Issuu on Google+

Special Section | November 22, 2012


2 3 4 5 6 8 10

TABlEof CONTENTS

Holiday Volunteer Opportunities

Bizarre Bazaar

11 12

Santa Spy

Kansas Nutcracker

14 15

Old-Fashioned Christmas Parade More than 120 artists pack their booths into the Lawrence Arts Center, displaying everything from jewelry to photographs to home decor

"The Kansas Nutcracker"

Holiday Farmers' Market Holiday Foods/Entertaining Holiday Drinks Holiday Homes Tour

Holiday Films

Unconventional Christmas Movies

Gifts for Pets

Holiday gift ideas for your furry friends

16

Holiday Events Calendar

20 21

Holiday Music Roundup

A comprehensive calendar of area holiday events

Organ Vespers Concert

Holiday Happenings 2012

22 24 26 28 30 31

Festival of Trees

Creative and innovative trees on display

Gingerbread Houses Festival of the Nativities

Nativities from around the world on display

Van Go Adornment Sale

Apprentice artists have been busy producing works of art

Eudora/Baldwin City Events Toys for Tots

3


4

Holiday Happenings 2012

Old-Fashioned

Christmas Parade

t

Kevin Anderson/Journal-World File Photo Russell Iverson, Lawrence, kneels under the umbrella with his children, Sebastian, 2, and Olivia, 5, Saturday at the Lawrence Old Fashioned Christmas Parade in 2011. Heavy rains moved through the area when the parade started.

By Alex Garrison

here’s being an outrider, and then there’s being a cowboy. Allen Prell is certainly an experienced rider, and, yes, he’s ranched and wrangled some in his day. But is he, as some of his Lawrence acquaintances say, a good oldfashioned cowboy? No, probably not. But maybe he wouldn’t mind being thought of as one, he laughs from his end of the phone line, on his way from his Maryville home to church on a Saturday evening. Prell is a wagon master. Twenty years ago, he led a wagon train on the Oregon Trail from Wamego to Hanover, and somewhere along the way, as Prell tells it, one of the passersby yelled out the idea to have a horse-drawn parade in Lawrence. “Well, why not? That sounds fun to try,” Prell said. It was perhaps one of those “and the rest is history” moments that come along once in awhile in a cowboy’s life. Prell helped found the Downtown Lawrence Old-Fashioned

Christmas Parade, an annual tradition that features horses decked out in festive attire. Prell helps keep the horses, which travel from the Douglas County Fairgrounds down a route through Massachusetts Street and back, in check. His role is largely that of protector, for the safety of riders and especially audience members. But he’s humble about all that. “Whatever they need, that’s my job,” he said of the parade riders. The hitch-wagon owners who participate come from far and wide — though not as far as they used to. Prell said he made “tremendous friends” from six or eight states, people who came together in the parade, making it a holiday-time reunion for the old-timers, the only time a group of wagon masters would all be together at once, and how nice to have it themed for Christmas. “The young people aren’t jumping in, not as many riding anyplace like there used to be,” he said. “It’s a nice event to bring people to Lawrence, and riding — I’m still working for it and with it.”

The DownTown Lawrence oLD-FashioneD chrisTmas ParaDe begins at 11 a.m. Dec. 1. The route is along Massachusetts Street, from 11th to Seventh streets. More information: lawrencechristmasparade.org

Gifts for the Scientist in your life! •• Microscopes Fossils • Insects • Rocks • Nature Jewelry • T-Shirts Lawrence’s Science & Nature Store & More 942 Mass St • 785-832-9453

T-Rex Wall Mount


Holiday Happenings 2012

5

Kim Lybarger, left, Lawrence, leans in to listen while Barbara Burket explains treasure balls during Bizarre Bazaar 2011 at the Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire St. Treasure balls, a German tradition that Burket grew up with, are crepe paper balls meant to be unwrapped to reveal presents inside. Burket said she tries to make her treasure balls too pretty to unwrap.

Bizarre John Young/Journal-World File Photo

B

By Daisy Wakefield

BAzAAr

izarre Bazaar, or the BizBaz as it has they bring are varied and unusual. come to be known, was founded “Shoppers will definitely find items like by a group of artists who were frusgorgeous, detailed paintings and jewelry, trated with the fees charged to participate but this is a show where less mainstream in conventional art and craft shows. On artwork is encouraged, and there will top of that, their art was unconventional be some interesting art,” co-chair Elenor for 25 years ago, and often they were not Buffington said. “The only requirement we accepted into shows. So six women, now have is that the art be handmade.” remembered as the Founding Mothers, Over half of the participants in the decided to create their own exhibit. show are returning artists, and demand for “Our art was not what you’d call mainvendor spaces is always tight. The registrastream,” said Founding Mother Nan Rentions go out via snail mail and must be barger. “And we decided to have our own replied via the same. This is done with the damn craft show and invite our friends. express intention of allowing those within Our children also participated. We all sent Lawrence a better shot at getting into the out invites, made some cookies, moved the show. It often becomes full within a few furniture out of my front room, and set up days of the registration being mailed, with our wares ... and waited for the throngs of most of the artists within a 100-mile radius people to show up.” of Lawrence. The throngs of people have been show“With the acceptance of out-of-theing up ever since, and the show, held now norm, eclectic handmade creations have at the Lawrence Arts Center, hosts around become widely accepted and even in de30,000 shoppers during the two-day mand,” said co-chair Marlene Feldt. “There exhibit. The artists are spread out over all are so many artists that either have particithree floors of the Arts pated in the past and Center. One hundred want to remain on our and thirty-nine artists Bizarre Bazaar mailing list or who are are signed up for this still in hopes of getting Lawrence Arts Center, year’s show, and each in for the first time, 940 New Hampshire St. participates in the lothat we notify over 400 Nov. 23, 5 p.m. - 9 p.m. gistics in order to keep people every year when Nov. 24, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. the entrance fees low. the next year’s show is The artistic creations open.”

HOLIDAY PACKAGES

each elegantly wrapped and include an AesthetiCare Spa Headband

Ah…Med Spa

$89 (reg. $110) Platinum Pampering

$199 (reg $235) Beauty in a Box

$425 (reg. $500)

Customized Signature Facial with Oxygen Therapy Crystal-free Microdermabrasion, Customized Signature Facial, Eyebrow Wax, Oxygen Therapy and $75 towards any Aesthetic Solution RX product

$500 Gift Certificate towards any services or products

BLACK FRIDAY

SPECIAL! November 23rd Stop by or call in!

20% OFF Gift Certificates

SAVE THE DATE! Holiday Open House Thursday, December 6th

3- 8 PM

Everything 20% off Including Gift Certificates

*Not to be combined with other offers or discounts.

AesthetiCare Medical Spa offers advanced treatment for: • Wrinkles • Acne and acne scars • Unwanted fat • Melasma • Sun damage

• Unwanted hair • Rosacea • Unwanted veins • Sagging skin • And much more….

3510 Clinton Place, Suite 120 • Lawrence, KS 66047

785.856.8880


6

Holiday Happenings 2012

‘a Kansas nuTcracKer’ when: 7 p.m. Dec. 7, 8, 14 and 15; 2 p.m. Dec. 9 and 16. where: Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire St.

Nick Krug/Journal-World File Photo

Godfather Drosselmeier's toys entertain those gathered during a dress rehearsal for “A Kansas Nutcracker: Sesquicentennial Edition” on Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2011, in the theater at the Lawrence Arts Center.

KansasNutcracker

D

By Terry rombeck

uring her eight performances with “A Kansas Nutcracker,” Emma Davison has been a mouse, a schoolgirl, a flower, a dew drop, a snowflake and a toy monkey. “I’ve been just about everything,” said Davison, 17 and a senior at Lawrence High School. “It doesn’t feel like winter without ‘Nutcracker’ rehearsals.” The Lawrence Arts Center’s retelling of E.T.A. Hoffmann’s classic — made famous by the Tchaikovsky ballet — returns for the ninth time in the past 11 years. It’s become a holiday tradition unique to Lawrence. “It’s a very Lawrence thing, because we infuse all of the historical stuff in it,” said Davison, who this year will portray a clown, snow, dew and the older version of Clara Stahlbaum, the main character. “‘The Nutcracker’ is such a quintessential holiday thing.” This year’s reincarnation is the same version written by Ric Averill, the center’s artistic director of performing arts, in 2011 for the sesquicentennial of the state of Kansas. It is set in Lawrence in 1861 and features characters from real-day Bleeding Kansas, including Gov. Charles Robinson, abolition-

ist John Brown and Sen. James Lane. Choreography is by Deb Bettinger, with orchestration and conducting by Jeff Dearinger. In the play, Clara’s father, Dr. Stahlbaum, leaves for Washington to help build a medical corps for the Civil War. Clara’s life is filled with colorful characters, including Godfather Drosselmeier and his magical toys. The performance includes a Civil War re-enactment, holiday presentations and patriotic speeches. Early Kansas history will be especially

Kansas PuBLic raDio PresenTs

“A Big Band Christmas” whaT: Kansas City Jazz Orchestra and vocalist Ron Gutierrez performing holiday standards. when: 7 p.m. Dec. 8 where: Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts St.

prominent this year, with the Arts Center sponsoring a series of events to explain the real-life history of the performance. “It becomes an educational opportunity for the community,” Averill said. “There’s abolition, race issues and suffrage.” Added Davison: “I was in U.S. history (class) last year, and a lot of the things we were learning in that, we were learning in ‘Nutcracker.’” But make no mistake about it: This is very much about entertainment as well. With an all-age cast of 130, a mandolin orchestra playing the traditional Tchaikovsky tunes and familiar Kansas themes — including “Snakes On The Prairie” and “Cold Winters” — “A Kansas Nutcracker” is relatable for audiences. “It’s one of the most fun things I do all year in that it combines performing arts and history,” Averill said. “It’s a festive celebration of the arts at the holiday time.” For Davison, this likely will mark her last performance in “A Kansas Nutcracker.” “Everyone who does it is really talented — and there’s a lot of people involved,” she said. “It’s fun seeing all that talent come out of the woodwork all of a sudden.”

TicKeTs: $19 for adults, $16 for seniors and $13 for students. aDDiTionaL PresenTaTions: The Arts Center will host a series of discussions about the era in which “A Kansas Nutcracker” is set. “Chautauqua,” with first-person presentations by Kansas historians and actors, 6 p.m. Nov. 27.


Holiday

Holiday Happenings 2012

7

Farmers' Market

C

By Kelly Stroda

ommunity meets community. That’s what Jack Wilson, co-owner of Washington Creek Lavender, likes about the Lawrence Farmers’ Market. The Holiday Farmers’ Market each December is no exception. From emu meat to handmade soaps, farmers and vendors from around the area come together to sell interesting and unusual gifts. And here’s one of the best parts, according to Wilson: “It’s all supporting the local farmer.� The Holiday Farmers’ Market is in its 25th year, and more than 50 vendors are expected to participate. The market will be on Saturday, Dec. 8, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Holiday Inn Lawrence, 200 McDonald Drive. Karen Pendleton of Pendleton’s Country Market has been involved in the holiday market since the beginning. She said the event seems to grow every year. In the beginning, 13 vendors crammed into a room at the South Park Lawrence Recreation Center for the first holiday market. “I can’t believe we all squeezed in there,� Pendleton said. The next year, there were around 20 vendors. The event quickly outgrew the location. From there, the holiday market was held at the Douglas County Fairgrounds and the Knights of Columbus Hall. This is the event’s third year at the Holiday Inn. Pendleton attributes the market’s growth to extending growing seasons and a larger variety of items being allowed for sale. In the beginning, meat products couldn’t be sold at the farmers

market. The same goes for local wine products. Some of the items available at the holiday market include goat butter soaps, woven rugs, jams and jellies, succulents, sunflower brittle, pottery wind chimes, hand-dyed scarves, fresh produce and dog treats. Because of the variety in products, Pendleton said she does all of her holiday shopping at the market. “I can find things there I can’t find anywhere else. These people are so creative,� she said. Jozie Schimke, co-owner of Earth Flowers, has been involved with the holiday market for three years. She said she enjoys how the market is different each year. “New people come to market, and they have new products,� she said. “Sometimes, you just don’t know what you’re going to see, and that’s kind of fun. Pendleton said the holiday market is important because, for most farmers, growing produce and making products is how they make a living. The holiday market provides one last sales boost before the winter season, she said. As the number of items allowed for sale has grown, so has the camaraderie of the regular farmers market and the holiday event. Pendleton also said the holiday market is special because farmers, vendors and loyal customers get to see one another one last time for the season. “The customers and the vendors are all family,� Pendleton said. “It’s like a reunion before we all won’t see each other all winter.�

Alex Garrison/Journal-World File Photo Debbie Milks, of Chestnut Charlie's, 1840 East 1450 Road, scores fresh chestnuts at the Holiday Farmers' Market, 200 McDonald Drive, on Dec. 10, 2011. Milks explains that a single circular cut works better for peeling than the traditional "X" cut. The chestnuts were grown on the Chestnut Charlie's farm north of Lawrence, where Milks and Charlie NovoGradac have grown organic nuts since 1995.

7KHUH¡V 1R 6XFK 7KLQJ $V %DG :HDWKHU ...Just ,QDSSURSULDWH &ORWKLQJ

+DWV &RDWV *ORYHV 6RFNV %DVH /D\HUV )OHHFH 0RUH  0DVVDFKXVHWWV 6W ‡ 'RZQWRZQ /DZUHQFH   ‡ ZZZVXQIORZHURXWGRRUDQGELNHFRP


8

Holiday Happenings 2012

Holiday Foods/Entertaining

F

By Sarah Henning

ood is like everything else during the holidays: memorable, fun and totally shaped by the occasion. Just as you wouldn’t wear an ugly sweater to a holiday cocktail hour or a strapless gown for mandatory brunch at Grandma’s, you wouldn’t leave a plate of stuffing for Santa or give a party hostess a box of Moonpies. And during the rough-and-tumble ride of obligations that is the holidays, being prepared is key. To help you have exactly what you need for whatever occasion that might get tapped into your smartphone calendar, we’ve come up with a roundup of recipes perfect for a myriad of events. So bring on the brunches, cocktails, feasts, parties and endless cookie exchanges. You’ll be ready. reciPes Cranberry almond bisCotti — Holiday brunCH 3/4 cup finely chopped almonds 3 cups flour 1 cup sugar 1 teaspoon baking powder

1/4 teaspoon salt 4 large eggs 1 teaspoon almond extract 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 lemon, zested 3/4 cup chopped dried cranberries 1 orange, zested Heat oven to 350 degrees. Toast almonds in single layer on baking sheet, tossing once or twice, 5-10 minutes. Cool. Grease a clean baking sheet or line it with parchment paper. Sift flour, sugar, baking powder and salt into a large bowl. Using a second bowl, beat eggs with extracts and lemon and orange zests. Stir egg mixture into dry mixture until nearly incorporated; stir in almonds and dried cranberries until sticky dough forms. Dump dough onto floured surface, divide it in half and shape it into two smooth 2-inch-thick logs. Place the logs four inches apart on baking sheet. Bake in top half of oven until golden, 30-35 minutes. Remove from oven; reduce temperature to 300 degrees. After logs have cooled 10 minutes, used a serrated knife to cut them on the diagonal into 1/2-inch-thick

John Young/Journal-World Photo Roasted Butternut Squash with Sage and Cranberries

slices. Lay the slices on the baking sheet and continue to bake them, turning each biscotti halfway through baking, until crisp but not darkened, about 20 minutes. Transfer biscotti to racks; cool thoroughly. Store airtight. — Copyright by Terese Allen for www.organicvalley.coop

Jewelry by Julie SKATEBOARD? Need a

Handmade Jewelry & Accessories by Julie Kingsbury

19 W. 9th Lawrence, KS 785-832-8693 Open: Tuesday - Saturday 10:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Op Sunday 12:00 - 4:00

933 Massachusetts Street WhiteChocolate.net

roasted butternut squasH witH sage and Cranberries — Holiday side disH to bring 1 medium butternut squash 4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided Sea salt and ground pepper 2 medium onions


2 tablespoons chopped sage 4 tablespoons dried cranberries or cherries Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Peel squash and cut in half lengthwise. Scoop out seeds from the center and discard. Cut squash into large chunks. Coat with 2 tablespoons of the olive oil. Season with salt and pepper to taste and arrange on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake for about 30 minutes or until well caramelized. Peel onions and cut into large chunks. Coat with remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil. Season to taste with salt and pepper and spread on a second lined baking sheet. Bake for about 20 minutes, or until well caramelized. When squash and onions are done, toss with sage and cranberries. Serve immediately. — Recipe from www.wholefoodsmarket.com. spiCed star Cookies — Cookies to sHare 1/2 cup (8 tablespoons) unsalted butter 3/4 cup brown sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves 1/2 teaspoon ground mace (or substitute 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg) 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 1/2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour 1/2 cup almond flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 2 to 4 tablespoons milk (regular or low-fat, not nonfat) 1/2 cup confectioners sugar 3 to 4 teaspoons milk or water To make the cookies: In a large mixing bowl, beat together the butter, sugar, vanilla, spices and salt. Stir in the flour, almond flour and baking powder, then enough of the milk to make a stiff dough. Form the dough into two disks, wrap in plastic, and refrigerate for 2 hours or more. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Lightly grease, or line with parchment, two baking sheets. Working with one disk at a time, roll the dough 1/8-inch to inch thick. Cut out shapes using your desired cutters, and

Holiday Happenings 2012

9

transfer the cookies to the prepared pans. Bake the cookies for 15 to 20 minutes, until they’re lightly browned around the edges. Remove them from the oven and transfer them to a rack to cool. As they cool, they’ll become quite hard. To make the icing: Stir together the sugar and enough milk or water to create a thick but “drizzle-able” icing. Drizzle the icing atop the cookies decoratively. Yield: 4 dozen small cookies. — Recipe from www.kingarthurflour.com maple spiCed nuts — Hostess gift 1/4 cup (4 tablespoons) unsalted butter 1 pound nuts — single variety, or a mixture 1/4 cup brown sugar 1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon salt 3 tablespoons maple syrup In a large skillet set over medium-high heat, melt the butter and add the nuts. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 3 to 4 minutes, until the nuts are fragrant and beginning to toast. Add the remaining ingredients, stirring until the sugar begins to melt. Lower the heat to medium and cook for another 3 to 4 minutes until the nuts are nicely caramelized around the outside. Transfer the nuts to a parchment-lined baking sheet to cool, stirring periodically so they don’t clump. Yield: 4 cups nuts. — Recipe from www.kingarthurflour.com roasted fresH CHestnuts — CoCktail party eats 1 pound chestnuts 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil 1/2 teaspoon sea salt Preheat oven to 375 degrees and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Using a sharp paring knife, cut a small cross into the round side of each chestnut. Lightly oil the surface of each chestnut and arrange on the lined baking sheet. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until the crosses pop open and the nuts yield easily to pressure, splitting the skins. Dip your oily fingers in salt and eat the chestnuts. — Recipe from www.melissas.com

Christmas at 1011 Vermont Street, Lawrence • 785-843-6166 trinitylawrence.org

Sunday, December 9 6:00 p.m.

Lessons and Carols

Monday, December 24 5:00 p.m.

Christmas Pageant and Communion

Monday, December 24 10:30 p.m.

Christmas Eve Concert

Monday, December 24 11:00 p.m.

Festival Choral Eucharist and Carols

Tuesday, December 25 9:00 a.m.

Holy Communion and Carols

ALL ARE INVITED! Regular Sunday Worship

Holy Eucharist Rite I, 8:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist Rite II, 10:30 a.m. Solemn High Mass, 6:00 p.m. (during the academic year)


10 Holiday Happenings 2012

Holiday Drinks i By Sarah Henning

t might seem like a bit of background chatter, what with all the family to see, presents to open and cookies to snarf down, but a good holiday drink can make each holiday occasion a bit more well-rounded. Yes, having the right drink in your hand during that special time of year can make the nights feel warmer, the good times seem even sunnier and even the most disastrous of family encounters go … a bit smoother. Of course, you could drink exactly what you prefer year-round, but why not spice it up and make a few changes during the last month of the year? Make your pre-noon mimosas a bit snappier, your go-to party drink a bit snazzier, and have your hot chocolate buzz, too. reciPes blood orange mimosas — for Holiday brunCH 4 tablespoons (2 ounces) Grand Marnier or orange juice 4 tablespoons (2 ounces) sugar

1 bottle champagne or sparkling wine 1 cup (about 8 blood oranges) blood orange juice freshly squeezed

Using two separate ramekins that will accommodate the glass diameter, pour the Grand Marnier in one and sugar in the other. Dip the rim of 4 fluted glasses in the Grand Marnier and then in the sugar, forming a ring of sugar around the rim. Pour 1/4 cup of the juice in each glass. Fill each glass with champagne (or sparkling wine). Serve and enjoy. — Recipe from www.melissas.com. VelVet rope — for a Holiday feast Velvet Rope Drink ingredients: 2 ounces vodka 1 1/2 ounce 100-percent cranberry juice (not “cocktail”) 1 ounce orange juice, freshly squeezed 1 ounce vanilla-infused syrup (recipe follows) 3 dashes peach bitters

Bow Meow Benefit Dinner & Auction Saturday, December 8th, 2012 | 5:00 PM Sacred Heart Church Parish Hall 426 S. Cedar Ottawa,KS

Phone: (785) 242-2967 Email: info@prairiepaws.org www.prairiepaws.org

• $50 per person • $350 for table of eight • Advance ticket reservation recommended! Business Advertising Sponsorships Are Available!

Reserve your tickets online NOW at www.bowmeow2012.eventbrite.com

John Young/Journal-World Photo Hot Mulled Red Wine Cider

1 splash Prosecco (Italian sparkling wine) 1 long orange twist or 2 skewered cranberries (garnish)

Prosecco) with ice and strain into a chilled glass. Serve with a splash of Prosecco on top. Garnish with a long orange twist or 2 skewered fresh cranberries.

Vanilla-infused syrup ingredients: 2 cups sugar 1 cup water 1 vanilla bean Shake all ingredients (except for the

Vanilla-infused syrup instructions: Bring water to a simmer in medium saucepan over high heat. Stir while adding sugar; bring to a simmer but don’t allow solution to boil. Reduce heat. Split vanilla


Holiday Happenings 2012 11

Artistic Direction and Choreography by Deb Bettinger Script and Stage Direction by Ric Averill Orchestration and Conducting by Jeff Dearinger

bean down the middle to expose soft, flavorful interior. Add bean to the saucepan and allow to simmer very gently, about 15 minutes. Remove from heat; allow to cool. Remove bean and transfer liquid to a glass container. It should keep for a couple of months. — Recipe from www.chsugar.com absolut sweet limeCoCktail — signature CoCktail party drink 2 parts vodka 4 slices lime 2 teaspoons superfine sugar Muddle lime and superfine sugar in a shaker. Fill with crushed ice. Add vodka. Shake and pour into a chilled rocks glass. Garnish with lime. — Recipe from www.absolutdrinks.com irisH Coffee — relaxing by tHe fire 1/2 cup hot, freshly brewed coffee 2 tablespoons Irish whiskey 1 teaspoon sugar 2 tablespoons thawed whipped topping Mix first 3 ingredients in heatproof

goblet or stemmed coffee cup. Top with whipped topping before serving. — Recipe from www.kraftrecipes.com Hot mulled red wine Cider — for dessert 1/2 cup C&H® Granulated Sugar 1/2 cup water 2 lemons, thinly sliced, divided 2 oranges, thinly sliced, divided 8 cloves, whole 3 cinnamon sticks, broken into pieces 1 cup orange juice 1 cup apple juice 1 bottle 750 milliliters (about 3 cups) dry red wine Combine sugar, water, slices of 1 lemon and 1 orange (reserve remaining fruit slices for garnish), cloves and cinnamon in medium saucepan. Stir over medium-high heat until sugar dissolves. Reduce heat and simmer 5 minutes. Add orange and apple juice and wine; heat until warm. Strain and serve. Garnish each glass with remaining lemon and orange slices. — Recipe from www.chsugar.com

Friday & Saturday

December 7 • 8 | 7 p.m. Friday & Saturday

December 14 • 15 | 7 p.m. Sundays

December 9 • 16 | 2 p.m. Come to Clara’s Tea Party (more information online)

original artwork by Lawrence artist Dave Loewenstein, 2011 photo by Ann Dean, 2011 sponsored by


12 Holiday Happenings 2012

Holiday Homes Tour I

By Margie Carr

f you’re looking for holiday decorating ideas, you won’t want to miss the Eighth Annual Holiday Homes Tour, a benefit for Health Care Access, Sunday, Dec. 2, from noon to 5 p.m. Five Lawrence residents (plus Meadowlark Estates), will open their homes to benefit the clinic that serves uninsured and low-income residents of Douglas County. Greg and Becky Orth, 1700 Lake Alvamar Drive, and Ron and Sue Johnson, 4116 Saddlehorn, are happy to help the cause. “It is critical to have that service in our community,” Becky Orth said, “and we are so fortunate to have it.” Sue Johnson echoed that sentiment. “We have heard from others that they

don’t know where they would be today without the help they have received from Health Care Access,” she said. In addition to helping the clinic, visitors can also expect to find a wealth of decorating ideas during the homes tour. “I’m a do-it-yourselfer” said Orth, who describes her “causally formal” style as French Country. “I like to recycle and upcycle things like old cabinet doors.” She’s also a fan of Mod Podge, a staple ingredient for those who like to decoupage. Orth said that she will take a room-byroom approach to her decorating. “There won’t be a consistent theme. The music room is red and I usually have black and white decorations in there, and the dining room is sort of a chocolaty brown so I’ll

Richard Gwin/Journal-World File Photo Ron and Susan Johnson, who live at 4116 Saddlehorn, have already decorated their home for Christmas as their home will be part of a tour to benefit Health Care Access.

have things that go with that décor.” Whatever decorations she decides to use, Orth knows that she is not going to get too stressed. “Christmas is about family,” she said, which perhaps explains why her favorite decoration is the family tree. “It’s where all of our family memories are, the place where we hang the decorations that the kids made, and the ones with the ornaments from our family travels.” Sue Johnson doesn’t get too stressed about decorating for Christmas either, but that’s probably because it is her husband, Ron, who does most of the work. “He’s the decorator!” she said of the trait that seems to be a part of his DNA. Ron has been in the furniture and decorating business since 1964 — his family owned Johnson Furniture, a downtown fixture for decades — and his holiday decorating starts early. “I used to keep a lock on the basement door until Halloween,” Sue said. “That worked until he built a shed in the backyard and kept the key himself.” Not only does the decorating start early according to the calendar, but it also starts early according to the clock. “Each morning he is up by 4:30 feeding and walking our four dogs, and then he decorates until it is time to go to work at Discovery Furniture,” she said. “Every morning when I get up there is something new and different to look at.” The look of her house changes from day to day and also year to year. “I always offer to take pictures of his handiwork to use as a guide for the following year, but he scoffs at that, because he knows he will start with a new plan — and many new decorations as well,” Sue said, before joking that her suggestion to have an intervention at Discovery and Hobby Lobby was not well-received. Despite the tweaking that occurs every year, the overall scheme stays the same, according to Johnson, who said that it’s basically “as many Santas and candles he can pack into the space available.” Folks at Health Care Access are appreciative of people who purchase tickets to see the homes and of the generous individuals who open them. “Each year we are amazed at the wonderful homes that open their doors to this event and that embrace decorating for the holidays with a beautiful variety of traditions,” said Kim Johnson, assistant director of the clinic.

heaLTh care access eighTh annuaL hoLiDay homes Tour when: Sunday, Dec. 2, noon-5 p.m. where: Homes on the tour include • Harley and Jeree Catlin, 1522 El Dorado Drive. • Greg and Becky Orth, 1700 Lake Alvamar Drive • Ron and Sue Johnson, 4116 Saddlehorn Drive. • Bob and Mary Kay Stephens, 508 Canyon Drive. • Pat and Steven Cardwell, 320 Eaton Drive. • Meadlowlark Estates, 4430 Bauer Farm Drive. DeTaiLs: Tickets may be purchased at all Hy-Vee stores, Sigler pharmacies, Weaver’s Department Store, and Health Care Access clinic, either in person or online. Tickets are $15 in advance or $20 at the door of the first home you visit. At the first home, a color brochure describing the homes will be given to people on the tour. The tickets will be placed in a basket at the last home for a drawing for a seasonal decor prize. There will be a boutique at Meadowlark Estates. About 20 local artists will be selling their art and holiday decor and donating a large portion to the clinic.


Holiday Happenings 2012 13

Holiday

Volunteer Opportunities

E

By Erin Heger

very year hundreds of families in Program, Ballard Community Services also Douglas County are in need of serves the community with food, clothing help with food, clothing and gifts and diaper pantries, as well as helping the for the holidays. unemployed with computer and job search Especially in the last couple of years, skills. with the state of the economy, agencies Those interested in helping with the such as Ballard Community Services have Holiday Bureau Program or any of the panseen an increase in demand for holiday tries can stop by the agency’s Penn House help. location at 1035 Pennsylvania or contact Last year, Ballard Community Services Kyle Roggenkamp at (785) 842-0729. served about 540 families with its Holiday The Roger Hill Volunteer Center can also Bureau Program, up from about 300 famihelp connect community members with lies served in 2007, said Kyle Roggenkamp, agencies seeking help for the holidays. director of human services with Ballard There are several holiday gift donations Community Services. In Douglas “noT onLy is voLunTeering County, a handgooD For The communiTy, ful of additional agencies take BuT iT is TruLy gooD For care of well over your heaLTh.” Shannon Reid, 1,000 families, volunteer coordinator with Roger he said. Hill Volunteer Center “It gets harder each year to adopt all the families who apply for the and adopt-a-family programs volunteers program, Roggenkamp said. “We do make can get involved with. Every year, there is sure that happens, but sometimes it puts a fair trade holiday market at Ecumenical some cost on our shoulders.” Christian Ministries on Kansas University’s With an increased demand comes an campus. Volunteers are needed to work the increased need for volunteer help, and Balevent in various shifts for about a week at lard Community Services, as well as many the end of November, said Shannon Reid, other agencies in Douglas County, provide volunteer coordinator with the Roger Hill several opportunities for members of the Volunteer Center. community to help those in need. The Lawrence Blues Santa Program, a Ballard Community Service’s Holiday collaboration with the Lawrence Police Bureau Program provides clothing and Department and Toys for Tots, needs volmeals for families during the holidays. The unteers to the staff the Toys for Tots store, agency is in need of volunteers to do some wrap gifts and help distribute them. community outreach to ensure the commuReid said she usually sees an increased nity stays engaged in the program. interest in volunteering during the holi“We send people out with fliers, and days. potential adopter letters, and any agency, “We do see a spike in calls during the organization or business that chooses to holidays, more people looking for more adopt a family receives a flier to put up in opportunities,” Reid said. “When Thankstheir window,” Roggenkamp said. “Volungiving rolls around, everybody seems to be teers are a big part of that.” looking for ways to volunteer.” In addition to the Holiday Bureau For more information on volunteer

opportunities in Douglas County, contact the Roger Hill Volunteer Center at (785) 865-5030. The need for volunteers is spread pretty evenly among the agencies that reach out to the Roger Hill Volunteer Center, Reid said. However, The Salvation Army’s holiday programs are well-known in the community and draw a lot of attention. “They have the Adopt-a-Family program, the Red Kettle bell ringing campaign; they do a Christmas Joy Toy shop, and they have their Share the Warmth coat donation,” Reid said. “They are very visible during the holidays.” Last year in Douglas County, The Salvation Army raised about $100,000 with its kettle bell program, said Matthew McCluer, a lieutenant with the Douglas County

Salvation Army. “There’s a huge need in our community,” McCluer said. “The Salvation Army and other agencies are actively working to address that need.” For additional volunteer opportunities with The Salvation Army, contact Marisa McCluer or Liz Coleman at (785) 8434188. Ultimately, volunteering during the holidays benefits everyone, Reid said. “Not only is volunteering good for the community, but it is truly good for your health,” Reid said. “Studies have shown that people who volunteer are healthier mentally and physically, so it’s good for the body, mind and soul to connect with members of the community and offer your skills and time to others in need.”

Great Gift For Mom or Dad!

Announcing the NEW ultra-simple messageQube text-printer

messageQube allows family and friends to send text messages and pictures to loved ones who do not have a computer or mobile device. Simply send the message and it will print outonthemessageQube. Ideal for: • Personal notes and family news • Birthday & anniversary messages • Medication reminders • Weather alerts Easy set up and use. Help your loved ones stay happier and healthier.

Order Now!

www.messageQube.com Enter promo code GIFT and save $10.


14 Holiday Happenings 2012

HolidayUnconventional T

By Eric Melin

Films

rying to pick out a good Christmas movie can be rough-going these days. For every modern classic like “A Christmas Story” and “Elf,” there are terrifyingly awful movies like “Jack Frost”— where Michael Keaton dies in a car accident and is resurrected in a creepy sentient snowman — or “Surviving Christmas,” a putrid Scrooge-like tale that features Ben Affleck at his smirking worst. The best way to avoid the glut of terrible Christmas movies with enough oppressively fake Christmas spirit to bring even Buddy the Elf down is to avoid the traditional Christmas movies altogether. There are plenty of unconventional Christmas movies set during the holidays that offer up their own version of heartwarming Christmas cheer. The ones that fall on the other side of the fence (i.e. the misery of Christmas) at least don’t pander to Hollywood’s worst tendencies. TraDing PLaces (1983) Stockbroker Louis Winthorpe III (Dan Aykroyd) has his life ruined on the whim of two oldster bankers (Don Ameche and Ralph Bellamy) looking for some cheap, cruel amusement in this funny morality tale that’s cold on the outside but has a warm, fuzzy center. When Louis trades places with street hustler Billy Ray Valentine (Eddie Murphy), he’s suddenly on the outside looking in. At his lowest point, he drunkenly crashes a Christmas Eve party in a dirty Santa suit—stealing salmon in his beard, holding people at gunpoint, and eventually trying unsuccessfully to kill himself. What makes “Trading Places” such a great Christmas movie, however, is that Aykroyd and Murphy both learn to be better people and eventually come together

Christmas movies

as an unlikely team (with hooker-witha-heart-of-gold Jamie Lee Curtis) to take down the evil bankers just in time for New Year’s Eve. Now if that’s not Frank Capraesque, I don’t know what is. smoKe (1995) Auggie Wren’s Christmas Story, a short story by author Paul Auster that appeared in the New York Times on Christmas Day in 1990, led to this film collaboration with director Wayne Wang. Several stories are linked together in “Smoke” by the colorful characters who shop at a Brooklyn cigar shop run by the ever-optimistic Auggie (Harvey Keitel). A frustrated writer (William Hurt), a doppelganger for Auster himself, learns to take the time to look at life differently after coincidences open him up to life-changing events. At one point in the film, Keitel sits Hurt down to tell him Auster’s Christmas story that appeared in the Times. It is the centerpiece of the movie and is a simple tale about a man who tries to return a young thief’s wallet and ends up giving an old blind woman an unexpected visit on Christmas. The story’s unexpected warmth comes from its honest exploration of human nature — both the good and bad sides. meTroPoLiTan (1990) Writer/director Whit Stillman’s indie gem follows a group of upper-crust New York students home from their first year in college on Christmas break. When a middle-class fellow intrudes upon the ranks of their self-proclaimed Brat Pack, it causes all kinds of trouble. Hearts are broken and loyalties change, but what’s appealing about “Metropolitan” is that an all-night party for these kids involves

Christmas trees, cocktails, hilarious pseudo-intellectual discussions about Jane Austen and socialism, plus dancing the cha-cha without any hint of kitsch. Stuck in that netherworld between youthful idealism and impending adulthood, these young debutantes are charming in their own clueless way. The snappy dialogue is a mouthful, but the naturalistic acting makes it even more charming, as if the actors struggling to get their lines out correctly only added to their characters’ unsure position in life. Did I mention that it’s flat-out deadpan funny too? The best thing I can say about “Metropolitan” is that I had no idea people like this existed, much less that by the film’s end I would care about them so much. eDwarD scissorhanDs (1990) Although most of the scenes in this Johnny Depp-Tim Burton fairy tale take place in a sunny West Coast setting sometime around the 1950s, many of its key emotional moments occur in a snowy paradise while the movie’s scissor-handed outcast (Depp) creates ice sculptures for his true love Kim (Winona Ryder). The entire movie is actually bookended by an elderly Kim explaining to her granddaughter about who Edward was and where snow comes from. Christmas season is the time for giving, but poor Edward can get no peace. In the movie’s most memorable scene, Edward creates a beautiful ice sculpture that Kim dances under while the family sets up Christmas decorations. But he also becomes feared and persecuted by most of the townspeople. “Edward Scissorhands” follows in the long tradition

of misunderstood and persecuted antiheroes like “The Hunchback from Notre Dame” and “Frankenstein,” and the theme of the film revolves around acceptance. BraziL (1986) A family man named Archibald Buttle is mistaken for criminal Archibald Tuttle when a dead fly falls into a typewriter at a government office and causes a key to type the wrong letter. Buttle is then tortured and executed by the State, and his family is offered receipts for their trouble in Terry Gilliam’s black comedy/dystopian nightmare “Brazil.” Office drone and part-time dreamer Sam Lowry (Jonathan Pryce) decides to do a good deed at Christmas time, so he drives out to the devastated family’s house to present them with their refund check — it was merely a governmental mistake. Ouch. It’s just the beginning of the very un-Christmas moments in a disturbing Orwellian movie that revels in the counterpoint of misery with “put on a-happy face” superficial Christmas cheer. The bulk of the film takes place during the holiday season, and there’s no shortage of anti-consumerism parody and snarky heartlessness to go with some of the characters’ hilariously hollow Christmas sentiment. If you like your comedy black, no sugar, this is your cup right here. Simply put, “Brazil” is one of the best and most original dystopian science-fiction films ever made. in Bruges (2008) A London mob boss (Ralph Fiennes) sends two hitmen (Colin Farrell and Brendan Gleeson) to the quaint medieval tourist trap of Bruges, Belgium, during Christmas to cool off. A botched hit has


Holiday Happenings 2012 15

presents: Theatre Lawrence presents:

SHOWS:

November 30, December 1,2; 6,7,8,9; 13,14,15,16 Thursday, Friday, Saturday: 7:30 Saturday & Sunday: 2:30

By Rodgers & Hammerstein

On Sale now! 785.843.7469

www.theatrelawrence.com raised the heat on this mismatched odd couple, so they need to lie low for a while. This is seemingly impossible for Farrell, who immediately falls in with a small-time drug dealer and a film crew to pass the time. Writer/director Martin McDonagh is the man behind this new cult classic, which mixes pitch-black absurdist comedy with real introspection. If Christmas is a time for reflection, then it is no wonder Farrell’s character is so haunted by his past during their stay in Bruges. As wild as the story gets, McDonagh manages to keep the characters in check and the whole loony affair ends on a surprisingly emotional note. This definitely isn’t your standard Christmas fare, but it may be a good and violent palette cleanser after another annual viewing of “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation.” BLacK chrisTmas (1974) Speaking of violent Christmas movies, the horror film “Black Christmas” was ahead of its time in that it became the template for “Friday the 13th” and all other slasher films that have followed. Margot Kidder and her sorority sisters are throwing a Christmas party when they start getting obscene phone calls. It turns out to be a deranged serial killer who begins picking them off as the list of possible suspects begins to dwindle. As with every horror classic,

“Black Christmas” was later remade with diminishing returns and gratuitous gore, in 2006. Believe-it-or-not fun fact: This is the first of two Christmas-themed movies to be directed by Bob Clark, who went on to give us the “Christmas Story” of a boy and his Official Red Ryder Carbine-Action 200-Shot Range Model Air Rifle in 1983. The ice harvesT (2005) This underappreciated crime drama/ black comedy revolves around a lonely mob lawyer from Wichita (John Cusack) and his buddy (Billy Bob Thornton), who steal a suitcase full of cash from some very bad gangsters on Christmas Eve. Directed by Harold Ramis, the man usually responsible for lighter comedic fare like “Groundhog Day,” this fatalistic neo-noir didn’t do well at the box office during the family-friendly Thanksgiving weekend. “The Ice Harvest” is one of Cusack’s darkest turns, as he pines for a local strip club owner and makes terrible decisions, while Thornton just basically goes off the deep end. As with most downward spiral noirs, money changes everything, and the desperation that brought on the crime in the first place bubbles to the surface. The holidays are definitely used as a counterpoint to spotlight Cusack’s misery, and Oliver Platt steals the show as an alcoholic who has the worst — and most hilarious — Christmas dinner ever.

1501 New Hampshire

Associate Co-Produced by Kurt Goeser: State Farm

Co-Produced by

HOURS Weekdays 9:30 - 6:00 Thurs.‘til 8:30 Sat. 9:30 - 5:30 Sun. 12-4

647 Massachusetts • 842-6000

www.lawrencemarketplace.com (search Winfield House)


16 Holiday Happenings 2012

Gifts for Mom and Tots

SantaSpy

Imported Directlyy From th h Pole the North

‘Twas the night before Christmas, and, unbeknownst to Santa, one 10-year-old boy had set up a security camera‌ Hoping to catch St. Nick in the act of bounding on in and opening his pack, This lad, who normally Doesn’t cause trouble – much, Programmed a camera On his iTouch. He carefully planted it Under a table To prove whether Santa Was fact, fiction or fable.

312-9494 841 Massachusetts St. www.bluedandelionkids.com

Off to bed went the Plotting young boy With visions of Legos, Airsofts and toys.

Julie Dunlap is the author of River City Jules, a weekly column that appears in the JournalWorld's Go! section on Mondays.

(Off to bed, also, Went his sisters, then parents, Clueless their living room Was under surveillance!)

Frame after frame Dear Santa deleted, Somewhat amused And somewhat defeated.

Soon Santa arrived with goodies in tow and set them all out for a Christmas morn show.

He worried that, next year, The boy upstairs sleeping Would lose sight of the magic Because of his peeping.

It took quite awhile, The clock was tick-tocking, Still he persevered To fill that last stocking.

But Santa forgot His magic is timeless, Bottled not in eight reindeer, But in his great kindness.

But something odd caught Santa’s weary eye, The iTouch was filming His moves like a spy.

His kids might grow up, But they’ll never lose cheer. And that he can count on Year after year.

“I’ve got to erase this, I hate to be rude, but I can’t have my method broadcast on YouTube!�

And that’s why he shouts With all of his might, “Happy Christmas to ALL, And to ALL a good night!�

Jayhawk Holiday Gift Guide Get everything your family needs in one trip!

Open Black Friday 7am - 7pm 30% off sale items all weekend long ˜ Free gift with purchase from 7am - 10am [Friday only] ˜ 4 for $20 tees, 2 for $25 long sleeve tees and 2 for $40 Hoodies [Select styles apply] ˜

Crewneck Sweatshirt $ 29.99

Ladies Wideneck Crew $27.99

Charcoal Hoodie $ 49.99

ADKU2012

Sock Monkey $ 13.99

ENNL T FG4& 64''6 ˜ #94'0%'X  ˜ KLIgLGLgHHHN ˜ #/'&#;72'4614'T%1/ ˜ 10&#;g#674&#; M#/gK2/ ˜ 70&#; EF2/gI2/


Giftsfor Pets

W

Holiday Happenings 2012 17

By Kelly Stroda

e usually think about buying gifts for people, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t plenty of options of presents to buy for Spot or Buffy. Here is a collection of some holiday gift items you can buy for pets and pet people, and where to buy them. Pet World’s Holiday Sale Sherry Emerson, co-owner of Pet World, 711 W. 23rd St., says the treat aisle becomes a popular destination during the Christmas season. “The treat aisle becomes very popular because people make stockings for Fido,” she said. Pet World has a holiday sale each December, and everything in the store is discounted. This year’s sale is scheduled for Dec. 8. Good Dog! Biscuits and Treats Guests at the Lawrence Community Shelter have been making these homemade dog treats since 2006. Shelter guests earn wages while making the treats. Treats can be purchased around town at Pawsh Wash, 1520 Wakarusa Drive; The Merc, 901 Iowa St.; Pet World, 711 W. 23rd St.; Sunflower Natural Pet Supplies, 919 Iowa St.; Lawrence Humane Society, 1805 E. 19th St.; and the Lawrence Farmers’ Market. Treats can also be purchased online at www.gooddoglcs.org. Lucky Paws Bakery and Unique BARKtique Lucky Paws owner Raven Rajani says

her downtown shop, at 4 E. Seventh St., will be transformed for the holidays. From Christmas-themed homemade dog biscuits to custom-painted pup portraits to Lucky Paws’ own coffee blend, she said her store provides a variety of gifts for dogs and dog people. Lucky Paws Bakery and Unique Bartktique is open on Thursdays from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m.; Fridays from noon to 5 p.m.; Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundays from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Rajani says that the store will have extended hours during the holiday season and that the hours will be announced on the Lucky Paws Facebook page. Holiday Farmers’ Market The Lawrence Farmers’ Market’s holiday market has a plethora of gifts for people, but they don’t forget about pets. A handful of vendors will have petfriendly gifts. Rocky Hills Elk Ranch has dog bones and Earth Flowers will have felt cat toys. Plus, Good Dog! Biscuits and Treats will be at the event. The Holiday Farmers’ Market is Saturday, Dec. 8, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Holiday Inn Lawrence, 200 McDonald Drive. BarkBox With BarkBox, Christmas can come every month. BarkBox is a service where customers (and their dogs) can receive four or more gifts for their pet each month. The BarkBoxes are shipped on the 15th of every month. Plus, 10 percent of the price goes to help a rescue group. For more, check out barkbox.com.

Ryan Waggoner/Journal-World Photo

Knit Spin Weave Crochet Gift Certificates Project Bags Needle & Hook Cases Fancy Weaving Shuttles Kid’s Potholder Looms Rigid Heddle Looms Hand-dyed Spinning Fiber

YARN BARN of Kansas 930 Massachusetts Open Daily 842-4333 www.yarnbarn-ks.com


18 Holiday Happenings 2012

Holiday Events 2012 11/22 • runLawrence Thanksgiving Day 5K, 8:30 a.m., Woodlawn School, 508 Elm St. • LINK Thanksgiving Day community meal, 1-2:30 p.m., First Christian Church, 1000 Kentucky. 11/23 • Fair Trade Holiday Market, 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Ecumenical Campus Ministries, 1204 Oread Ave. • Downtown Holiday Lighting and Santa Rescue, 5:30 p.m., Ninth and Massachusetts streets. 11/24 • Fair Trade Holiday Market, 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Ecumenical Campus Ministries, 1204 Oread Ave. • Holiday Art Sale, 9 a.m.-noon, Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. • Bizarre Bazaar, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire. • Van Go Adornment Sale, 7-10 p.m., 715 N.J. 11/25 • Fair Trade Holiday Market, 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Ecumenical Campus Ministries, 1204 Oread Ave. • Van Go Adornment Sale, 1-5 p.m., 715 New Jersey. 11/26 • Festival of Trees, 10 a.m.-8:30 p.m., Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts. • Fair Trade Holiday Market, 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Ecumenical Campus Ministries, 1204 Oread Ave. • Van Go Adornment Sale, 1-5 p.m., 715 New Jersey. 11/27 • Festival of Trees, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts. • Fair Trade Holiday Market, 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Ecumenical Campus Ministries, 1204 Oread Ave. • Van Go Adornment Sale, 1-5 p.m., 715 New Jersey. • Holiday Art Sale, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City.

• “Chautauqua,” with first-person presentations by Kansas historians and actors, a tie-in to “The Kansas Nutcracker,” 6 p.m., Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire. 11/28 • Festival of Trees, 10 a.m.-8:30 p.m., Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts. • Fair Trade Holiday Market, 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Ecumenical Campus Ministries, 1204 Oread Ave. • Van Go Adornment Sale, 1-5 p.m., 715 New Jersey. • Holiday Art Sale, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. 11/29 • Festival of Trees, 10 a.m.-8:30 p.m., Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts. • Fair Trade Holiday Market, 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Ecumenical Campus Ministries, 1204 Oread Ave. • Van Go Adornment Sale, 1-5 p.m., 715 New Jersey. • Holiday Art Sale, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. • Lawrence Children’s Choir Holiday Concert, 7 p.m., Free State High School, 4700 Overland Drive. 11/30 • Fair Trade Holiday Market, 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Ecumenical Campus Ministries, 1204 Oread Ave. • Share the Warmth Coat Distribution, 9 a.m.-noon and 1-4 p.m., location to be announced. • Gingerbread Festival, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Carnegie Building, 200 W. Ninth St. • Van Go Adornment Sale, 1-5 p.m., 715 New Jersey. • Holiday Art Sale, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. • Final Friday, 5-9 p.m., downtown and East Lawrence. • “The Sound of Music,” 7:30 p.m., Theatre Lawrence, 1501 New Hampshire. 12/1 • Fair Trade Holiday Market, 8

Kevin Anderson/Journal-World File Photo Andrew Luton, 4, Lawrence, took his turn to sit on Santa's lap and tell him what he wants for Christmas at an annual Downtown Holiday Lighting Ceremony at Ninth and Massachusetts Streets.

• • • • • •

• • • • • • •

a.m.-6 p.m., Ecumenical Campus Ministries, 1204 Oread Ave. Share the Warmth Coat Distribution, 9 a.m.-noon, location to be announced. Holiday Art Fair, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire. Holiday Extravaganza, 9 a.m.4 p.m., Douglas County Fairgrounds, 2110 Harper. Lighted Christmas Village, 9 a.m.noon, Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. Holiday Art Sale, 9 a.m.-noon, Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. The Santa Claus Express, departures at 10 a.m., 1 p.m. and 3 p.m., Midland Railway Depot, 1515 W. High St., Baldwin City. Gingerbread Festival, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Carnegie Building, 200 W. Ninth St. Downtown Lawrence OldFashioned Christmas Parade, 11 a.m., downtown Lawrence. Ugly Sweater Run, 11 a.m., 12th and Massachusetts streets. First Saturday Players: “The Patchwork Girl of Oz,” 11 a.m., Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire. Santa Paws, pet photos and dog adoption, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Briggs Subaru, 2300 W. 29th Terrace. Festival of Nativities, noon-4 p.m., Centenary United Methodist Church, North Fourth and Elm. December Music Series, 1-2:30 p.m., Watkins Museum, 1047 Massachusetts.

• Van Go Adornment Sale, 1-5 p.m., 715 New Jersey. • First Saturday Players: “The Patchwork Girl of Oz,” 2 p.m., Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire. • “The Nutcracker,” Kansas City Ballet, 2 p.m., Kauffman Center, 17th and Wyandotte streets, Kansas City, Mo. • “The Sound of Music,” 2:30 p.m., Theatre Lawrence, 1501 New Hampshire. • KU School of Music Horn Ensemble Holiday Concert, 7:30 p.m., Swarthout Recital Hall, Murphy Hall, 1530 Naismith Drive. • “The Sound of Music,” 7:30 p.m., Theatre Lawrence, 1501 New Hampshire. • “The Nutcracker,” Kansas City Ballet, 7:30 p.m., Kauffman Center, 17th and Wyandotte streets, Kansas City, Mo. • Handel’s “Messiah,” Kansas City Symphony, 8 p.m., Kauffman Center, 17th and Wyandotte streets, Kansas City, Mo. 12/2 • The Santa Claus Express, departures at 10 a.m., 1 p.m. and 3 p.m., Midland Railway Depot, 1515 W. High St., Baldwin City. • Gingerbread Festival, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Carnegie Building, 200 W. Ninth St. • Festival of Nativities, noon-4 p.m., Centenary United Methodist Church, North Fourth and Elm. • Holiday Homes Tour, a benefit for Health Care Access, noon-5 p.m. at various homes around Lawrence.


• Van Go Adornment Sale, 1-5 p.m., 715 New Jersey. • “The Nutcracker,” Kansas City Ballet, 1 p.m., Kauffman Center, 17th and Wyandotte streets, Kansas City, Mo. • KU School of Music Pre-Vespers Concerts,  1:30 p.m., Bales Organ Recital Hall, 1600 Stewart Drive. • Community Care Visits and Gift Distribution at area nursing homes, 2-4 p.m. • “The Sound of Music,” 2:30 p.m., Theatre Lawrence, 1501 New Hampshire. • KU School of Music presents Holiday Vespers, 2:30 p.m., Lied Center, 1600 Stewart Drive. • Baker University Candlelight Vespers, 4 p.m., Rice Auditorium, Eighth and Dearborn streets, Baldwin City. • KU School of Music Pre-Vespers Concerts,  6:30 p.m., Bales Organ Recital Hall, 1600 Stewart Drive. • KU School of Music presents Holiday Vespers, 7:30 p.m., Lied Center, 1600 Stewart Drive. • Baker University Candlelight Vespers, 7:30 p.m., Rice Auditorium, Eighth and Dearborn streets, Baldwin City. 12/3 • Van Go Adornment Sale, 1-5 p.m., 715 New Jersey. 12/4 • Lighted Christmas Village, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. • Van Go Adornment Sale, 1-5 p.m., 715 New Jersey. • Holiday Art Sale, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. • Rock Chalk Singers, 6 p.m., Swarthout Recital Hall, Murphy Hall, 1530 Naismith Drive • Tuesday Concert: Ukulele Fest!, 7 p.m., Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire. 12/5 • Community Holiday Dinner, 1-3 p.m., Salvation Army, 946 New Hampshire. • Lighted Christmas Village, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. • Van Go Adornment Sale, 1-5 p.m., 715 New Jersey. • Holiday Art Sale, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. • Gingerbread Festival Auction and Gala, 7 p.m., Carnegie Building, 200 W. Ninth St. • Topeka Symphony Orchestra, Capitol Federal Holiday Concert,

• • • •

• •

• • • • • •

• • • • • •

• •

Dec. 5, 7:30 p.m., White Concert Hall, Washburn University, 17th Street and Jewell Avenue, Topeka. 12/6 Lighted Christmas Village, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. Van Go Adornment Sale, 1-5 p.m., 715 New Jersey. Holiday Art Sale, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. The Holly and the Ivy, 7 p.m., Kansas City Symphony, Kauffman Center, 17th and Wyandotte streets, Kansas City, Mo. “The Sound of Music,” 7:30 p.m., Theatre Lawrence, 1501 New Hampshire. KU School of Music Instrumental Collegium Musicum, 7:30 p.m., Bales Organ Recital Hall, 1600 Stewart Drive. KU School of Music Jazz Vespers, 7:30 p.m., Lied Center, 1600 Stewart Drive. 12/7 Lighted Christmas Village, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. Van Go Adornment Sale, 1-5 p.m., 715 New Jersey. Holiday Art Sale, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. “The Kansas Nutcracker,” 7 p.m., Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire. “The Sound of Music,” 7:30 p.m., Theatre Lawrence, 1501 New Hampshire. 12/8 Jingle Bell Run/Walk for Arthritis, 8 a.m., Carnegie Building, 200 W. Ninth St. Breakfast With Santa, 8:30-11:30 a.m., Community Building, 115 W. 11th St. Holiday Art Sale, 9 a.m.-noon, Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. Lighted Christmas Village, 9 a.m.noon, Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. Holiday Farmers Market, 9 a.m.5 p.m., Holiday Inn Lawrence, 200 McDonald Drive. The Santa Claus Express, departures at 10 a.m., 1 p.m. and 3 p.m., Midland Railway Depot, 1515 W. High St., Baldwin City. Children’s Holiday Shop, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire. LOLA Giant Galley Show, 10 a.m.-

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • •

4 p.m., Van Go, 715 New Jersey. Gingerbread House Class for kids, 10 a.m.-noon., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City Santa Paws, pet photos for cats only, noon-3 p.m., Cat Clinic of Lawrence, 1701 Massachusetts. Festival of Nativities, noon-4 p.m., Centenary United Methodist Church, North Fourth and Elm. December Music Series, 1-2:30 p.m., Watkins Museum, 1047 Massachusetts. Van Go Adornment Sale, 1-5 p.m., 715 New Jersey. “The Nutcracker,” Kansas City Ballet, 2 p.m., Kauffman Center, 17th and Wyandotte streets, Kansas City, Mo. “The Sound of Music,” 2:30 p.m., Theatre Lawrence, 1501 New Hampshire. Festival of Lights, 6-9 p.m., downtown Baldwin City. “The Kansas Nutcracker,” 7 p.m., Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire. Kansas Public Radio presents “A Big Band Christmas,” 7 p.m., Liberty Hall, 644 Mass. Lawrence Civic Choir Winter concert, 7:30 p.m., Free Methodist Church, 3001 Lawrence Ave. “The Nutcracker,” Kansas City Ballet, 7:30 p.m., Kauffman Center, 17th and Wyandotte streets, Kansas City, Mo. “The Sound of Music,” 7:30 p.m., Theatre Lawrence, 1501 New Hampshire. 12/9 The Santa Claus Express, departures at 10 a.m., 1 p.m. and 3 p.m., Midland Railway Depot, 1515 W. High St., Baldwin City. LOLA Giant Galley Show, 11 a.m.4 pm., Van Go, 715 New Jersey. Festival of Nativities, noon-4 p.m., Centenary United Methodist Church, North Fourth and Elm. Santa Claws, open house benefit for Operation WildLife, 2-4 p.m., 23375 Guthrie Road in Linwood. Van Go Adornment Sale, 1-5 p.m., 715 New Jersey. “The Nutcracker,” Kansas City Ballet, 1 p.m., Kauffman Center, 17th and Wyandotte streets, Kansas City, Mo. “The Kansas Nutcracker,” 2 p.m., Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire. “The Sound of Music,” 2:30 p.m., Theatre Lawrence, 1501 New Hampshire. Trans-Siberian Orchestra, 3 p.m., Sprint Center, 1407 Grand

• • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Holiday Happenings 2012 19

Blvd., Kansas City, Mo. Washburn Holiday Vespers Concert, 4 p.m., White Concert Hall, Washburn University, 17th Street and Jewell Avenue, Topeka. Organ Vespers Concert, 5 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 946 Vermont. “The Nutcracker,” Kansas City Ballet, 5 p.m., Kauffman Center, 17th and Wyandotte streets, Kansas City, Mo. Lawrence Children’s Choir Holiday Concert, 7 p.m., Free State High School, 4700 Overland Drive. Trans-Siberian Orchestra, 7:30 p.m., Sprint Center, 1407 Grand Blvd., Kansas City, Mo. 12/10 Van Go Adornment Sale, 1-5 p.m., 715 New Jersey. 12/11 Van Go Adornment Sale, 1-5 p.m., 715 New Jersey. Lighted Christmas Village, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. Holiday Art Sale, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. Tuesday Concert: Forest Green, The Winter Concert, 7:30 p.m., LAC. 12/12 Van Go Adornment Sale, 1-5 p.m., 715 New Jersey. Lighted Christmas Village, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. Holiday Art Sale, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast,” 7:30 p.m., Lied Center, 1600 Stewart Drive. 12/13 Salvation Army’s Christmas Joy Shop, 9 a.m.-noon and 1-4 p.m., Douglas County Fairgrounds, 2110 Harper St. Van Go Adornment Sale, 1-5 p.m., 715 New Jersey. Lighted Christmas Village, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. Holiday Art Sale, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. Red Dog’s Jingle Jog, 6 p.m., meet at Ninth and Vermont streets. “The Sound of Music,” 7:30 p.m., Theatre Lawrence, 1501 New Hampshire. Christmas Festival, Kansas City Symphony, 7:30 p.m., Kauffman Center, 17th and Wyandotte streets, Kansas City, Mo.


FelizNavidad! Holiday 20 Holiday Happenings 2012

2 Great Traditional Mexican Restaurants to Celebrate GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE!

712 Mass

785-856-TACO

dine in | carry out | catering

Buy 1 Entrée

Get 1 1/2 Price Equal on lesser value. Offer good at both restaurants Expires 12/31/12

Order Your Tamales For The Holidays! *Only available at Tortas Jalisco

534 Frontier Rd. • Lawrence, KS

785-865-1515 Carry Out - Dine In - Catering

12/14 • Salvation Army’s Christmas Joy Shop, 9 a.m.-noon and 1-4 p.m., Douglas County Fairgrounds, 2110 Harper St. • TubaChristmas 2012, Kansas City Symphony, noon, Kauffman Center, 17th and Wyandotte streets, Kansas City, Mo. • Van Go Adornment Sale, 1-5 p.m., 715 New Jersey. • Lighted Christmas Village, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. • Holiday Art Sale, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. • “The Kansas Nutcracker,” 7 p.m., Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire. • Christmas Festival, Kansas City Symphony, 7:30 p.m., Kauffman Center, 17th and Wyandotte streets, Kansas City, Mo. • “The Nutcracker,” Kansas City Ballet, 7:30 p.m., Kauffman Center, 17th and Wyandotte streets, Kansas City, Mo. • “The Sound of Music,” 7:30 p.m., Theatre Lawrence, 1501 New Hampshire. 12/15 • Lighted Christmas Village, 9 a.m.noon, Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. • Holiday Art Sale, 9 a.m.-noon, Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. • Festival of Nativities, noon-4 p.m., Centenary United Methodist Church, North Fourth and Elm. • Santa Splash, noon-12:45 p.m., Indoor Aquatic Center, 4706 Overland Drive. • December Music Series, 1-2:30 p.m., Watkins Museum, 1047 Massachusetts. • SantaCon Lawrence 2012, 1 p.m., downtown Lawrence. • Van Go Adornment Sale, 1-5 p.m., 715 New Jersey. • Christmas Festival, Kansas City Symphony, 1 p.m., Kauffman Center, 17th and Wyandotte streets, Kansas City, Mo. • “The Kansas Nutcracker,” 2 p.m., Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire.

Events

• “The Nutcracker,” Kansas City Ballet, 2 p.m., Kauffman Center, 17th and Wyandotte streets, Kansas City, Mo. • “The Sound of Music,” 2:30 p.m., Theatre Lawrence, 1501 New Hampshire. • “The Kansas Nutcracker,” 7 p.m., Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire. • “The Sound of Music,” 7:30 p.m., Theatre Lawrence, 1501 New Hampshire. • “The Nutcracker,” Kansas City Ballet, 7:30 p.m., Kauffman Center, 17th and Wyandotte streets, Kansas City, Mo. • Christmas Festival, Kansas City Symphony, 8 p.m., Kauffman Center, 17th and Wyandotte streets, Kansas City, Mo. 12/16 • Salvation Army’s Children’s Christmas Program and Party, 10:45 a.m., Salvation Army, 946 New Hampshire. • Festival of Nativities, noon-4 p.m., Centenary United Methodist Church, North Fourth and Elm. • Van Go Adornment Sale, 1-5 p.m., 715 New Jersey. • KU School of Music Community Music School Concert, 1 p.m., Swarthout Recital Hall, Murphy Hall, 1530 Naismith Drive. • “The Nutcracker,” Kansas City Ballet, 1 p.m., Kauffman Center, 17th and Wyandotte streets, Kansas City, Mo. • “The Kansas Nutcracker,” 2 p.m., Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire. • Christmas Festival, Kansas City Symphony, 2:30 p.m., Kauffman Center, 17th and Wyandotte streets, Kansas City, Mo. • “The Sound of Music,” 2:30 p.m., Theatre Lawrence, 1501 New Hampshire. • Christmas Festival, Kansas City Symphony, 6 p.m., Kauffman Center, 17th and Wyandotte streets, Kansas City, Mo. • “The Nutcracker,” Kansas City Ballet, 5 p.m., Kauffman Center, 17th and Wyandotte streets, Kansas City, Mo.


12/17 • Van Go Adornment Sale, 1-5 p.m., 715 New Jersey. • “Glad Tidings,” Topeka Festival Singers, 7:30 p.m., White Concert hall, Washburn University, 17th Street and Jewell Avenue, Topeka. 12/18 • Van Go Adornment Sale, 1-5 p.m., 715 New Jersey. • Lighted Christmas Village, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. • Holiday Art Sale, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. 12/19 • Van Go Adornment Sale, 1-5 p.m., 715 New Jersey. • Lighted Christmas Village, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. • Holiday Art Sale, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. • “The Nutcracker,” Kansas City Ballet, 7:30 p.m., Kauffman Center, 17th and Wyandotte streets, Kansas City, Mo. 12/20 • Adopt-a-Family Distribution, 9 a.m.-noon, Salvation Army, 946 New Hampshire. • Van Go Adornment Sale, 1-5 p.m., 715 New Jersey. • Lighted Christmas Village, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. • Holiday Art Sale, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. • “The Nutcracker,” Kansas City Ballet, 7:30 p.m., Kauffman Center, 17th and Wyandotte streets, Kansas City, Mo. 12/21 • Van Go Adornment Sale, 1-5 p.m., 715 New Jersey. • Lighted Christmas Village, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. • Holiday Art Sale, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. • “The Nutcracker,” Kansas City Ballet, 2 p.m., Kauffman Center, 17th and Wyandotte streets, Kansas City, Mo. • “The Nutcracker,” Kansas City Ballet, 7:30 p.m., Kauffman Center, 17th and Wyandotte streets, Kansas City, Mo. 12/22 • Lighted Christmas Village, 9 a.m.noon, Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City.

Holiday Happenings 2012 21

Mike Yoder/Journal-World File Photo Stephanie Roberts, front left, and Shannon Gray, right, lead participants in the 2nd annual SantaCon event Dec. 17, 2011. SantaCon featured elements of a flash mob and pub crawl with Christmas carols and random acts of kindness.

• Holiday Art Sale, 9 a.m.-noon, Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City. • Festival of Nativities, noon-4 p.m., Centenary United Methodist Church, North Fourth and Elm. • Van Go Adornment Sale, 1-5 p.m., 715 New Jersey. • “The Nutcracker,” Kansas City Ballet, 2 p.m., Kauffman Center, 17th and Wyandotte streets, Kansas City, Mo. • “The Nutcracker,” Kansas City Ballet, 7:30 p.m., Kauffman Center, 17th and Wyandotte streets, Kansas City, Mo. 12/23 • Festival of Nativities, noon-4 p.m., Centenary United Methodist Church, North Fourth and Elm Streets. • Van Go Adornment Sale, 1-5 p.m., 715 New Jersey. • “The Nutcracker,” Kansas City Ballet, 1 p.m., Kauffman Center, 17th and Wyandotte streets, Kansas City, Mo. • “The Nutcracker,” Kansas City Ballet, 5 p.m., Kauffman Center, 17th and Wyandotte streets, Kansas City, Mo. 12/24 • Salvation Army Red Kettle drive ends at noon. 12/25 • Lawrence Free Community Christmas Day Dinner, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 946 Vt. 12/26 • Lighted Christmas Village, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City.

12/27 • Lighted Christmas Village, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City.

12/28 • Lighted Christmas Village, 1-4 p.m., Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., Baldwin City.

G IF T CA R D


22 Holiday Happenings 2012

Holiday Music roundup

W

By Sarah Henning

ant free holiday entertainment without a bunch of strangers signing on your dormant lawn? The Lawrence Civic Choir can deliver. The choir’s 2012 winter concert is at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 8, at the Lawrence Free Methodist Church, 3001 Lawrence Ave. For $10, event-goers can hear a number of holiday and winter favorites, including: • Ave Maria – by Anton Bruckner • Ave Maria – Music by Franz Schubert, Arr. Janet Pummill • Ave Maria – by James A. Smith • Blow, Blow, Thou Winter Wind – by John Rutter

• Christmas Day – by Gustav Holst • Christmas Time Is Here – Words by Lee Mendelson, Music by Vince Guaraldi, Arr. by Audrey Snyder • The First Noel – English Carol, Arr. Dan Forrest • The First Noel – Arr. Dan Forrest • Good Ale – by John Rutter • Joy, Joy, Joy – Arr. Robert Page • Snowfall – Lyrics by Ruth Thornhill, Music by Claude Thornhill, Arr. by Roger Emerson wanT more? Lawrence and the surrounding area has plenty to choose from for music lovers

during the month of December. A rundown of holiday and winter performances: Ku vesPers When: 2:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Dec. 2 Where: The Lied Center, 1600 Stewart Drive Cost: $13.50 for general admission, $11 for students and seniors; discounts available for KU faculty, staff and students Ticket information: lied.ku.edu; 785-864-2787 Ku Jazz vesPers When: 7:30 p.m. Dec. 6 Where: The Lied Center, 1600 Stewart Drive Cost: $8 for general admission, $16 for students and seniors; discounts available for KU faculty, staff and students Ticket information: lied.ku.edu; 785-864-2787

LecomPTon vesPers When: 2 p.m. Dec. 2 Where: Territorial Capital (Lane) Museum, 620 Woodson Ave., Lecompton Cost: Free Information: 785-887-6148; lanemuseum@aol.com. BaKer chrisTmas canDLeLighT vesPers When: 4 p.m. Dec. 1 Where: First United Methodist Church, 708 Eighth St., Baldwin City Cost: Free Information: bakeru.edu organ vesPers concerT FeaTuring TanDy reussner When: 5 p.m. Dec. 9 Where: First United Methodist Church, 946 Vermont St.

Holiday Gifts and Food from Amish Country fine food

candy stocking

gifts

stuffers

gift baskets cookbooks mond a n n Ci s bake roll aily! d

Come visit us for a memorable holiday season!

case Visit our deli eats for Troyer m y and cheeses b the pound!

Auntie Em’s Deli

832-1333 • 2311 Wakarusa Dr. M-F 10am -6pm & Sat. 10am-4pm


Holiday Happenings 2012 23

Mike Yoder/Journal-World File Photo Tandy Reussner, a Ph.D. concert organist, will give a free Organ Vespers concert Dec. 9, to benefit local charities.

Organ Vespers concert

D

By Daisy Wakefield

r. Tandy Reussner is aware from Kansas University. She has won that the organ isn’t the first national organ competitions, including that instrument that comes to mind of the Music Teachers National Association when talking about lively, family-friendly and the Chicago Women Organists. She is concerts. But anyone who has been to her the author of a book on the life of American Christmas performances can attest to the organist David Craighead, and a composer fact that people of all ages enjoy the annual of a choral anthem, which the Lawrence benefit concert that is in its 15th year. Children’s Choir premiered. Spirited, fun pieces are interspersed with The donations-only concert will holiday classics, many of which Reussner benefit the local charity Family Promise has personally arranged or transcribed. and the Lawrence Memorial Hospital This takes a tremendous amount of time, Endowment Fund. Contributions may be but when songs like “Sleigh Ride” come designated specifically, and all undesignated alive in a symphonic orchestra on the contributions will be divided among the organ, Reussner is gratified. She gives two beneficiaries. significant time and thought to the concert This year’s Organ Vespers Concert will each year, beginning the process during the also feature a brass ensemble, a violinist, summer months by considering the theme and the Lawrence Memorial Hospital and pieces for that year’s concert. Medical Staff Men’s Chorus. As well, “In order to make sure the program Reussner’s husband, Lee, and daughters, engages the audience and keeps their Liesel and Hannah, have always taken part attention, I choose the pieces very carefully in the concert as vocalists, and they see this and think about the flow, one piece to as a family tradition. another. Mood, logical progression and “[We] love this time of year when we ease of logistics are all carefully chosen so as a family spend hours making music that folks can come away from the concert together. Some families take mission feeling like they had a respite from the trips together, some serve at Habitat for busyness of the season and that all that is Humanity or Family Promise. Others good about Christmas has been restored. volunteer at the Community Shelter.  In the It’s part of the art of same way, in an effort performing that I to make an impact organ vesPers absolutely love.”   on the world around concerT Reussner, whose Featuring Tandy Reussner us and on people’s career in organ playing lives, we make music 5 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 9 has spanned almost 30 together by giving this First United Methodist years, has a doctorate annual Organ Vespers Church, 946 Vermont in organ performance Concert.”

3

201


24 Holiday Happenings 2012

Festival ofTrees Candice Cesare, Lawrence, of OrthoKansas, P.A., decorates her Bad to the Bone Christmas tree during setup for the annual Festival of Trees, Nov. 27, 2011, at Liberty Hall in downtown Lawrence.

John Young/Journal-World File Photo

V

isit Ruth Daum at Pioneer Ridge Health Center and she’ll have something to show you. Almost six months out of the year, she’s got a project in the works — handmade Christmas ornaments of paper. Her designs are elaborate, intricate and highly sought. Mainly, she takes small circles of brightly colored paper — at least 20, sometimes more — and curls each one into a point, bringing them all together to create a spiky ball. If it looks like it took hours of care to make, that’s because it did. But you’d never guess that many of Daum’s materials are things others would have thrown away. Ann Bell says Daum transforms medicine cups, old papers and would-be recycling into her crafts because Daum, 97, didn’t have much growing up in a Depression-era farmhouse. She doesn’t like seeing things go to waste. No, not when her crafty imagination can turn cardboard and scraps — with a little heart and a little Elmer’s — into something to help someone else.

Gift includes candle and class offer redeemable for 12 Jazzercise classes. Offer must be redeemed by January 31, 2013 and 12 classes must be used by March 1, 2013. Valid at participating locations for new customers or those who have not attended Jazzercise in six months or longer. No cash value. Other restrictions may apply.

Join us Saturday December 1st, 5-8pm GIRLS' NIGHT OUT & SHOPPING EXPO Sip, Shop & Socialize! FREE Admission (with 2 food items for Just Food) includes Wine Tasting, Chair Massages, Appetizer Samples, Shopping: Jewelry, Fashion Accessories, Art, Gifts, Holiday Decor, Local Services.

By Alex Garrison

Lawrence Jazzercise Fitness Center

3115 W. 6th St. - 785-331-4333 - jazzercise.com - 800-FIT-IS-IT

When Bell came to work at Pioneer Ridge as a case manager, she said, staff told her pretty quickly about Daum and her trees. Since 2007, she’s volunteered her time to make the ornaments for a tree in the annual festival, a benefit of the Shelter Inc., held at Liberty Hall. Daum didn’t know Bell had come from working at the Shelter and already knew the buzz about Daum’s highly bid-for trees. Still, she put Bell to work helping gather materials and being the person to set up at Liberty Hall — under Daum’s strict instructions. Bell has tried to make the starburst-like ornaments. She couldn’t, she says, but she’s had Daum pass the secrets to her 10-year-old son. This year, which Daum admits could be her last, the starburst tree will be the first in line for viewing and for auction, a fact Daum beams in retelling her current care giver, Synthia Somerhalder. Everybody wants your crafts, Somerhalder tells Daum. “You could go into business!” Nope, Daum says. “I just want to help some kids.”


Holiday Happenings 2012 25

Ruth Daum, 97, poses with one of her decorated trees. She spends many months of the year creating handmade Christmas ornaments, many of which can be seen at the annual Festival of Trees.

The Beginning of the Good News of Jesus Christ

See and Celebrate What’s Emerging

Trinity Lutheran Church 1245 New Hampshire

Contributed Photo

(one block east of Massachusetts, just south of South Park); 843-4150

www.tlclawrence.org Sunday Services, 8:30 & 11 a.m. Thanksgiving Eve, Wed., Nov. 21 Service at 6:30 p.m. All offerings support Lawrence Community Shelter John Young/Journal-World File Photo Lori Alexander, Lawrence, of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, P.A., decorates her Mardi Gras Christmas tree during setup for the annual Festival of Trees on Nov. 27, 2011, at Liberty Hall in downtown Lawrence.

The 26Th annuaL FesTivaL oF Trees runs from 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Nov. 26, Nov. 28 and Nov. 29, and from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Nov. 27 at Liberty Hall. (These are the viewing times) There’s a $3 suggested donation to the Shelter to view the trees and wreaths. The auction party begins at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 27 for a suggested donation of $35. The displays are up for auction then, with delivery to the winning bidders Nov. 30.

Advent III, Sunday, Dec. 16: Lessons and Carols at both 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Wednesday in Winter Soup Supper, 5:30 p.m. Worship, 6:30 p.m. All offerings support Family Promise

“Fear Not”

And then Christmas! Christmas Eve services: 4 p.m., 7 p.m., and 10 p.m. Christmas Day, Tuesday, Dec. 25: Brunch at 10 a.m. Holy Eucharist at 11 a.m.


26 Holiday Happenings 2012

Gingerbread T Richard Gwin/Journal-World File Photo

Clark Fulton has transformed gingerbread into an 1800s-style home for this year's Gingerbread House Festival and Auction.

DINE WITH US

LOCATED IN THE HEART OF HISTORICAL DOWNTOWN LAWRENCE

785-843-4111

746 MASSACHUSETTS STREET | LAWRENCE, KS 66044

Houses

By Alex Garrison

he gingerbread houses for sale at the annual Big Brothers Big Sisters auction are not what you’d call “cookie-cutter.” They’re detailed and elaborate, funny and nostalgic, but never run-of-the-mill. And they raise hundreds of dollars for a good cause. Greg Thompson and his wife, Tonya Kulaga, a Lawrence Realtor, plus their daughter, on occasion, are frequent contributors to the auction. Kulaga says it’s Thompson who has the true artistic skill, but her advice for gingerbread mastery is to use a recipe that includes corn-syrup; the bread’s not for eating, after all; it’s for home-building. Thompson’s creations have included an Empire State Building replica (complete with a Santa-hat-wearing King Kong) and a crowd-pleasing version of the balloon-uplifted house from the children’s movie “Up.” His advice for creating gingerbread houses is to keep it simple at first and then work your way up over several holiday seasons to more detailed work. And a true masterpiece takes time, at least eight hours. More advice from Thompson, who gets email requests for help frequently after Kulaga posts pictures of the auction entries online: • Clean, detailed work is the most important thing. So simplifying your house so you can concentrate your time on clean work and details is better than trying to add more to it in a rush. • What surrounds the house is as important as the house itself. Walkways, trees, grass, fences, animals, people, kites, birds, planes, smoke, gardens, whatever you can think of to enhance the parcel around your building will add that something special to your work,

again focus on detail and not quantity. • Make sure your basic structure is strong and ready to withstand the weight and ornamentation you will be applying to it. Plan your work in phases so you can allow your icing to set and harden before stressing it with a lot of additional weight. A smaller house will generally require less attention to address its structural soundness. • I find using canned food of various sizes works well to support and hold walls, trees and other what-nots upright and together overnight to allow icing that’s holding them together to set. • It helps to mark/outline the foundations on your base before you stand up your gingerbread walls, this helps to make sure your structure is squared. • Use gingerbread scraps and extra icing to re-enforce interior corners of your base structure, any additional surface area you can get to bridge two pieces of gingerbread will improve the chances your house will stay together. • Gingerbread expands and contracts with moisture. It does not expand and contract the same amount as the other “stuff” like royal icing and candy that you are attaching to it. Trying to keep your work away from heating/cooling vents and in a room with a steady temperature and climate will help reduce stress on your piece as it contracts and expands each day. • Foam-core poster board can make a good stand-in when you are trying to figure out your pattern. Once you have tricky pieces hammered out in foam-core poster board, you can use those pieces as your gingerbread template. Foam-core might stick to your raw gingerbread so you might want to keep it separated with


Holiday Happenings 2012 27 • a sheet of parchment paper. • Some things you might find handy when building your house: » Canned food to prop up walls while they set » A sheet of sandpaper to adjust cooked gingerbread to fit » An X-acto knife » Foam-Core poster board to model your gingerbread pieces and make templates » Two wooden yard sticks; you can

use these for many things, but they are also good as a spacer » Parchment paper; cook and roll your dough on this » A couple of toothpicks to make small adjustments and scrape off excess icing » Nonstick spray can he helpful when cutting out your gingerbread to apply to your templates to keep them from sticking to your raw bread.

This year’s aucTion is at 7 p.m. Dec.

5 at the Eldridge Hotel. Tickets are $40 and can be purchased the night of, or anyone can call 843-7359 for more info. The viewing times are from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Nov. 30 and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Dec. 1 and Dec. 2.

LAWRENCE FARMERS MARKET

Holiday Market AT THE HOLIDAY INN

HOLIDOME 200 MCDONALD DRIVE

LAWRENCE, KS

DECEMBER 8 9AM TO 5PM

Thank you to our friends at KLWN for their continued support! Mike Yoder/Journal-World File Photo A gingerbread version of Kansas University’s Spooner Hall, foreground left, is one of 25 gingerbread creations featured at the 17th annual Gingerbread Festival Auction at the Carnegie Building, 200 W. Ninth St. This year's auction will be at 7 p.m. Dec. 5 at the Eldridge.

25TH

ANN

IVER

SARY


28 Holiday Happenings 2012

Festivalof the Nativities i By Kelly Stroda

The Lawrence Civic Choir Presents a Holiday Concert:

Joyful Sounds of the Season 7:30 p.m. Saturday, December 8, 2012 Free Methodist Church - 3001 Lawrence Avenue $10 General Admission www.lawrencecivicchoir.org

WE HAVE A VARIETY OF SHIPPING OPTIONS. Big or small we ship it all . And with multiple shipping options, you can choose when to get it there on time, We keep the happy in holiday. Bring your gifts to the Certified Packing Experts today. Copyright© 2012 Mail Boxes Etc., Inc. C8FF333836 08.12

3 OFF

$

UPS® SHIPPING

Limit one coupon per customer. Not valid with other offers. Restrictions apply. Valid and redeemable only when presented at a participating location. The UPS Store centers are independently owned and operated. ©2012 The UPS Store, Inc. Offer expires 12/31/12

The UPS Store

2 5 10

$ OFF PACKAGING when we pack 1 package

$ OFF PACKAGING when we pack 2 packages $ OFF PACKAGING

when we pack 3 packages Limit one coupon per customer. Not valid with other offers. Restrictions apply. Valid and redeemable only when presented at a participating location. The UPS Store centers are independently owned and operated. ©2012 The UPS Store, Inc. Offer expires 12/31/12

Visit us at these two locations:

4000 W 6th St Ste B Lawrence, KS 66049

2040 W 31st St Ste G Lawrence, KS 66046

(Behind Applebee’s)

(Across from Best Buy)

We are locally Owned and Operated.

t’s an evening in late October and a group of women are hard at work in the Upper Room at Centenary United Methodist Church. Right now, the room isn’t much to look at. There are a few tables covered in fabric and, if you turn your gaze upward, garland and Christmas lights line the perimeter of the room. In a few weeks — after 300plus hours of preparation — the room will be transformed to tell the story of Jesus’ birth in more ways than most can imagine. “People come in and say, ‘Oh my gosh. Wow!’” said Connie Hadl, who heads the church’s nativity committee. During the 18th annual Festival of Nativities, more than 350 nativity scenes made of various materials will be displayed at the church, which sits at the corner of Fourth and Elm Streets. The public can come view the nativity scenes between 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. on the first four Saturdays and Sundays in December. The event is free, but donations are welcome. Hadl said the nativity sets are made of “anything you can imagine.” The materials include wood, coal, ceramic, porcelain, marbles, metal, plastic and cornhusks. The number of nativities in the event has grown over the years. “I don’t even remember a lot of them until I unpack them,” said Chris Jump, another member of the nativity committee. Some of the scenes come from close to home. Some come from thousands of miles away. In all, five continents and countless cultures are represented. With each nativity comes a different medium or perspective; with each comes a story of its own, and with each comes a little bit

of history. For example, Jump collects 8-inch and 12-inch-tall clay Santon figurines that date back to the French Revolution. “During the Revolution, they started outlawing churches so people started putting nativities in their homes,” she said. With another set, a Kansas artist painted the nativity scene on a piece of limestone fencepost. Another made of wool felt is from Kurdistan, a predominantly Muslim country in the Middle East. A veil covers Mary’s face. One particular nativity set was made by an artist from Argentina who represents one of the most southernmost living cultures in the world. “It’s as close to Antarctica as we could get,” she said. Joy Sodders has helped with the event for six years. She said there are nativity sets she always looks forward to seeing. Her favorite is the rotating canvas tree that is decorated to mimic Vincent Van Gogh’s “Starry Night” painting. The painting includes a small nativity scene and silhouettes of the Three Wise Men. Art students at Bishop Seabury Academy made the tree. “I wish I knew more about those involved in creating it because it wows me every year,” Sodders said. Over the years, Jump and Sodders have researched nativity scenes and realized that Western culture has made a handful of assumptions about the circumstances of Jesus’ birth. “I think that’s one of the things I like about this,” Jump said. “You have so many different artists’ perspective and so you get so many different views of what people think it might have been like.”


Holiday Happenings 2012 29

Just right for the season! For the stocking

Jpn Goering/Journal-World File Photo Chris Jump and Connie Hadl, left, both of Lawrence, set up the newest addition to Jump's Nativity collection as part of the Festival of Nativities on Dec. 12, 2009, at the Centenary United Methodist Church. Jump said this set, from the headwaters of the Amazon, depicts the holy family as Shipido people.

For Mom gifts For BFF gifts

Kevin Anderson/Journal-World File Photo Meredith Lang and her daughter, Amelia, 8, stopped by the Centenary United Methodist Church, 245 N. Fourth St., to view the Festival of the Nativities. This year the public can view the nativity between 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. on the first four Saturdays and Sundays in December.

704 Massachusetts Lawrence, KS

785-749-7321 since 1994


30 Holiday Happenings 2012

Van Go Adornment Sale T

By Daisy Wakefield

his is Cortez Davis’ third session volunteers act as employers, mentors and with Van Go Inc. and he’s working teachers to her “kiddos,” creating a safe on a project for the annual Adornand family-like environment for the kids ment Sale fundraiser. who need it. This is a small piece compared with Green says, “We do as much esteem the one he finished last summer, a bench building through the process of makcommissioned by Briggs Auto — in the ing art as some one-to-one social service Subaru building, he clarifies, not the programs do. Making art builds esteem in Nissan one. That project entailed more these kids and ultimately impacts if they than two months of work, checking off finish school.” 30 steps in order to complete the project. The 15-year-old program has an atBut that was then, and this is now. A tendance rate of 95 percent, a completion galvanized metal trash can sits in front rate of 97 percent, and a higher graduof him, waiting to be painted. He gives ation rate in similar peer comparisons. it careful attention and “maKing arT BuiLDs ponders esTeem in These KiDs anD what it will be used for. uLTimaTeLy imPacTs iF They “It’s a Finish schooL.” Lynne Green, metal gardirector of Van Go bage can, but I can see it being used like a laundry bin, or a A separate program works with 18- to toy storage bin — maybe for a collection 21-year-olds in the transition from school of Legos.” to adulthood, aiding in social services Like the other apprentice artists at and job placement. Van Go, Davis is a teen worker who The program is funded in part by the was referred to the program by a social U.S. Department of Labor’s Workforce worker or counselor. The youths who Investment Act and also relies on grants, come to Van Go from 3:30 p.m. to 6 donations and fundraisers. The biggest p.m. Monday through Thursday have a sale that Van Go holds in its studio space mix of at-risk backgrounds — mental is the Holiday Adornment Sale. The health issues, educational disabilities, warehouse is decked out as a glittering poverty, juvenile delinquency, substance winter wonderland, where the projects of abuse, teen pregnancy, foster care. They the apprentice artists are displayed and participate in the JAMS program (Jobs in sold. The inventory includes beaded jewthe Arts Make Sense), making art for 10 elry, painted woodwork, fused glass ornahours a week with Van Go’s staff as their ments and platters, and tiled mosaics. bosses and teachers. As for Davis, he plans to continue at Lynne Green, founder and director of Van Go as an apprentice artist. Van Go, has merged her two passions in “Van Go has a level of standards that this converted warehouse at Seventh and they expect, and meeting those standards New Jersey streets: art and disadvantaged gives me a sense of accomplishment, “ he youth. She and her crew of staff and said. “This is a good place.”


Holiday Happenings 2012 31

Celebrate the Season with

Mike Yoder/Journal-World File Photo JAMS (Jobs in the Arts Make Sense) students at Van Go Inc. work on decorating cans for Adornment, the program's holiday show and sale. All proceeds go directly to fund Van Go's arts-based job-training program. JAMS pays at-risk teens, ages 14 to 18, to create permanent, public works of art.

Corpus Christi Catholic Community

Christmas Mass Schedule Monday, December 24th 4 PM 6 PM 12 AM

(Children’s Choir)

Midnight Mass (Choirs begin 11:30pm)

Tuesday, December 25th 9 AM

Christmas Festivities We hope you & your family will be able to join us in these events! Tuesday

Dec. 11

6:30 PM

Dec. 15

9 AM 9 AM - Noon

Dec. 16

4:00 PM

Mike Yoder/Journal-World File Photo Winona Boado, 18, an apprentice artist at Van Go Mobile Arts Inc., paints some handmade wooden trees that were in a previous adornment sale.

van go inc. aDornmenT saLe

715 New Jersey St. Opening night is Nov. 24, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Items may be bought every day after that through Dec. 23, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

School Christmas Program (Pre-Grade 5)

Saturday

Sunday

Cookie Walk Santa’s Workshop

Vespers

6001 Bob Billings Pkwy Lawrence, KS 66049 785-843-6286

www.cccparish.org


32 Holiday Happenings 2012

Eudora/Baldwin City

H

events

By Kelly Stroda

Not everyone is an architect, but with the Gingerbread House Party in Baldwin City, people can at least be architects of their own dessert. On Dec. 8, kindergartners through high school seniors can attend the event at the Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St., and make their own house out of graham crackers, homemade icing and assorted candies. “It’s amazing how clever and unique some of the houses are,” said Arlena McLaren, who has organized the event for nearly a decade. As the weather cools down, the holiday season is in full swing. Both Baldwin City and Eudora have a slew of events planned throughout December to celebrate.

This is the first year the Gingerbread House Party will be held at the Lumberyard Arts Center. Previously, McLaren held the event at her home. She would have four to five parties each December. This year, she joined the children’s programming committee at the arts center, and the event was moved to the arts center. “We’ll have a lot more room to spread out, and we’ll be able to accommodate more kids that way,” McLaren said. Rachelle Vigna has been attending the event with her two daughters for nine years. She said her kids always look forward to the event. “She has perfected it each year and now she has it down

THE PERFECT GIFT Leather Goods for Men & Women Brighton – Hobo – Scully Handbags, Wallets, Briefcases Shoes, Belts, Jackets, Luggage Sunglasses RayBan – Brighton – Hobo Jewelry Huge Selections of Sterling Silver Brighton – Ayala Bar – Chamilia Native American Jewelry Antique Jewelry Gifts & Accessories Frank Lloyd Wright Designs Lamps, Art Glass, Clocks KU Jewelry Jayhawk Doorbell Ties, Scarves, etc.

928 Mass. • Lawrence 785-843-0611 etcowner@sunflower.com www.theetcshop.com FREE Parking in Garage Behind Store

to a science,” Vigna said. In Eudora, the newest event is the Holiday Tour of Lights. The Holiday Tour of Lights costs $2 per person and will allow people to view holiday decorations throughout the city while riding on a hay wagon. “I want people, families especially, to come out and enjoy the holiday season and the town,” said Gary Scott, director of Parks and Recreation for the City of Eudora. The tours will be Tuesdays and Thursdays from Dec. 4 to Dec. 20, and will begin at 6:30 p.m. at the Eudora Recreation Center, 1630 Elm St. Scott said if businesses, large families or other groups would like to reserve a private tour, they can call the Recreation Center at 785-542-1725 or email him at gscott@cityofeudoraks.gov. EUDoRA HoLiDAy EvEnTS hoLiDay Tour oF LighTs • Eudora Recreation Center, 1630 Elm St. • $2 per person • Tuesdays and Thursdays Dec. 4 through Dec. 20 beginning at 6:30 p.m. See holiday lights and decorations throughout the city while riding on a hay wagon that is pulled by a truck. Special tours available upon request and availability. Contact Gary Scott at 785-542-1725 or gscott@ cityofeudoraks.gov. This is a Eudora Parks and Recreation event.   sanTa visiT To euDora recreaTion cenTer • Dec. 8 from 10 a.m. to noon • Dec. 15 from 10 a.m. to noon Children can visit Santa in Eudora and take photos with him. This is a Eudora Chamber of Commerce and Eudora Parks and Recreation sponsored event. BALDWin CiTy HoLiDAy EvEnTS miDLanD raiLway’s sanTa cLaus exPress • Dec. 1-9 • Midland Railway at Santa Fe Depot, 1515 High St.

Children can get an hourlong train ride, take photos with Santa and get a treat. Trains leave the depot at 10 a.m., 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online through the Midway Railway’s website, www. midlandrailway.org. Prices are $8 for children under 12 and $15 for adults. vesPers • Dec. 2 • 4 p.m. to 5 p.m; 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. • First United Methodist Church, 704 Eighth St. The Baker University music department will sing during two Vespers services at First United Methodist Church. FesTivaL oF LighTs ParaDe • Dec. 8 • 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. The annual Festival of Lights Parade and tree lighting ceremony welcomes Santa to town. Children can have their photo taken with Santa after the parade. Hot cocoa and cider are also available at area businesses. hoLiDay arTs saLe • Lumberyard Arts Center • From Nov. 23 to Dec. 21 • Tuesday through Fridays, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.; Saturdays, 9 a.m. to noon Browse gifts made by local artists including jewelry, paintings, prints, notecards and more. gingerBreaD house ParTy • Dec. 8 • 10 a.m. to noon • Lumberyard Arts Center, 718 High St. All supplies and set-up included in the $15 fee. Pre-registration for classes is required. Scholarships available. For more information or to sign up, go to www.lumberyardartscenter.org/classes • Cost: $15 • Contact: Wendy • 785-594-3186 • artfulparties@hotmail.com


Holiday Happenings 2012 33

A

By Terry rombeck

t its root, volunteering for Douglas County Toys for Tots can be a bittersweet role. Watching prideful parents admit they need help to give their children a proper Christmas with toys is tough. But providing that Christmas — and the toy shopping involved — can be a joy. “It’s unbelievably fun,” says Julie Brown, who serves on the organization’s board of directors. “Sometimes we walk through a store with seven or eight carts of toys and people say, ‘Oh, my gosh. How many kids do you have?’” The answer: More than 2,000. That’s the number of children the group’s toy store likely will serve this year, as it does every year. Mary Jones, the Douglas County Toys for Tots coordinator, says the organization aims to help anyone in need — from those with nothing to those who are one missed paycheck away from financial trouble. “We want to make it as easy as possible,” Jones says. “We don’t ask a lot of questions. Our goal is to help as many people as we can.” To receive assistance, toy store shoppers must: • Show proof they live in Douglas County. • Show proof they have children, such as a Social Security card, doctor’s record or school paperwork. • Sign a statement they have not received help from other agencies to pay for toys during the holiday season. “We never ask too many questions,” Jones says. Each family will receive one large gift and two smaller gifts per child; stocking stuffers; stuffed animals; and one board game per family.

Jones says gathering the 10,000 to 15,000 items for the toy shop is a yearround venture, with financial support coming from personal and corporate donations in addition to fundraisers such as an annual pancake feed and the “Fire in the Hole” barbecue contest. “We shop sales,” she says. “We usually keep and eye on what’s out there. We’re picky. We want really quality toys.” She adds: “The staple toys, the scooters and skateboards, kids always want those. They always want dolls, but the dolls change. The Star Wars and Superman types of things come and go.” For the second year, Toys for Tots is partnering with Blue Santa, a charity formed by the Lawrence Police Department, in providing support for families in need. While Toys for Tots provides toys, Blue Santa can provide assistance with food and other items. The groups cross-refer their clients to ensure a secure Christmas for all. Jones and Brown admit watching customers shop for toys can be a difficult process. “Pride is a powerful thing,” Brown says. “It’s hard for some people to come in and ask for help. They’re not always joyful, friendly, warm and happy. But sometimes people in tears come up to you and say, ‘I didn’t have anything for Christmas. I didn’t know what I was going to do. I’m so unbelievably grateful.’ And one of those can carry me through a year.” Those who want to volunteer can contribute new toys at boxes throughout the county. Financial support is accepted by sending a check to Douglas County Toys for Tots, 4100 W. Sixth St., Lawrence, 66049. “We’ll never run out of toys,” Jones says. “The Lawrence community is so great. They always help when we really need help.”

Toy sTore organizeD By DougLas counTy Toys For ToTs when: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays; 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Thursdays; and 9 a.m.-noon Saturdays Dec. 4-22. where: Contact Mary Jones at 766-3023 for the location, which had not been finalized at press time.

First Presbyterian Church 2415 Clinton Parkway

Where all are welcome to share in the journey. December 16

Bells and Choir – both services Children's Christmas Pageant All Church Christmas Dinner

December 20

Healing and Wholeness 7:00 pm in the Chapel

Christmas Eve – December 24

6 pm Family Worship All children encouraged to participate 10 pm Bells, Choir and Communion

December 30

10 am Worship 11 am Fellowship

Sunday Worship 8:30 am Service of Reflection 9:40 am Sunday School for All Ages 11:00 Service for the Lord’s Day

785-843-4171 www.firstpreslawrence.org


AVAILABLE NOW!

• PLAYER PROFILES • BIG 12 FORECAST • 2012 SEASON RECAP • BONUS DIGITAL CONTENT

JUST

$3.95

Purchase online at: ljworldstore.com or at the News Center, 645 New Hampshire


Make the

Holidays

Happen Downtown! Saturday, December 1st

Lawrence Old-Fashioned Christmas Parade Featuring horse-drawn carriages, wagons and coaches on Massachusetts Street

11 am - Parade begins!

Friday, November 23

Lighting Ceremony and Santa’s Arrival 9th & Massachusetts Street

5 pm - Entertainment begins 6 pm - Santa arrives

130

12/25/12



Holiday Happenings