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Kimberly Connell Architectural Work Sample


“The reality of architecture is the concrete body in which forms, volumes, and spaces come into being. There are no ideas except in things.� -Peter Zumthor, Thinking Architecture


SELECTED WORKS

6

Ritual Consciousness | Rural Guest House

12

Variegated Permeations | Sarasota Interpretive Center

18

Interlaced Morphologies | Edge Adaptations for St. Augustine

24

Permutated Ecologies | Reforming the Edge of St. Petersburg

30

Implied Erosions | St. Petersburg Artist’s Center

40

Special Collections Pavilion | Reading Room Addition

44

Leedy Office | Understanding Florida Modernism

48

Photographic Investigations of Place


Ritual Consciousness | Rural Guest House Graduate Florida House Seminar- Spring 2013 Critic- Martin Gundersen Site- Belleview, Florida

The guest house assumes a posture of respect for the exterior and is elevated, generating a dialog with the surrounding landscape. Slide panel windows allow the guest house to open almost completely to the outside, allowing for the full blurring between the borders of inside and outside within the main living space. 6

The guest house is situated in a pasture bordering the main house and adapts to its surrounding through two volumes organized in a linear distribution that define the usage areas and programs. The first volume is where all daytime activities happen: the entrance, kitchen, and living room, whereas the second volume contains the private functions--the bedroom and bathroom.


7


These nested pockets of space are organized beneath a sweeping canopy that pulls its inspiration from the oak canopy bordering it. Creating a place of refuge from the sun, the canopy was folded along the northern edge to bring people into the home and project views out of the living space into the pastures beyond. The process of pinching and manipulating the surface also allows for a view back to the main house, as well. The canopy was lifted more to allow for the addition of an elevated reading nook, located on top of the main living space, this elevated portion encourages investigation and crafts a different spatial condition to experience within the home.

8

Projecting Folds Lines


Folding of Edges for View

Finalized Roof Plane

9

Overhead

Nested Boxes


10

4

3

1

2

Ground Floor Plan 1 2 3 4 5

Bedroom Kitchen Living Room Screen Porch Reading Nook

6

Elevated Living


The area connecting the two volumes is articulated by means of a screen porch that project the extents of the main living space. The Western wall harbors a fire place that organizes the interior and exterior living space--relating back to the campfires of my childhood--and effectively centers the home around the hearth. 11

5

6

Second Floor Plan


Variegated Permeations | Sarasota Interpretive Center Advanced Graduate Studio I- Fall 2012 Critic- Martin Gold Site- Sarasota, Florida

12

A concern for nature and the emphasis of human dependency on the natural environment, in the form of water, light, and sky became the defining characteristics of investigation for the construct. The spaces orient to the outside as though in a state of architectural meditation emphasizing the sense of time—ultimately crafting a composition in which a feeling of transience or the passing of time is a part of the spatial experience. Thusly, both time and space must be shaped in such a way as to provide man a dwelling place, which ultimately must address an understanding and engagement with the entire body.


13


14


A horizontal screening system wraps the outer volumes of the center and filters views into the landscape. The spaces are pulled beneath a large canopy that extends the internal space of the Interpretive center out into the landscape--providing shade for visitors and encouraging the movement of exhibits to the outside exhibit garden. The overhead was altered to allow for filtering of light over the main entry hall and circulation space, while the cutouts allow for a pulling down of light into the space--creating garden spaces that are viewable from within the office spaces.

15


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Entry Foyer Past Exhibit Hall Exterior Exhibit Storage Restrooms Mechanical Room Cafe and Bookstore Event Kitchen Interior Courtyard

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

Auditorium Projection Room Future Exhibit Hall Offices Director’s Office Manager’s Office Conference Room Copy Room Employee Lounge

16

5

5

6

3 2

7 1

9

8

Ground Floor Plan


17

14 12

13 15 16

18 17

11

10

Second Floor Plan


Interlaced Morphologies | Edge Adaptations for St. Augustine Advanced Graduate Studio II- Spring 2013 Critic- Nancy Clark and Martha Kohen Site- St. Augustine, Florida

18

St. Augustine, with its historic significance represents an opportunity to deploy new development strategies that rethink the interplay between land and water. The leadership and City Administration of St. Augustine have propsed that the new city should promote walkability and encourage a new connection with the urban waterfront. The proposed site extends into historic King Street and remakes the entire Eastern coastline of the city. The city currently has a developement approved for the site following the regulations set forth in the Comprehensive Plan for 2030; however, there are limited strategies to combat a growing concern of sea level rise. Given the desire to increase pedestrian activity and encourage the redevelopment and growth of St. Augustine, the site was selected to act as a catalyst for the city--promoting new ideas for the ecological system.


19


Current Coast Condition 20


+ 1 ft

+ 3 ft

+ 6 ft 21

Focusing on the responsive integration of landscape and urban form, this project proposes a new vision for the historic district. Based on the study of projected sea level rise and the city’s desire for the redevelopment of blighted areas, new critical infrastructural systems are deployed, spawning new landscape typologies and urban organizations that are suited for the area. Overall, the proposal sought to create an urban datum that connects three primary systems: water, parks, and the built environment. Emphasizing the idea of contact with the water both in a visual sense, as well as a physical sense, varying degrees of contact occur with the water’s edge, dependent on where along the datum occupants begin to move through.


22


23

The project proposal integrates both soft and hard barrier systems to provide St. Augustine with a new urban water defense system. The usage of soft barriers will allow for more personal interaction with the water through the usage of constructed piers, which is currently not possible along the waterfront. It will also encourage the development of programmatic pieces along the waterfront—turning it from strictly a promenade to walk along, into a promenade with destination points.


Permutated Ecologies| Reforming the Edge of St. Petersburg Advanced Graduate Studio 3- Fall 2013 Critic- Stephen Belton Site- St. Petersburg, Florida Group Members: D. Cardenas, M. Cortes, T. Howard, Z. Mendieta

24

Focusing on the responsive integration of landscape and urban form, this project proposes a new vision for the city of St. Petersburg, Florida. Based on the study of edge typologies within the city, as well as an alaysis of the urban fabric, a new landscape typology for the city and urban organizations that are suited to the artistic culture which culminates near the projected site. The proposed site is charged politically due to its location near the St. Petersburg Pier, but also benefits from a strong connection to other art institutes within the city fabric. Currently, the city is very susceptible to flooding from storm surges, or even the slightest change in sea level. This promotes the notion that the edge condition must be altered to somehow account for this eventuality, and use it as a means of charging the experiential qualities along the coastline. The current usage of hard barriers marks the water’s edge as a highly underutilized condition.


25

Early Site Speculations


B

A

26

Docks

Sculpture Landscape

Transportation Hub

Art Center Exterior Gallery

Art Center Interior Gallery

Art Center Lecture Halls + Classrooms

Marketplace

Urban Scul Constructe

Constructed Water Features

Vehicular Access

Exterior Reprogrammable Marketplace

Constructed Water Feature


Constructed Water Features

Exterior Reprogrammable Marketplace

Constructed Landscape

Marketplace

Pedestrian Docks

es

Waterfront Pavilions

lpture Park + ed Green Areas

27

Constructed Landscape

Waterfront Pavillions

Constructed Tide-Dependent Waterfront


28

10

9

3

1

2

4

8 5 6

7


29

Uplands Master Plan 1 Sculpture Garden 2 Art Center 3 Waterfront Promenade 4 Amphitheater 5 Urban Sculpture Park 6 Market Plaza 7 Transportation Hub 8 Market 9 Outdoor Pavilions 10 Sunken Garden


Implied Erosions| St. Petersburg Artist’s Center Advanced Graduate Studio 3- Fall 2013 Critic- Stephen Belton Site- St. Petersburg, Florida

30

The development of the Art Center within St. Petersburg is meant to act as a public anchor for the Uplands that would help to draw people to the site. The process began by assembling a series of collages that investigated the varying relationships that arise between ideas present within screen printing and the print press process. A series of words were chosen as the spatial drivers to initate a spatial dialogue between concept and construct. abrade (verb): to wear off or down by scraping or rubbing ganging (verb): combining of two or more different printing projects on the same sheet of paper kerning (verb): the adjusting (narrowing) of space between two letters so they take up less space on a page


31


32


33

The construct draws its name from an implication of eroding volumes and materials layers that pull apart from one another to formalize the spatial makeup. These relationships spill out into the landscape, creating a series of striations that pull through the construct and change the orientation of occupants as they progress through the ground floor. Low lying walls and subtle ground shifts extend the alignments of volumes outwards to interlock the construct and landscape to further emphasize their integration.


34

1

4

5

7 3 2 6

Ground Floor Plan


Between the lines that pull out into the landscape, various sculptures are integrated into the landscape to achieve an active and engaging sculpture center. This orientation into the landscape achieved by the ground floor, shifts into a series of volumes that pull upwards to form the second floor programmatics spaces that are more enclosed, allowing for a contrasting feeling of looking in.

35

8

10

10

10

9

11 12

1 2 3 4 5 6

Entry from Street Gallery Walk Gallery Garden Market Cafe

7 Sculpture Garden 8 Lecture Hall 9 Student Gallery 10 Classrooms 11 Offices 12 Conference Room


36


37

Within the construct lies an implication of eroding volumes and layers that begin to peel apart from one another to formalize the spatial makeup. These relationships spill out into the landscape developing a series of striations that pull through the construct and change the orientation of occupants.


38


39


Typical Mullion

47'-6 3/16"

An addition to the Gainesville City Library, the Special Collections Pavilion consists of an opaque volume that is intersected by smaller transparent volumes that pull the interior spaces out into the landscape. A small garden links the library and pavilion together, creating opportunities for intimate external gathering spaces. Utilizing basic code research, explorations into product specifications, and the production of construction documents, this collaborative project focused on the development of a working set of architectural drawings aimed at facilitating an understanding of materials and how architectural joints are constructed between them.

46'-4 9/16"

Special Collections Pavilion

20'-3 1/2"

6'-0"

EXISTING BUILDING SPECIAL COLLECTIONS PAVILION 33'-11 5/16"

-0’-3”

-0’-3”

17'-7 9/16"

78'-3 1/8"

59'-8 7/16"

T.O. FINISHED FLOOR 0’-0”

6'-8"

14'-0"

10'-10"

10'-10"

8'-0"

6'-10 7/16"

12'-0"

21'-4 7/16"

1/4"

1/4"

21'-4 7/16"

21'-4 7/16"

36'-0

36'-0"

"

10'-11 11/16"

21'-4 7/16"

'-2

'-2 R11

R11

18'-0 "

6'-0"

11TH STREET

6'-10 7/16"

12TH STREET

R11'

-2

N

R11'

-2

1/4"

7'-5 13/16"

1/4"

REVISIONS:

7'-5 13/16"

-0’-8”

14'-0 15/16"

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CMC ARCHITECTS

Project Benchmark Marked Elevation=124.8’

Gainesville, Florida 32611

Materials and Methods II- Spring 2012 Critic- Mark McGlothlin Site- Gainesville, Florida Group Members: D. Cardenas, Z. Mendieta

Studio 414 Architecture Building Inner Road

Special Collections Pavilion| Reading Room Addition

02-14-2012 03-13-2012 03-23-2012

Drawn By: D. Cardenas, K. Connell, Z. Mendieta LEGEND

Checked By: Prof. McGlothlin

Concrete pavers

Site Plan

Grass

Scale: 1/16" = 1'-0"

Water

G1.01

Florida Privet Dogwood

Site Plan

1

1/16"=1'-0"

Green Ash

G1.01

DATE : March 13, 2012

2 A2.01

2 A3.01 19'-6 1/2"

18'-4"

18'-4"

18'-4"

18'-7 1/2"

Typical Column O.C.

93'-2 1/2" 59'-8"

6" 9'-1"

18'-6 1/2"

Men's Restroom 108

1'-0"

1'-6"

21'-0 1/2"

7'-4 1/2"

3'-0"

2 A2.02 1'-0"

8"

8"

6'-10 1/2"

7'-0" Typical Mullion O.C.

12'-11"

3'-11"

7'-5"

6'-6 1/2"

1

3'-8 1/2"

4'-5 1/2"

4

Computer Terminal 109 57'-0"

10'-0 1/2"

1'-6"

Informal Reading 110

3'-0"

T.O. Finished Floor 0’-0”

6"

Janitor's Closet 105

20'-7"

1

11'-11"

57'-0"

1 A3.01

6'-4 1/2"

A5.03

38'-10"

21'-6 1/2"

1 A2.02

3'-0"

12'-6 1/2"

21'-0"

20'-10"

6" 18'-6 1/2"

Women's Restroom 107

6'-6"

6" 10'-0 1/2"

Mechanical Room 106

1'-0"

19'-0 1/2"

9'-1"

19'-7 1/2"

10'-10 1/2"

19'-6 1/2"

3'-0"

11'-0 1/2"

13'-11"

Book Stack Area 103

Reference Tables 102 3'-11"

32'-5 1/2"

32'-5 1/2"

3'-0"

1

Storage Room 104

5'-8"

15'-7"

16'-0 1/2"

Circulation Desk 101

8"

D

11'-0 1/2"

53'-1 1/2"

4'-3"

6'-0"

4'-0 1/2"

7'-0"

7'-0"

1'-0"

Typical Mullion O.C.

64'-2"

14'-3 1/2"

14'-9"

D D C

C P

L

S 1 A2.01

Site Plan

1/16"=1'-0"

1 G1.01

Ground Floor

A

D


2 A3.01

59'-8"

19'-8"

18'-3"

18'-4"

12'-6 1/2"

21'-0"

8" 17'-7 1/2"

30'-4 1/2"

1'-0"

11'-0 1/2"

Studio 414 Architecture Building Inner Road

CMC ARCHITECTS

41

10'-0 1/2"

T.O. PARAPET 16’-2”

7'-0"

7'-0" 10'-2 1/2"

7'-4 1/2"

1'-0"

12'-11"

7"

4'-0"

11'-7 1/2" 44'-9"

5'-9"

8"

10'-10"

Terrace 112

Guardrail 20'-7"

57'-0"

1 A3.01

7'-0"

7'-5"

46'-2"

7'-0"

6'-0"

21'-1 1/2"

Open to Below

Mezzanine 111

K

T.O. FINISHED FLOOR 13’-0”

12'-3"

15'-7"

T.O. FINISHED FLOOR 0’-0”

Special Collections Pavilion

4'-5 1/2"

1'-0"

12" x 12" Concrete Base Roof Paver

N

REVISION

1'-0" 7'-0 1/2"

11'-2" 18'-3"

49'-1 1/2"

10'-1" 60'-3"

7'-0"

7'-0"

1'-0"

14'-9"

93'-2 1/2"

02-14-201 03-13-201 04-23-201 04-30-201

Drawn By: D. Cardenas, K. Connell, Z. Mendiet Checked By: Prof. McGlothlin

Mezzanine P

Scale: 3/16" = 1'-0"

Mezzanine Plan

3/16"=1'-0"

1 A1.02

Mezzanine Plan

A1.0

DATE : April 30, 201


A3.01

20'-7"

15'-7"

T 2

Exposed Wall Finish

111

T.O. Guard 16’-2”

42

T.O. Paver 12’-6”

Reinforced Concrete Tile

107 103

Cross Section

2

18'-2 5/16"

A3.01

18'-4 1/8"

18'-4 1/8"

T.O. Parapet 27’-9”

Aluminum Frame Insulated Glazing

Exposed Wall Finish REFERENCE TABLES 102

CIRCULATION DESK 101

1 A2.02

001

Longitudinal Section


Special Collect

T.O. Parapet 27’-9”

T.O. Guard 16’-2”

Bonding Adhesive

T.O. Parapet 27’-9”

Reinforced Concrete

Lap Sealant

Ballast

Reglet

1/2" Pedestal

REVISIONS:

Metal Sleeve

Sealant

TPO Membrane

02-14-2012 03-13-2012 03-27-2012 04-23-2012

Vapor Barrier

Protection Board

Rigid Insulation Cant

T.O Roof Deck 12’-2”

Vapor Barrier

1 A2.01

Rigid Insulation

Gainesville, Florida 32611

Anchor

Flashing 12" x 12" Concrete Base Paver

Studio 414 Architecture Building Inner Road

Precast Concrete Cap

CMC ARCHITECTS

Splicing Cement

Form Tie

43

T.O. Roof Deck 26’-5”

T.O. Plastic Finished Floor gh Density Bearing Strip 0’-0”

Checked By: High Density Prof. McGlothlin Plastic Bearing Strip

Special Collections Pavilion

Drawn By: Z. Mendieta

Building Sections

Form Tie

A5.01

18'-4 1/16"

3

1 1/2" = 1'-0"

A5.01

Scale: 3/16"=1'-0"

Typical Scupper Detail

A3.01

21'-4 3/16" Precast Concrete Cap

DATE : April 30, 2012

2 "Rigid Insulation Steel Reinforcing

Steel Reinforcing Reinforced Concrete

Water Barrier

Control joint

Reinforced Concrete Column Rigid Insulation

Gravel

Isolation Joint

Screed Finish

Water Barrier

Screed Finish French Drain

Water Barrier REVISIONS: 02-14-2012 03-13-2012 04-23-2012 04-30-2012

T.O. Guard 16’-2”

Drawn By: D. Cardenas, K. Connell, Z. Mendieta

T.O. Paver 12’-6”

Checked By: Prof. McGlothlin

Details

Studio 414 Architecture Building Inner Road

= 1'-0"

Typical Scupper Detail

2

CMC ARCHITECTS

of Detail At Terrace

Scale: Per Drawing

= 1'-0"

5 A5.01

Load Bearing Column To Foundation 1" = 1'-0"

A5.01

6 A5.01

DATE : April 30, 2012

T.O. Finished Floor 0’-0”

s Pavilion

terior Bearing Wall To Foundation

2 A2.02


Leedy Office| Understanding Florida Modernism Florida House- Spring 2013 Critic- Martin Gundersen Site- Winter Haven, Florida Group Members: A. Byars, M. Cortes, Z. Mendieta

44

The semester involved field measuring and photography in an effort to document a series of Florida houses and buildings that express a notion of sustainability and stewardship, which resulted in a series of representational drawings to convey the spatial ideals each construct expressed. The office was designed by Gene Leedy, a founding father of the Sarasota School of Architecture who pioneered innovative work with pre-stressed concrete and the development of long-span “double-tee� beams. His office, located in Winter Haven, employed a walled-in courtyard and sliding glass windows to begin to alter the definitions of spatial boundaries.


45


The focus of the office remains within its own courtyard, completely ignoring any reference to the surrounding context. The importance, instead, is its relationship to a large oak tree situated immediately outside of the bounding wall. 46


47


PHOTOGRAPHIC INVESTIGATIONS OF PLACE

48

Boston, MA--Pavilion


49

According to Heidegger, “existence” requires one to become an interpreter, “to receive and express the existence of particular things” and to further engage in the reinterpretation of information initially perceived (Campbell, 41). The process of interpretation distinguishes the difference between “things” and intentional objects, allowing for the discerning of greater meaning. The importance of this definition of existence is essential in the understanding of Heidegger’s definition of dwelling and the means through which it can be achieved. The act of building exists as a device to help create the environment which nurtures man’s activities; in essence, to build is to define how man is to dwell.


50

Cultural identity must be a response to our “place in the world,� as it and place are images of each other, and thusly, inseparable. The idea of place does not rely solely upon the fact of its physical existence in the world, but on its connectedness with narrative, memory, and ritual—its connection with the establishment of human. The engagement in the practice of architecture organizes past experiences, present actions, and future desires into significance at any given moment. To study architecture is to study the spatial dimension of human existence, and as architects, we are charged with the cultivation of our cultural heritage, to aid in the fostering and maintenance of local cultures as cultural linkages to place expose human necessities and limits, clarifying our inescapable bonds to the earth and to each other.


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52

Shenzhen, China--Entry


53

The notion of dwelling relies upon a system of boundaries with specific characteristics that determine a plane of field in which existence is meant ot take place. This idea implies man’s “place of being” exists between earth and sky--the domain man predominantly occupies and interacts within. Heidegger suggested the primary function of architecture is to “set truth into work” by bringing the “world [into] immediate presence,” where presence “onsists [of[ what [is] gather[ed]” (Norberg-Schulz, 76). Buildings, by this definition, are constructed objects, which gather a world and allow for dwelling. More directly, buildings deliberately define a place with specific features and bring these features into the view of occupants, effectively, establishing the world with a sense of poetic presence in the built environment; in other words, establishing a sense of place in the world.


CURRICULUM VITAE 54

EDUCATION

EXPERIENCE | PEDAGOGY

Master of Architecture University of Florida: Gainesville, FL Expected Graduation: May 2014 Current GPA: 3.95

Graduate Teaching Assistant University of Florida: Gainesville, FL Aug 2012- Present

From Hydrogenerated Urban Environments to Hydro Retrofitting of the Metropolis: The Florida- Sao Paulo Dialogues Spring 2013 Bachelor of Design Majoring in Arch. Minor: History University of Florida: Gainesville, FL May 2012: Summa Cum Laude GPA: 3.75 East Asia Study Abroad Joint Studio with Chongqing University [Beijing, Hong Kong, Chengdu, Chongqing] Summer 2011 Associates of Arts Central Florida Community College: Ocala, FL General Studies: May 2008 GPA: 3.9

Assistant Instructor: Architectural Design II with Tim Beecken for Professor Nina Hofer Spring 2014 Assistant Instructor: Architectural Design I with Melissa Cortes for Professor Lisa Huang Fall 2013 Assistant Instructor: Architectural Design II with Timothy Beecken for Professor Donna Cohen Spring 2013 Assistant Instructor: Architectural Theory II with Paul Stanley for Professor Martin Gundersen Fall 2012 Consultant | School of Architecture Conference Room Redesign University of Florida: Gainesville, FL Jan 2014- Present UF School of Architecture Director Search | Student Representative University of Florida: Gainesville, FL Oct 2013- Mar 2014 Editor | Exhibiting Sarasota University of Florida: Gainesville, FL Spring 2013


AWARDS

PUBLICATIONS | EXHIBITS

SKILLS

AIA Henry Adams Medal University of Florida: Spring 2014

Florida-Sao Paulo Dialogues “Interlaced Morphologies” Spring 2013

Technical Skills MS Office | Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Publisher Rhinosceros 4.0 + 5.0 VRay for Rhino AutoCAD 2013 Adobe | Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator

Master’s Research Design Honor University of Florida: Spring 2014 Graduate Teaching Award University of Florida: Spring 2014 ArchitectureAcademic Achievement University of Florida: Spring 2014 Graduate Teaching Award University of Florida: Spring 2013 Ferendino Endowment University of Florida: Spring 2013 Architecture Design Honor Award University of Florida: Spring 2013 Architecture Academic Achievement University of Florida: Spring 2013

Architrave 20: 2012-2013 “Addressing Inter-City Loss of Density” Spring 2013 NAAB Accreditation Exhibit “Special Collections Pavilion” “Watercube Analysis” “Addressing Inter-City Loss of Density” Spring 2013

Familiar SketchUp and Grasshopper Other Skills Model making, laser cutting software, woodshop machinery, photography

Exhibiting Sarasota “Variegated Permeations” Spring 2013 Architrave 19: 2011-2012 “Hermetic Remnants” “Sensory Promenade” Spring 2011

Mellen C. Greeley Award University of Florida: Spring 2012

Contact: Kimberly Connell 2701 SW 13th ST Apt H05 Gainesville, FL 32608 352.857.0064 kconnell@ufl.edu References: Prof M. Gundersen [margund9@gmail.com] Prof L. Huang [lisahuang@ufl.edu] Director M. Gold [mgold@ufl.edu]

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Architectural Work Sample | Spring 2014  
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