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Volume 1 Issue 4 July 2002

To r Sea each far ou er r s

avelength centrofin@centrofin.gr

CENTRO-NEWS

New buildings

In this issue

On June 11th, 2002 took place the naming ceremony of the second new built 159,000 dwt crude oil tanker (hull nr 5191) at Okpo Shipyard, DAEWOO Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering Co., Ltd in Geoje Island, S.Korea. Her name; "YANNIS P" The Sponsor was Master Yannis D. Procopiou, son of the Chairman of CENTROFIN MANAGEMENT INC. Mr Dimitris & Mrs Mikaela Procopiou. "May God Bless this Ship and All Who Sail on Her". The neophyte joining her other two young sisterships "PANAGIA ARMATA" & "GEORGIOS S" will be awaiting for their fourth one, by next October 2002, which will thus complete the present new-building programme, for this year.

pg2

Intertanko Vocon Operational Procedure pg4

Bridge Resource Management pg6

Criminal Liability

Inspection alert - Warning! USCG is targeting MARPOL issues Applicability: All ships trading in US waters Information: In addition to routine port state control inspections, the United States Coast Guard (USCG) is focusing heavily on the proper usage of the oily water separator (OWS) The USCG is reviewing all oil record books and other ships' documents to establish whether proper documentation has been maintained and whether false entries are being made, especially in the oil record book. More specifically, current inspections now routinely include checks on: 1)Any discrepancies between the deck log and the oil record logs regard to any discharges noted in the oil record book.

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2)Any discrepancies between the amount of water pumped overboard after going through the OWS and the amount that the pumps could physically pump overboard during the same period, i.e., whether the amount shown in the oil record book is greater than the pump capacity. 3)Whether discharges from sludge tanks to shoreside facilities or barges exceed the pumping capacity of the vessel during the period the sludge oil was being discharged. In the most serious cases USCG has insisted that the pipeline leading from the OWS to the ship's side be removed for closer internal inspection. Requests have also been made to make the overboard sea valve available for examination and owners have in some instances been required to use divers to secure the valve externally, so that it can be removed.

LEADERSHIP "Leadership is the art of accomplishing more than the science of management says is possible" by Colin Powell.

"In this issue I would like to shed some light to the ever topic of Leadership, Management and People. Though the contents below come mostly from publications covering the leaders of the world, however, the principles apply to even the smallest grocery shop with only three employees.

The present advanced technology has being assisting the vessels and their crews onboard in their duties of navigation, loading / discharging calculations, meteorology, operation of equipment etc. ...cont'd to pg 8

TO THE MASTER: Please circulate this Bulletin to the CREW.


INTERTANKO VOCON OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE (This procedure is for your information only. Not to be used unless you are explicitly instructed to do so by your Head Office).

Objective To reduce the extent of emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the event that a release of gas pressure is required to be undertaken from the cargo tanks on board a crude oil tanker during her voyage.

A Shipboard Procedure for the Control of Atmospheric Pollution by Volatile Organic Compounds and Reducing Loss of Cargo Who's really important in the organization? Everyone! A sea captain and his chief engineer got into an argument about which one was more important to the ship. Finally they decided to trade places for a day. The chief went up to the bridge and the Captain went down to the engine room. After a few hours, the Captain suddenly appeared on deck, covered with oil and soot. "Chief!" he yelled, wildly waving aloft a monkey wrench. "You'll have to come down here! I can't make her go!" "Of course not!" replied the chief. "We're aground!"

To limit the extent of cargo loss and the impact of these gases/vapours as an air pollutant.

Background When transporting crude oils, particularly at the start of a loaded voyage, a large build up of "gas" pressure can be registered on the Inert Gas pressure gauge either on the vessel's bridge or in cargo control room. This increase in pressure prompts the vessel's command to instigate a controlled release of "gas" either through the vessel's Mast Riser or by opening one of the vessel's P/V Valves. This controlled release is often undertaken when the "gas" pressure within the Inert Gas system approaches the pre-set opening pressure of the vessel's P/V Valves (these valves are normally set at approximately +/-1500 mmWG). Thus, a vessel's command can establish when and what pressure a manually controlled release of pressure becomes necessary for the safe

- pg 2 -

operation of the vessel. However, a vessel's command does not know when or at what pressure a manually controlled release should be stopped. Without this information or guidance, excess cargo vapours can be unnecessarily released to the atmosphere causing a loss of cargo and air pollution. INTERTANKO, Safety, Technical and Environmental Committee (ISTEC) has therefore developed this Operational Procedure that Members of INTERTANKO are invited to consider to implement as a normal routine onboard their vessels that requires no additional equipment other than that currently available onboard a tanker This procedure recognises the presence of the two differing types of "gases" (the Unsaturate gas from the Inert Gas supply and the Saturated Hydrocarbon vapours from the crude oil cargo) present in the vapour system and utilises their differing physical behaviour to determine when the manually controlled release should be stopped in order to avoid the unnecessary release of Hydrocarbon vapours to the atmosphere. To understand the background for this procedure and the physical behaviour of the "gases" present, reference to the INTERTANKO publication "Guidelines for the Control of a Multiphase Crude Oil Cargo for Cargo Operations and

Handling" is recommended. By reference to either Figure 1 or 2, this procedure requires the monitoring and the recording of the pressure drop during a release of gas from the cargo tank vapour system. This can be undertaken with the use of the Inert Gas pressure gauge in the cargo control room or, as available, located on the Inert Gas pipeline on deck. Figure 1 records a typical pressure release drop profile using P/V valve whereas Figure 2 shows a similar profile using the Mast Riser.

The VOCON Procedure (1) Before opening either the Mast Riser or a P/V valve on deck, note the pressure in the Inert Gas pipeline system. (2) Open the pressure release valve and record/monitor the pressure within the Inert Gas pipeline at regular short intervals (every 30 seconds for a Mast Riser release or every minute for a P/V Valve release). Note Undertaking a pressure release through a P/V valve, by manually opening the pressure system on the valve, will supply a greater degree of control of the pressure drop profile throughout the release period due to the smaller pipeline connection to the designated P/V valve. (3)Plot the pressure drop profile and this can be


TO: ALL VESSELS / MASTER FM: CREW DEPT RE: ACCIDENT PREVENTION ONBOARD SHIP AT SEA & PORT

Figure 1: a P/V Valve Release

Figure 2: a Master Riser Release achieved either manually or by use of the Inert Gas Oxygen and Pressure Recorder in the Cargo Control Room but an increase in the Recorder paper feed rate will be required to achieve definition of the plot. (4) When the rate of pressure drop becomes constant (after the initial rapid pressure drop) then the gas release should be stopped and the valve closed. (5)Monitor the Tank Gas Pressure after completion of the controlled release in order to check the final pressure obtained within the Vapour/Inert Gas system.

Advice Notes (A) A review of figures 1 and 2 show a clear change in the rate of pressure drop during the release period. If the gas release continues after this point then the pressure in the Inert Gas system will be quickly restored to the pressure associated with the point where the rate of pressure drop changes (the Red horizontal line on Figures 1 and 2). (B) If there is a Straight line drop of pressure observed and no inflection observed by 800 mm WG, then close the release valve anyway. (C) By reference to the ISGOTT Publication, all safety measures should be taken to minimise the hazards associated with vented gases from the vessel's cargo tank system. Courtecy INTERTANKO

WE REGRET TO ADVISE YOU THAT DURING THE LAST SIX MONTHS WE HAD A COUPLE OF PETTY ACCIDENTS ONBOARD AGAINST THE OWNER'S HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY. AS YOU ARE AWARE THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE NECESSARY DEGREE OF SAFETY CONSCIOUSNESS AND THE ACHIEVEMENT OF HIGH STANDARDS OF SAFETY DEPEND ON FORESIGHT, GOOD ORGANISATION AND THE WHOLEHEARTED SUPPORT OF THE MANAGEMENT AND OF ALL THE SEAFARERS. ACTIVITIES SHOULD BE PLANNED, PREPARED AND UNDERTAKEN SO THAT: (1). DANGERS LIKELY TO ARISE O/B SHIP ARE PREVENTED (2). EXCESSIVELY OR UNNECESSARILY STRENUOUS WORK POSITIONS & MOVEMENT ARE AVOIDED (3). ORGANISATION OF ALL WORK TAKES INTO ACCOUNT THE SAFETY AND HEALTH (4). MATERIALS & PRODUCTS ARE USED SAFELY AND POSE NO DANGER (5). WORKING METHODS ARE EMPLOYED WHICH PROTECT SEAFARERS AGAINST HARMFUL EFFECTS OF CHEMICAL, PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL AGENTS. THE MASTER IS THE PERSON RESPONSIBLE TO IMPLEMENT THE SHIPOWNERS SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY. THE MASTER APPOINTS THE "SAFETY OFFICER" O/B, WHO COULD ALSO BE THE " TRAINING OFFICER" TOO. SEAFARERS SHOULD PARTICIPATE IN ENSURING SAFE WORKING CONDITIONS AND SHOULD BE ENCOURAGED TO EXPRESS THEIR VIEWS ON WORKING PROCEDURES ADOPTED. THE "SAFETY COMMITTEE" MEETINGS IS YOUR PLATFORM AND YOUR CREW'S FORUM TO INFLUENCE SAFETY MATTERS. THE VESSEL'S UPDATED "SAFETY TRAINING" AND THE OTHER RELATED PUBLICATIONS YOUR TOOL. PLEASE REQUEST AND INSTRUCT YOUR OFFICERS AND CREW TO EXERCISE P R U D E N C E AT ALL TIMES. YOU MUST HAVE RECEIVED BY NOW THE THREE FIRST ISSUES OF OUR QUARTERLY BULLETIN "WAVELENGTH" WOULD APPRECIATE YOUR FREE COMMENTS / CREW'S CONTRIBUTION. WE REMAIN AT YOUR DISPOSAL. THE EDITOR

CENTROFIN's football team

Communications Mobile phones acessible to 60% of crew despite rules on safety SIX out of 10 crew interviewed in an Inmarsat survey had access to a mobile phone onboard, despite rules which outlaw the use of any electrical equipment that is not intrinsically safe. The Masters must ensure compliance with existing company / industry regulations. - pg 3 -

Under the guidance of Operator Babbis TRANTAS. When finish kicking the ball they come to the office to rest and exercise their hobby (vessel management). (l to r - back row): Manousakis V. (EDP), Alefragis L. (ACCTS), Moraris A.(TECHN), Soulimiotis L. (ACCTS), Zenebissis N. (ACCTS), Babbis Trantas, (l to r - front row): Stavrakis N.(OPS/BUNKERS), Christopoulos F. (FREIGHT COLL), Madenzis K. (ACCTS), Romanidis Y.(TECHN), Madenzis T. (ACCTS).


Brid Man What are the BRM elements 1.-Error Chain 2.-Situation Awareness 3.-Human Factor 4.-Team Work - Communication The Bridge The Bridge States Optimum - Concerned - Alarmed Bored - Inattentive - Inattentive in a Critical Phase The Factors Workload - Personality - Motivation Experienced - Tiredness - Health Change - External - Technology

Error Chain Dear Captain In our efforts to provide you with more topics, - for you and your Training Officer to use during the 'Onboard-Training' and the 'SafetyMeetings' - please find here below an outline of certain aspects related to the BRM course. These topics collected from various sources are presented below in a brief form for easy reference. Nothing in these guidelines is intended to replace or otherwise contravene the detailed operational instructions issued to you by your owners. Should you find yourself in any degree of doubt as to procedure, please feel free to discuss with us or your operator. As you are aware BRM deals with management in highly operational situations, for example on board ship's bridge, engine room and elsewhere. It is a TEAM Work. It is a fact that the way human beings interact, communicate and make decisions in such situations is quite similar. So management errors are also similar. The base course was developed in the airline industry as a result of a research in which it was showed that most aircraft accidents are caused not by technical errors but by crew management errors.

Examples of such errors are preoccupation with minor technical problems, failure to delegate tasks and assign responsibilities, failure to set priorities, inadequate monitoring, failure to use available data, failure to communicate intent and plans, and failure to detect and challenge deviations from standard operating procedures. Lack of competence is actually a minor reason for accidents BRM's main objective is the team's performance onboard when exposed to critical situations; success will come when they perform as follows: -They have good situation awareness; that is they anticipate each next condition -They obtain relevant information early -They built a shared mental model of the situation -They use cautious, safe strategies, and keep options open as long as possible -Their decisions are realistic and sensitive to constraints -They share workload -They monitor progress by crosschecking each other The Master sets the Tone. The Master sets the principles of communication & briefings.

- pg 4 -

Ambiguity - Uncertainty - Confusion Distraction -Inadequacy Communication Breakdown Lack of Assertiveness (by junior ranks) - Violation of Rules, Regulations and Procedures

Situation Awareness The Human Factor Diversity Leadership Behaviour Stress Team Work - Communications Bridge Organisation under STCW-95 Bridge Watchkeeping under STCW 95 Calling the Master -If restricted visibility is encountered or expected -If traffic conditions or the movements of other ships are causing concern -If difficulties are experienced in maintaining course -On failure to sight land, a navigational mark, or obtain soundings by the expected time -If unexpectedly, land navigation mark is sighted or a change in sounding occurs -On breakdown of the engines, propulsion machinery remote control, steering gear, or any essential

To get the credit, share the credit The ability to toot your own horn without sounding vain can enhance your reputation in any organisation you work for. To avoid boasting, try sharing the credit: Compliment your staff or co-workers on the successful completion of an important project.


dge Resource nagement navigation equipment, alarm or indicator -If the radio equipment malfunctions -In heavy weather, if any doubt about the possibility of weather damage -If the ship meets any hazard to navigation, such as ice or a derelict -In any other emergency "When in doubt" "Ask don't assume" Emergencies & Accidents Types of Emergency: Prepared - Anticipated - Slow Reaction Or Unprepared - Unanticipated - Fast Reaction Demonstrate the ability to move an emergency from the unanticipated, fast reaction type toward the anticipated slow reaction type

Emergencies

' ' ' ' ' ' ' '

Main engine failure Electrical power failure Rudder gear failure Collision Grounding Hull / Construction damage Flooding Fire

' ' ' ' ' '

Pollution Abandon ship Man overboard / Rescue Piracy / terrorism Cargo movement / inclination Death serious injury / illness

bilges and tanks -Determine which way deep water lies, nature of seabed, local currents, tides etc -Reduce draught of the ship -Ship's position available near transmitters. -Update as necessary

Brief Emergency Check List Main engine - electrical power failure -Inform Master -Prepare for anchoring (in shallow waters) -'Not under command' shapes / lights -Sound signalling -Broadcast EMERGENCY to ships in vicinity Steering -Inform engine room -Engage emergency steering -Prepare engines / thrusters for manoeuvering Collision -General alarm -Manoeuver ship to minimise effects of collision -Close watertight doors and automatic fire doors. Sound bilges and tanks -Deck lightning (at night) -VHF Ch 16. Broadcast DISTRESS ALERT/URGENCY message to ships in vicinity -Passengers (if carried) at emergency stations -Ship's position available at GMDSS / radio transmitters. Update as necessary -Check for fire / damage -Offer assistance to other ship Grounding -General emergency alarm -Stop engines, close watertight doors -VHF ch 16. Broadcast DISTRESS ALERT/URGENCYmessage to ships in vicinity -Deck lighting (at night) -Check hull for damage, sound

Flooding -General emergency alarm -Close watertight doors -Sound bilges and tanks -Identify location of incoming water -Cut off electric power running through the area -Shore up area to stem water flow -Check bilge and back up pumps for operation -Ship's position available to transmitters -Broadcast DISTRESS ALERT and Message to ships in vicinity Fire -Sound fire alarm, call master & notify engine room -Close ventilation fans, all doors (fire & watertight) -Notify all onboard fire location -Muster crew, check for missing & injured -Establish communications -Switch on deck lighting (at night) -Assess fire and determine: -Class of fire -Appropriate extinguishing agent & method -How to prevent the spread of fire -Necessary personnel & firefighting methods -Ship's position available to transmitters. Update -Broadcast DISTRESS message to nearby ships Abandon Ship -Broadcast DISTRESS message -Instruct crew to put on adequate and warm clothing, immersion suits if water temperature <16C and lifejackets

- pg 5 -

-Order crew to lifeboat stations. Muster -Prepare to launch lifeboats / life crafts -Ensure that lifeboat sea painters are attached to the ship -Embark all crew in lifeboat/life crafts and launch -Ensure lifeboats/life crafts remain in safe proximity to the ship and in contract with each other Man over board -Release man overboard lifebuoy -Engage hand steering, clear stern from man o/b,commence recovery manoeuvre -Sound three prolonged blasts and repeat. Hoist signal flag 'O' -Post outlook for continuous watch on the man o/b -Note ship's position, wind speed, direction, & time. -Ship's position available to all transmitters (GMDSS etc) -Inform master and engine room -Prepare rescue boat and rig pilot ladder/nets -Distribute VHF radios -Broadcast EMERGENCY message to ships in vicinity Salvage Operations -Salvage plan: work & resource required for restoring watertight envelope, repairing damage, dewatering and re-floating vessel -Information compiled from the internal & underwater surveys -Engineering calculations of ground reaction,freeing force, stability, strength & hydrographic data -Pollution efforts -Results, recommendations and actions from the safety survey


to p u e fac

CRIMINAL LIABILITY We provide below two quick-reference cards containing information and guidelines to the Master, officers and crewmembers of how to initially respond to an inspection or search of their vessel.

RESPONDING TO GOVERNMENT INTERVIEW - YOUR RIGHTS During your employment or afterward a Government Agent or investigator may telephone or approach you without warning attempting to interview you. Regardless of how persuasive and intimidating he may be remember that you have the following fundamental rights:

DEALING WITH A SHORE / GOVERNMENT INVESTIGATION. During the course of serving on board a vessel, it is very likely that the Master, the officers and even the crewmembers will be confronted with some kind of an investigation initiated from a shore authority or government agency. This may be the result of a marine incident (e.g. pollution, collision, etc), some other violation on the part of the vessel, or even a routine investigation in line with a policy of a specific country (for security, drug trafficking, etc). Depending on the vessel's location and the nature of the investigation, the method, severity and depth will be different in each case. A few items are however more or less common to all cases and in this respect the fundamental response of the party under investigation can also be governed by a few standard "rules".

(a).- You have the right to request the Government Agent's identification and to record this information (which you should do). (b).- You have the right to decline the interview or tell the Government Agent to contact you at work the next business day or to tell the Government Agent to submit all questions in writing. (c).- If you consent to an interview, you have the right to: ! confer with an attorney before and/or after the interview, ! choose the time and place of interview, ! answer only selected questions or stop the interview at any time, and ! take notes during (or immediately after) the interview to help you remember its substance

! !

If you choose to answer questions, consider

- pg 6 -

the following:

! ! ! !

You should always be polite and professional You must answer truthfully You should not guess or speculate about matters that you do not personally know to be fact, and should only provide such information as necessary to answer any question.

If the investigation is initiated by, say, a pollution incident which was the result of a marine casualty, such as a collision, grounding, failure of equipment and so on, the Government Agency (e.g. Coast Guard) may conduct a marine casualty investigation to determine the cause of the incident. If this occurs, you may be considered a "party in interest" if your personal conduct is under investigation. In addition to the above rights you are entitled by law as a 'party in interest' to be represented by counsel, to cross-examine witnesses and to call witnesses. For legal advice call your Head Office at once.

RESPONDING TO GOVERNMENT INSPECTIONS & SEARCHES PROCEDURES No matter what government agency involved, when the vessel is boarded, vessel officers should:

Be Professional at All Times. Regardless of the demeanour of the government agents or investigators, always be calm and courteous.


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As politely as possible, obtain as much of the following information as you can: ! the name & title of the lead Government Agent / investigator ! the number of persons in the investigation team, and ! the government agencies that are represented on the team

Contact Proper Company Representatives. Ask the Government Agents or investigators to wait while you contact a company representative to meet with them. If the Government Agents / investigators do not ask for a particular company representative, call immediately the Head Office (your Operator).

Do Not Feel Obligated to Answer All Questions. Provide basic information, but do not feel obligated to answer more probing questions about the vessel, its personnel, or its operations (particularly if there are others more qualified to answer). Do not volunteer information, but always be truthful when answering questions.

Copy Any Warrant. If the Government Agents / investigators offer a search warrant, ask to photocopy it. Immediately fax a copy to the Head Office. (Because of exceptions to the warrant requirements that are applicable to vessels in many circumstances, it is unlikely that the agents will have a warrant. If they do have one, however, remember that the scope of the search must conform with the terms of the warrant).

Accompany and Record. If the Government Agents / investigators do not wait for the shore side management before conducting the search, without interfering, have the vessel officers (and if necessary, crew), accompany the Govern-ment Agents at all times and carefully record all that is said and done concerning every file that is searched or seized. You may be asked where certain items can be found (and you should answer), as well as more substantive questions (which you may decline to answer). Write down all such questions, because they contain useful leads regarding the government's prior sources of information and the focus of their investigation.

Advise Officers & Crewmembers Not to Consent to Broadening of the Search. In instances when a search is being conducted under a search warrant, the warrant determines the

scope of the search. Even if the vessel is boarded without a warrant, in most instances the Government Agents may only search common areas of the vessel (i.e. engine room, bridge, cargo areas etc) and not private cabins or other such areas. Investigators may often ask for permission to search specific areas. Officers & crewmembers must refer the Government Agents to the Master or to the Head Office ashore and not give consent themselves. Always note the areas that are searched, and also note those areas that the Government Agents request permission to search, even if they do not initially search these areas.

Object as Necessary. Object to any aspect of the search or seizure that exceeds the scope outlined in the warrant, if a warrant is used. If the Master or Head Office ashore give permission to search, the scope of the search is limited by the consent given. If the Government Agents persists in searching areas for which you have objected, contact again the company representative or Head Office, continue to object and document (preferably on videotape) how the Government Agent proceeds. (DO NOT attempt to physically prevent from continuing or impede him in any way. This could later result in charges of obstruction of justice).

C.

Identify the Government Agents or Investigators.

M AGE ENT I N AN

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NTROF

QUOTATIONS You cannot depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus. You are in charge of your own attitude--whatever others do or circumstances you face. The only person you can control is yourself....Worry more about your attitude than your aptitude or lineage. What we call evil is simply ignorance bumping its head in the dark No man would listen to you talk if he didn't know his turn was next Try not to become a success, but rather try to become a man of value. Albert Einstein

Request Split Samples and Take Additional Sample.

The only alternative to co-existence is co-destruction

If Government Agents take samples from the vessel (such as the bilge, engine room etc), note the area of the vessel from which the samples were taken and if necessary equipment is available, take videotape or photograph of the investigators as they take any samples. Also request split samples (i.e. part of the sample taken) by the Government Agents by using approved sampling protocols.

Everything can be forgiven except success.

Obtain Inventory of Items and Copies of Documents Seized. The company is entitled to an inventory of all items taken by the investigator, so request a complete inventory. Also while Government Agents are not required to provide copies of documents seized, they often will agree to allow copies to be made.

Request Closure Meeting. The Master should ask to meet with the Government Agents / investigators before they leave the vessel so that you carefully double-check your inventory of items seized, make sure that you have received a split sample of all samples taken, obtain copies of all documents and material seized (if possible) and find out as much about the investigation as possible (i.e. focus, scope etc).

- pg 7 -

Motivational Quotes Work Whatever your life's work is, do it well. A man should do his job so well that the living, the dead, and the unborn could do it no better. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Competition The two common reasons for losing are: not knowing you're competing in the first place, and not knowing with whom you really are competing. Persistence Persistence is what makes the impossible possible, the possible likely, and the likely definite. Bravery Is the capacity to perform properly even when scared half to death


LEADERSHIP

A leader is an agent of change, an inspirer and developer who shows the way forward. A leader must integrate people and ideas by drawing from past and present experience; to show how the future should be shaped. A leader has to bring both colleagues and followers along in a way that is at once pragmatic and meaningful, persuading them to share objectives in order to achieve what was considered impossible before. Must have drive, vision and support.

performance within set parameters; leaders are judged by higher requirements. I am of the opinion that good management requires some leadership qualities, just as leadership requires some management qualities. Leadership has to provide managers with the incentive to manage and to advance. The qualities required for management and for leadership can be summed up as follows:

Your best people are those who support your agenda and who deliver the goods. But these people expect more and deserve more. In summary: The practical lesson for the Master is straight forward: Set a clear disruptive agenda, stick to it, invite everyone to participate, give them considerable opportunity to shape and develop it, provide people with tools and resources to succeed, be open and collaborative, hold people fully accountable for new results and reward accordingly. Inspires Controls That means being thinks does responsible: and applies to motivates organises the ship-manager ashore too. initiates change adjusts to change challenges existing ways accepts current practice creates administers The Manager has to be proacts reacts frank, know when to piss shapes actions responds to circumstances people off, and fight to make dictates follows through their job easier. takes decisions implements decisions Simply put the Master has sets objectives gets results also the responsibility to be sets the pace concentrates on procedure available to his crew; he has driving force coordinator to give them an easy unmethodical methodical opportunity to speak their front of the camera back stage piece, a platform to air their inspires loyalty motivated by discipline grievances and articulate apart from the others involved with others their issues, without fear self sufficient depends on organisation of bureaucratic or personal retribution. "The day crews stop bringing The placing of certain of these qualities you their problems is the day you have in their respective columns might stopped leading them". be disputed, but the trend is clear. A Master should have a healthy ego and It is obvious that the Master of a vessel at the same time should be flexible is a Manager. and willing to change his opinion in light Given the necessary background and of new facts. experience the skills in dealing with "Checked egos" make certain kinds of people and the required charisma, the communications easier and the group sense of self and the sense of mission collectively more productive. The ego required are very similar across the should be not wed to the status quo. board. In today's world ultimately it is people - Finally be patient and disagree without not plans, systems, structures or been disagreeable; do it in a way budgets - who make the difference that respects the dignity of the other between organisational success and person and preserves the dignity of organisational failure. your own position.

LEADER MANAGER

NTROF AGEMENT I N AN

C.

Articles written in this bulletin do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of CENTROFIN. DISCLAIMER. The contents provided herewith are for general information purposes only; not intended to replace or otherwise contradict the detailed instructions issued by the owners, flag etc.

IN

Wavelength CENTRO-NEWS

Alexander the Great

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Leadership depends on an inherited character as well as on training and experience. Management is a skill which can be taught and learned. Leadership is a calling for which no amount of training ever going to be enough. Some leadership qualities can be learned, but only if an extra something is there already (Leadership Rules by Michael Shea).

Managers are judged by their

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...continued from pg 1

Thus the Master of today needs to mostly concentrate on the management of his multinational/multic ultural crew: The Human Factor.

Editor: Cmdr Nicholas A. Iliopoulos Staff Captain Manning & Training Tel: +30.(0)108983305 Fax: +30.(0)108983231 E-mail: nai@centrofin.gr Design-Production : Paradox Adv. +30.(0)106560832 www.paradox.com.gr

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