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PhotoHubs 2018 – Coventry Newborn Baby Photography – Liz Roberts Weddings – 1500 Photography New Panel Member – Clive Hall Photoshop – Glyn Dewis

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Looking for a great deal on Fuji X?

Call our challenge team with your wish list.

01772 252188

sales@wilkinson.co.uk

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Contents 10 20

PhotoHubs is Back! Coventry 2018

28 30

Rob Hill Marketing

54 74 84

Liz Roberts Baby & Newborn Photographer Clive Hall New Panel Member

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Gold Awards May & June 2018

© Kelly Aldis

Nigel Ord-Smith Dog Portraits

Stuart Wood Weddings 1500 Photography

© Andy Perrymanford

Glyn Dewis Realistic Skin Smoothing © Jean Rolfe

© Christine Russell Issue 26

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Front Cover “I was kindly told about the location of a Kestrel nest and on my second visit, early doors, I sat and watched as the male would bring food back to the neighbouring tree. Then I watched the female fly over to take the food from him, typically a vole, and then return to the nest to feed her chicks. Watching this was incredibly special to me, although getting a decent image did prove a little tricky with the light as it was falling, shooting hand-held and waiting for the breeze to just move a few leaves to enable me to get some shots. After a quick edit and tidy up of a few areas I managed to make it all about the beautiful Kestrel feeding her young. An amazing few hours and a very special moment�

maark lynham

-Mark Lynham

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STEVE & LESLEY THIRSK The Guild of Photographers Going off the weather that we’ve been having recently, you will no doubt be reading this somewhere hot, whether that is at home or whilst on holiday! As ever, there are plenty of exciting things happening at the Guild, adding value and support to being a member. You may recall that in the last edition we announced an amazing new partnership with Pixsy, one of the worlds leading copyright protection services. This offers all Guild members one of their brilliant packages worth £350 a year totally FREE OF CHARGE. If you’ve not signed up for it yet, you should – the full details are on the Guild’s website! In this edition of Creative Light we have two more new partnerships to announce. Every month we see some amazing work in our Image of the Month competition and we know this is just the tip of the Iceberg in terms of what is produced everyday by members. That got us thinking that we could help you generate extra income from the images you have already produced. With that in mind we are delighted to announce that we have joined forces with ALAMY - “The best place to sell your stock images”! They make it easy for you to work with them as you choose what you want to sell plus they are non-exclusive and offer a better commission than most other agencies. In fact, one of our members has made themselves over £100,000 to date by selling images through them! Normally when you ‘sell’ an image through Alamy, you get a 50% commission on the image sold, a far better rate than many stock agencies but, as you are a member of the Guild, you now get 100% commission for the first 6 months up to the value of £500! So, why not let your images work for you and generate you some extra income? Following requests from members we are also pleased to announce that nPhoto have also become a new Trade Partner. Based in Poland, and with UK representation, nPhoto employ over 400 staff and have become one of the biggest print labs in Europe. Over the last 10 years nPhoto have established themselves as a major player in the UK wedding album supply market. They boast excellent customer care and an 8 day turnaround plus until the end of September they are offering members 75% off Sample Products and 25% off your first year’s orders. You can read more about these two new partnerships in this edition of Creative Light, and the full details are on the Guild’s website. We are also delighted to say that we now know the line up for the PhotoHubs Coventry event that takes place at the amazing Welcome Centre on 14th and 15th November this year. Going off last year it’s a ‘do not miss’ couple of days packed with learning and fun! The event is kindly sponsored by Loxley Colour and ProFoto as well as the Guild of Photographers, and just like last year the main stage has 5 amazing speakers each day! There are also several workshops to attend as well as FREE 121 mentoring opportunities...and of course the Guild will be hosting a fun social event for its members on the evening between the two days. The photographers who are speaking and running workshops are Sujata Setia, Chris Chambers, Guy Gowan, Lauren Bennett, Audrey Kelly, Glenn Norwood, Scott Johnson, Saraya Cortaville, Hannah Couzens and Linda Johnstone. As you would expect, there are more details in this edition, and full details can be found at the PhotoHubs website (www.photohubs.co.uk). We cannot wait! Finally, we would like to warmly welcome Clive Hall as the latest addition to the Guild of Photographers judging panel. He’s a very talented photographer who became a Master Craftsman some time ago following the submission of an amazing body of work, and he’s also a thoroughly nice person, committed to helping others. There’s a great article about him in here, along with others, so we won’t say any more, other than - enjoy the read!

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Editor Welcome to the twenty-sixth edition of Creative Light. Guild member Liz Roberts runs a Newborn & Baby Photography business based in Inverness, Scotland. Liz has been involved in the photography industry for 30 years and shares with the readers of Creative Light a few tips on photographing babies with you. A favourite topic of mine (perhaps because I love dogs and have two of my own), is Dog Portraiture. I was thrilled when Nigel Ord-Smith agreed to be interviewed and he has shared with Creative Light an insight into his world of dogs. The Guild of Photographers welcomes a new Panel Member, Clive Hall. Clive shares with you his work and talks about his photographic journey. See page 74. My Editors Choice for this edition is the beautiful image opposite which was captured by Tracey Dobbs. Tracey's image received Silver in the Guild's Image of the Month Competition for April 2018. I personally love the colour palette of this image. Simply beautiful Tracey and a great capture. Finally, I share with you one of my images. Taken on a recent training course. I was leaning over the bannister looking explaining about pools of available light and direction when this image presented itself to us. The shot was just as it was seen. One of those moments we, as photographers get, and that little extra bit of luck.

julie oswin

Enjoy this fantastic weather we are having, apparently it is going to stick around until the end of August... but we all know the British Weather can be very unpredictable.

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Editors Choice Tracey Dobbs

Awarded Silver - April 2018

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Creative PROCESSING Light LAB Magazine

WINNER 2015-17

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PhotoHubs Coventr

Photo: Suiata Setia

Ten

Inspirational Speakers –

Two ‘Do Not Miss’

Audrey Kelly

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Lauren Bennett

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Days – One Great Location!

Chris Chambers

Linda Johnstone

Glenn Norwood


ry is back!

Sujata Setia

Hannah Couzens

Saraya Cortaville

Scott Johnson

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Photo: Glenn Norwood

THE SPEAKERS ARE: Sujata Setia Photo: Audrey Kelly

Photo: Audrey Kelly

Following on from the success of last year’s amazing event PhotoHubs Coventry is back on 14th and 15th November! Whatever your photographic interests you will learn, be inspired and have fun at these 2 ‘do not miss’ days.

There are 10 incredible seminars on the main stage and 12 potential workshops to attend, as well as great social opportunities and amazing lunches which are included in the very low attendance cost. Key Trade companies will also be there including the event sponsors Profoto and Loxley Colour. The subjects covered include Newborn, Children, Portraiture, Fine Art, Conceptual Storytelling, Fashion and Beauty, Weddings, Travel, Personal Projects, Branding, Pricing, Dog Photography, Editing and Post Production, Workflow, Natural Light and Studio Lighting plus more. There are some great Early Bird booking offers on the event and the number of workshop tickets available are limited so don’t miss out and book your place now. Find out more at the PhotoHubs website – www.photohubs.co.uk.

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An endless source of inspiration, Sujata Setia is a multi-award winning children, newborn, pregnancy /maternity  and family  photographer based in London. Arguably she is one of the most wellknown photographers in the world – all achieved in just over three years. Clients travel from around the world to be photographed by her and she teaches and influences photographers across the world too. She is also a professor of photography at Spain’s most reputable photography institute, and a member of the Guild of Photographers.

Guy Gowan Joining us from the Netherlands is Guy Gowan, one of the creative industry’s world leading solutions experts. In fact he’s regarded by many as an unmatched digital imaging guru! For over 30 years he was a trainer, consultant and presenter for Adobe, Apple, Nikon, Canon, Epson, HP and others but he is best known for his unique ‘Retouching Workflow’ which he has developed and refined for Photographers and Designers worldwide. This unique methodology and non-destructive technique has influenced thousands in the creative community worldwide.


Lauren Bennett As a photographer, Laurens unique editing style inspired many photographers around the globe, resulting in her launching ‘LSP Actions’ in early 2016 to share her unique gift for fast and perfect editing in Photoshop and Lightroom. Adobe is a "second language" to her and many well known photographers swear by her Actions over all other editing tools. These include Ana Brandt, Gary Hill, Russ Jackson, Claire Elliot, Tracy Willis and Melanie East amongst others, so do not miss this rare seminar and workshop opportunity.

Chris Chambers Yorkshire based Chris Chambers is one of the most admired photographers in the UK. Amongst his many accolades he has won Wedding Photographer of the Year, All Round Photographer of the Year and Overall Photographer of the Year with the Guild of Photographers. He has also been recognised by the SWPP as their Overall Photographer of the Year and their Wildlife Photographer of the Year. His training courses are always ‘sell-out’ events.  One of the reasons for this is that they are full of real world advice and practical information which can be used day in day out.

Saraya Cortaville

Photo: Suiata Setia

Saraya is an award winning portrait and documentary photographer with a passion for travel. She was the first ever female photographer to obtain a studio portraiture Fellowship from the BIPP and she is currently one of only two women in the UK to have achieved 2 Fellowships – the latter one of these was also awarded the Peter Grugeon award for the best fellowship portfolio of 2015 Saraya is also a Master Craftsman, Judge and Mentor with the Guild of Photographers as well as author of the book Portrait Photography Art and Techniques.

Scott Johnson Scott photographs weddings across Europe and the United States. He also travels the world as a fun and energetic educator, speaking at major events such as the WPPI Conference. Amongst his many achievements, he has won the Guild of Photographers ‘Wedding image of the Year’, the SWPP’s Wedding and Documentary Categories and won the MPA’s Wedding Album of the Year for 2 consecutive years. He is also a Master Craftsman with the Guild and has Fellowships with both the BIPP and SWPP.

Photo: Saraya Cortaville

Photo: Glenn Norwood

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Audrey Kelly Mum of two Audrey Kelly, is a wedding, portrait and fine art photographer as well as the current president of Northern Ireland’s photography association (PPANI). The “dark beauty” of her thought provoking personal work, has led to many awards. She is the‘Overall Wedding Photographer of the Year 2018’ with PPANI and has been their ‘Overall Photographer of the Year’ many times. She has also won BIPPNI Photographer of the Year, SWPP Illustrative Photographer of the Year as well as international competition accolades including WPPI.

Glenn Norwood Glenn has been working in the professional photography industry since 1990.Based in Northern Ireland, he has worked in many disciplines from commercial to social photographic genres, but has specialised in Fashion and Beauty photography for the last 15 years. Known for how he pushes creative boundaries to capture unique images his work has won him many awards over the years including Northern Ireland Photographer of the Year and he has been a recipient of the Kodak European Gold Award on no less than on three occasions.

Hannah Couzens Hannah is a multi-award winning professional portrait photographer based in London who shoots everything from corporate headshots to families and celebrities.

Photo: Linda Johnson

She started her photographic career young in life, opening her first portrait studio at the age of just 22 and in 2011 she became the youngest member ever to obtain an Associateship with the BIPP. She is known as a lighting specialist and is highly regarded as an educator and mentor, working closely with Profoto, and speaking at events such as the Photography Show.

Linda Johnstone Linda Johnstone is an award winning Animal Photography specialist based in East Sussex. She has an understanding of dogs nature and body language which helps to capture their unique character.  She is happiest and does her best work when with animals, and with the people who share that love of these special companions. She is highly sought after as both a photographer and trainer in this specialist field, running excellent workshops where she generously shares her knowledge and practical advice.

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Guy Gowan


Photo: Hannah Couzens

More Info: PhotoHubs website

Photo: Scott Johnson

www.photohubs.co.uk Issue 26

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Š Sal Cincotta

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The world is my studio Profoto A1

We created the Profoto A1 with a round head that delivers light that’s both natural and beautiful both on camera and off. It’s also incredibly easy and to use, with superfast recycling and a longlasting battery, so you’ll never miss a shot. It might be the smallest light we’ve ever made, but the creative possibilities are enormous. Discover the world’s smallest studio light at profoto.com Issue 26

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Make money from your photography with Alamy Whether it’s your full-time job, a weekend hobby or you’re a student; join our community who are already selling their stock imagery on Alamy to over 100,000 customers worldwide. So far we’ve paid over $190 million to our contributors. Want to know more? Visit alamy.com/contributors

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But can you really make money from stock photography? We spoke to photographer Keith Morris about how he has made over $300,000. Keith! Other photographers keep asking what your secret is, but is there one? “A lot of hard work! But really it isn’t that difficult… just put in the hours, and keep your eyes and ears open for every opportunity that comes your way. Keep on looking and seeing and learning…. and try to expand the range and style of work you have to offer.”

What is your approach to shooting for Alamy? Do you travel far and wide? “I don’t travel anywhere! I’ve not been abroad since 1987; and most of my time is spent in Aberystwyth unless I have a paid-for assignment from a client. If you know what to look for there are images to be made anywhere and everywhere. If I can make this work for me in Aberystwyth, which is a small town of 15,000 people, then really anyone in or near a big city has much much more potential material than I have.”

Stock photography is becoming more and more popular with professional photographers and proficient hobbyists alike – how do you approach being better than the competition when it comes to selling stock photos? “Keeping one step ahead…! I’m not sure if I’m any better at the technical side of photography, but I’m pretty persistent in what I do, and I have a reasonably advanced understanding of the dark arts of captioning and keywording (or tagging, as Alamy now describes it). I’m thinking in my head ‘what is going on in this photo? What is the story it’s telling? How and where could it be used?”

What’s your best-selling image to date? “Ha! I’m not going to give away any big secrets! In this hyper – competitive business I need to keep a few things under my hat. But the mantra of ‘one person doing one thing’ has always been a good one to bear in mind when making stock photos. And it’s important to distinguish between photos that I’ve sold for big individual prices, and the pictures that have sold regularly, they may not get big single values, but the running total can be very healthy indeed. As stock photographers we’re all looking to get a good number of ‘potboilers’ in our portfolios – images that are good repeat sellers and which have long shelf-lives.”

Read the full interview

If you have any questions then please get in touch: contributors@alamy.com www.alamy.com/contributor Issue 26

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Dog Portraits

nigel ord-smith

“My background was IT and Finance. I ended up as a Senior Manager at a building society turned bank on the IT compliance side. It bored me rigid. I was fast approaching a significant birthday and realised that I had to do what I was passionate about or else I would always be thinking ‘what if’. So, as I’d built up a part-time wedding business and I undertook the year-long bespoke course at Contemporary Photographic Training, as was, this gave me the confidence to give my notice in at my ‘day job’ and 1 August 2007 I woke up as a full-time photographer. I’m still here 11 years later, with a change of direction or two, thriving and loving what I do!”

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Creative Light talks to Nigel Ord -Smith

Q: What have you found most challenging about being a Dog Portrait Photographer?

Probably the weather. I like to work with natural light outside. Dull wet days don’t always yield the best images, but they can be excellent for character portraits. And in complete contrast, the heat of this summer has been a challenge, often too hot for dogs to try anything too strenuous for action images and tongues are out all the time. Beyond the weather there aren’t usually significant challenges with the dogs themselves, providing that you have done your homework, had a pre-consultation with the owner and found out about their dog. With a particular lively dog, or with multiple dogs, we’ll ask that at least two people come along with them.

Q: How long have you been a photographer? Full time for 11 years, and part-time for a few years before that. It’s always been something that I have been interested in, and when I left school, I almost went to art college to do photography. Q: When did your business concentrate purely on Dog Portraiture? I started photographing dogs seriously five years ago and got so busy with dogs that I stopped weddings in 2015 and, effectively, portraits in 2016.

Q: Did you have formal training to be a photographer, i.e. college/

university? Or are you relatively self-taught with attendance to workshops, training days etc.? I moved to Leicestershire from Sussex in the mid-1990s and rekindled my photographic interest at a local evening class on black and white photography. That led me to set up my darkroom at home (the excitement of seeing my first print come through!!) and get involved in the local photographic society. Both of those taught me a lot, not least how subjective a critique of an image can be! Beyond those days I’ve probably attended too many workshops/training days in the past but am a bit more selective now. There’s always a nugget or two to pick up from a workshop or seminar, and you then have to think how that little nugget can be applied to your business. The most important aspect of training these days is on the business side, and I have immense respect for and gratitude for people who have helped me over the years.

Q: You were awarded Midlands Portrait Photographer of the Year with the

BIPP in March 2018 with some fabulous photographs of dogs, especially the one of ‘Ocean’ a black standard poodle. Did you photograph Ocean in your studio? If so, tell us a little about this gorgeous dog and how you settle dogs in your studio? The shoot with Ocean came about from my fascination with the preparation of Standard Poodles for Crufts. Watching the preening, coiffuring and topiary was terrific. At that time, I hadn’t photographed a Standard Poodle and decided that I wanted to get a Standard Poodle booked into the studio. I put a shout out on social media, and as a result, Ocean came to my studio and then I had a furthe two portrait sessions with white Standard Poodles. The groomers who own all of these show dogs were fabulous to work with and travelled some distance to come to me. Concerning the settling of dogs when they come to visit us at The Coach House, I always invite the owners into the studio before the dog is brought in and talk about potential hazards. I’ll then greet the dog outside with the aim of getting it comfortable with me but not too excited and, once inside, we’ll let the dog sniff around to get its bearings and get settled. While the dog settles, I’ll fire a couple of test flashes to check that there is no adverse reaction. All dogs are different, and some settle sooner, and some take a little longer. The dogs don’t know me, and they don’t know the different smells in the studio so we will always ask their owners to bring some of the dogs favourite treats and toys. We’ll also ask the owners to ensure that they have a collar and lead for their dog, especially if the dog wears a harness typically. continued... Issue 26

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than too excited, when it does come in give it time to settle and sniff around. Once the dog has settled you can then start your shoot but you must give the dog plenty of breaks, so it doesn’t get bored and disinterested. Work quickly as certain dogs will get bored if kept in the same area for too long. Outside, be aware of the risks and distractions and, if necessary, photograph the dog on a lead but show the owner how to hold it so that you can remove it quickly afterwards. Enjoy it, and have fun!

Q:

Can you tell readers a little bit about your work with animal charities?

Q: Lighting equipment on location? Do you use additional lighting on location or use the available light? I prefer to work with natural light as dogs move and won’t necessarily sit or stay where you want them to. Occasionally I’ll supplement that with a reflector, a Speedlight or a set of Quadras, but natural light is the ‘go to’.

Q: If your client books “A walk with ….” and the weather isn’t great what do you, postpone or continue?

I want to get the best results for my clients so if the weather is looking particularly bad, yes, we’ll reschedule. If the weather changes during the session that’s fine as there’ll be a mix of images for the clients to choose from.

Q: What advice would you give to members of The

Guild of Photographers looking to sell or make a living from Dog Portraiture? Build relationships with good, local dog-related businesses. Their clients, the people that regularly spend money on their dogs, are your ideal clients, so develop your thirdparty marketing with those businesses. And if you have a dog of your own, make sure you have business cards in your pocket when you’re out walking.

Q:

Camera equipment, what do you use for your Photography? In the old days of that thing called film, I used Olympus cameras, and when the time to switch to digital came my lenses weren’t compatible with their digital bodies, so I went down the Fuji route. They were Nikon fit lenses and latterly I switched entirely to Nikon. I now shoot on Nikon D800 and D750 bodies with a range of lenses, favourites being 24 – 70 mm f2.8, 70 – 200 mm f2.8, and 85 mm f2.8. Lighting in the studio is all Bowens. The essential items in my kit back are a variety of dog whistles, squeakers and treats!!

Q: Favourite go to lens?

As the dog photography side of my business grew I‘ve wanted to give a bit back, and I’ve done that over recent years by working with local dog charities. Each year, in certain months, I’ve set myself a challenge to photograph a number of dogs each day over a fixed number of days. By breed, i.e. once a breed of dog is booked that breed place is taken. Rather than a regular session fee, a donation is made to the charity, the amount depending on how many dogs are booked for the session. The session includes a photograph in a desk frame. Running something like this in quieter months fills the studio with a variety of interesting breeds to photograph and a good fundraiser for the charity.

Q: Post-processing and photoshop, how important it is to your finished image?

Nowadays everybody has a camera with them all the time on their phone and finishing images is vital to stand out from what people can take themselves. Clients come back to view their pictures a week or two after their session. For clients who are not local, the viewing takes place on the same day. All photographs are fully edited and finished for the viewing, even on the same day.

Q: Working with animals and children has always been a problematic area for photography. So how did your portrait photography of dogs evolve? I moved into my studio seven years ago as a wedding photographer. I wanted to get away from working at home, and I wanted an office for consultations and viewings. The studio space I have meant that I was able to introduce studio portraits and expand my photography business other than weddings. What I didn’t realise at first was the tremendous potential my studio had for dog photography. The studio was fully fitted inside and had an excellent rural location outside. It was during the first 18 months I was at the studio that I became aware of the seasons and how the outside location changed and realised the potential for dog portraiture. In early 2013 I ran a competition and had a great response. I enjoyed it and quickly started to build a portfolio of dog portraits. I haven’t looked back since.

Q:

Q:

Developing your market-place, how important was it to create your brand and build your reputation apart from having a love of dogs?

Do your homework. Consult the owner first about the dog; it’s temperament and how well behaved and responsive to the owner it is. I always show the owner the inside of the studio before bringing the dog in and then, after having greeted the dog and, hopefully, got it used to me rather

If I’m honest, my brand has been through a few changes, so I’m not sure how important it is on the broader scale of things. What is important is working closely with other dog-related businesses and getting your name known with them. Working with such businesses, and doing an excellent job for them, will build your reputation and mean that they

For outside work the 70 – 200 mm.

What advice would you give to photographers about shooting dogs?

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can confidently recommend you to their clients. A love of dogs certainly helps but I don’t think is necessary. More important is to not have a fear of dogs!

Q:

Studio or Location? Which do you prefer from a photographers point of view? I’m lucky that my studio is in a fabulous location. I have a full photographic studio inside and my the location literally on my doorstep. And the right location! I have a private drive and fields outside with a lovely rustic looking tin shed to the side of the studio. I love the control that my portrait studio provides inside, but I am disappointed if the weather is wet and we are unable to work outside for the more natural images.

Q: Your most popular breeds of dog? I love working with all breeds and part of the joy of photographing dogs is that, while there are breed specific traits, you never know the temperament or character of a particular dog that’s coming into the studio. Therefore, each day is different. The most popular breeds to come into the studio last year were Cocker and Springer Spaniels. They are popular visitors again this year, but not as much as the Border Collies, so far, they have been the most popular this year.

Q: Have you a dog? We’ve recently re-homed a dog called Molly; she is a sixyear-old Pointer with a lovely character and the perfect temperament. Molly comes to work with me and is entirely laid back and chilled when other dogs come in.

Q: Who inspires you? From a dog photography point of view, Paul Walker of PAWS Pet Photography was my initial inspiration. I helped Paul run a couple of workshops back in 2010 and 2011 in the Midlands and vowed at the time that pet photography wasn’t for me. Who’d have thought that!

Q: Interesting facts about you? I’m a Helixophilist - I’ll leave you to work that one out!!

Q: Favourite place in the world and why? I love cities, especially Havana and Venice, but the current favourite is Porto, with fabulous places to eat, the city is compact and walkable, and the Portuguese people are so friendly. We’ve just come back from a visit which included an urban portrait session with a French Bulldog.

Q: Favourite food? Juniper. Infused with some other botanicals in a bottle...

Q: And finally, where next?

After the portrait shoot in the City of Porto, possibly some more location sessions in various European cities and a weekend away for location portraits on the beach. Beyond that, several projects on the go or in mind, so watch this space ... Thank you Nigel for sharing with the readers of Creative Light magazine an insight into your Dog Portraits! - Julie Oswin

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MARKETING Rob Hill is a life-long photography enthusiast with a product / commercial photography business – MarketingShotz as well as a successful technology marketing business. He qualified as a Master Craftsman with the Guild of Photographers and is also a member of their judging panel. His commercial work can be seen at www.marketingshotz.com and his personal work is found at www.robhillphoto.com

Differentiate to WIN – But not on PRICE Technology inevitably changes the world we live in, sometimes for the better and sometimes not so much. Advances in digital camera technology combined with a huge industry dedicated to training photographers and the prevalence of multiple social media platforms, have changed the world of social photography almost beyond measure. This has dramatically lowered the barriers to entry for those wanting to earn a living, in whole or in part, from photography and now, even the most cursory online search will rapidly locate many photographers trying to tempt people to part with their hard-earned cash in exchange for their photography services. Coupling this with changes in the dynamics of employment – the so-called ‘gig economy’ and zero-hours contracts have created a perfect storm. As technology has advanced, even entry-level cameras can produce decent images (in the right hands) and, as many people seek to change careers or supplement incomes, the reduced barriers to entry make the social photography space very attractive with thousands of people entering the industry. If you are reading this, chances are that you are a photographer. It is also quite likely that you are a member of one or more online groups dedicated to your profession – maybe even an association such as The Guild of Photographers. As a result, it is almost certain that you have either seen, or participated in, discussions about the ‘low priced photographers that are ruining the industry for the rest of us’. Price erosion is often a result of commoditisation. As more people enter the market, supply outstrips demand, services become increasingly generic and

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the only variable for photographers to compete on is price – so that plummets in a ‘race to the bottom’. While that is clearly a significant factor here, it is not the whole story. Business-minded photographers set their prices based on a combination of what they need to cover their overheads and what the market they serve will bear. However, many of those entering the market are not bound by these constraints. They may already have a ‘main job’ that covers their bills and anything from their photography is simply incremental income, or they may be semi-retired with no mortgage and require a far lower level of income to cover their overheads. While these people are often dismissed as ‘stupid’ in online groups, in many cases this is far from the truth (it may be true in some cases...). They simply have far lower overheads and / or are willing to live on less income, giving them the power to disrupt the market from a price standpoint. While this may go some way to explain the situation, how does it help photographers with a mortgage, bills, a family and other commitments to manage? In short, it doesn’t. You simply can’t compete at these price levels and cover all your commitments without working for at least ten days per week. The first step here is recognizing that the people who want a £25 studio portrait session or a £250 wedding on a USB stick are not your customers. Move away from them and leave this section of the market to those that can afford to service it. In ‘marketing-speak’ you need to ‘position’ your business correctly to attract the customers that you want – the ones that can and will pay the prices that you need to attract to make your business viable. To do this, you need differentiate and this normally involves looking at three aspects of what you do – quality, service and price. We have already established that not changing what you do and dropping price in a ‘race to the bottom’ will not make for a viable business, so we are left with quality and service. There are many ways to benchmark the quality of your photography. One of the best is through the qualifications available via the Guild of Photographers where a panel of industry judges can assess your work and validate that you meet industry standards – this is exactly what ‘Qualified’ status means. Many go on to strive for the higher levels of ‘Craftsman’ or ‘Master Craftsman’ – but obtaining a ‘Q’ means that your work is of a professional standard and, if maintained, should be acceptable to most customers. Next, look at the service your business offers – and this means every aspect of your business – how you respond to enquiries, how you treat your customers, how you conduct yourself in customer-facing situations – in fact, every thing that you do. Assess yourself very honestly – maybe do a reciprocal assessment with another photographer so you both get an honest opinion and then work on any deficiencies until your service is able to attract the customers that you want. The reality is that falling prices are a fact of life and they are here to stay. You will not beat them but through looking at your business and differentiating on factors other than price (coupled with a lot of hard work) you can work around them and enjoy a successful social photography business.

- Rob Hill Marketing Shotz www.marketingshotz.com Issue 26

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Weddings from Scotland

Stuart Wood has been a wedding and portrait photographer in the Loch Lomond area for 25 years. Starting as a YTS who scooped the front page picture of Princess Anne for the local paper, he has since worked both in the darkroom and behind the camera for a few different studios in Central Scotland until he started his own company, 1500 Photography. Within 3 years he became the Scottish Wedding Photographer of the Year with the MPA and since then Stuart has continued to carve out a reputation for high-quality wedding photography across Scotland.

stuart wood

He lives midway between Glasgow and Loch Lomond with his partner Gillian and their daughter Rachel. Both of whom will be mortified by a mention in his bio!

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© Stuart Wood, 1500 Photography

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Creative Light talks to 1500 Photography Q:

What have you found most challenging about being a Wedding Photographer? Today? It is carving out a niche in amongst the throng of photographers out there. Some are truly appalling, and some are absolutely fantastic. I think the toughest thing if finding a way through the noise to talk to a couple, help them differentiate and showcase your work to them.

Q: How long have you been a full-time, professonal wedding photographer? 25 years (holy moly, did I say that out loud?) I started off working for a local wedding photographer when I was 18. Carrying the kit and minding the shop. Then I graduated to shooting the guests as they arrived at the church, then pre-posed groups as the photographer explained to me why and how he had lit them and what the correct exposure should be. This was back in the days of shooting a mock cutting of the cake, running back to the lab, processing the films, printing them and returning to the wedding that evening to take orders from guests. I was eventually “let loose” and shot my first wedding when I was 21. I remember it as distinctly as last weeks. Since then the advent of digital has wholly changed photography, yet the techniques I learnt with film (posing, communication and decisiveness) are as reliable and valuable now as they were then.

Q: Have you always wanted to be a wedding photographer or did your wedding photography evolve?

I actually really wanted to wanted to be a photographer for the RAF taking pictures of planes (yes I was a model kit nerd) I then got a YTS with the local newspaper where I managed to talk my way into helping out in the photography department. That’s when I realised that photography is really about people and the move to weddings came naturally after that.

Q:

What advice would you give to members of The Guild of Photographers looking to sell or make a living from Wedding Photography? Invest in yourself and find your own voice. Let’s be honest. Cameras are so advanced now you can pick one from a shelf, set it to auto and come away with some half decent images. Take those images and run them through a batch of actions in Lightroom and hey presto - you are a contemporary wedding photographer. Congratulations. But then, your stuff will look like everyone else’s, what happens when the next photographer your potential client meets has the same batch of actions? This is where you need to differentiate from the pack, and this is where training yourself to be better comes in. Attend courses, mix with photographers, see what people who have truly mastered the art are doing. Use them as inspiration to move your own photography forward. The more you hone your craft, the more you can define your style. The more you define your style, the more you will stand out from the crowd.

Q: Camera equipment, what do you use for your Photography? I came to digital from Bronica medium format camera (shooting an entire wedding on 5 rolls of film - can you imagine?) The Canon 20D was the first digital camera I used that felt “right” in my hand (I was really late in moving from film) These days it’s a 5D MkIII but most importantly I got my hands on the Canon 70-200 2.8 lens. It is gorgeous, and probably my favourite go-to lens.

Q: What advice would you give to photographers about shooting weddings? Before the day build a relationship with the couple. You don’t need to be ‘best pals’ on Facebook, but you do need to be able to communicate well and understand what they want from their photography. Also, make sure you know your gear inside out. You probably won’t have any issues on the day, but nothing throws your confidence and concentration quicker than suddenly being challenged by your own equipment. Issue 26

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On the day, slow down. Its really hard but take a breath and think about what you are doing, ‘see’ the picture in the camera before you hit the button, it will save you so much time in post processing.

Q: Wedding Albums do you provide them as an

optional extra or as an included option. Do you believe that wedding albums are an essential part of the wedding photographers catalogue? Absolutely. A wedding album feels like the perfect way to present the images. The most common comment I get from my clients on delivering the album is “how sharp everything seems, how great the colours look”. They have become so conditioned to viewing images on a screen that the printed article often blows them away. It’s a wellworn phrase, but wedding albums are future proof. They will not be overtaken by technology, and you can pick up a wedding album today from 50 years ago and look through it. However, 50 years from now, what will you be able to do with a USB memory stick?

Q: Apart from sheer hard-work and dedication, what

would you say is the main ingredient to your imagery? Empathy. I love my clients. I want them to look amazing, and I want to try and capture some of their rapport with each other, their friends, their love and happiness. I want to see the bride as the groom sees her. I want the groom to crack that smile that she loves. I can almost guarantee that at our very first meeting the bride and groom would have told me how much they hate getting their picture taken. Find a way to talk to them, to relate to them and build that relationship. Do that and they will relax. If they feel and act relaxed in front of your camera, it will help you create great wedding images.

Q: Post-processing and photoshop, how vital it is to your finished image?

Its there as a tool. Use it when you need to use it. My opinion is that if you notice that an image has been digitally altered, then you have done it wrong. It should be a seamless addition to your photography, to finesse what you have captured. Colour correction, cropping, burning in a sky or two and a couple of B&W conversions. That’ll do it. Leave the tea-bag stained, flat black, washed out and processed to death. In five years time, the style of the images will be as relevant as the superimposed heads on a brandy glass.

Q: How do you proof your weddings? Honestly, at this stage, I think delivery is a mess. My current favourite option is a presentation pack from Loxley Colour. The images are presented on a USB as proofs and a selection of images (ten 10 9x7” mounted prints) which I have chosen and presented with my compliments. I add a couple of proposed album layouts and sometimes a slideshow.

Q: Developing your market-place, how important was it to create a brand?

Crucial. Now more than ever. Exploit every resource available to you. All social media channels can be

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combined to a degree to help establish not only your ‘look’ but also create an online personality. This is what people will buy into. You are your brand. I read a quote last week which knocked my socks off “your brand is your promise to your clients, and your logo is your signature on the contract.”

Q: Who inspires you? For the last 10 years Jerry Ghionis has been my ‘go to’ inspiration, but lately, I am finding more and more niche photographers on Instagram who are consistently producing very high-level work. It is both frightening and liberating to see so much excellent work out there from people I have never heard of before! Portrait Photography I have always loved wise the powerful iconic portrait style of Albert Watson.

Q: Interesting facts about you? You want me on your quiz team (especially with movie trivia). However, this has to lead to my family frequently calling me a cheat when I romp to victory at Trivial Pursuit. Ironically as a wedding photographer, I have actually yet to marry my partner of 16 years Gillian. But why spoil a good thing, eh?

Q: Favourite place in the world and why? In a darkened cinema or my couch with Gillian on one side, my daughter on the other and a big old bucket of popcorn in my lap. Stick on Raiders of the Lost Ark, and I’m in heaven.

Q: Favourite food? Pizza! You just can’t go wrong with pizza! Especially Paesano in Glasgow, washed down with an ice cold Moretti.

Q: And finally, where next? I am actually already looking past 2018 and well into 2019/20. This year I suffered a bit of a blow when my local 5-star wedding venue burned to the ground. This has given me a somewhat enforced opportunity (on top of my 10th anniversary in business) to take stock and re-evaluate everything I do. I have completely dismantled my photography business, created a new plan and feel that I am practically starting again. Call it an MOT. This year has been all about putting new systems in place and looking forward to the next 10 years. Add in a wee bit of personal development, training and experimenting. I am really excited about what is coming next. Short term? I cant get the image of a pizza and a beer out my head after that last answer Stuart’s website: www.1500photography.co.uk

Thank you Stuart for giving the readers an insight into your Wedding Photography Business and wish you every success for the next 10 years. - Julie Oswin


© Stuart Wood, 1500 Photography

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congratulations Jenny Rolfe QGPP

Qualified Guild Professional Photographer June 2018

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THE BRAND NEW

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ALBUM IMAGE CREDITS: GRAHAM EDWARDS

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| 0845 862 0217


congratulations Ralph Hardwick QGPP

Qualified Guild Professional May 2018 Issue 26

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Autofocus:

Razor-sharp images and high resolution sensors Autofocus systems are an inherent part of modern digital cameras. Additional autofocus assistants like face- or eye-recognition support the photographer to accurately capture common subjects. However, in the field of creative photography there are a few possible autofocus pitfalls in combination with high resolution image sensors. This applies also to sport-, action and macro photography. It is always an advantage to have a profound knowledge about the autofocus technology to avoid unpleasant surprises later in the post-processing workflow. These issues can often only be detected in 100% view of an image. Only an absolutely correct position of the focal plane guarantees razor-sharp images when using high resolution full-frame sensors. Advanced amateurs and professional photographers often try to separate the main subject from the background by choosing a longer focal length combined with a large focal aperture. Such shooting situations are still a challenge even for sophisticated autofocus systems, particularly when using high resolution image sensors. When shooting portraits it can happen that the nose is sharp, but the eye facing the camera is slightly out of focus. Even if it is perhaps only a minor error of the position of the focal plane, we generally perceive such images as “slightly out of focus”. ©2017 Datacolor Inc. All rights reserved. Datacolor and Spyder are registered trademarks of Datacolor.

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AF fine adjustment In case of SLR cameras the AF sensor is not located on the actual image sensor and is addressed via the mirror. The different optical path could be the cause that the focal plane of the AF sensor and the image sensor don’t match accurately. This effect is known as the “front focus” or “back focus” issue: the focal plane of the image is slightly ahead or behind the targeted autofocus point. Fortunately, this error can be corrected very easily with the assistance of the AF fine adjustment of the camera. Creative photographers who like to work with fixed focal lengths and large focal apertures should make sure when purchasing a camera body that the SLR camera provides an AF fine adjustment feature. There are also supporting tools (for example the SpyderLENSCAL focus tool from Datacolor), which makes AF fine adjustment easy and reliable. Mirrorless system cameras use the actual image sensor for the autofocus and have an advantage because no AF fine adjustment is necessary.

Correct AF point selection Modern AF sensors of SLR cameras can evaluate a lot of information from the subject of the image; mirrorless system cameras can even use the information of the entire image sensor. One might expect that this information almost excludes focus errors. However, only scenes such as faces and eyes are reliably detected. Other image information like for instance the color is predominantly used for AF tracking. If no subject can be detected, the AF sensor’s algorithm usually prefers the point closest to the camera as the optimum initial focal plane, which is not always the best result. For this reason, experienced photographers often choose the initial autofocus point by themself, leaving only the automatic tracking of the subject to the AF system.

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Face recognition and eye recognition The face- and eye-recognition of modern AF sensors are great tools, but as often the devil is in the detail. If the camera only provides facerecognition the autofocus might be too inaccurate. This can lead to issues like the ear or the nose of a portrait image is sharp, but the eyes are slightly out of focus. Although the eye-recognition is more accurate and extremely useful for portraits in most situations, the limits are shown in close-up shots. In case the face is the image-filling subject the usable depth of field is very narrow. These close-up scenarios in combination with high-resolution full-frame image sensors are a huge challenge for the accuracy of AF modules. It is a difference whether the AF point is positioned on the eyelashes, the iris or the skin below the eye. For example, portraits of children’s faces may appear slightly out of focus when the typical long eyelashes of children are blurred. On the contrary, a portrait of an old person full of character may be classified as out of focus if the wrinkles of the face are slightly blurred although the eyelashes might be razor-sharp.

Diffraction and focus stacking When using high-resolution full-frame sensors the issue with diffraction is quite noticeable in combination with small focal apertures. The undesirable diffraction of the light beams at small focal apertures can lead to soft picture results. At first glance the soft images often look like the result of an autofocus error. Unfortunately, a small aperture cannot always be avoided, especially in landscape photography. The problem can be solved in static scenes with “focus-stacking”: The landscape scenery (see the example below) was first exposed with the aperture 22 in order to optimally depict the sun stars of the setting sun on the horizon. In the second shot, the focus point was set on the foreground with the aperture 11. In the subsequent post-processing workflow, both exposures have been combined and a razor-sharp image is obtained over the entire image area.

DIETMAR TEMPS Accomplished media designer and photographer Dietmar Temps lives in Cologne, Germany and has amassed almost 20 years in the media business. His first professional position as a photographic assistant took him through whole Europe and across the pond to America. After that he studied photo and media technology at the Cologne University of Applied Science. Currently he mainly realizes photo and internet projects with the focus on travel photography, social networking and video streaming. On his travel blog he writes about beautiful spots around the world which he visited in recent years. He realized many photo trips to Africa, but also to South America and Asia. On his website a series of photo galleries are available where he presents his photographic work, which also is published in many books, magazines and travel blogs. Contact: Dietmar Temps • Photography and media design • Cologne, Germany dietmar.temps@gmail.com • http://dietmartemps.com

Dietmar about Colour Management: “The calibration is surprisingly easy. The device is really great. The colours are after calibration better and the contrast is slightly higher. The images are simply looking better. After using the before/after function my monitor shows a slight yellow/green colour cast which I hadn’t realized before. Problem: A few of my portraits are now too reddish which I have to retouch again….but now my display is calibrated! My feedback: very good solution!” Dietmar Temps // Travel Photographer and Photo Blogger // Cologne, Germany 46

Dietmar is a Datacolor Friends with since March 2017. He is using a : Creative Light Magazine - Vision Issue Member 26

Spyder5ELITE+.


congratulations Andrew Ford QGP

Qualified Guild Photographer May 2018 Issue 26

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congratulations Callum Harrison QGPP

Qualified Guild Professional Photographer June 2018

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WE’RE SERIOUS ABOUT BUSINESS. ARE YOU? We understand the value of what you do, the joy you bring to people’s lives, your ability to capture moments in time and transform them into little pieces of history that can be admired forever. As a photographer, you are a true artist. But we want to help you to maximise your potential in business too. That’s why our mission is to help photographers worldwide to create better businesses. Join 3XM Insiders, our exclusive Facebook group for professional photographers where you can stay up to date with the latest business tips and trends. We’re better together.

JOIN 3XM INSIDERS

https://www.3xmsolution.com

3XM

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© Jean Rolfe Photograhy

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congratulations Christine Russell QGP

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Š Liz Roberts

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Newborn & Baby

Liz Roberts www.lizrobertsphotography.co.uk

Liz Roberts is a newborn photographer, an Associate with the SWPP and has been photographing babies for almost ten years. She is married to Ken Roberts who has been a professional wedding and portrait photographer of over 30 years. Liz is a mother of four daughters and nearly seven grandchildren! She has won several awards, including:The Guild of Photographers Newborn Image of the Year, runner-up 2015; The Guild of Photographers Newborn Image of the Year 2016; The Guild of Photographers Overall Image of the Year runner-up (Judges choice) 2016; SWPP Newborn Photographer of the Year 2010; SWPP Pregnancy Photographer of the Year 2010; Photo Training Overseas Photographer of the year 2010; Photo Training Overseas photographer of the year 2011; Photo Training Overseas Photographer of the Year 2017. Liz has a home studio based in Inverness, in the Highlands of Scotland.

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Guild Member, Liz Roberts talks to Creative Light about her Baby Photography

Q: What have you found most challenging about being a Newborn Baby Photographer?

There is so much to learn; from all things baby, such as baby psychology, physiology, posing and safety, to all things photography; such camera craft, lighting and editing, not to mention the giant field of business.

Q: Props. What do you feel about the use of props? Props can be used straightforwardly to echo baby’s shape and form or to bring attention to their squishy faces. Props can also be used to create beautiful FineArt pieces or to tell an evocative story. The effective use of props is all relative to the skill, vision and style of the photographer.

Q: What is your preferred 'window' to photograph a newborn, i.e. day 4 or day 10? And why?

I usually aim to photograph babies, between 4-14 days Babies are “new” for such a short period of time. Within the 4-14 day window, they are still very womb-like and in the foetal position. All the sweet newborn poses are created to work with babies that are still very curly and flexible. They are also more sleepy at this stage, well most of the time!

Q: With your husband an established photographer, what prompted you to pick up the camera and start your own photography business?

Having lived with a photographer for 20 years, I had no intention of becoming one. I knew how much hard work is involved. Photography just happened to me. The first studio shots I took were of my daughter Sarah, for her pregnancy. She wanted something “arty” and my husband Ken thought that was my department. I shared some of the images with Ken’s customers (I was taking his viewing appoinments at the time). They then passed the word on. The same thing happened once I took the baby images of my grandson and my business just grew from there.

Q: Did you have formal training to be a photographer, i.e. college/university? Or are you relatively self-taught with attendance to workshops, training days?

The latter for me as I initially trained as a teacher, leaving my job as a special needs teacher to follow my photography career.

Q: Website? Do you market and work on your SEO? I am a one woman, band. So yes that’s me. I am quite technical, so I don’t mind learning. It’s also fascinating to follow the trends in photographic marketing. However, word of mouth is of the highest value.

Q: Camera equipment, what do you use for your Photography?

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Q: What advice would you give to members of The Guild of Photographers starting out as a Baby Photographer?

Make it all about the baby and consider the baby in all things; No one can create a beautiful photograph of a baby if the baby is unhappy. Learn about babies and how they tick. Look after baby’s needs comfort and safety, and you are halfway there. Master your craft: get to know your camera, lighting and equipment and how best to use it to create the imagery you want. Posing: start with some basic wrapped poses and gradually add in more complex ones, one at a time. Make sure you understand how to pose babies safely. Props: Keep them to a minimum. The best investments are wraps, hats, headbands and a couple of basic baskets. Make sure props are safe and comfortable, keeping in mind that many shots where babies appear to be balanced or hanging in a prop are composite images. Include parents and siblings, their relationship to the baby is so significant. They make good props too! Business: Work out your cost of doing business, and charge accordingly. Supply your clients good quality products; it shows respect for them and your work. Take it slowly, be safe, be kind to yourself.

Q: What do you think makes an excellent newborn image?

Newborn images are no different to any other genre. Images need to be technically perfect, well composed and sensitively lit. I like the baby to be the primary focus of the image, this can be achieved through the emotional connection of a parent or family, or by drawing attention to the baby with excellent lighting or an unusual prop that helps to tell a story.

Q: One 'top tip' of business advice you would like to share? Go for quality over quantity.

Q: Apart from sheer hard-work and dedication, what would you say is the main ingredient to your imagery?

Probably connection to the family. My family, my children and my grandchildren are my greatest joy, and my motivation is to celebrate the joy of parenthood, with others, through my imagery.

Q: Post-processing and photoshop, how important it is to your finished image?

My newborn images are about 90% ready SOOC; however, Photoshop is vital to add those essential finishing touches, such as tidying up newborn flaky skin or colour correcting redness or jaundice. My specialised “painted” images are all created with Corel Painter, which is a whole other learning curve! Issue 26

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Q: Developing your market-place, how important was it to create a brand and build your photographic reputation apart from having a love of photographing children?

I think my customers did this for me. By showing the images that I loved, it seemed to attract people who liked my style. I guess the message would be; show what you love.

Q: Do you use just your studio to photograph babies or do you also shoot on location?

All my work is in the studio. I am such a control freak; I don’t think I could cope with the ever-changing conditions associated with outdoor photography, especially in the Highlands of Scotland. I do however occasionally take elements of the outdoors into my studio, much to my husband’s dismay, as they are usually his carefully nurtured plants!

Q: Why do you love babies? Why do you love photographing babies?

I’m not entirely sure. I think it’s because babies seem to like me, for some reason. I’m not entirely sure, to be honest, but I think it’s because they seem to like me, for some reason. When I am with them, I feel connected. At home. At peace. They are the essence of innocence, beauty and hope. Trying to capture that essence with photography, is my challenge and my privilege.

Q: Who inspires you? I love and adore art. If I were lucky enough to win the lottery, I would fill my home with paintings. The first painting I fell in love with was Salvador Dali’s, Christ of St John of the Cross. I was seven years old, and I saw it at Glasgow’s Kelvingrove Museum. I don’t remember why I loved it so much, but my parents couldn’t drag me away. My favourite photographer is Joyce Tenneson. Her images fill my soul.

Q: Interesting facts about you? I’m not very interesting. My life is filled with caring for my home, my lovely, large family and my pets. Primarily, I am a nurturer. I love decor, crafts, occasionally trying to draw and pain. Love Laura Ashley and above all, being a daughter, a wife and a mother.

Q: Favourite place in the world and why? It would have to be Paris. I am a true romantic and fervent art lover.

Q: Favourite food? All things sweet and nothing beats my mum’s sherry trifle.

Q: Where next? I’d like to gain some further qualifications and once I master a few more things, maybe a bit of teaching. - Thank you Liz for sharing thoughts and your approach to Newborn Baby Photography with Creative Light. - Julie Oswin Issue 26

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© NEWO Imagery

www.creativitybackgrounds.co.uk

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congratulations Jenny Higgs QGP

Qualified Guild Photographer May 2018

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G.D.P You’re sick of hearing about it. Who isn’t. Employers and Public Liability insurance: But, just say, for a moment, that you unwittingly fall foul of GDPR, suffering what’s known as a ‘Privacy Incident’… where do you turn? Your insurance could be the resource you need for practical financial and expert help.

A must-have policy for anyone with employees or working with the public. Currently these provide some protection against claims raised under current Data Protection Act. Industry expectations are that these GDPR regulations take over in May 2018, cover is likely to be amended and very much more restricted.

This month, photography insurance specialists Infocus, look at common policies for photographers, which relate to GDPR, and data generally. Please bear in mind that all policies can vary in their terms and we advise you to check your own specific cover with your broker or agent.

Professional Indemnity insurance These policies are designed to protect Professional Service companies from client claims, so in the event of a GDPR claim, this SHOULD cover you. Under PI policies there is no cover for the loss or exposure of the private records of staff or Directors or Partners, or suppliers or prospects who are equally protected by GDPR. There is also no cover under PI policies for loss or damage to a policy holder’s own IT assets and systems, Income, or theft of funds held.

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The GDPR workshop was a runaway success

Commercial Legal Expenses

IT system and Data clean, repair and reinstatement costs - These policies usually provide for the These often cover legal defence and compensation cost of cleaning, repairing and reinstating your IT awards for claims under current Data Protection programme and data assets following an IT breach Act legislation, though usually exclude fines. causing a loss of or damage to or corruption of Cover maybe subject to the business being proper- systems and data. ly registered with the ICO (Information CommisLoss of IT based Trade Income - These policies can sioners Office). sometimes provide for trading losses arising from These policy sections will need to be updated to an interruption to normal IT or Web Site reflect the change of guard from the DPA to GDPR. operations.

Cyber Insurance This is the biggie for GDPR, as it’s insurance for your IT systems, which usually includes storage of company and client data. Here are some of the elements cyber insurance can cover:

Where do we all go from here Work out what private personal information you control or process, where it is, how it is protected, how it is used, how old it is, how accurate it is and whether any improvements to security and safe processing could be made. Work out what happens if all your safety and security measures fail and you fall victim to a GDPR incident.

Under Data Protection regulations its referred to IT Crime – Electronic theft of money or funds from as a Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA). More broadbank accounts arising from an IT breach or mally it should form part of an IT System Risk ware (Ransomware, Virus, Trojan etc) or deception Assessment and be part of a Business Continuity via e-mail or other messaging. Plan. In our opinion appropriate insurance protection and access to expertise is an absolutely essential component of those plans.

In summary

Personal Information Loss, Damage, Theft or Leak Insurance is there to help. But is no substitute for – If personal details are hacked, this can provide being properly prepared. the cost of monitoring personal credit records for A good Cyber policy is likely to be the safest bet a specified period (usually twelve months). as they have been designed with Cyber Risks in Regulatory Fines – Some policies appear to cover mind and that is where the heaviest GDPR risks fines, but the problem here is lack of case law as seem to exist, not the paper based documents to what a court might deem to be recoverable. and filing systems. Fines are meant to be a form of punishment, so businesses should not assume they are insurable. Issue 26

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congratulations Nick Brown QGP

Qualified Guild Photographer June 2018

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WHY YOU NEED TO OPTIMISE YOUR IMAGES FOR YOUR WEBSITE AND SEO & WIN A 1:1 WITH LEMONADE DESIGN ON HOW TO OPTIMISE YOUR IMAGES

O

ne of the biggest mistakes I see photographers make is ‘not optimising their images for use on their websites’, there are many reason why you should but here are just a few: -

• Your website will load faster • User experience • Google with love you!! And your images will be found when someone searches for them SO WHAT IS IMAGE OPTIMISATION? Image optimisation is where you reduce the size of an image without losing the quality so that your web page loads faster, in addition if you name and add keywords to your images so that they rank on Google.

Have you ever wondered why some photographers images come up in a search for a particular venue and your don’t? The chances are you have not renamed your images to be specific to the venue, or you and not added keywords to help Google find you. 68

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creating beautiful BRANDS & WEBSITES

SO HOW DO YOU OPTIMISATION YOUR IMAGES FOR WEB? Personally I prefer Lightroom, its quick and easy and for 80% of what you will put on your website it will do the job, as it allows you to add your copyright details, along with renaming and keywords appropriate to that venue and depending on where the images are going on your website you can crop accordingly, as a rough guide images that are going on a blog should be 1000 pixels on the longest edge and no more than 250KB and they should be named as follows: Venue name_area_your name or Leeds_castle_wedding_kent_yvette_craig_ photography

IF YOU WOULD LIKE THE CHANCE TO WIN A ONE TO ONE WITH ME WORTH £250, THEN JOIN MY MAILING LIST CLICK HERE> WINNER WILL BE NOTIFIED 1ST OCT, NO CASH ALTERNATIVE, PRIZE IS THAT STATED YOU MAY ALSO LIKE TO JOIN MY FACEBOOK GROUP

JOIN FACEBOOK GROUP “it’s an absolute dream working with a somebody who totally gets what a photographer needs.. because you are indeed also an amazing photographer with a wealth of wisdom, understanding and experience. You know what good looks like :-)” TAMARA “I’m absolutely delighted with my new website. Yvette is patient, easy to work with and speedy too! Thank you!” ALEX RICKARD “Yvette is wonderful. We had about two weeks to go live with a new website and she rock and rolled with the punches and created magic. She is so responsive, and it was wonderful.” MICHELE MALONEY “Outstanding service and help from Yvette from day one. Yvette didn’t mind me asking the daftest of questions, pointed me in the right direction when needed and spent a great amount of time afterward going through the site with me so I could alter text and photographs as and when I need to. Friendly, personable and 100 % professional, Thank you,” SARAH MORRIS

LEMONADEDESIGN.CO

https://lemonadedesign.co

YVETTE@LEMONADEDESIGN.CO T: +44 (1)233 642 733 26 - Creative Light Magazine M: +44 (0)7984Issue 470415

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congratulations Kelly Aldis QGNBP

Qualified Newborn Baby Photographer May 2018

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SPEND MORE TIME SH HOW ZENFOLIO HELPED STREAMLINE MY BUSINESS by Ioan Said

HERE AT CELYNNEN PHOTOGRAPHY WE ARE CELEBRATING OUR 10TH ANNIVERSARY!

Over the past 10 years we have many changes to refine our busin we’ve tried different web solution trialed new camera systems, outsourced editing, brought it ba house, etc. But we had not mana to find a Web solution that worke us — until Zenfolio.

This year we really wanted to streamline and expand our busin

Ioan Said is the BIPP North-West Wedding Photographer of the Year 2017, and two time North Wales Wedding Photographer of the Year. He is ranked among the TOP 100 wedding photographers in the UK on Fearless Photographers and recently served as Chairman of the North West BIPP region. See his site at: celynnenphotography.co.uk 72

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Like many wedding photographe we are busy with all the different we need to do — shooting, editi social media, blog writing, traini networking, selling, organising, finances, and more. These other are time consuming, and the who reason we got into this business the first place was to take picture Plus, our little boy is now an ama 2 year old, and I want to make s spend as much time with him as I can!


OOTING

made ness; ns,

ack in aged ed for

ness.

ers, t tasks ng, ing,

tasks ole in es. azing sure I

Because of the time-consuming aspects of running a photography business, I constantly felt like I was missing out on maximising my database, missing promotions, getting through my blog posts, missing upsell opportunities…the list goes on. These are all areas where Zenfolio has really sorted things out for me. Partnerships with print companies who handle everything with suggested pricing including markups save me time. Free marketing campaigns that can ensure we make the most of our databases — many of them activated with a single click — are beneficial as well. Since switching to Zenfolio we have sold more prints in a year than we had in the previous five years combined! The blog is fully integrated, making it easy to source images and ensure Web traffic is optimised to one

website. Previously we had a separate blog, had to ensure it was kept secure, and optimise two websites… which was very stressful. Not any more. Our website is now fully responsive, and there are other smart integrations such as client apps that let our clients share their pictures on social media in a way that always promotes us. All of our photoshoots are stored within the Zenfolio system, giving us an easily accessible backup of our files, and with a few SEO tweaks, our site recently shot up in Google for most of our targeted keywords. We are delighted we made the switch to Zenfolio. It’s sorted out a lot of issues that were bugging us and has also opened up new opportunities for us to expand. We are looking forward to seeing where our new website takes us!

GET 30% OFF YOUR SITE https://www.zenfolio.co.uk/guild

USE CODE GUILD AT ZENFOLIO.CO.UK/GUILD Issue 26

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New Panel Member

Clive Hall “

“I am very much a people person and you will find me very approachable, kind-hearted and relaxed to work with. I’m professionally qualified and have my Fellowship and I’m also a Master Craftsman in portraiture. Working as a full-time photographer in Swindon, Wiltshire and offering my skills and service both locally and nationally. I specialise in fine art, portraiture, Sportraits (inspirational sports portraits) and also pet photography and I invite you to peruse my gallery for examples of my work. I strive for the very highest of standards, capturing those special moments and giving you images to cherish for a lifetime. I love and thrive on the challenge of being commissioned to create something special for people. Such commissions give me the opportunity to work closely with clients, understand their wishes and use my technical knowledge, practical experience and personal creativity to deliver a result to exceed their expectations. Photography to me is not just a job or a career but a lifestyle, as I see beautiful images everywhere and I’m always on the lookout for the next creative project. I absolutely love photography and get great pleasure in capturing those moments of joy and happiness for people”. - Clive Hall

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An Interview with Clive Hall, Master Craftsman & Panel Member Q: What motivates you to get up in the morning to create your beautiful artwork?

A new day; A new experience; A chance of meeting new people and that’s before I even start on about photography, sounds like a fun day today. (Normally it goes downhill fast but I always get up with a fresh approach) And, a big mug of tea helps as well!

Q:

One piece of equipment that you couldn’t do without and why?

This one piece of equipment would be my ELB400 Quadra with HSS head, just an incredible flash unit. It is fantastic in the studio as well as out on location in all weathers. You can get some stunning depths of field, being able to shoot wide open in daylight you can freeze the motion of action shots.

Q:

Favourite lens?

That would be my Nikon 85mm f1.8. A superb lens for my Portrait work.

Q:

What have you found the most challenging in your area of photography?

Creatively, finding that different image to knock out the judge’s something unique that hasn’t been done before.

Q: Camera equipment, what do you use for your photography? I am a Nikon user and have two main cameras D810 which is my portrait workhorse and my D3s for sports and more action style of shooting. Lens are sigma 150-500mm f5.6, 70-200mm f2.8, 24-70mm f2.8, 85mm f1.8, 50mm f1.4 and a macro 105mm all Nikon. Love it!

Q: What advice would you give to photographers about shooting FineArt or Sports portraits? Don’t rush in to do the shoot, meet and talk to your subject and get to know them over coffee and find out what motivates them, what is their drive and passion. What targets or challenges are they going for next. Very importantly how would they like to be portrayed in the commissioned piece of art? Planning. Put together with some ideas so you can see the outcome in your mind’s eye. Make them relaxed around you and confident they can trust you. Explain the processes and how you are going to go about and complete the session. Sports people especially are very driven people and work so hard to meet their goals and by doing the above will demonstrate how professional you are, and you will get so much more from your subject on the day of your shoot. Then, once all this is done you have the easy bit. The actual shoot.

Q: Do you use a Studio Stand or Tripod? If so, how essential is it to your work? I own a good quality tripod but very rarely use it, unless I’m capturing something that doesn’t move or a landscape but it’s always at hand if needed. I like to keep moving when taking my images, just a short step left or right can change how the lighting is on a face. Just by moving your feet the outcome of the photograph can be so different.

Q: Developing your marketplace, how important was it to create your brand? Branding is vital for a professional photographer, but I have to hold my hands up here, business and branding is not my fortei and not something I am very active with. I love taking pictures and capturing the essence of a person; business takes second place for me and I know it shouldn’t so this is definitely an area I am working on to improve.

Q: Lighting equipment in the Studio what is your preferred choice for your work? I use Elinchrom lighting mainly which consist of 4X D-lite ones, two x 250 and two x 500 heads and two Quadra’s with different heads. But the question was, what’s my preferred choice? Well, that is where we get to the expensive kit list! My studio choice is four flashguns with modifiers; these are the Yongnuo flash guns YN560 IV and the four of them with a controller. The cost was £120 and purchased from eBay. My Master Craftsman panel was shot with these lights. Light, you have to learn how to control the lighting and the ambient light levels. 76

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Q: Location or Studio? Which is your preferred

Q: Favourite place in the world and why?

Most of my clients have wanted studio images but I’m open to both location and studio photography. Preference, I don’t have a strong one as long as I can deliver what the client requested. However, I do like to test myself in different situations.

Nepal and the Himalayan Mountains, this was the last serious trek I did before having a back injury which resulted in me having to give up mountain climbing. Nepal and the Himalayan Mountains is such a wonderful place and filled with beautiful people.

Q: Who inspires you?

Q: Three words that describe you?

working environment for your photography?

It’s the smaller people in this world, not the big named stars. Its people that have fought with adversity, It’s the people that have taken knocks and still get up a smile and do their best no matter what. True grit and passion are what inspires me, couple that with good manners and the will to do the right thing by others. We have two people that spring to mind here in the Guild, Imelda Bell and Karen Brammer, people like these inspire me. Our wounded servicemen and women maimed and disabled. I bow down to them. Photography wise, I take inspiration from great images, and we have loads of these every time IOM comes out, but photographers I have always liked Joel Grimms and Dave Black.

Q: Apart from sheer hard work and dedication,

what would you say is the main ingredient of your success? A passion for photography, a thirst for knowledge and most importantly a drive to deliver something that means so much to the client.

Q:

How would you describe your ‘style’ and approach to your work? Think this is quite a hard question for me as I try to give the client what they have requested. My portrait style has tended to be quite gritty, dark and compelling, which was inspired from the clients I have photographed. I do have a passion for black and white images, I find them very dramatic and enhance the story of the image. Some of my children’s portraiture is the other end of that scale, so in general, I guess you could say I have a style that has developed with me along with my photographic journey?

Q: Interesting fact about you? I was a fire-fighter for 30 years and was awarded the National Charity Person of the Year in 2010 for the work I carried out for the Fire Services Charity.

Q:

• Friendly; • Honest; • Open;

Q: Favourite food? Many foods to be honest, but the best food has to be when you share it with your loved ones and friends. My absolute favourite is T-Bone Steak or a curry! They have to be top of the list.

Q: How do you feel about becoming a Judge and a Panel Member?

I’m honoured and proud to have been asked to join the Panel of Judges for the Guild of Photographers. The Guild is a wonderful place full of some great people, and I love the fact my standard of work and the knowledge I have obtained, has been deemed good enough so I can serve our organisation and more importantly give something back to this great industry and help our members develop themselves into even better photographers. We have some highly talented photographers that are already panel members, and It’s a great honour to be alongside them. I have met most of the judges so far on my learning journey, and everyone has been a great help to me, thank you all, but especially to, Kevin Pengelly, Lesley Thirsk and Gavin Prest who have spent time guiding me. Thank you one and all.

Q:

And finally, where next?

My goal now is to become a true Master of this photography game, I have a Master Craftsman and a Fellowship, but I want these in many different genres, showing I’m an all-around good photographer. I want to learn and strive for more knowledge and become better and better. I have a saying “never stop learning”, and I try and live by this. I don’t care who it is or what level a person is at; you can always pick up and learn something new from them.

Can you recommend any photography books for the readers? I have done most of my reading and studying from the internet as I find that so much easier, following the links photos etc. One book I do have is The Art Of Photography, a personal approach to artistic expression which I would recommend.

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Thank you Clive for sharing your thoughts and giving us an insight into your photography. - Julie Oswin


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congratulations Sandie Powner QGPP

Qualified Guild Professional Photographer June 2018

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TIP SHEET #7

Realistic Skin Smoothing

I think it’s fair to say when it comes to retouching techniques, the number of different ways to smooth skin is seemingly endless. From blurring techniques through to 3rd Party Plug Ins, all will produce different results however when it comes to portrait retouching the goal should ultimately be smooth skin that retains a level of texture and ultimately looks realistic. In this tutorial I want to take you through a technique that I turn to again and gain because it does exactly that; maintains texture, looks realistic but also give you, the Photographer / Retoucher total control over how much of the effect you wish to apply depend on the subject.

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/glyndewis


Step 1: Vivid Light Blend Mode With you image open in Photoshop, let’s start off by creating a duplicate layer by going LAYER > NEW > LAYER VIA COPY or by using the keyboard shortcut Command/CTRL + J and then rename it Smooth Skin. We do this so that our original is safe but also, as you’ll see later, so that we can use it to control exactly how smooth we want the skin to be.

Step 2: Vivid Light Blend Mode Now that we have a duplicate of our original image in the layers panel, start by changing it’s Blend Mode to Vivid Light. This will create what looks like a very high contrast version of our picture but next go to IMAGE > ADJUSTMENTS and then INVERT or simply use the keyboard shortcut of Command/CTRL + I

Step 3: High Pass Filter Next go the FILTER > OTHER > HIGH PASS and for a high resolution picture a pixel radius of around 20 will be perfect (For lower resolution images you’ll need to add in a lower amount). We now need to add a small amount of blur, so go to FILTER > BLUR > GAUSSIAN BLUR and for high resolution images a pixel radius of around 3 is all we need.

www.glyndewis.com

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Step 4: Blend Options The actual smoothing has been applied however at this stage you’ll see that our picture doesn’t look quite right and we’ve lost the highlights and blacks in the all important areas. So the next step here is to click on the fx icon at the bottom of the layers panel and choose Blending Options from the pop up menu.

Step 5: Blend If (Part 1) Within the Blending Options are the Blend If sliders and we can now use these to bring the image back to looking normal but also retain the smoothness we have applied. First off we’ll be using the upper most Blend If slider labelled ‘This Layer’. With the Option/ALT key held down click on the black marker to the far right. This splits the marker in half so now drag the one half across to the right until you get a reading of approximately 0/200

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Step 6: Blend If (Part 2) The previous step brought back some of the lighter parts of the image so now we need to being back the darker areas, certainly around the eyes, nose and mouth. To do this, whilst again holding down the Option/ALT key click on the white marker to the far right to split it in half and then drag it to the left until you get a reading of approximately 60/255.

Step 7: Layer Mask At this stage our entire picture has the smoothing applied to it, including our subjects hair, teeth and the background. Also the smoothing / softening is actually a little too much at this stage so we now need to restrict where the effect is applied and also reduce it to the desired amount. To do this simply hold down the Option/ALT key and click on the layer mask icon at the bottom of the layers panel. This hides the smoothing. Then with a soft white brush at 100% opacity paint the effect back in over the skin then lower the opacity of the layer to around 40%

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Step 8: Contrast We’ve now given our subject smooth skin and also maintained a realistic amount of detail and texture and indeed you could stop at this point and carry on with other areas of retouching you may wish to do. However I do find that adding in a touch more contrast at this stage finishes the smoothing effect quite nicely and I do this by firstly creating a merged/stamp layer at the top of the layer stack by going to SELECT > ALL > EDIT > COPY MERGED > EDIT > PASTE and then FILTER > SHARPEN > UNSHARP MASK. Amount of 10%, Radius 10 and Threshold 0 works just fine.

CHECK OUT MY YOUTUBE PAGE FOR 100’S OF FREE TUTORIALS

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congratulations Jamie Scott QGPP

Qualified Guild Professional Photographer June 2018

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© Moritz Rehbein

UKSALES@HAHNEMUEHLE .COM • 08453 300 129 • WWW 90

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© Michael Taterka © Tom Schönfeld

HAHNEMÜHLE PHOTO The Quality Choice For Everyday Printing

An assortment of universally usable inkjet papers that are ideal for artists and professional photographers daily printing.

© Angela Simi

MAKING PAPER

SINCE

1584

TRIAL PACKS AVAIL ABLE IN A4 AND A3+ FORMATS

W.HAHNEMUEHLE .COM • #HAHNEMUEHLE_GLOBAL Issue 26

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Jayne Bond

Claire Osborne

Ian Knaggs

Claire Osborne

May & June 2018

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Vicky Norton Jason Allison

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Mark Lynham

Mark Lynham

Ian Knaggs

Bernard Pretorius

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Roger Jepson

SharonLewis

Judith Lawley

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Frances van der Merwe

Sarah Wilkes 94

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Claire Osborne Cliff Spooner

Gina Rayment

Claire Osborne

Stephanie Chapman

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Cameracraft is BACK! As a member of The Guild of Photographers you will receive a bi-monthly CameraCraft Magazine as part of your membership!

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© Christine Russell

“To me, photography is an art of observation. It’s about finding something interesting an ordinary place… I’ve found it has little to do with the things you see and everything to do with the way you see them.” — Elliott Erwitt

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THE GUILD OF PHOTOGRAPHERS Let the Guild help you with your photographic journey like it has done for many others! The Guild is suitable for those in business, contemplating a career in photography, undertaking photography related courses, or even those who simply love using their camera.

Professional Membership costs £126 and Regular Membership costs £96

PHOTO: HELEN ROWAN

“No other photographic body offers what the Guild does... get an incredible package of business support, training and mentoring by some of the most respected names in the industry, insurance, legal protection and the rights to use our respected membership logos” EMAIL info@photoguild.co.uk CALL 01782 970323 / 07982 613985 98

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Creative Light - Issue 26  

Creative Light Magazine brings toegether people interested in the craft of photography.

Creative Light - Issue 26  

Creative Light Magazine brings toegether people interested in the craft of photography.