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WILLIAMSON RESIDENCE

PA S S A G E |

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AN I-35W BRIDGE MEMORIAL

FOREVER SPRING | AN ADVERTISING AGENCY

HDS-1 |

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A P R I VAT E R E S I D E N C E

RELEASE |

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THE YWCA GREEN ROOF

CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS | THE YWCA GREEN ROOF

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EXTEND WILLIAMSON RESIDENCE

Williamson Residents Square Footage: 2204 Robbinsdale, Minnesota

Nestled between two parks near Lake Crystal in Robbinsdale, Minnesota this remodel focused on reverting life to the simplest ideas: understanding the human connection to the earth and reusing waste for a purpose. Also to create an environment within an already existing one, similar to some coffee grown around the world.

TO SHADE AND TO ENVELOPE Coffee grown in the shade (Rustic growing, refer to image on the right) is slow ripening, and often is grown by vintage cultivators, there is the suggestion that it tastes better, with more complex flavors. The home of the Williamson’s will sustain the family during their entire life cycle and future residences. The structure and the environment surrounding the home utilize shade techniques, covering the home as if it were native to the site. The interior elements emphasize repetition in both plan and perspective. The elongated horizontal planes extend the eye’s composition up and through the space. The exterior environment elude to transitional areas being transparent and all areas being one. 2

Site plan

The above diagram shows the five different coffee growing systems. Notice the vegetational complexity, height of arboreal strata, and variety of components in the systems (from Toledo and Moguel 1997). The original footprint EXTEND

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Tree grafting: [the tissue of one plant is encouraged to fuse with another] creates a structure hovering above the already existing one.

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Creating an outer shell, strong lines help organize spaces. Passive solar heating and cooling technique such as structure orientation on the site, window placement and exterior planting, also help determine room placement. Then the planning process is broken down into simple planning steps such as: site, amenities, wants and then narrowing the most important wants into the needs.

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Diane, Robert, Jacob, Isabelle and soon to be baby, desire to have a home that will be as environmentally conscious as they are. In addition to being environmentally conscious they require a home that can accommodate their neighbor and Robert’s mother, Ruth, who is physically handicapped. With hobbies ranging from gardening, composting, recycling and biking the family takes pride in reducing their environmental footprint. Requesting the remodel for their home keep all structural walls and mechanical systems in place, they want to reduce waste and reuse as much as possible. The initial interview with the family took place early in the morning and was obvious after the first few minutes of meeting, the fuel for their day was coffee. So further investigation into growing methods and sustainable harvesting methods became the driving design concept for this project.

Floor Plan 1. Entry

9. Mechanical Room

2. Entry Vestibule

10. Isabelle’s Room

3. Laundry

11. Sink Area

4. Diane’s Office

12. Bathroom

5. Kitchen

13. Jacob’s Room

6. Entertaining Room

14. Nursery

7. Dining Room

15. Master Bedroom

8. ADA Bathroom

16. Maser Bathroom

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4 2 Section of pubic living spaces, with ceiling lines guiding the eye through.

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The flooring throughout the entryway shown here and the laundry room adjacent to the entryway has indoor/outdoor sealed slate for ease of cleaning.

The entryway is located on the south side of the home, opposite the street and driveway, hidden for security and visual interest. The entry vestibule has layers of entry and then branching areas for secondary functions, mainly for the children and guests. There are multiple areas to touch down momentarily before being drawn to the rest of the dwelling.

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Reville, Diane’s eco-chic party planning business, is headquartered in her home office with large horizontal surfaces for organization and assembly.

The custom kitchen utilized the existing fireplace to create a brick fire pizza oven. The center island contains the major appliances and is also double-sided for additional storage. The brick walls were added to the repeat the texture of the fireplace wall.

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The dining room in the home has horizontal wood beams across the ceiling connecting to the vertical room dividing beams. The dropped light below dances around the space at night with only the high transom windows to let in additional light.

Heat generated by halogen lights activates a propeller and thus movement in the Dancing Shades lamp. The lamp projects shadows on the wall that create the same type of relaxing and hypnotic atmosphere that reflections of moving water create. Design Frank Tjepkema

Reflected Ceiling Plan

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The living area has a structural wood partition creating a partial visual block while still keeping an open feel to the space.

The built-in unit carries the eye horizontally, vertically then horizontally again, connecting the beam structures above, to the room below. The unit is made from recycled materials with design assistance from the client’s. 14

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Isabelle’s room designed to display a room for a girl of all ages. The soft knobs on the wall create a wall of texture and color, and can also be used for storage. As Isabelle grows the function for the knobs may also change, but the graphic element with shapes will always stimulate the mind.

Soft knob by Ed Annink

The section cut of Isabelle’s bedroom illustrates the texture with form.

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This portion of the hallway, adjacent to the sink area, signifies the parent only zone with an architectural pop wood veneer pattern.

This separate sink area for three children allows for multiple users at the same time.

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The multi-functioning nursery and playroom has a dynamic complimentary color scheme for sensory stimulation.

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The master suite has an open floor plan with a transitional 3Form wall separating the bathroom and bedroom. The ceiling over the bed is 14’ with wood beams like the dining room to create a canopy allowing light to emphasize the height differences. The unifying design element, the back wall, is the Pop plywood wood veneers also used in the hallway. The colors in Diane and Robert’s room are a muted version of the palette for the dwelling.

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PA S S A G E

A passage system with segments of interrupted voided masses. The fallen beams now serve as a memory rather than support.

AN I-35W BRIDGE MEMORIAL

Simplicity in material: Metal allowed to deteriorate and fade. Stone, native to the land able to chip back to the site.

Length: 554’ Gold Medal Park

“As the memory fades within us Passage will be the trigger that sparks what once was.”

Minneapolis, Minnesota

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PA S S A G E

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Howland said, "to They came, h o"We n oknew r tearly h eon p e o p l e that this was a design error," said Dan Dorgan. H o w l a n d s a i d , " t o honor the people w h o--Minnesota w e r e Public a f fRadio ected who were affected by this major event b y t h i s m a j o r e v e n t Mayor Rybak said. i n M i n n e a“Victims’ polis h i s t o r y. ” say it's important i n IM i nOK, ne a p o l i s On Aug. 1, 2007, the 40-year-old bridge spanning the - S t a r Tr i b u n e Mississippi River collapsed, killing 13 people and injuring 145. collapse survivors felt we nee even, that we continue -Minnesota Public Radio h i s t o r y. ” to be reminded. - S t a r T r i b u n"Tragedy e lives lost Howland and changed affectsthe people differently," surmised. th

They came, H it's o wOK, l a important nd said, "to I say h o n o r t h e p e o p l e even, that we continue who were affected -Star Tribune to be reminded. green space, where so many by this major event draw on communal strength -Star i n Tribune Minneapolis aftermath of this terrible trage h i s t o r y. ”

-Star Tribune

"Everyone on that bridge that day left a part of

themselves there," said Margaret McAbee, "They've all become someone different because of that experience."

Mayor Rybak said. “Victims’ families and collapse survivors felt we needed to remember the lives lost and changed that day with a quiet green space, where so many people gathered to draw on communal strength and support in the aftermath of this terrible tragedy.”

-Star Tribune

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PA S S A G E

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The top garden makes you feel as if you are on a separate level connected to the earth.

Curiosity to climb to the top. From top to bottom the noises carried through the swirling trees. The only burst of light were the brightly colored leaves still clinging to the dark finger like branches all too stiff. In the gloomy, cold, dead of the day the inauspicious reality sets in of the situation and the past.

360 degree winding path around the mound.

The swaying wind forced every leaf to stand at attention. The set of benches promised relaxation for hours.

The corner on the benches is the best view, connecting North and East.

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PA S S A G E

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The mound and path existing in Gold Medal Park were originally going to remain in the park, serving as their own memory; keeping their original purpose. But with the new purpose for the park, the structures were removed so not to conflict with the memory created by the memorial.

The preliminary sketch drawn from a form study which creates floating islands inset in land volumes. When the land connects to structure there are short bridges and places of light.

Form studies

The benches create finger-like projections, pulling the outsider into the park and letting them rest.

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PA S S A G E

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Views of the Stone Arch Bridge to the north and the new 1-35W bridge to the east, Passage will serve as a reminder to the city. Those affected by the bridge collapse will not have to be near to feel its immensity and presence.

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PA S S A G E

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The site of Passage, Gold Medal Park, just west of the I-35W Bridge, was a gathering place for many Minnesotans in the hours and days following the bridge collapse.

The sections of void in structure, simulate the gaps in the bridge after the collapse. 36

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The plan of the monument has gaps in the limestone below to reveal the fallen beams. The continuous glass walkway may be unsettling for some to walk across but once you enter Passage you must move forward or back, crossing over areas of uneasiness.

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When manipulated by human force the beams wouldn’t touch. But the original beam design had strategically placed them in a geometric pattern. The original design also used a geometric pattern and repeated it. When an experiment was done simulating the falling action of structured beams, they fell randomly. When left to gravity and natural forces the beams never touched. The higher the simulated beams were dropped, the farther they separated when landing. Thus the design for the final “fallen beams� portion of the design became random and they were meant to never touch one another.

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PA S S A G E

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The varying heights in the structure of Passage were derived from the height variations of the original bridge.

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PA S S A G E

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FOREVER SPRING AN ADVERTISING AGENCY Meeting in college Jackson and Kate became leaders within campus life and became organizers of regular group activities. A natural tag team they would organize games, group events and activities that caused interaction and sometimes lighthearted competition. They would use games to evoke a spirit of childhood and bring those involved to a common mind-set. They realized by interacting with those around you not only enabled creativity, but also caused relationships to be built. Teamwork became initialized through necessity and strategy became Square Footage: 7791

apparent. Activity, whether it be physical or mental, caused the

Minneapolis, Minnesota

imagination to be boundless.

Group Project

The people who work for Forever Spring will have at times to put themselves in a childhood mind-set, and Jackson and Kate know just how to accomplish this.

1. Reception 2. Public Restrooms 3. Breakroom 4. Think Zone 5. Conference Area

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6. Relaxation

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7. Employee Entrance 8

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8. Phone Booths

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9. Creative Director’s Offices

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10. Research Library 11. Print Station

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12. Work Zone 13. Private Restroom 14. Work Station

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The design for Forever Spring encourages an interactive atmosphere that stretches the imagination enhancing the work environment. The design utilizes reinvented objects and bold colors to create a backdrop to highlight these pieces. Using variation in form, group interaction will be initiated; color and form help define these areas. A healthy surrounding formed in part by natural day lighting and sustainable materials improves employee productivity.

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FOREVER SPRING

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The entrance to the advertising agency from the skyway leaves nothing to the imagination. With glass sliding doors the public is able to see this bright, youthful space, and intrigue is left in the pedestrian’s mind as they round the corner.

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The concept for the design of the advertising agency is a light-hearted sensibility and remembering the youthful side of being an adult. With the opportunity to design a chair for reception area, the inspiration came from my childhood. Marbleworks is a game of constructing pieces and simply watching marbles follow the path to the end. The user of this chair has the same opportunity to put a marble in the top, and watch it follow the path to the bottom of the chair.

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FOREVER SPRING

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The kitchen and cafe area in Forever Spring are designed to be an equally inspiring work zone, with areas for collaboration, or lunch meetings. Natural light is utilized to eliminate the need for intrusive overhead lighting. Soffits hovering just above the light fixtures, bounce the light back down onto the user.

Transformable, colorful, and stimulating, the think zone is a place for ideas to be exchanged and fun to happen.

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FOREVER SPRING

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The think tank at Forever Spring contains areas to collaborate, and relax the mind. A habitable wall inspired by Isamu Noguchi’s playground designs, where he only provides a space of exploration rather then one of regimented play, telling the child what to do. The sketches to the left provide ideas integrating office functions and fun, in a wall of varying heights and depths. 54

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The conference room when closed creates a private room, but also has the ability to be open to the rest of the think area, allowing it to be transformable to all working needs.

The sketch to the right is an idea for the think area, to hold semiprivate collaborating meetings. The whimsical honeycomb idea, could be a means of way finding throughout Forever Spring, and an easily identifiable area for employees.

A section cut of an enclosed meeting room displays the builtin seating and multi-functions of having an enclosed think zone.

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FOREVER SPRING

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The creative director’s, Jackson and Kate, want private offices with the ability to open a wall of doors and create a large collaborative private office.

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FOREVER SPRING

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Collaborative work can be achieved in these semi-private, low horizon desks. The stations are mimicked above by the dropped lighting units. They also reduce sound echoing in the main work area. The daylight sensors in the work area allow for low usage of artificial lighting and concealed window coverings can be used to regulate light throughout the day.

The work station is an area for cutting, spraying, and mounting, along with being another general work area. Lighting in the room is mainly supplied by the south facing windows, which receive the most sun penetration during regular business hours. 60

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HDS-1

A P R I VAT E R E S I D E N C E

Square Footage: 1773

The concept of this residence is derived from the motion created by a volleyball spike. Heather Laudenbach, the client, has coached volleyball since she was 19 and including an aspect of the game in the design for her future residence is important. One of the strongest contacts, a spike, would create the strongest volumes and forms, reflected in plan and perspective. The history of the game is another element in the design, originating in Holyoke, Massachusetts the site for HDS-1 is this small town. The industrial area along the river contains shipping warehouses and some of the best views of the river. The site is converted to its original topography and native plants replace the asphalt.

A gesture, a strike, a pose. A gesture propelled by force with a voided leap and violent impact followed by a drop. The motion of a jump, suspension in space, is illustrated in form. Repetition and volume soften the industrial site along with renewal of site with native landscaping and original topography. The surrounding warehouse buildings with original dark brick and large openings create the backdrop for the collective of the residence. Continuing the dark brick to front exterior wall, the structure fuses the utilitarian urban hard scape with modern volumes of the structure.

Holyoke Massachusetts

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The site plan, which is a 60’ x 100’ parcel of land is shown here with the roof plan. Holyoke, Massachusetts was chosen for its small town atmosphere with beautiful views of the Connecticut River and its developing city.

Level one floor plan 1. Entry 2. Guest Bathroom 3. Guest Bedroom 4. Mechanical Room 5. Library 6. Living Room 1

7. Office 8. Dining Room 9. Kitchen

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This exterior perspective shows surrounding warehouse buildings along the river used for shipping and receiving cargo freight. The exterior garage wall repeats the same brick as the warehouses, slightly disguising it.

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The kitchen has custom cabinets in a high gloss orange to reflect the light from the river’s reflections and used to bounce light around the entire kitchen. There is a custom growing area inset in the counter top for herbs and spices.

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The exterior perspective shows this homes ability to blend into the surrounding environment of warehouses, but with volumes of color setting it apart. The topography shown dropping off from one volume and regaining the structure on the next volume.

HDS-1

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The office nestled behind the library has a semi-private atmosphere and has a glass ceiling for views from every angle.

The living room has a glass ceiling so from atop the stairs of the second level one can see into the space. The transparency with walls, windows and ceiling allows for sun penetration and a view from any position in the structure.

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Level two floorplan 10. Master Bathroom 11. Closet 12. Master Bedroom 13. Habitable Green Roof

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The habitable green roof connecting to the master bedroom has native plants to Massachusetts, including Big Bluestem, and Tickle grasses, and Carolina Rose and Summersweet bushes.

The view from the master bedroom is overlooking the Connecticut River with access to the green rooftop.

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HDS-1

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This view from the Connecticut River shows the rotated upper volume with privacy wood beams protecting the exterior staircase. The natural topography along the river has been revitalized and the home is cantilevered over the steep drop-offs that would occur near the banks of the river.

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RELEASE

THE YWCA GREEN ROOF

Square Footage: 16368

A rooftop secret linking various forms, shapes and depths to accommodate those who live in an urban environment but need a connection to nature. Indoor and outdoor planting allows for the space to be accessed year round and never have a fully dormant background. A play area that uses recycled materials and natural colors will aid in blending with newly formed environment. Also the yoga spaces are transformable allowing the adults to release their inner chaos either indoors or out. Green roof techniques are used to enhance the space visually and economically. Proper use of day lighting allows all users connect to the natural rhythm of the day and year.

Sun studies during the summer and winter equinoxes were executed and the images display the need for sturdy plants requiring full sun, and areas of protection for all users.

December 22, 12pm

Individually the spaces serve different users with different needs, but creates a state of ultimate bliss, and empowerment for anyone who seeks natural interaction.

Minneapolis, Minnesota

A conceptual sketch creating a graphic which displays the idea of inner chaos and outer release. December 22, 3pm

June 22, 6am 78

June 22, 9am

June 22, 12pm

June 22, 3pm

June 22, 6pm RELEASE

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Public and private areas on the rooftop become separated for user preference and maintenance.

The flow of traffic is focused in the atrium as a gathering space and then depending on user branches in either direction, creating distinctively separate zones.

When laying out general areas on the rooftop it became apparent that functions and pathways were going to be defined by planting rather then large walkways. All areas flow together and transitions are as seamless as possible.

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New focal areas direct the eye through the garden and serve as a way finding system for the space.

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A green roof has multiple advantages beyond just the aesthetic value. It improves air quality by adding in natural ventilation systems (trees). Also from the layers of planting and soil, the excess rainwater can be filtered and stored for later use. After the plants are established there is little to no upkeep.

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1. Elevator Lobby

7. Yoga Studio Two

2. Stair Entrance Walkway

8. Nana Wall Storage

3. Yoga Studio Entrance

9. Garden Overlook

4. Storage Room

10. Children’s Storage Room

5. Outdoor Storage and Walkway

11. Children’s Play Area

6. Yoga Studio One

12. Entry Area and Seating RELEASE

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The door to the exterior is a quiet section of the wall, and one might not see it if they weren’t looking for it.

The bench seating around the atrium was ergonomically formed to allow a person to fully recline in the whole seat or perch on the edge. The planting on the YWCA Green Roof will be native plants or grasses that can survive in the sometimes unforgiving climate of Minnesota.

The entrance and reception desk are a domed area full of motion. The desk will be lit from the displaying the YWCA logo. There will be up-lighting from each of the beams that can be used as display shelving. The ceiling has an inverted version of the dome creating texture and rhythm. This area has high traffic and all the shapes create movement to assist people to move through. From the elevator lobby the user relaxes with the welcome of trickling water through the rock wall.

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The indoor entry tunnel to the yoga studios is a quiet restful repetitious walk for the mind to take in natural day light and the climbing plants. The rings emphasize the inner chaos before the release of the yoga studios.

This sketch displays the original idea for the indoor tunnel and at the end of each ring is a bench.

The outdoor storage for yoga students is an alternate to using the main locker room downstairs.

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The yoga studios have reclaimed wood flooring and light layered ceiling planes. In the back of each studio there are sections of indoor plants and rocks that will overtime climb the wall and bloom.

The teak inlay of flooring mimics the ceiling lines and directs the eye through the space. The yoga studios have a glass wall separating the two spaces with access between. There are Nana walls in the entire front of the studio which can be opened to enjoy the natural sunlight and air. Along the perimeter of the adult area and children’s play area there is a ring of densely planted grass in the shape of yoga mats. Weather permitting the students and teachers can use these mats to feel a greater connection to the earth.

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From atop the slide during winter the view of the entire rooftop can be taken in.

The children’s play area has three different flooring materials, and custom benches designed to seat two children. All the equipment was custom designed for the YWCA rooftop. The living walls soften the large vertical concrete walls. The children’s play area has a living wall but with shapes cut out that allow only certain plants to grow through. 90

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The ecological garden, the relocated peace garden, is a complex landscape where plants are grouped together into plant guilds. It reflects the natural cycles of the seasons-- birth, growth, and decay become part of the garden landscape. At this site asparagus and its plant companions are combined with prairie grass to provide a visual block to the street. Also to allow for visual interest from Peavy Plaza, and the street below. 92

Rooftop View: Peavy Plaza

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CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS THE YWCA GREEN ROOF

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Profile for Kristin Greeley

Kristin Greeley's Portfolio  

This is a collection of work from my time attending The Art Institutes International Minnesota.

Kristin Greeley's Portfolio  

This is a collection of work from my time attending The Art Institutes International Minnesota.

Profile for k_greeley
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