his discriminatory and hateful anti-immigrant agenda. “America and our students deserve better. The purpose of investing in public education is to help level the playing field so that children in every ZIP code receive an adequate and equitable education. Regardless, educators will continue to stand up for all students and for the promise of public education. And we expect most members of Congress will agree.”

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California Casualty awards $1000 athletics grants to two Kentucky public schools

Kentucky teachers set another new national participation record with 2017 TELL Kentucky Survey Kentucky teachers set a new TELL Survey participation record again this year. More than 41,500 teachers and other school– based certified staff went online to take the survey, giving Kentucky a completion rate of 90.95 percent and breaking the old national record of 89.3 percent, which Kentucky set in 2015. The TELL Kentucky Survey is designed to gather a broad array of information from teachers, counselors, principals and other administrators about the working conditions in their schools. The survey includes questions on the adequacy of facilities and resources; use of school time; teacher empowerment and school leadership; community support; student conduct; professional development; mentoring and induction services; and student learning. The half-hour, web-based survey is voluntary, anonymous and confidential. This is the fourth time educators in Kentucky have taken the survey since 2011. As an incentive for educators to participate May 2017

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in the TELL Kentucky Survey, the Tell Kentucky Coalition again conducted cash drawings every week during the survey period. Once a school reached the 50 percent participation threshold the name of the school was entered into the drawing for a $500 school prize. When 100 percent of teachers and other certified staff in a school completed the survey all of their names went into the pool for individual $500 cash prizes. No public funds were used for the incentive drawings. KEA, the Kentucky Association of School Superintendents, the Kentucky Association of School Administrators, the Center for Education Leadership, Jefferson County Teachers Association and the Kentucky School Boards Association each contributed a share of the prize money. The survey data will be available at TELLKentucky.org in early June. Reports will be tabulated for each district and for each school at which more than fifty percent of certified staff completed the survey.

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Student athletes at Lexington Traditional Magnet School and at Moore Traditional School in Jefferson County will enjoy a competitive edge thanks to a California Casualty Thomas R. Brown Athletics Grant. The schools each received $1,000 and are among 79 public middle and high schools in 33 states awarded a total of $83,000 to aid athletic departments affected by tight budgets. Tanya Rigsby, who is the California Casualty Representative for Kentucky, announced the awards at the 145th KEA Delegate Assembly April 7 in Louisville. The grant is named after California Casualty Chairman Emeritus Thomas R. Brown, an avid sportsman who believes in helping more students learn valuable lessons of teamwork and confidence. Since its inception in 2011, more than $580,000 has been awarded to schools across the nation. The California Casualty grant will pay for new practice uniforms for the girls’ basketball team at Lexington Traditional Magnet School. Moore Traditional School will use the funds to purchase uniforms for the boys and girls soccer teams. “California Casualty has been supporting educators for more than 65 years, and we understand the correlation between participation in sports and higher performance in the classroom,” said Doug Goldberg, Senior Vice President. If your school needs help with funding for an athletic team or teams, you can apply for a grant in next year’s cycle. Applications for the 2017/2018 California Casualty Thomas R. Brown Athletics Grants are now being taken at www. calcasathleticsgrant.com. The deadline for applications is January 15, 2018. California Casualty offers insurance to KEA members at competitive rates through the KEA Auto & Home Insurance Program. You can find out more at KEA.org, under the “members” tab.

Kentucky Education Association


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Based on discussions that occurred during the 2017 regular session and public statements that have since been made, it appears Governor Bevin plans to call a special session some time later this year. Although the timing is still unknown, the focus of the special session will

A defined benefit pension guarantees you a consistent monthly income for the rest of your life after your working days are over. It provides the financial security you deserve after a lifetime of hard work. Defined benefit pensions are the most cost effective way to allow teachers, firefighters, nurses, librarians and other public servants to retire with dignity.

be pension and tax reform. There is particular concern over the unfunded liabilities of the pension systems in which most public school employees participate, and on which they will depend when they retire. The remedy most often suggested by the administration is to move public

employees from the current defined benefit plans to a defined contribution plan, such as a 401 (K). KEA will support a reasonable and sustained legislative effort to pay down the unfunded liabilities in these systems. However, we cannot support eliminating the defined benefit for school employees. Here’s why:

Defined benefit pensions offer low fees, asset diversification, longevity risk pooling, and professional management. Because of these advantages, pensions are able to provide equivalent benefits for about half the cost of 401(k)-style defined contribution plans. Moving from pensions to 401(k) style plans benefits Wall Street, but hurts workers and taxpayers. In states

that have moved public employees to 401(k) style plans, costs have increased—damaging state budgets and costing taxpayers—and benefits for employees have dropped. The only winners have been Wall Street executives, the same people who tried to privatize Social Security, who profit from the high fees associated with 401(k) style plans.

It’s about fairness. Most public employees contribute a portion of their salary to their pension–and they never miss a payment. It’s not fair for politicians to rewrite the rules and jeopardize the retirement security of thousands of Kentucky public employees and retirees. Pensions are rebounding. Public pension funds are returning to healthy funding levels following the Wall Street crash of 2008. According to a fall 2014 Wilshire Consulting report, the average funding ratio across all public pension plans in FY 2013 was 75%, up from 65% in FY 2009. And researchers at the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College project funding levels will be as high as 80.5% by 2018. Pension benefits are modest. The average public employee earns $25,000 annually in retirement. Thirty percent of public employees, including Kentucky teachers, do not earn Social Security. A recent study by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee revealed that

Kentucky Education Association

state workers earned 12 percent less than comparable private sector workers between 2000 and 2008. “Public workers get lower pay than private-company employees even when benefits are included,” Bloomberg reported. “Total compensation is 6.8 percent lower for state employees and 7.4 percent less for local workers [and] the pay gap is widening.” Pensions benefit the local economy, spurring growth and development. Every dollar paid in pension benefits supports $1.98 in economic activity. That translates to 6.2 million American jobs and nearly $307 billion in labor income.4 Kentucky public employees should not lose their life savings because some Kentucky legislatures did not consistently pay the full employer contribution to pensions. Instead of cutting pensions by a few thousand dollars for hard-working teachers, firefighters, nurses and others, we should eliminate special tax breaks for the wealthy and big corporations.

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7 Final campaign spending reports for candidates in the 2017 KEA elections

KEA members who run for state association office are required to submit reports of their campaigns’ income and expenses within 60 days of the election. The KEA constitution requires that those reports be printed in KEA News. Campaign rules allow a candidate up to $2,500 in direct expenses (such as for printing, postage and campaign supplies). Candidates may spend more than that on travel for their campaigns but most report the cost of that travel, at 53.5 cents per mile. Candidates may accept cash and in-kind contributions but must list each separately. In the elections held in April at the KEA Delegate Assembly, there were two candidates for NEA Director, and one candidate for KEA Ethnic Minority Director at Large. Lakilia Bedeau, Candidate for NEA Director Revenue: $ 1,046.82 Expenses: $ 1,046.82 Travel: $ 00.00 In-Kind donations: $ 262.00 Robin Brown, Candidate for NEA Director Revenue: $ 1,150.00 Expenses: $ 191.63 Travel: $ 2,888.25 In-Kind donations: $ 1,245.00 Lucretia Starnes, Candidate for KEA Ethnic Minority Director at Large Revenue: $ 00.00 Expenses: $ 00.00 Travel: $ 65.30 In-Kind donations: $ 00.00

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Kentucky Education Association


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KEA News volume 53, issue 4 - May 2017  

The final issue of KEA News for the 2016-2017 school year includes a complete rundown of the most important school-related bills approved by...

KEA News volume 53, issue 4 - May 2017  

The final issue of KEA News for the 2016-2017 school year includes a complete rundown of the most important school-related bills approved by...

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