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POWERED BY JETGALA

GANGSTER OF THE FRENCH CASTLES

07 August – October 2013

FIFTY YEARS OF DASSAULT’S FALCON THE NEW PILATUS PC-24 JET FLARIS VLJ|LEARJET 75 AIRBUS BLUEJAY

MAISON CORTHAY BESPOKE SHOES

PORSCHE EXCLUSIVE SERVICES PEKING TO PARIS CAR RACE | JET ART HIMALAYAN ESCAPE | BASELWORLD 2013


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EXECUJETINTRO

"I AM A DREAMER — BUT ONE WITH GOOD TASTE " — ERIC OTTO, PHOTOGRAPHER

WELCOME TO OUR INFLIGHT MAGAZINE. As we entered our new financial year in July, we also entered yet another chapter in ExecuJet’s strive to provide the best service we can offer our clients and partners worldwide. This year we shall once again endeavour to exceed your expectations and, as always, we value your feedback. In this edition, you can read about some of our latest activities and achievements in our news snippets section. Our new iPad app for aircraft management customers deserves a special mention. The free app, myExecuJet, enables customers to locate their aircraft and quickly access information on matters such as schedules, crew and operational statistics. It enhances a personalised connection between the owner, the aircraft and the management company — ExecuJet. This customised app will make a real difference to the user, but it will probably remain rather unnoticed by a larger audience. This is the nature of a personalised service and client-focussed company such as ExecuJet. Not everything we do is necessarily visible to the outside world. However, in the words of Xavier de Royere, CEO of Maison Corthay, we might not be very exposed, but we are exposed to the right people. In the editorial about his business, de Royere describes Maison Corthay, a Paris-based bespoke shoemaker, as “a small tree with quite big roots — not very well known, but having credibility with the people in the know”. De Royere talks about the advantages of having a rather small company, saying it enabled him to position the business where he felt it should be — and all along the emphasis remains on maintaining excellence. An admirable goal! Our second editorial is also about size. It is about dreaming big. Eric Otto, a French photographer based in Hamburg, plays with the idea of illusion and imagination. He takes pictures of miniature cars in front of existing buildings and monuments and makes the setting look real. What Otto works with is finding the right moment, and the right angle, to capture a scene. This simple but effective idea creates beautiful pictures with a conspiratorial atmosphere. Otto invites us rethink our point of view. Apparent magnitude might be relative only to the perspective after all. Please enjoy our Inflight Magazine. Kind Regards, Niall Olver CEO ExecuJet Aviation Group

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Necklace fire enamel, hand guillochĂŠ, 18 kt gold, 2.0 ct

Bangkok, Baechtold, Tel +662 939 7028 30 / Hong Kong, King Fook, Tel +852 2526 6786 Kuala Lumpur, DeGem, Tel +603 2282 3618 / Nagoya, Sunmenard, Tel +81 52 962 4755 Shenzen, Frank & Label, Tel +86 0755 2658 0852 / Singapore, DeGem, Tel: +65 6688 7032


EXECUJET CONTENT

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INTRO SCALED OPPORTUNITIES

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EXECUJET LOCATIONS

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GANGSTER OF THE FRENCH CASTLES Eric Otto’s Dramatic Car Photography

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HEART & SOLE Maison Corthay — For The Love Of Shoemaking

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SNIPPETS New & Exclusive

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WINGS

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VERSATILE CLASS Faster & Lighter With The Pilatus PC-24

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SPACE BIRD Airbus Design Looks To Outer Space

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PERFORMANCE HERITAGE A New & Improved Mid-Sized Learjet

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ABOUT PRECISION & CONTROL Birdmen Get Serious

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THE BIG PICTURE Diana Chou of Sino Private Aviation

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ELECTRIC GLIDE Towards Electricity-Driven Flight

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SKY HEROES

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COVERT COALITION

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CARBON BIRD

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FIRST FALCON

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WINDS OF CHANGE

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CAPTAIN SPEAKING

Bespoke Medical Evacuation Services The German Geniuses In The Space Race Poland’s Sporty Light Jet

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Fifty Years Of Falcon Business Jets Eastern Europe Takes Wing Reading The Skies

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EXECUJET CONTENT

86 82 66

LUXE

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SUITE GUANGZHOU Sky-High Hospitality By The Pearl River

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A MOST PERSONAL LEGEND Bespoke Cars By Porsche Exclusive

80 AIR BRUSH Jet Engines For A Paintbrush 82

THE RACE FOR TIME Baselworld Top Picks

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ALL ABOUT EMOTION The Creative Mind Behind Daum Crystal

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Peking To Paris In 33 Days 94 AUDIO REVOLUTION The Best Way To Enjoy Sound 98

NATURAL HIGH A Luxurious Himalayan Haven

102 CREATING CONTRAST Adam Flipp’s Light-Filled Photography 109 AIRBORNE 114 SHOW REVIEWS SHOW FLIGHT 116 BRIEFING Business Aviation In Brief 122 PLANE SPEAK Aviation Glossary

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126 AIR SHOW DIARY 128 TAILHOOK French Beetle


MAX SPEED: MACH 0.885 MAX RANGE: 12,501 KM MAX ALTITUDE: 15,545 M Large-Cabin | Ultra-Long-Range

A

IR OF CONFIDENCE

With the capability to fly 55% farther than its closest sibling, the ultra-long-range G550® gives you the confidence, capability and comfort to complete any mission. Whether your destination lies across the country, across the continent or across the world, the Gulfstream G550 sets The World Standard® for business travel.

ASIA PACIFIC: +65 6256 8301

– JASON AKOVENKO +86 10 8535 1866 – HERMAN CHAI (蔡海文) HONG KONG: +852 2918 1600 – PETER HOI (许建钿) CHINA:

GULFSTREAMG550.com

Range shown is based on NBAA IFR theoretical range at Mach 0.80 with eight passengers. Actual range will be affected by ATC routing, operating speed, weather, outfitting options and other factors.


EXECUJET LOCATIONS

CONTENT EDITOR Katrina Balmaceda ART DIRECTOR Sylvia Weimer (Spacelab Design, Sydney) EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS Charmaine Tai and Charmaine Tay AVIATION EDITOR Rainer Sigel

CONTRIBUTORS Jim Gregory Jennifer Henricus Jeff Heselwood Carol Lee Brian Moore Jianna K Olayvar Jim Simon Steve Slater Mavis Teo Alex Unruh COMPANY PUBLISHER Rainer Sigel MANAGING DIRECTOR Michelle Tay ASSISTANT MANAGER, BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Kiren Gill CIRCULATION & PRODUCTION MANAGER Caroline Rayney OFFICE MANAGER Winnie Lim MARKETING ASSISTANT Anne Goh

CONTACT 120 Lower Delta Road #13-11 Cendex Centre, Singapore 169208 T: +65 6273 0620 F: +65 6273 0632 EMAILS ADVERTISING business@oriental-publishing.com EDITORIAL content@oriental-publishing.com EVENTS events@oriental-publishing.com CIRCULATION circulation@oriental-publishing.com ADMINISTRATION office@oriental-publishing.com

EXECUJET LOCATIONS FEATURED IN THIS EDITION ExecuJet Aviation Group Head Office Zurich ExecuJet Aviation Group ExecuJet Aviation Centre PO Box 1 8058 Zurich-Airport Switzerland Tel: +41 44 804 1616 Fax: +41 44 804 1617 enquiries@execujet.eu

ExecuJet Europe GmbH General Aviation Terminal Airport Berlin Schoenefeld 12529 Berlin Germany Tel: +49 30 8875 4700 Fax: +49 30 8875 4701 fbo.eddb@execujet.eu

WEBSITES MAGAZINES www.jetgala.com | www.solitairemagazine.com GROUP www.orientalmediagroup.com SINGAPORE www.oriental-publishing.com VIETNAM www.oriental-ltd.com DIGITAL EDITIONS & DOWNLOADS www.jetgala.com/digital-editions FACEBOOK www.facebook.jetgala.com (Luxury News) LINKEDIN www.linkedin.jetgala.com (Aviation News) TWITTER www.twitter.jetgala.com (Aviation News) INSTAGRAM instagram.com/jetgalamagazine# RSS www.rss.jetgala.com (Aviation News) EXECUJET JETGALA is a special edition of JETGALA and is published in cooperation with JETGALA and distributed globally, including on aircraft operated by the companies of the ExecuJet Aviation Group. Opinions expressed are those of the contributors and not necessarily endorsed by the Publisher. COPYRIGHT AND OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS NOTICE: All rights, including copyright and all other intellectual property rights, in, out of and to the content of this publication are owned or controlled by ExecuJet Aviation Group AG, Switzerland, respectively by Oriental Publishing Pte Ltd, Singapore, as applicable. You are not permitted to, by any means or technology including without limitation any electronic means, copy, broadcast, upload, download, store in any medium, transmit, show or play in public, adapt or change in any way the content of this publication or any part thereof for any purpose whatsoever without the prior written permission of ExecuJet Aviation Group AG, Switzerland, respectively of Oriental Publishing Pte Ltd, Singapore, as applicable.

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TRADEMARKS NOTICE: The masthead logo ‘JETGALA’ is a Registered Trademark of Oriental Publishing Pte Ltd, Singapore. The logo ‘EXECUJET AVIATION’ and ‘EXECUJET AVIATION GROUP’ and the words ‘ExecuJet’, ‘ExecuJet Aviation’ and ‘ExecuJet Aviation Group’, in whatever form are Registered Trademarks of ExecuJet Aviation Group AG, Switzerland, and/or of its subsidiaries. The rights and title to other logos and trademarks contained in this publication are the rights and title of the respective title holders. All rights to their respective Registered Trademarks are cumulatively reserved by Oriental Publishing Pte Ltd, Singapore, respectively by ExecuJet Aviation Group AG, Switzerland, as applicable. The protection of all rights will be pursued to the full extent of the law. Printed by KHL Printing Co, Singapore MCI (P) 156/05/2013

PHOTO CREDITS COVER Photography: Adam Flipp MODEL: Alexandra Argoston / Chic STYLIST: Penny Mcarthy from Viviens Creative SECTION OPENER WINGS Image courtesy of Dassault Aviation SECTION OPENER LUXE Image courtesy of Porsche Automobil Holding SE SECTION OPENER AIRBORNE Image courtesy of Gulfstream Aerospace Corp

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Minuit à Chambord with a 1962 Cadillac and 1955 Sedan from the series Gangster of the French Castles

ERIC OTTO

FROM FRENCH WINE TO THE FRENCH GANGSTER EPOCH — PHOTOGRAPHER ERIC OTTO AND HIS MINIATURE CARS

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A 1960S CHEVY IMPALA STANDS IN THE SHADOW OF A SPECTACULAR FRENCH CHATEAU, ABANDONED BUT WITH ITS LIGHTS STILL ON. Blocking its path is a police car, its siren light glaring. This is not a dramatic still from a gangster movie — it’s the illusory work of French photographer Eric Otto. The imposing chateau is real. The cars, however, are miniature models, eight centimetres long. Otto combines two aesthetically eye-catching entities — magnificent buildings, and immaculate reproductions of automobiles from the era of classic design (the ’50s to the ’70s) — and creates photographs that are as striking for their originality as for their implied narrative. The viewer of the picture is like a passerby glimpsing an intriguing scene from a train window — our attention is caught for a brief second, and we are left to work out what might have happened. A dawn raid by the police? A daring heist followed by a car chase and a shootout? A storied vintner arrested for tax evasion? Otto admits that in juxtaposing hoodlum vehicles with French chateaus in his series Gangster of the French Castles, he was trying “to pay homage to these sumptuous edifices by making them part of an unfamiliar scene”. The idea “was to allow the imagination free reign in the milieu of luxury, which sometimes is also connected to that of the crooks. You sense a certain opulence, but also something menacing and mysterious. How much do these two worlds overlap? A meeting of two secret and powerful societies — that’s the feel of this series.” How did he come across such a simple but effective idea? The answer lies, apparently, at the bottom of a wine bottle. While on holiday in southern France in 2008, Otto was enjoying an aperitif on the terrace in Pézenas, a small artists’ town near Montpellier. He had bought some replica miniature cars from an antiques shop, among them a Charles de Gaulle 10

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Citroen DS and a 1955 model Citroen HY lorry. “After a few rather excellent bottles of wine,” he says, “something told me to lie down on the ground with my cars and make my own gangster pictures. Night was falling, and I was looking to create an atmosphere heavily charged with suspense. After my holiday, I was surprised to see that the pictures looked astonishingly realistic, while soaked in this sombre ambience. I immediately chose the best ones to show to people I know, and they met with a really positive response.” Otto realised that the idea of photographing old-timers in real settings, while re-creating the feel of neo-noir films from the ’50s and ’60s, was a new, exciting challenge. He decided to travel around the world and make an extravagant series, eventually opening his first exhibition, The French Connection or The French Gangster Epoch, 1955-70, in February 2009. Otto lives in the northern German port city of Hamburg (“an incredibly photogenic city for my work with its many splendid bridges”) and has now staged 16 exhibitions of his pictures covering Paris, Berlin, Hamburg, Lisbon and Barcelona. He recently returned from New York with photos of Brooklyn and Manhattan. The tall buildings in New York, he found, are trickier to use for his concepts. He will be bringing his gangster cars to San Francisco and Cuba next. Such photography is not without its practical difficulties. Placing the tiny cars in front of huge structures to gain the correct perspective requires a combination of patience, precision and the correct light conditions. Otto says the key is to work “almost like a street artist. I don’t want to create studio photos where I build miniature trees and miniature houses. Quite the opposite — the challenge is to place an eight-cm Bentley, for example, in front of the Château de Chambord, which is around the length of two soccer fields, or in front of the Eiffel Tower with a height of 300 metres, and to create the illusion of realism.” Sometimes, accidental overexposure works perfectly, such as for this picture called Brooklyn Night


“I AM A DREAMER — BUT ONE WITH GOOD TASTE”

FROM TOP London Spy Past a tower bridge

Sometimes, to get the right results and find the best perspective, he has to lie down in the middle of the road or scramble down a roof. Otto says this always makes passersby “extremely curious”, and that he’s run into numerous unexpected situations, such as being approached by gunwielding security guards while taking pictures at 5AM outside the USA Embassy in Berlin. But when he opened his suitcase and started taking pictures of model cars, “the guards relaxed and withdrew. That’s the kind of situation I thrive on.” No matter where or how he’s working, he always tries to “combine the design of the automobile with unique architecture”. Gangster of the French Castles brings together “the French monarchy with its majestic décor and the aesthetic beauty of the cars of yesteryear. My photos shout out to connoisseurs of car design as well as to connoisseurs of architecture.” When it comes to technique, Otto insists that “everything’s allowed”, and that he experiments a lot. “For example, instead of sophisticated lighting, I might use a simple pocket torch to achieve a certain lighting effect. I use all kinds of different cameras, from a Cannon D50 to an iPhone. I’ve found that for certain photos a telephoto lens fixed to an iPhone will work best.” The photographer says he reworks his photos “as little as possible. Sometimes an accidental overexposure is an incredible stroke of luck... Intuition and perception in a fleeting moment constitute the essence of my pictures: waiting for the ideal light, finding the optimum distance between a giant edifice and an eight-cm-long Dodge Charger, and shooting at the right moment while finding the ideal angle — that’s the most difficult part.” He refuses to spend three days re-working a photo and insists that he’s not looking for perfection — far from it. “I don’t think that perfection has anything to do with artistic work. I sometimes leave certain well-hidden but indiscernible details in a photograph which would betray that my cars are miniatures, simply because I like the idea of doing that. The most important thing for me is that the viewer experiences this profound ‘noir’ atmosphere that you find in the films of Scorcese or in films like Serpico or Bonny and Clyde.” While shooting, Otto works “visually and spontaneously”, and only later does the story become more concrete. “I visualise the series,” he says, “but it’s only when I’m re-grouping the pictures that I discover the harmony between them. Although my cars are always stationary, I sometimes look more for a mysterious ambience or sometimes a surreal atmosphere to create a rhythm, like the ones you’ll find in my series Brooklyn Boogie or The Stickup.” When you look at his pictures, he continues, “you always notice a conspiratorial or menacing atmosphere. You guess that shortly something’s going to happen, but what? Everyone will have his own response.” www.eric-otto.com EXECUJET

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EXECUJET MAISON CORTHAY

Maison Corthay’s Paris boutique

A SHOEMAKER STICKS TO ITS ROOTS WHILE GROWING GLOBALLY IT’S A BUSINESS STORY AS OLD AS COMMERCE ITSELF. A hot, upstart company gradually builds a reputation and attracts both interest and new investors. It goes forth to multiply, and its products become popular in faraway places. Its name is known in households across the globe. But by this time the company has lost its soul; the vision, ideals and quality upon which its reputation were founded have long since been lost to the demands of bankers and shareholders. And yet there are a handful of reassuring exceptions to such qualified success stories. Take French shoe-maker Maison Corthay, for example. The small, Paris-based producer of both bespoke and ready-to-wear men’s footwear quietly enjoyed a considerable reputation for comfort and excellence for the best part of two decades. In 2010, it took on new investors who wanted to launch the firm to a wider, international customer base. Yet at the same time, everyone involved wanted to retain Corthay’s core principles — keeping production local at its Paris workshop, and making quality shoes without taking any short cuts. “A business colleague once told me the key is not to go too fast from ‘hard-to-find’ to ‘hard-to-miss’,” says Xavier de Royere, the company’s CEO since 2010. “So don’t overexpose the brand and open 55 outlets so that you see a company store every time you walk into any mall.” He likens buying a pair of Corthay shoes to looking at a wine list. You don’t immediately choose the most famous or most expensive wine on the list, “you ask the sommelier to give you some advice. That’s the kind of customer that comes to us.” 12

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Corthay now employs 50 people and around 20 shoemakers, a significant expansion from the days when it was founded in a tiny Parisian atelier by Pierre Corthay in 1990. At that time, the 27-year-old shoemaker had spent 10 years working for other companies and honing his craft before deciding to set up on his own. A burgeoning reputation led to an article on the firm in the International Herald Tribune, which in turn prompted the Sultan of Brunei to order 30 pairs of bespoke shoes. Demand increased, both for bespoke and ready-to-wear shoes. When a Japanese distributor promised the guarantee of larger orders if the firm could expand its manufacturing capabilities, Corthay expanded the premises on the outskirts of the French capital, instead of taking production abroad. Not that there’s anything ‘wrong’ with producing or subcontracting in other countries; the trick is that not many companies are truthful about what they produce and where. But Corthay chose the difficult path, and when new investors like de Royere bought into the company a few years ago they understood, and opted to keep production in France using local labour. The only problem was finding trained shoemakers. “There are none,” says de Royere bluntly. “Well, there are, but they’re not willing to come to Paris. They have them in other countries, but if you ask them if they want to come and work in Paris, most people say no because it’s too expensive.” It’s the same, he adds, with French workers, who’d “rather die than come to Paris”. He adds that the solution is to “go out and find people


“BUYING A PAIR OF CORTHAY SHOES IS LIKE LOOKING AT A WINE LIST. YOU DON’T IMMEDIATELY CHOOSE THE MOST FAMOUS OR MOST EXPENSIVE WINE ON THE LIST, YOU ASK THE SOMMELIER TO GIVE YOU SOME ADVICE. THAT’S THE KIND OF CUSTOMER THAT COMES TO US” and teach them. The process is a lot longer, there is an element of trial and error, and at the end of the day you have so many pairs of shoes to produce, and maybe you have one guy who’s not as proficient — so you have to throw away one, two or three pairs per day, and that’s a huge cost. But it’s the only way.” Corthay consequently employs quite a young work force, “guys who have the physical ability to meet quite a demanding job”. Now Corthay has shops in Japan, the UK, Dubai, Hong Kong, wholesale in Singapore, Switzerland, Holland and Belgium, not to mention outlets across France, and US distribution through Saks Fifth Avenue and Leffot in NYC. De Royere says Corthay has “always maintained quality at all costs to the detriment of quantity, and somehow the best stories are when you have steady development, step by step, and you’re not rushing”. He was initially attracted to the company because he saw it as “a small tree with quite big roots. It wasn’t very exposed, but it was exposed to the right kind of people — not very well known, but it had credibility with people in the know.” De Royere also cites Pierre Corthay’s personality and “an element of truthfulness in the whole story and the way it’s been run” as the reasons that drew him towards the manufacturer. “The small size was an opportunity, because it enabled us to really build it internationally, and position it where we felt it should be.” And all along the emphasis remained on maintaining excellence. “You want to be able to look people in the eye,” says de Royere, “and say, I know how this is manufactured. It’s all done in-house. I don’t outsource to all kinds of places, and the materials I use are the best.” Without wanting to sound arrogant, he stresses, de Royere says that he doesn’t like to refer to Corthay as a ‘brand’, a term he views as vulgar and over-exposed. “Our story is true, it’s not a marketing story,” he says. “We feel mediumto long-term customers are prepared to put money into what they’re buying, as long as they know it’s real, and that they’re not being taken for a ride.” Not your usual business story at all.

Corthay CEO Xavier de Royere explains what makes his company’s shoes unique, and chooses his favourite Corthay design. “The shape of the front of the shoes is something we work on a lot. We’re inspired by cars and boats and planes, so we have this front that looks a bit like a sports car. Then there’s the colour, which we use either in a bold way or an understated manner. Finally, there’s the

quality of construction, and a lot of that comes from the accumulation of details that are not visible, but do make a difference in terms of comfort and durability, such as the use of natural cork. “My own favourite is the Arca, which we do in all sorts of materials and colours and combinations, and that’s the one I like to wear. It’s the bestseller, the one that the press likes, and the one that everyone likes to go for.” www.corthay.com

BELOW Kleber men’s dress shoes in Lie de Vin colour

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EXECUJET EUROPE HAS WON THE SHELL AVIATION SAFETY AWARD ExecuJet Europe’s fixed-based operation (FBO) at Berlin Schönefeld Airport has won the Shell Aviation Platinum Award for Safety and Quality in recognition of the operation’s high level of service. This latest accolade marks five consecutive years the Berlin FBO has been presented a Shell Award for Safety and Quality. The company previously won the Shell Gold Award in 2011 and 2012, the Shell Silver Award in 2010 and the Shell Bronze Award in 2009. In addition, ExecuJet’s FBO at Frankfurt am Main International Airport has won the Shell Bronze Award for Safety and Quality, after operating for just one year.

Team Berlin

The fifth edition of the Only Watch charity auction will be held in September in Monaco to raise funds in the fight against muscular dystrophy. For this event, Hublot has designed the Red'n'Black Skeleton Tourbillon, which features a brightly coloured ceramic bezel that reflects the red colour in Monaco’s flag. The handwound skeleton tourbillon movement is seen through an anti-reflective sapphire crystal casing, and offers a power reserve of 120 hours. www.hublot.com

EXECUJET LAUNCHES IPAD APP ExecuJet Aviation Group has launched an iPad app for aircraft management customers. The free app, called myExecuJet, enables customers to locate their aircraft and quickly access information on matters such as fuel consumption, schedules and crew. Aircraft owners and managers, as well as key account managers, can use the app to see their aircraft location on a world map in real time, as well as view routes, aircraft usage statistics, weather forecasts, flight schedules and maintenance events for past or future dates.

EXECUJET AFRICA CELEBRATES AFRICAN AVIATION AWARD WIN ExecuJet Africa has been recognised for its ‘Outstanding Services to African Aviation Development’ at the African Aviation awards in Nairobi. The company was praised by the awards organiser African Aviation journal at the ceremony, held during the African Business Aviation Conference & Exhibition from 27-29 May. Stephen Paddy, Sales & Marketing Director ExecuJet Africa, Ettore Poggi, Managing Director ExecuJet Africa

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THE DIAMOND OF LEGEND.

A S H O K A D I A M O N D.C O M

ASH A SHOKA OKA A速. The exc e clu llussive di d amo mond d cu utt byy Wi u W lliam m Gol G db Go dbe d berg. g. U. U S. S Pat atent ent #D # 418 4 44 41 444 44


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SHELL AVIATION AND EXECUJET MIDDLE EAST ANNOUNCE REFUELLING PARTNERSHIP AT DUBAI INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

Mark Hardman, Ops Director ExecuJet ME, Xavier Hery, GM Shell Markets ME

Shell Aviation and ExecuJet Middle East announced a new refuelling partnership at Dubai International Airport, effective this month. With this partnership, Shell expands its support to the regional aviation industry at the Dubai International Airport. A highly experienced team of Shell technical experts will be responsible for the day-to-day running of fuel operations at the fixed-base operation (FBO), ensuring round-the-clock and rapid access to fuel solutions.

EXECUJET LAUNCHES KEY ACCOUNT MANAGER SERVICES

Vladimir Velebit, Christian Mölleney, Gerrit Basson, Alex Shkurin, Andreas Pfisterer, Sergey Sheshenya

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ExecuJet Europe has launched a Key Account Manager service for aircraft management clients. The new system channels all departmental issues, such as operations, charter, maintenance, completions and accounting, through one dedicated contact. The company has appointed eight Key Account Managers based in various locations, including Zurich, Geneva, London, Moscow and Kiev. The team is headed by Andreas Pfisterer, European Director of Account Management, who has been with ExecuJet Europe for almost 10 years.

EXECUJET MIDDLE EAST AND ROLLS-ROYCE SIGN ENGINE SERVICE AGREEMENT ExecuJet and Rolls-Royce have signed an engine service agreement that authorises the ExecuJet Service Centre in Dubai, United Arab Emirates to perform engine line maintenance, removals and installations on Rolls-Royce BR710 and AE 3007A engines. The BR710 engine is installed on the Bombardier Global Express, Global Express XRS, Global 5000 and Global 6000 aircraft and the AE 3007A on Embraer’s Legacy 600 and 650 aircraft. ExecuJet Dubai will be the first Authorised Service Centre in the Rolls-Royce network to work across multiple product types. L: Andrew Robinson, Rolls-Royce Senior Vice President, Customer Services Civil and Small Medium Engines C: Wayne Dooley, ExecuJet Middle East General Manager Maintenance R: Todd Chambers, Rolls-Royce Director Customer Support

TEA PARTY Traditional French malletier Moynat reminds us of picnics in lush greenery and sunshine with a one-of-akind tea-time picnic hamper from the brand’s vintage collection. Customers may now order personalised versions of the hamper, which will be made with poplar wood and reinforced with walnut, and finished with a hand-stitched leather exterior and goat skin lining. Cutlery and porcelain will be included according to the client’s wishes. Waiting time for the bespoke hamper is at least five months. www.moynat.com


LOUNGE

Bentley’s driving goggles evoke the aviator look of the 1940s. This leather face mask comes with clear, laminated glass lenses secured by polished chrome frames, plus an adjustable nose bridge. It is made for shielding the eyes from sand and debris while cruising along the coast with the top down. www.bentleymotors.com

INSIDE LOOK Pam Tietze transforms everyday eyewear into wearable works of art. Once worn, the kaleidoscopic glasses incorporate light and transform your surroundings into psychedelic visual fields. Made of high-quality prismatic glass fragments, the eyewear is meant to bridge art and fashion, as well as to “evoke the feeling of being a tourist in your own reality”.

SKYEYE

Aerial photography is literally brought to new heights with Lehmann Aviation’s latest creation — the first UAV dedicated to GoPro users. The LA100 drone follows a pre-programmed flight path at speeds of up to 80 km/h, and returns to the user after five minutes. up to 80 to 100 metres, allowing the mounted GoPro camera to take photos and high-definition videos from the sky. www.lehmannaviation.com

www.h0les.com

INSIDE Hard Graft offers a rich, tactile experience and old-world charm with its Smoke luggage collection, which features deep brown tones combined with pale greys. The Carry On suitcase — reinforced for strength and lined with British wool — is suitable for short-haul flights. www.hardgraft.com 18

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FAIL PROOF The August Smart Lock stands out from existing traditional keys, keypad codes and biometric locks. It serves as an add-on to existing deadbolt locks, and operates via Bluetooth connection to lock or unlock doors. This allows homeowners to grant visitors access to the house while they are away. www.august.com


LOUNGE

BRIGHT EYED LEGEND AFTER LEGEND The Aeroboat by British yacht designer Claydon Reeves was inspired by the Spitfire, an iconic British fighter plane made during World War II. A RollsRoyce Merlin V12 engine, similar to that of the aircraft, powers the yacht and enables speeds of over 50 knots. Other features borrowed from the Spitfire are fluid lines and unique shock-mounted forward seats. The yacht will come with analogue gauges, touch-screen navigational systems, a joystick throttle with leather stitching, and a wooden dashboard. Ten Aeroboats will be fully customised according to their buyers’ wishes. www.claydonreeves.com

Patek Philippe unveiled a new version of one of the most complicated watches it has ever made, the Sky Moon Tourbillon. The new model, Ref. 6002, comes in an intricately engraved white gold case, while its front dial is decorated with champlevé and cloisonné enamelling. Among the watch’s 12 complications are a perpetual calendar with retrograde date and moonphase display, a tourbillon and a minute repeater with cathedral gong. www.patek.com

RUST AND SHADOW The MusicMachine is a spaceship sculpture created by watchmaker MB&F and Swiss music-box maker Reuge. Each of the spaceship’s two cylindrical cones contains 1,400 pins representing 72 notes, which are plucked by a ‘comb’ as the cones revolve, playing six 35-second melodies. Instead of classical music, MusicMachine plays excerpts of sci-fi film soundtracks and hits by Deep Purple, Pink Floyd and John Lennon. It is available in black or white lacquer. www.mbandf.com

AIR GRAFFITI

Indian-born, award-winning photographer John Issac has lived in New York City for the better part of his career and life. Having worked as a photojournalist for the United Nations, Issac has also photographed personalities such as Audrey Hepburn and Michael Jackson. He recently shifted his creative focus to wildlife and travel, and will be exhibiting a series of abstract images involving rust and shadows found in nature from 19 September at Asiatique Collections in Singapore. www.asiatiquecollections.com

Hold movie marathons or make impressive presentations in the air with Skybox™ by Rockwell Collins. Skybox™ projects graphs, films and other content from a device like an iPad onto a cabin display screen. It works wirelessly with Apple devices and can be linked to Android gadgets and laptops with Windows version 7 or later. www.rockwellcollins.com 20

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WINGS PILATUS PC-24

PILATUS PC-24

by Jim Gregory

by Jim Gregory

VERSATILE CLASS

A NEW BUSINESS JET FROM SWITZERLAND PROMISES FASTER TRIPS AND SHORTER LANDINGS 26

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Cessna’s in-production Citation M2 is slated to make an Asian appearance later this year or in early 2014

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IT DOESN’T TAKE LONG TO FLY FROM PILATUS AIRCRAFT’S HEADQUARTERS IN THE HEART OF SWITZERLAND to Geneva International Airport on the southernmost tip of Lake Geneva. Earlier this spring, when the company’s board chairman Oscar J. Schwenk made the trip in the Pilatus PC-12 to join the 2013 European Business Aviation Convention & Exhibition (EBACE), his flight lasted only an hour. In a few years, that flight to EBACE will be even shorter for Schwenk, who announced one of the prime news at the convention — a new flagship Pilatus business jet, the PC-24. The twin-engine PC-24 will be faster than the singleengine PC-12 but will have short, soft-field adaptability like its predecessor, as well as the cabin volume of a midsize aircraft and the performance of a light jet. “Over 10 years ago, we started asking our PC-12 customers what they would like to see in the next Pilatus aircraft. The answers were always the same: farther and faster — whilst retaining the much appreciated strengths of the PC-12, such as the ability to use very short runways. It was a huge challenge for our development team,” said Schwenk at the EBACE announcement. 28

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The development is quite a departure for an aircraft company credited for driving the market acceptance of single-engine aircraft by a business world sceptical of flying on only one engine. In less than 20 years, the 1,200 or so PC-12 aircraft flying around the world have clocked in more than four million hours of flight time with an impressive safety record. Now, that reputation for single-engine aircraft, crafted with Swiss precision, is about to expand into the twin-engine realm. The PC-24 is aimed at being the first business jet in the world with the ability to use very short runways, paved or unpaved. Pilatus calls the aircraft a “Super Versatile Jet”, with a cabin that can be configured to individual requirements. Interior layout choices include executive seating for six to eight passengers, a commuter setup for up to 10 passengers, combination versions with space for both passengers and cargo, and special installations for emergency medical flights. A large cargo door is standard — also a first for a business jet, says Pilatus. The PC-24 is designed to reach a maximum speed of 425 knots (787 km/h), compared with the PC-12’s 280 knots (519km/h). The maximum range with four passengers is >>


The PC-24 will have the volume of a midsize jet, with space for four to 10 passengers and allowing seatconfigurations for meetings and desktop work

PILATUS CALLS THE AIRCRAFT A “SUPER VERSATILE JET”, WITH A CABIN THAT CAN BE CONFIGURED TO INDIVIDUAL REQUIREMENTS JETGALA

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>> 3,610 km, compared to 2,889 km with three passengers in the PC-12. The PC-24 will be powered by two popular and reliable Williams FJ44-4A turbines, and will fly to an altitude of 13,716 metres, compared to the PC-12 ceiling of 9,144 metres. A prototype is currently being built at Pilatus’ hangars at Buochs Airport in Stans, Switzerland. The first prototype is expected to be rolled out in the third quarter of 2014, and the PC-24 is scheduled for its maiden flight by the end of 2014. Certification by the European Aviation Safety Agency and American Federal Aviation Administration is planned for early 2017. Customers will be able to start placing orders for the new business jet at next year’s EBACE. The PC-24 could be a game-changer, if you ask Schwenk, who says: “The PC-24 is a completely new development — not a ‘me too product’. Once again, we aim to fill a market niche, and I am confident we will do so successfully.”

LIGHTER LOADS For its new PC-24 business jet, Pilatus Aircraft developed the Advanced Cockpit Environment avionics system, which is aimed at reducing pilot workload. It will display flight data on four 12-inch, flat, glass screens, and will include a SmartView™ synthetic vision system and the ability for the pilot to complete flightplanning procedures on the screen itself in graphical form.

THE TWIN-ENGINE PC-24 WILL BE FASTER THAN THE PC-12 BUT WILL HAVE SHORT, SOFT-FIELD ADAPTABILITY LIKE ITS PREDECESSOR 30

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SPECIFICATION

IMPERIAL

METRIC

LENGTH (EXTERNAL)

55 FT 2 IN

16.8 M

WINGSPAN

55 FT 9 IN

17.0 M

HEIGHT (EXTERNAL)

17 FT 4 IN

5.3 M

CABIN LENGTH

23 FT 00 IN

7.01 M

CABIN WIDTH

5 FT 7 IN

1.69 M

CABIN HEIGHT

5 FT 1 IN

1.55 M

RANGE WITH IFR RESERVE

1,950 NM (4 PERSONS)

3,610 KM (4 PERSONS)

1,800 NM (6 PERSONS)

3,330 KM (6 PERSONS)

MAXIMUM (PASSENGER) SEATING MAXIMUM CRUISE SPEED

10 PASSENGERS 425 K TAS (489 MPH)

787 KM/H TAS

CERTIFIED CEILING

45,000 FT

13,716 M

TAKE-OFF BALANCED FIELD LENGTH

2,690 FT

820 M

MAXIMUM TAKEOFF WEIGHT

17,650 LBS

8,005 KG

OPPOSITE (TOP) A large cargo door makes it possible to transport equipment or store luggage comfortably

THIS PAGE Adjustable, reclining seats and mood lighting help provide a relaxing atmosphere on board

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WINGS AIRBUS BLUEJAY CABIN

SPA C E BIRD by Jim Simon

COMFORT CONCEPTS FOR FUTURE FLIERS 32

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magine the soundtrack to Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey playing as you board your private jet. That may not be the case with Airbus’ latest cabin concept, but it seeks to render a similar effect. Inspired by the 1968 film, the Airbus Corporate Jet Centre’s (ACJC’s) Bluejay cabin design for the ACJ319 is purist and technologically powerful. A hologram display showing passengers’ names greets them as they step onboard — a first for a corporate jet, says Airbus, and a modern complement to the classic crew welcome. The Bluejay concept uses objects normally ignored by passengers to create special effects. For instance, partitions separating the forward lounge and dining area are made of glass that can change from transparent to translucent at the touch of a button, catering to passengers’ whims for company or privacy. The partitions also act as

loudspeakers, using a technology that makes the glass vibrate like a diaphragm and providing concert hall-like sound. “While creating this concept, I thought of 2001’s soundtrack and imagined how it would be fantastic to listen to the opening from Richard Strauss’ tone poem, Also sprach Zarathustra,” says Sylvain Mariat, head of the ACJC Creative Design Studio. For Mariat, elegance without ergonomics makes no sense. A flip of a switch allows passengers to change the seating configuration for more sociable or intimate settings. Mariat designed the VIP seats, made from dark wood veneer in smoked oak and light-grey leather. The seats are inspired by the iconic lounge chair and ottoman released by famed American designers Charles and Ray Eames in 1956. The warmth of the wood softens the avant-garde interior, as does the decorative crystal light by Baccarat, which features a carbonfibre panel and LED pendants. >>

OPPOSITE The Bluejay’s seats are inspired by classic, functional furniture made by Charles and Ray Eaemes in the 1950s

THIS PAGE, FROM TOP Designers at ACJC came up with the concept of entering a space-inspired cabin, complete with glass partitions that act as loudspeakers Like a home, the cabin room comes complete with a queen-sized bed, sofa and HDTV

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PARTITIONS ARE MADE OF GLASS THAT CAN CHANGE FROM TRANSPARENT TO TRANSLUCENT AT THE TOUCH OF A BUTTON

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Suitable for long-distance travel, tables can be easily flipped out at ease The spacious cabin keeps a simplistic design, using silver, brown and cream tones Kept minimalistic, compartments are opened with a touch With this concept, the ACJC Design Team strives to illustrate the possibilities of a high-tech cabin

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>> Another Baccarat crystal light fixture adorns the master bedroom, which houses a queen-size bed and a large sofa. Five reading lamps, a 46-inch HDTV flat-display and an iPod docking station give the guest options for entertainment. And just like a house on the ground, the bedroom includes a spacious bathroom with a granite vanity and oversized glass shower. “I really wanted a very contemporary design for this area, which must be both spacious and ergonomic. That is why I designed a large square shower, with glossy paint and metal, which is very bright and airy,” says Mariat. This blend of functionality and style would be incomplete without the basic necessities of long-distance travel — but in the Bluejay, such basics are high-tech, too. These include a four-seater table designed by the ACJC Design Office Team, which specially extends to accommodate an additional person without the need

for additional seats. A well-equipped, U-shaped galley offers the space and ease of food preparation found in a home. Even here, the purist theme is unmistakable — the cabinets have no handles, but automatically open and close with a slight push of their doors. But Mariat adds that while “luxury and space are the basics, the added value of a designer goes also from an initial perception of emotions to the final attention to details”. And so he incorporates a sentimental reminder of earth amid all the outer spaceinspired avant-gardism: the trunk, the traditional symbol of travel. “I wanted it to represent the ancestral French know-how of trunk manufacture by using leather, wood and crystal inserts,” says Mariat. It comes with an interior padding of nubuck. The overall design is consistent inside and out, with the cold cabin colours reflected in a livery of blue tones and silver — inspired, of course, by the Blue Jay bird.


WINGS LEARJET 75 by Jim Gregory

A NEW LEARJET PROMISES TO MAKE ASIAN FLIGHTS A BREEZE

FROM TOP The Learjet 75 will have a maximum speed of Mach .81, convenient for travel within Asia Seats in the Learjet 75 will be strategically arranged so that no chair will face another’s backseat

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PRIVATE FLIERS IN ASIA ARE GENERALLY KNOWN TO PREFER LARGER AIRCRAFT — the bigger, the better — but manufacturers reckon passengers will gravitate toward lighter jets, too. Bombardier Aerospace flew the first production model of its Learjet 75 light jet to Geneva this spring and believes it will satisfy the demand for smaller aircraft for travel within Asia. A successor to the Learjet 45, it will feature a 1.56-metre-wide passenger cabin with interiors inspired by the larger, midsize Learjet 85. “Our clients want us to preserve the Learjet performance heritage but to have modern features in the cabin, like our Learjet 85,” says Bombardier Business Aircraft president Steven Ridolfi. These features include cabin management and in-flight entertainment systems — conceived by the brain trust Lufthansa

Technik — complete with hidden speakers and individual seven-inch, pop-up, touch-screen monitors operated by a scroll wheel, highlighted by a bigger bulkhead HD display. Passengers will sit in two four-chair club arrangements that serve as conversation and dining areas or work stations with Internet connectivity. The seats will be more comfortable than those of the Learjet 45, and no chair will face another’s backrest. There will also be a larger galley for those longer airborne interludes when cuisine becomes more important. With a range of 3,778 kilometres and a maximum speed of Mach .81, Mumbai to Bangkok or Singapore to Hong Kong will be a snap — even in undesirable weather, as the Learjet 75 will, under certain conditions, be able to operate at a maximum height of 51,000 feet (15,545m), >>

The aircraft is fitted with a Vision Flight Deck, decreasing pilot workload and improving situational awareness

THE TRANSCONTINENTAL JET FEATURES AN AIRFRAME THAT SITS BETWEEN EMBRAER’S LIGHT PHENOM JETS AND THE LARGER LEGACY 600 AND 650 MODELS

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SPECIFICATION

IMPERIAL

LENGTH (EXTERNAL)

57.6 FT

17.56 M

WINGSPAN

45.8 FT

13.96 M

HEIGHT (EXTERNAL)

14.13 FT

4.31 M

CABIN LENGTH

19.75 FT

6.02 M

CABIN WIDTH

5 .12 FT

1.56 M

CABIN HEIGHT

4.92 FT

1.50 M

MAXIMUM RANGE (1) WITH IFR RESERVES

2,040 NM

3,778 KM

MAXIMUM (PASSENGER) SEATING

METRIC

UP TO 8+1

HIGH SPEED CRUISE

0.81 MACH

CERTIFIED CEILING

51,000 FT

15,545 M

TAKEOFF DISTANCE

4,440 FT

1,353 M

MAXIMUM TAKEOFF WEIGHT

21,500 LB

9,752 KG

SKY THEATRE In the 1970s, Learjet pioneered business-jet flight at 51,000 ft (15,545m), that rarefied operating altitude where one has a chance to observe multiple phenomena. From that height, passengers can see the curvature of Earth, the “terminator” — where sunlight and darkness meet. One can also see the Milky Way unfiltered by 15,000 metres of atmosphere, while looking down on lightning storms and a lot of horizon. At that altitude, passengers will see only few other private and military jets.

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A SUCCESSOR TO THE LEARJET 45, IT WILL FEATURE A 1.56-METRE-WIDE PASSENGER CABIN WITH INTERIORS INSPIRED BY THE LARGER, MIDSIZE LEARJET 85

>> where conditions are calm. From this perch, passengers will get a view of Earth that relatively few people see (see box story). Canted winglets will improve the aircraft’s aerodynamics, making it four percent more fuel-efficient than the Learjet 45. While Bombardier cannot disclose its order book, Ridolfi says interest in the Learjet 75 is high. Last year an undisclosed customer ordered six Learjet 75s, while London Air Services ordered five. The first delivery is expected in the fourth quarter of 2013. Ridolfi admits that “the times are still challenging for business aviation, and the expected recovery is still not here”, but adds that Bombardier has launched several new aircraft programmes in recent years — proof that despite varying economic conditions worldwide, the Canadian manufacturer expects brighter days ahead for private jets.


WINGS

ALEXANDER POLLI by Brian Moore

A BIRDMAN’S QUEST TO PUT HIS SKY-HIGH DREAMS INTO ACTION 40

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OPPOSITE PAGE Polli practices flying through a gap barely wider than his body before flying through a narrow cave in Spain THIS PAGE FROM TOP Polli started the flight by jumping out of a hovering helicopter, before making his way through the narrow cave Polli lives his dream, BASE jumping in places like Brazil and the Swiss alps

POLLI FLEW AT 250 KM/H THROUGH A NARROW HOLE IN A ROCK WALL IN MONTSERRAT, SPAIN

hen skydiver Patrick de Gayardon first flew using a self-designed wingsuit in 1997, he revived the centuries-old quest for unpowered human flight. Then in 1999 ‘birdmen’ Jari Kuosma and Robert Pecnik produced the first commercially available, safe wingsuit, bringing man ever closer to his ultimate dream. Today, wingsuit flying is considered a legitimate sport, with competitions involving formations and individual pilots’ speed records, but it has become no less challenging. Without the aid of fly-by-wire technology, GPS, or terrain-detecting radar, these pilots rely solely on physical and mental awareness plus instinct as they fly faster than 150 km/h. And they are taking the sport further. In April this

year a video went viral of 27-year-old Alexander Polli gliding at 250 km/h through a narrow hole in a rock wall in Montserrat, Spain. Polli practises proximity flying, in which wingsuit flyers get as close as possible to the ground or the side of a mountain, or zip through very narrow caves or between two buildings. “It’s all about mental attitude. Before each flight, I rehearse the jump a hundred times in my head: I visualise the descent, the contours of the land and my target as I race towards it,” says Polli, who became the first WiSBASE (Wingsuit BASE Jumping) pilot to successfully and intentionally strike a target in November 2012. Wanting to find out how much precision and control a wingsuit pilot can achieve, Polli flew toward a three-metre pole made of foam, intentionally hitting it with his left hand as he executed a turn. >> JETGALA

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“YOU BECOME THE WING... WITH THE SMALLEST MOVEMENT OF YOUR BODY YOU CAN CONTROL THE FLIGHT”

>> WiSBASE jumpers begin their flight by jumping off a fixed object — such as a building, cliff or bridge — while many wingsuit flyers also jump from hovering helicopters. The flyer leaps from a height of 500 to 700 metres and glides toward his target, controlling his direction and descent. In this type of flight, “you become the wing. Your arms and shoulders are the leading edges; with the smallest movement of your body you can control the flight. You can control the pitch, the angle of attack and speed, and you can change course,” says Polli. As with skydivers, wingsuit flyers break their fall with a parachute. But even with the quality of modern wingsuits, things can still go wrong. Polli explains: “There is a tendency, when deploying your chute, for lines to get twisted. This is where your training comes in. I’ve landed in some trees because of this ‘twisting’, but thankfully, only my ego was hurt as I had to call for help to get out of the tree.” Being a young sport, wingsuit flying offers many opportunities for development. For instance, while pilots can climb several times during the jump, they are unable to sustain the height. Jumping from 700 metres results in a flight

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Behind the daredevil stunts, Polli pictures how each jump should look and feel like, and spends time doing numerous calculations

efficiency of 1:1 — meaning the pilot descends one metre for every metre of forward flight. Some try to rectify this by attaching a set of small engines to the suit or to their legs — in 2010 Swiss pilot Yves Rossy performed aerial loops using his jetpack, a backpack with carbon-fibre wings powered by four jet engines, which he designed. Japanese pilot Shin Ito holds the record for the greatest horizontal distance flown in a wingsuit at 26.9 km, but this was unpowered flight. Polli believes a powered suit can increase flight time and distance, and hopes to create one. Whether he is jumping from a mountaintop in Rio, flying over the Swiss Alps or diving through a seven-square-metre cave, Polli never tires of the landscape and the new challenges that each flight reveals. He says: “I am truly privileged to see the earth in such a manner... I find that no matter how often you rehearse the flight in your head, or how often you study the terrain, each time I jump, I learn something new. It’s a lot like life that way and that’s what I love about it.” Watch Polli’s precision-flying technique here


WINGS DIANA CHOU OF SINO AVIATION

BLAZING A TRAIL IN CHINA’S BUSINESS AVIATION

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IN 1999, LONG BEFORE THE INFLUX OF PRIVATE-JET BROKERS AND CHARTER OPERATORS IN CHINA, DIANA CHOU FOUNDED SINO PRIVATE AVIATION. Based in Hong Kong, the company became Bombardier’s sales and marketing representative for mainland China, Macau and Hong Kong. Sino Private Aviation also offers on-demand charter and markets pre-owned jets. Now the company’s managing director, Chou is known for her philanthropic zeal and is setting up an aviation scholarship fund for underprivileged children. She is a founding member and executive committee member of the Asian Business Aviation Association.

Diana Chou’s (inset) family has always admired Bombardier aircraft, and it was only natural that Chou decided to represent the brand in mainland China, Macau and Hong Kong through Sino Private Aviation. Its fleet includes a Global 7000 (opposite), Learjet 85 (above), Challenger 605 (left) and Challenger 350 (below)

I

Q: When and why did you enter the private aviation industry, and how different is the industry today from the time you started? I’ve been in business aviation for close to 15 years and have always had passion for the industry. I like the challenges it presents. I stumbled into this industry by opportunity as Bombardier was looking for an agent to represent its product. Seeing the enormous China market, I decided to give it a try. Today there are more than 200 jets in Greater China. When I started there were only a handful. In those days, it took three weeks to get permission to fly into China. Nowadays, approval only takes 24 hours. Q: Please walk us briefly through the process of buying a new private jet. First, we find out the client’s travel patterns and assist him in selecting the most suitable aircraft type. The client then signs a letter of intent then enters into purchase agreement negotiation. We work closely with the client to select his preference on interior and exterior painting, and assist him in appointing an aircraft management company. We regularly update him on the production status of his aircraft, and coordinate with the management company on final delivery. >> JETGALA

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Sino Private Aviation’s jets for charter use come with comfortable VIP cabins, as seen in the Challenger 605

Q: What opportunities do you see in Asia this year in terms of new or growing markets? More high-net-worth individuals and companies [in Asia] are seeing and recognising the efficiency of using a business jet. Inquiries about pre-owned aircraft have increased. We expect to see more charter companies, financial leasing companies and pre-owned aircraft brokers setting up base in the region. Fractional ownership or jet cards will be soon be a popular way of experiencing private jet travel. Q: How have flight patterns in Asia evolved in the past five years, in terms of popular destinations for business and leisure? The beauty of the business jet is it allows you to travel to any city you need for business or leisure. You will see more jets flying into major cities and holiday destinations such as Beijing, Shanghai, Seoul, Taiwan, Singapore, Hong Kong, Bali, Phuket and Myanmar, as well as faraway destinations in Europe, North and South America. Now, most airports have experience in handling business jet passengers and have 46

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established FBOs — Beijing, Shanghai, Hainan and Singapore, for instance, have well-equipped FBOs. Q: How have flight preferences changed in Asia in the past five years, in terms of jet size preference and demand for additional services? The Asian market still has strong buying power and more clients prefer mid-sized jets like the Challenger 605 and/or large business jets like the Global 5000 and 6000. Nowadays, clients pay more attention to the interior design of their aircraft. Q: What services — especially bespoke services — do you offer your clients apart from jet sales and charter? We walk the client through the whole process until his aircraft is delivered. Aside from the processes mentioned earlier, we also help the client to appoint an aviation lawyer. We coordinate third-party aircraft inspection, as well as financing if it is needed. After the aircraft is delivered, we monitor it closely with the client and management company to ensure that it is operating smoothly. When a client eventually wants to upgrade or trade in his existing aircraft, we help to market it. If the aircraft utilisation is low, we help

the customer to charter their aircraft out. We also help to provide an interim solution while a customer is waiting for aircraft delivery or when his aircraft is under maintenance. Q: What are the top three changes that you would like to see in Asia’s private aviation industry? We would like to see de-regulation in countries such as India and Japan, and the opening of more flight corridors or air routes for private jets in China and Russia. We would also like to see more business aviation facilities and more experienced aviation personnel in the country. Q: How have shows such as ABACE improved business in the private aviation industry in Asia? They benefit regional aviation professionals, allowing them to get the latest updates around the globe. They are a great platform for showing jets to end-clients, and offer a networking opportunity within the industry. They also serve to educate to the market about business jets.

Sino Private Aviation also helps clients select interior options

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EVEKTOR SPORTSTAR EPOS by Charmaine Tay

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WHEN IT COMES TO LESSENING OUR IMPACT ON THE ENVIRONMENT, THERE’S LITTLE DISCUSSION ABOUT WHAT ELECTRIC CARS CAN DO. What is still unclear, though, is if this new automotive breed can ever be as reliable and powerful as its gasoline-burning predecessor. The same holds true with aircraft, if you ask Martin Drštiþka, manager of the Electric Powered Small Aircraft (EPOS) project by the Czech company Evektor. He says: “I perceive a close parallel with the automotive industry. In that field, electromobility also struggles for its place on the market, which it deserves, but in doing so it must overcome a number of technical problems. I am convinced that the range of potential of electricity-driven sport aircraft is very wide.” Much has been said about solar flight and alternative jet fuels, but Evektor is showing that it means business in encouraging electrically powered flight. The company, a developer and designer of car parts and aircraft, unveiled the SportStar EPOS in April this year. This was preceded by a test flight that saw the SportStar EPOS airborne for 10 minutes. A second test brought its total time running on electricity to 30 minutes. Targeted at light aircraft enthusiasts and pilot trainees, the two-seater SportStar EPOS comes with trapezoidal wings that span 10.5 metres (34.32 feet). It is driven by a DC electric motor RE X90-7 power unit supplied by Rotex Electric, which powers the aircraft’s three-blade composite propeller. The engine can be modified for use in other aircraft, as well as cars. For the aircraft, the manufacturer specifies a maximum speed of 260 km/h and a cruise speed of 150 km/h. An electric control unit developed by MGM COMPRO ensures optimal use of the energy stored in the battery containers, each of which holds 45 lithium polymer cells connected in series. These are automatically rechargeable and can be accessed and replaced if needed. Each SportStar EPOS can carry two pairs of battery containers, each weighing 53 kg (116 lbs). As with electric cars, noise pollution is reduced to a whisper compared to fuelpowered aircraft, allowing the SportStar EPOS to use airfields near residential areas. Financially supported by the Technology Agency of the Czech Republic, Evektor also counts VZLÚ Prague (propeller manufacturer) and the Faculty of Information Technology of Brno University of Technology (supplier of the display unit for motor parameters) as its partners. Having helped develop aircrafts L159 ALCA and Ae270 for Aero Vodochody in the Czech Republic, Evektor has since produced its own fleet, including the EV-97 Eurostar — a touring or leisure flying two-seater — and the twinengined EV-55 Outback, which can transport either up to nine passengers or a full load of cargo. OPPOSITE PAGE The SportStar EPOS sport aircraft is designed to run on electricity THIS PAGE The SportsStar EPOS is powered by Rotex Electric’s electric motor, which significantly reduces noise pollution and allows the aircraft to to use airports in populated areas

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EXPRESS MEDICAL ASSISTANCE by Mavis Teo

EMERGENCY EVACUATION ON MORE THAN JUST A WING AND A PRAYER 50

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AT TIMES THINGS JUST DON’T GO THE WAY WE HOPE OR PLAN, EVEN IN THE MOST SEEMINGLY PREDICTABLE SITUATIONS. A lady in her 80s enjoying her holiday was knocked unconscious when a coconut fell on her at a beach resort in Phuket, causing her severe spine injury. A European businessman was wrapping up a business trip in China, riding a taxi to the airport when the cab driver diverted, robbed him and slashed his artery. “Both victims were speedily evacuated to Singapore by our air ambulance,” says Dr Winston Jong, medical director of Express Medical Assistance (EMA), who carried out medical evacuation in both cases. Medical evacuation or medevac, as it is commonly known, is a medically assisted transfer of a patient from one place to another where he can receive appropriate medical care. Medevac may be covered in credit card and travel insurance policies, but in such cases one has no control over the details – like which doctor tends to you on board, and which hospital you get sent to when you are evacuated home. Companies like EMA enable their clients to customise the details of their rescue, from pickup to the hospital bed. The client can choose the type of air ambulance he wants to use for the transfer, be it a Boeing 737 or EMA’s own Learjet 60. He or his family may put together their own medical team to include their personal family doctor or preferred medical specialist, and may choose the hospital the patient gets sent to. EMA has a 40-strong in-house aero-medical team comprising intensivists, anaesthetists and intensive-care nurses who are trained in full-service bed-to-bed medical transfers and aeronautical medicine, each with at least 10 years of experience. EMA has direct access to a full range of modern, mobile aero-medical ICU equipment to bring on board the aircraft to suit each client’s medical condition. The team also has round-the-clock access to a well-stocked pharmacy back at the base. EMA’s fully integrated, bed-to-bed service includes land ambulance to and from the aircraft, immigration and customs clearance, and follow-up monitoring at the patient’s home or at the receiving medical facility when requested. The team is able to evacuate a patient within three hours of confirming a request. The company handles an average of 300 medevac cases a year, and has operated for almost 18 years and in at least 30 countries.

OPPOSITE PAGE EMA’s aircraft has been modified to comfortable transport patients THIS PAGE Various medical devices that may be brought on-board include neonatal intensive care equipment

EMA HAS DIRECT ACCESS TO A FULL RANGE OF MODERN, MOBILE AERO-MEDICAL ICU EQUIPMENT TO BRING ON BOARD THE AIRCRAFT

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OPERATION PAPERCLIP by Steve Slater

THE DARK SIDE OF THE SPACE RACE

IT IS WELL DOCUMENTED HOW POST-WAR AMERICA LED THE WORLD IN DESIGNING HIGH-SPEED AIRCRAFT AND JET ENGINES, IN THE PROCESS PUTTING MEN ON THE MOON. Less known, though, is that much of this is thanks to Operation Paperclip — a secret recruitment programme of scientists from Nazi Germany by the USA. In 1943, as Germany was losing World War II, Adolf Hitler switched from using conventional military force to creating new ‘wonder weapons’, hoping to regain power. Scientists, mathematicians and engineers who had been assigned to lowly roles in the military, such as baking and driving, suddenly found themselves back at doing research work. Among them were some 4,000 rocket engineers sent to Peenemünde, a far-flung village on the north-eastern coast of Germany. The regime first ascertained the scientists’ politics and ideology, and the names of those deemed loyal were compiled under the Osenberg List. 52

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OPPOSITE PAGE A group of 104 German rocket scientists who moved to the USA under Operation Paperclip at Fort Bliss, Texas, in 1946

THIS PAGE, FROM TOP The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in May 1958, with Von Braun seen at front right Walt Disney (left) visited von Braun, then chief of Guided Missile Development Operation Division at the Army Ballistic Missile Agency, in Alabama in 1954 All images courtesy of NASA

LED BY DR WERNHER VON BRAUN, THE SCIENTISTS CREATED THE V-2 — THE WORLD’S FIRST LONG-RANGE COMBAT-BALLISTIC MISSILE

Led by Dr Wernher von Braun, a rocketeer, the scientists at the Peenemünde site created a new weapon, the V-2 — the world’s first long-range combat-ballistic missile. Elsewhere at the site, other technicians were building the V-1 flying bomb, the world’s first cruise missile. The V-2 went into action in September 1944, targeting Allied forces. But even then, Germany was losing, and the first frosts of the Cold War were already forming. More than 3,000 V-2 rockets took off before their launching points were overrun by Allied forces. By 1945 the borders of what would become East and West Germany had been defined by Russian leader Stalin, British Prime Minister Churchill and American President Roosevelt at a conference in Yalta in the Crimea. The Peenemünde research establishment, plus a vast underground V-2 rocket factory at Nordhausen and many of Germany’s other research establishments, would lie on the eastern, Soviet side of what would become the Iron Curtain. Von Braun and his staff fled to central Germany and surrendered to the Americans in May for fear of Soviet cruelty to war prisoners. They were evacuated from the village in June. Coincidentally, earlier that year pieces of the Osenberg List — which included von Braun — were discovered in a toilet at a university, and made their way to American hands. Discovering the extent of the scientists’ work, the US planned to evacuate them from Germany to deny the UK and the Soviet forces scientific knowledge. This was handled by the US’ Joint Intelligence Objectives Agency (JIOA). American President Harry Truman banned the hiring of any scientist “found to have been a member of the Nazi Party, and more than a nominal participant in its activities, or an active supporter of Nazi militarism” — which aptly described most of the scientists the JIOA intended to recruit. Fearing that the scientists would end up lending their intelligence to America’s enemies, the JIOA secretly cleansed the scientists’ political and work histories, and destroyed the public records of their Nazi Party affiliations. The name ‘Operation Paperclip’ came from the paperclips used to attach the whitewashed records to the US Government Scientist profiles. >> JETGALA

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WINGS FROM TOP Von Braun stands by the five F-1 engines of the Saturn V Dynamic Test Vehicle on display at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama Dr. von Braun briefs astronaut John Glenn (left) in the control room of the Vehicle Test Section, Quality Assurance Division, Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama

VON BRAUN AND HIS STAFF FLED TO CENTRAL GERMANY AND SURRENDERED TO THE AMERICANS FOR FEAR OF SOVIET CRUELTY TO WAR PRISONERS >> Russia still gained vital hardware and production equipment, as research work continued at Peenemünde. Many of the scientists left there were subsequently moved to the USSR, allowing the Sputnik to beat the Americans in the race to launch the first orbital satellite. Meanwhile America, thanks to Operation Paperclip, was enhancing rocket technology with the expertise of von Braun who, along with 126 others, had opted to become a ‘War Department Special Employee’ and later accepted an invitation to become an American civilian. Back in the 1930s, von Braun’s original interest in rocketry had lain not in its military use, but in its potential for space voyage. In 1960 von Braun became the head of NASA’s Marshall Space Centre and played a key role in the development of America’s space programme. His dream to bring man to the moon became reality on 16 July 1969, when the Saturn V rocket that he and his team developed launched Neil Armstrong on the successful Apollo 11 lunar mission. America won the space race, largely thanks to Operation Paperclip. 54

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ROCKET MAN Wernher von Braun first became fascinated with space exploration when, as a child, he devoured the science fiction of Jules Verne and HG Wells. He decided to master calculus and trigonometry after reading physicist and engineer Hermann Oberth’s classic study, By Rocket to Space. Von Braun joined the German rocket society around the age of 17. At 20 he joined the German army and built ballistic missiles, and later spearheaded the development of the V-2 rocket (see main story). After having been moved to the US under Operation Paperclip, von Braun built ballistic missiles for the US army for 15 years. In 1960, his rocket development centre was transferred to NASA, where he became director of the Marshall Space Flight Center and built the Saturn V launch vehicle, which brought Neil Armstrong to the moon. Von Braun was known to say that he used the word “impossible” with the greatest caution. He died on 16 June 1977 at age 65.


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HIGHER with 50 years knowhow and now in Asia.

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FLARIS LAR 01 by Jeff Heselwood

POLAND’S NEW, SPORTY, VERY LIGHT JET

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OPPOSITE PAGE

THIS PAGE FROM TOP

LAR 01 features detachable winfs and horizontal stabilisers that help ease storage of the jet

The jet will have safety features such as an electric de-icing system and a rescue parachute It will be able to seat up to four passengers, excluding the pilot Like the Airbus A350 and Boeing 787, the LAR 01 uses carbon fibre, reducing its weight to a mere 650 kg

TO THE OUTSIDE WORLD, THE STARS OF THIS YEAR’S PARIS AIRSHOW APPEARED TO BE THE AIRBUS A350 (which flew for the first time just a few days before) and the Boeing 787 Dreamliner. But a surprise addition to the bi-annual airshow also turned heads — the Polish-built Flaris LAR 01 very light jet. Like the A350 and 787, the LAR 01 is an all-composite aircraft, using pre-impregnated carbon fibre — a new foray for Flaris’ parent company Metal-Master, which produces steel panels for many of Europe’s motor manufacturers, including a number of truck makers. A fun and sporty aircraft that can take off on grassy airstrips, the LAR 01 was not made for carrying coolers of champagne. It is a personal jet that can take the family or a small group of friends on a weekend getaway, with room for four passengers plus the pilot. It is useful for transporting family doctors and company managers, too. “Already at this stage we can see a wide range of interest for this aircraft, both for private and corporate use, as well as some commercial potential. We can see interest in modern jet training as well. Originally we should hit the experimental market, working on Polish S1, EASA and FAR certificates,” says Maciej Peikert of the Flaris Team in Podgòrzyn, Poland. The LAR 01 will feature wide rear-hinged access doors for the pilot and co-pilot, while detachable wings and horizontal stabilisers will help ease storage of the jet. The fuel tank will be fitted into the fuselage, as no fuel can be stored in the detachable wings. Flaris sales manager Anthony Krol says that while the prototype displayed at the Paris Airshow came with a FADEC-controlled, 1,460-pound thrust Pratt & Whitney engine, the manufacturer is considering equipping production aircraft with engines from Williams International and Price Induction. Avionics will be a dual Garmin G600 system, and safety features will include an electric de-icing system and a rescue parachute. Should the motor fail, the LAR 01 will be able to glide for 18 km for each kilometre of height loss. The LAR 01 has already completed low-speed taxi tests with test-flights set to begin by the end of this year. Flight certification is expected by 2015. If targets are met, the LAR 01 will be able to take off at a distance of just 250 metres (820 feet), fly at a cruise speed of 380 knots and reach an altitude of 13,716 metres (45,000 feet). It will cover a range of 1,400 nautical miles; a 2,000-km trip will take three hours. Weighing a mere 650 kg and boasting a compact drop shape, its aerodynamics will be comparable to a glider’s.

IT IS A PERSONAL JET THAT CAN TAKE THE FAMILY OR A SMALL GROUP OF FRIENDS ON A WEEKEND GETAWAY

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FALCON BUSINESS JETS by Steve Slater

THE BIRTH OF FRANCE’S ICONIC BUSINESS JET THE ROOTS OF THE DASSAULT AVIATION COMPANY CAN BE TRACED TO ONE SUNNY AFTERNOON IN A SCHOOL PLAYGROUND IN FRANCE, when a young Marcel Bloch looked up at the sky and saw an aircraft for the first time. From that time on, aviation consumed his thoughts. As an adult in the 1930s he fulfilled his passion, producing aircraft for both the French military and the country’s national airline, Air France. But Bloch’s fortunes changed dramatically when World War II broke out, causing his country’s downfall. Bloch refused to collaborate with the German aviation industry and, as a result, was deported to the infamous Buchenwald concentration camp. Meanwhile Bloch’s elder brother, General Darius Paul Bloch, escaped capture to lead the Frenc h Resistance around Paris. To disguise his identity, he used the codename “Chardasso”, a French military slang for “tank”. Having survived the conflict, both brothers changed their Germanic-sounding Alsace surname to a derivation of the old code word. “Dassault” was thus conceived. Marcel Dassault returned home to find his factories still intact, and continued to design fighter planes. In the 1960s he observed that America — no longer Europe — was becoming the prime market for business aviation. He began the Mystère project at the company’s expense, and on 1 April 1963, a prototype of the Mystère 20 business jet rolled off the Dassault assembly line at Bordeaux-Merignac in France. It looked more like an airliner than an executive jet, and was based on technologies designed for the Mystère IV fighter-bomber aircraft.

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At the same time, Pan American Airlines created a businessjet division, and founder Juan Trippe sent legendary aviator Charles Lindbergh, then acting as the airline’s technical advisor, to look at Dassault’s new jet. Lindbergh wired back: “I’ve found the bird.” His words propelled the Mystère 20 towards commercial success, with Pan American placing an order of unprecedented scale for 40 aircraft with options on 120 more. To promote the Mystère 20’s use of quieter General Electric CF700 turbofans and because customers found the French name difficult to pronounce, Pan Am suggested a new name, ‘Fan Jet Falcon’. The aircraft set a world speed record on 10 June 1965 when famous test pilot Jacqueline Auriol flew it over a distance of 1,000 km at an average of 859 km/h. To meet the needs of American clients, the Dassault Falcon Jet Corporation was set up in Little Rock, Arkansas, creating a transatlantic design and engineering partnership that continues today. In the 1970s, surveys of business aviation in America demonstrated that the average flight carried only four passengers. Dassault responded with 226 examples of the Falcon 10, which was smaller than the Mystère 20 (already renamed Falcon 20) and produced until 1989. It remains one of the most popularly used business jets on the market today. >>

OPPOSITE First flown in 1963, the Mystère 20 was a low-wing monoplane with two rear-mounted engines BELOW Marcel Dassault inspecting the company’s first computer-aided design concept in 1980 A full-scale mock-up of the Mystère 20 at Dassault’s hangar in Bordeaux-Merignac, France All images © Dassault Aviation

“I’VE FOUND THE BIRD” — CHARLES LINDBERGH

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IN THE 1960S DASSAULT OBSERVED THAT AMERICA — NO LONGER EUROPE — WAS BECOMING THE PRIME MARKET FOR BUSINESS AVIATION >> Eventually, the need arose for a long-range jet to cross the Atlantic or to travel non-stop across America. The Falcon 50 offered a solution, with a third engine that gave an added safety margin at greater heights and during long over-water routes. For the aircraft, Dassault developed an all-new ‘supercritical’ wing combining high-speed cruising with slow-speed controllability. This meant it could use shorter runways. When longer flying routes prompted passenger demand for greater space and comfort, Dassault answered with the Falcon 900, which combined the supercritical wing with a wider fuselage to spearhead a new class of wide-body business jets. Using its own software, Dassault broke more new ground with the Falcon 2000, the first civilian aircraft to be designed in virtual reality. The aircraft came with the ‘EASy’ Enhanced Avionics System, which reduced flight-deck workloads and allowed more efficient flight management. The latest Falcon 7X introduced a further new wing design and the first use of ‘fly-by-wire’ control technology in a business jet. The next-generation Falcon SMS, “super mid-size”, looks to the next 50 years with innovative technologies in manufacturing, aerodynamics, power and flight control, as well as style and comfort.

FROM TOP Charles Lindbergh and the Pan Am delegation viewed the Mystère 20 in 4 May 1963 A Falcon 50 flying over New York in the 1970s. The aircraft first flew in 1976

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FINE REVIVAL

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Test pilot Jacqueline Auriol in 1956 Serge Dassault is named chairman of Avions Marcel Dassault-Breguet Aviation in 1986 A mock-up of the Mystère 20 interior layout in 1963 The 50-year-old Mystère 20 prototype was restored and flew earlier this year

With more than 500 Falcon 20 and Falcon 200 aircraft built between 1963 and 1988, the Mystère 20 became one of the most successful business jets in the world. Its 50-year-old prototype turned heads at the 2013 Paris Air Show in June, having been immaculately restored to its original livery — the result of a three-year effort. The aircraft was then moved onto permanent display at the National Air & Space Museum at Paris Le Bourget Airport.

FedEx purchased 33 Falcon 20 jets for use as freighters in 1971

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MOST OF EUROPE has experienced a drop in overall aviation purchasing activity due to the Eurozone crisis, but significant growth has been observed in Poland, Russia, Ukraine and Romania. “Europe is not a monolithic region and Eastern Europe has come a long way economically since the collapse of the Soviet Union. While the rest of Europe falters, ultrahigh-net-worth (UHNW) entrepreneurs in Eastern Europe have been at the forefront of wealth creation, propelling the growth of business aviation,” says Mykolas Rambus, CEO of wealth intelligence company Wealth-X. Growth patterns of private aviation differ within Eastern Europe, with Russia leading the way. After all, the country has 1,191 UHNWIs with a total wealth of USD636 billion — compared to 804 with a total net worth of USD95 billion in Poland, 498 with a total net worth of USD57 billion in Ukraine and 130 with a total net worth of USD15 billion in Romania. Many Russians who own private jets use them for business purposes, with interests spanning the United Kingdom, 62

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the United States and their home country. The value of private aircraft in the country tends to be much higher than those in other Eastern European nations. Russians tend to own jets such as an Embraer-135BJ Legacy or a Gulfstream V501-V699, while Romanian or Polish UHNWIs typically own a Fairchild Dornier private jet or a helicopter. While the rate of jet ownership in Poland, Ukraine and Romania is low, these markets are expected to reach USD207 billion by 2018, according to Wealth-X. UHNW entrepreneurs in these regions use private aircraft not only for business ventures within Europe, but also beyond the continent. One Romanian businessman who travels on a Fairchild Dornier 328300 jet has interests such as gas and geological prospecting, and has invested in an oil exploration project in Senegal and Guinea-Bissau. In some parts of Eastern Europe, a significant portion of private flights are for domestic travel. This amounts to more than 56 per cent of all private flights in Ukraine, where internal flights experienced a two per cent year-on-year growth in March

2013. One Ukrainian billionaire who is hailed for championing local businesses and agriculture flies on a Bell 430 helicopter. While it sometimes seems that all eyes are on Asia’s private aviation industry, Eastern Europe should not be underestimated. The region should remain shielded from the Eurozone’s economic stagnation, as market capitalism post-Soviet rule fuels wealth creation.

OPPOSITE PAGE Despite the Eurozone crisis, business aviation continues to capture interest, especially from Eastern Europe Image courtesy of EBACE

THIS PAGE, FROM TOP Apart from large private jets, Eastern Europeans in Romania and Poland tend to turn to helicopters as an alternate mode of private transportation, especially for use within their own countries Image courtesy of EBACE

Eastern European countires such as Romania are exhibiting growth potential in business aviation Image by Dobre Cezar

Russia leads private aviation growth within Eastern Europe, with its UHNWI population having a total wealth of USD636 billion Image by Dmitry Mordolff

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by Alex Unruh

CAPTAIN SPEAKING... READING THE SKIES

Image by Christie Thomas www.christiebea.com

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ANOTHER THUNDERSTORM LAY EVEN FURTHER AHEAD, WITH THE TWO TEMPESTS SEPARATED BY A MERE 80 MILES OF RELATIVE CALM — OUR DESTINATION

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n my 14 years of piloting aircraft, I’ve been fortunate to have had only a few nerve-racking moments — frightening situations made graver by the lack of weather information. Such a dilemma normally does not occur on the modern aircraft I fly for my company; on occasion, though, I am asked to fly legacy models that are no longer in production, and thus do not have the latest flight instruments. One May evening three years ago, my co-captain and I departed in a legacy aircraft on what was to be a routine flight from Florida to our home airport in the central US. The weather was not going to be great, but reasonable, according to the forecast. Over the course of our three-hour flight the weather deteriorated into a fast-developing line of thunderstorms that were normal at that time of the year. Only when the air traffic controller asked us about our plans to deviate around the “heavy to extreme” precipitation about 200 miles (320 km) ahead did we begin to smell real trouble. As it turned out, another thunderstorm lay even further ahead, with the two tempests separated by a mere 80 miles (130 km) of relative calm — our destination. When you consider that on average it takes 120 miles to descend a jet from 40,000 feet, an 80-mile gap is simply not enough. Lightning flashed and reflected off the clouds around us, making the storm look like one continuous line from our vantage point right above it. We couldn’t see the gap on our radar until we were almost over it, and we set the aircraft on a steep descent amid occasional ripples of turbulence, fortunately avoiding getting struck by stray lightning bolts. The worst part of the whole process was the unknown — how were other pilots navigating the weather? Was there something we missed, and did we make the best decision? Dilemmas we could have avoided on an aircraft equipped with satellite-based weather data. With neither daylight nor a modern cockpit, all we had was an ancient weather radar by today’s standards. So when people ask me what innovation available in today’s cockpit makes my job as a pilot less stressful, the best answer I can give is accurate and up-to-date weather information, which avionics systems on modern aircraft can provide.

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PRESIDENTIAL SUITES by Charmaine Tai

SUITE

GUANGZHOU SKY-HIGH HOSPITALITY ON THE PEARL RIVER

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Guangzhou, formerly known as Canton, never seems to sleep with its flood of neon lights and energy Image courtesy of Dragon Lake Princess Hotel

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BEIJING AND SHANGHAI MAY BE THE FRONTRUNNERS OF CHINA, BUT GUANGZHOU, THE CAPITAL CITY OF GUANGDONG PROVINCE ON THE SOUTH CHINA SEA COAST, ISN’T TAKING A BACK SEAT. THE COUNTRY’S THIRD LARGEST CITY WITH A POPULATION OF MORE THAN 12 MILLION, AND ISOLATED FROM MOST OF CHINA BECAUSE OF ITS MOUNTAINOUS TERRAIN, GUANGZHOU HAS DEVELOPED ITS OWN SUBCULTURE. As a modern manufacturing hub, it has advanced rapidly, with unique architecture in Zhujiang New Town. At the same time, it is home to some of the oldest temples in the country, the imperial tomb of the Western Han Nanyue King, preserved colonial villas and one of the oldest mosques in the world. The city never seems to sleep, not only because the façades of buildings come alive after sunset, but also because crowds throng the streets late at night for shopping and for plates of wanton noodle soup and dim sum — after all, this is the birthplace of Cantonese fare, and the city boasts the highest density of restaurants in China. While it may seem nearly impossible to avoid the crowds, one can seek refuge in some of the city’s most luxurious hotel suites.

OPPOSITE, FROM TOP Plush cushions and carpeted flooring welcome guests in the living area Image courtesy of Ken Seet, Four Seasons Hotel Guangzhou

At the Ritz-Carlton Suite, a modern Victorian living room is equipped with chandelier lights

EUROPE IN THE FAR EAST Those who visit Dragon Lake Resort for the first time may feel as if they have entered an old European quarter, even though it is a mere 35 minutes from downtown Guangzhou. The resort was indeed designed to look like one, with cobblestone paths and a central square with a bell tower. The surrounding scenery enhances the illusion, with a misty river, brooks, mountains and forests. Within the resort is the 110,000-sq-m Dragon Lake Princess Hotel, which houses 331 luxurious rooms with balconies spread throughout 15 different buildings. The hotel also offers restaurants, shops, a gym, wine bar, spa and chess and card room.

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The 253-sq-m Presidential Suite at Four Seasons Hotel Guangzhou sits on the 97th storey and boasts a view of the city, including the Pearl River Delta and the iconic Canton Tower. The suite features contemporary décor with original art and warm wood tones. The master bedroom comes with a full-marble bathroom, with a soaking tub, walk-in rain shower and a TV screen embedded in the mirror. The suite includes a separate study and living area, a dining room for a cosy party of six, a separate butler’s pantry and a second bedroom with en suite bathroom. Orthopaedic pillows are available on request.

ISOLATED FROM MOST OF CHINA BECAUSE OF ITS MOUNTAINOUS TERRAIN, GUANGZHOU HAS DEVELOPED ITS OWN SUBCULTURE

The 418-sq-m Ritz-Carlton Suite on the 38th storey of The Ritz-Carlton, Guangzhou features 18th-century Rococo-style furnishings and two 40-sq-m outdoor patios. Guests with hectic schedules can find time to de-stress at the suite’s private gym or at its outdoor Jacuzzi. Intimate parties are livened up with a fully stocked kitchen, chef service, outdoor barbecue grill and a walk-in wine cellar stocked by a sommelier to suit guests’ tastes. Service personnel are on call round-the-clock, and a complimentary limousine service takes guests to and from major shopping and business landmarks in the city. >> JETGALA

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LUXE THIS PAGE Guests can entertain their visitors in the separated sitting and living areas of the Shangri-La Suite Hilton Guangzhou Tianhe’s Presidential Suite boasts a front-seat view of the CBD OPPOSITE PAGE Grand Hyatt Guangzhou’s modernity evokes the feel of a penthouse

Celebrate Asian culture and history in the 305-sq-m ShangriLa Suite in Shangri-La Hotel, Guangzhou. The interior, painted in ivory tones, features a full-service kitchenette for entertaining, a snug sitting room, and a dining room that overlooks the Pearl River. The master bedroom, adorned with pink floral motifs, comes with its own living area. The marblefloored bathroom includes a soaking tub and a separate walk-in glass-enclosed shower with rotating showerheads. A pillow menu with hypoallergenic options is also presented to guests for more comfort.

IT IS HOME TO SOME OF THE OLDEST TEMPLES IN THE COUNTRY AND THE IMPERIAL TOMB OF THE WESTERN HAN NANYUE KING

‘Tianhe’, the name given to one of Guangzhou’s 10 districts, translates loosely to mean ‘sky river’ — a fitting name for Hilton Guangzhou Tianhe’s Presidential Suite, which overlooks the river and the CBD. The two-bedroom, 501-sq-m suite comes with a spacious dining area, a separate kitchen, and a living room equipped with a parlour and modern digital systems, including a 60-inch LCD HDTV. The bathroom features a whirlpool to help guests unwind at the end of each day.

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DIRECTORY

Four Seasons Hotel Guangzhou 5 Zhujiang West Rd Pearl River New City, Tianhe District Guangzhou 510623 China T: +86 20 8883 3888 F: +86 20 8883 3999 The Ritz Carlton, Guangzhou 3 Xing An Road Pearl River New City, Tianhe District Guangzhou 510623 China T: +86 20 3813 6688 F: +86 20 3813 6666 E: rc.canrz.leads@ritzcarlton.com Shangri-La Hotel, Guangzhou 1 Hui Zhan Dong Road Hai Zhu District Guangzhou 510308 China T: +86 20 8917 8888 F: +86 20 8719 8899 E: slpg@shangri-la.com Hilton Guangzhou Tianhe No. 215 Linhe Xi Heng Road, Tianhe District Guangzhou 510500 China T: +86 20 6683 9999 F: +86 60 6683 3888

Opened in 2008, Grand Hyatt Guangzhou was designed by Remedios Studio, a world-renowned architectural firm known for dramatic concepts. The hotel has a uniquely designed ‘sky lobby’ located 22 storeys above the ground. On the 19th floor is the 270-sq-m Presidential Suite, which features a cream and blue palette in its dining area, study room and two separate living areas. The warm tones continue in the marble bathroom, which features textured walls that give extra depth. Guests can savour a bottle of red wine courtesy of the hotel.

Grand Hyatt Guangzhou 12 Zhujiang West Road Pearl River New City, Tianhe District Guangzhou 51062 China T: +86 20 8396 1234 F: +86 20 8550 8234 E: guangzhou.grand@hyatt.com Dragon Lake Princess Hotel Jiulonghu Community Area Huadong Town, Guangzhou 510897 China T: +86 20 2580 8888 F: +86 20 3690 8208 E: hotel@dragonlake.com.cn JETGALA

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PORSCHE EXCLUSIVE by Brian Moore

BESPOKE SERVICES TO CREATE UNIQUE CARS

OPPOSITE PAGE Porsche Exclusive can clad a car interior entirely in leather

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hen Ferry Porsche presented his first sports car in 1948, his story was not much different from that of other car makers: he wanted something to suit his very own taste but found none. So he took matters into his own hands, and the rest is motor industry legend. What Porsche has done since, though, has made the company story even more unique — it customised clients’ vehicles, first as an added service to royalty, racers, and the like, but as an integral part of its iconic production. In 1986, it set up Porsche Exclusive, becoming the first car manufacture to create a department dedicated to car personalisation. Many accessories that are standard in today’s vehicles began at Porsche’s home base in Zuffenhausen, near Stuttgart in Germany. Special commissions have been carried out ever since the ’50s, and created such items like the first ever car CD changer, automatically activated headlights, or a rain sensor for Cabriolet folding tops. Porsche started debating the safety of using root-wood trim in instrument consoles in the ’80s, well before the material became popular throughout the 76

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automotive world. And while no one thinks too much about rear windshield wipers, in the ’60s Porsche had to drill a special hole into the rear windscreen of a client’s 356 B to make way for the wiper and its motor. Many a windshield cracked before the team got it right. One of the more memorable customisations at that time was done for a certain Mr Schmidt, who had numerous requests for his Porsche 356 B 2000 GS Carrera 2 — including large Lucas rally roof lights, Talbot exterior mirrors and a


OPPOSITE PAGE, FROM TOP Interior colours can be totally customised to suit the owner’s liking 911 Carrera 2 “Turbolook” Cabriolet, 1992

THIS PAGE, FROP TOP A 356 painted in green and fishsilver was delivered to Dr. Ottomar Domnick in 1950 Count Rossi with his converted, street-legal 917 KH Customisation options include interior and exterior aesthetics, comfort, entertainment and performance

rubber-seal bumper. Lights illuminated the bumper, engine and luggage compartment; high-beam headlights improved forward visibility; and warning lights were set in the doors. Other features included a car phone with controls in the glove compartment, a selective-call radio telephone, and a dashboard with a tachometer and interior and exterior thermometer. Porsche described the car in its in-house customer magazine: “Apart from the engine and the sheet metal body welded together, there is virtually nothing that is standard!” Converting race cars into street-legal vehicles often proved challenging, too. In the 1970s, Count Gregorio Rossi de Montelera purchased a 917 KH with 620 horsepower, and asked Porsche to make it street-legal for driving in France. In 1977, a German hotelier followed suit, asking for the conversion of a 917 into road-use for Germany, which had more stringent rules. The result was a 917 with hazard warning lights, steering lock, handbrake, auxiliary heating, safety glass windows, and a cover for the fan wheel. >>

“Apart from the engine and the sheet metal body... there is virtually nothing that is standard in Mr. Schmidt’s Porsche”

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For a client who often travelled to East Germany, where car phones were forbidden, Porsche concealed the phone receiver in the door compartment

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OPPOSITE PAGE, FROM TOP The 1996 911 Turbo Cabriolet A golden 959 THIS PAGE, FROM TOP A 1995 911 Carrera Turbo Cabriolet The 911 50th Anniversary Edition model

>> At times, the bespoke accents were not immediately noticeable — almost-secret pleasures of the car owners. Take for instance velvet pile carpet, custom tool boxes hidden beneath the passenger seats, a net-protected space for a dog to lie down, a compartment for a precious bottle of cognac, tailpipes in 24-carat gold, or one’s name engraved on the door guards. The Sultan of Brunei once had a solid-gold gear-shift lever made for his 928, while pianist Justus Frantz had 24 speakers installed in his 959. For a client who often travelled to East Germany, where car phones were forbidden, Porsche concealed the phone receiver in the door compartment while the keypad was located in the ashtray. But the personal touches can also be explicit and extravagant. A client once had the entire exterior of his Porsche 356 covered in imitation fur, while another in 1964 had a custom ski holder installed atop the boot of his 356 SC. In the ’80s, wider rims, wings, and front and rear spoilers were very much in vogue. Extensive leather trim was popular, sometimes covering the entire interior, including instrument dials, air-vent slats, and all the cross-head screws in the passenger compartment. An even more unique expression of personality came in colour choices — one car body came in a peacock-feather paint scheme with 18 different colour shades, while another was painted in various purple hues to evoke a setting sun. Inspiration for colours has also come from a wife’s handbag, a kitchen panel and a plate. More recently, a Swiss designer requested a colour concept for his 911 based on a tiny teacup. “The colour was so bright and intense that when completed we recommended that the driver wear sunglasses,” says Carl Isenbeck, marketing director for Porsche Asia Pacific. Today, Porsche customers can choose from more than 600 special features, not counting the colour variants. Sporty options continue to form the core of Porsche Exclusive offerings, with power kits, sport exhaust systems, tail pipes and wheel options among those on top of the list. Other features include carbon-fibre body works, air-conditioned seats, in-car Internet access, digital radio, hands-free communications and a permanently installed fridge. “Every model can be customised as long as it is qualitatively, technically and legally compliant,” says Isenbeck. “We try to make every customer’s dream come true.”

HALF-CENTURY MARK With its appealing shape, sound and performance, the 911 has gained a worldwide cult following. Through the years, Porsche has created various, highly coveted versions of this car. In 2009, it introduced the 911 Sport Classic with a limited run of 250 units. It came with ultra luxurious interiors, a 408-hp flat engine and the iconic ‘ducktail’ of the 1973 Carrera RS 2.7. In 2011, Porsche Exclusive celebrated its 25th anniversary with the 911 Speedster, based on the Carrera S type 997 but with a shortened windscreen typical of the 356 Speedster. It was limited to 356 units. This year, marking 50 years of Porsche, the company launched the 911 50th Anniversary Edition car, based on the 911 Carrera S. With a flat-six engine upgraded to 430 hp, it reaches 0-100 km/h in 4.2 seconds, and boasts a top speed of 300 km/h. Enhanced with Porsche’s Sport Chrono Package, it offers a performance display as well as digital and analogue stopwatches, while the Porsche Active Suspension Management system improves steering and suspension. This Porsche comes with rear-wheel drive and a widebody kit, 20-inch Fuch wheels, cornering lights, and special chrome strips and fins. Colour options are grey or light grey, and only 1963 models will be produced. JETGALA

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LUXE JET ART by Jianna K Olayvar

Not one to be daunted by the mechanics of her technique, von Anhalt skilfully paints on canvas with the help of a jet engine

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IT IS HARD TO IMAGINE A PAINTER WITHOUT A PAINTBRUSH, BUT ARTIST TARINAN VON ANHALT abandons the brush for something much more powerful — the jet engine. Inspired and mentored by her late husband, Prinz Jurgen von Anhalt, she began practicing Jet Art — the name her husband gave the technique — in 2006 and became the first woman in the world to stand behind a jet to create unique paintings. She traces her interest in the style to her admiration of Jackson Pollock, an American abstract expressionist artist known for his drip painting method. “To bring [that] genre into the jet age, as well as [to use] man’s greatest transportation tool of its time to place paint, move paint, and capture a moment in time, seemed amazing to me,” says von Anhalt. Prinz Jurgen von Anhalt is credited for having created this artistic style 32 years ago. The Jet Art technique fuses art, science and engineering. Standing behind a jet with its engine running, the artist hurls paint onto a large piece of canvas with the aid of the engine’s force, as strong as a hurricane. The heat of the engine welds the paint onto the canvas. Aside from having an eye for colour and tone, the artist must also know and understand how a specific aircraft works, as each model has different properties. The distance of the canvas from the engine, the amount of power the engine produces, wind, temperature, heat and even the containers and tools that will be used — all these are critically considered. “The result is a synthesis of power, timing and the artist’s vision,” von Anhalt explains. “The jet blast creates the most unusual textures and

structures, which cannot be achieved by a brush or a palette knife and can only be accomplished with the heat and velocity of the jet engines.” The symphony of colours, texture and intensity is what makes each painting original. “It can never be copied even by the artist,” she adds. Producing such artwork requires extensive preparation and could even be dangerous, but it is something von Anhalt describes as “very addicting”. She has worked with the Cessna Citation II, Dassault Falcon 10, Hawker 400, Bombardier Challenger, Bombardier Learjets, Boeing 707 and Boeing 747, and hopes to create even more pieces using large jets. Not limited by the canvas, von Anhalt also uses the Jet Art technique to create patterns on fabrics, which she uses for her clothing line, Jet Art Fashion. In 2008, she also applied Jet Art to a six-foot tall, gold-plated statue called The Chamois amidst a crowd of approximately 350 people in California. Motivated by the excitement and appreciation she gets from her audience, as well as the opportunity to travel to different cities all over the world, von Anhalt likes to push herself as an artist. Her ultimate goal? “To Jet Art a jet with another jet.”.

FROM TOP Much preparation goes into the art, for the size and strength of the engine play a part in how a painting will come to be von Anhalt carries on her late husband’s legacy, becoming the first woman in the world to create paintings with the help of jets von Anhalt has worked with jets of different sizes, although she hopes to create more projects using larger jets

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BASELWORLD 2013 by Katrina Balmaceda

WATCHMAKERS BRING WRISTWATCH TECHNOLOGY, SOUND AND AESTHETICS TO MORE COMPETITIVE HEIGHTS AT BASELWORLD 2013

Blancpain Tourbillon Carrousel Blancpain has spent the past few years educating the market about the carrousel, which some consider inferior to the tourbillon. While both mechanisms reduce gravitational effects on a watch’s movement and thus enhance time-keeping precision, they differ slightly in their components and processes. This year, Blancpain illustrated its point with a world-first: the Tourbillon Carrousel, a wristwatch combining the two complications. In this timepiece, the two operate independently but are connected to a differential gear train system, which in turn transmits their average rate to the time display. Both barrels may be wound simultaneously and equally using one external winding crown. Housed in a 44.6-mm-diameter, red-gold case, the dial displays a flying tourbillon at 12 o’clock, a flying carrousel at six o’clock and the date at three o’clock. The watch offers seven days of power reserve.

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Breguet Classique Chronométrie 772 In 2010, Breguet filed a patent for a magnetic pivot, which counters the negative effects of magnetism on a watch and renders it shock-resistant and insensitive to gravity. The system uses two micro-magnets that keep the balance staff centred and self-adjusting, improving its rotation and stability. This is used in the new Classique Chronométrie 7727, bringing the timepiece’s precision to an average rate of -1/+3 seconds a day (the Contrôle Officiel Suisse des Equipped with calibre 574DR, the watch comes with a balance frequency of 10Hz, and a double balancespring, pallet lever and escape wheel made in highfrequency silicon — giving the watch 830 microwatts of power, above the usual 300 to 400 microwatts of high-quality chronometers. The watch has a power reserve of 60 hours and comes in a choice of rose gold or white gold.

Christophe Claret Kantharos Christophe Claret’s Kantharos is an automatic-winding chronograph that strikes the brand’s trademark cathedral gong with each change of function (stop, start, reset). This concept is inspired by athletic competitions in which sounds, such as a gunshot, signal the start of the timer. The gong, seen at 10 o’clock, comes with a patented system that prevents the gongs from vibrating against each other, cre ating a crisper sound. A clutchdisk system prevents the hand from jumping when the chronograph is triggered. The movement is powered by a constant-force escapement, seen at six o’clock, which delivers constant energy from the beginning to the end of the 48-hour power reserve. Aviation-inspired chronograph counters are seen on the left and right sides of the 45-mm-diameter dial. The watch comes in a case of titanium, black titanium, pink gold or white gold.

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Glashütte Original PanoLunar Tourbillon In 2012 Glashütte Original released new Pano timepieces, which returned to Baselworld this year with new dials and cases and more sophisticated aesthetics. The PanoLunar Tourbillon, based on the automatic-winding, mechanical calibre 93-02 with 48 hours of power reserve, comes in a new 40-mm-diameter, red-gold case and a warm silver dial. The alignment of the subdials follows the so-called ‘golden ratio’ observed by mathematicians and artists as key to aesthetic harmony. A large hour/minute dial is positioned to the left of centre, in alignment with the flying tourbillon set within it and centred at seven o’clock. The Panorama Date display is positioned at the lower right with black numerals on an ivory-hued background. The moon phase display on the upper right shows stars and a golden moon against a dark blue sky.

Harry Winston Opus XIII Harry Winston and independent watchmaker Ludovic Ballouard presented a new way to indicate time with the Opus XIII. An outer disk comes with 59 partially concealed pegs representing minutes, with every five pegs coloured red. Every minute, a peg rotates 40 degrees to become more visible, and on the 60th minute of an hour all pegs simultaneously spring back to their original positions. An inner ring consists of 12 triangles that rotate outward in turns to indicate the start of an hour, reverting to their original, concealed positions at the end of the hour. Every 12 hours, a ‘dome’ at the centre reveals the Harry Winston logo, which stays visible for 60 minutes. Energy comes from two sources — a mainspring barrel and another barrel that powers the minutes display. The watch comes in a white-gold case and boasts a movement with 242 functional jewels, 364 components and a 35-hour power reserve.

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Jaquet Droz The Charming Bird Historically known for automata and bird figurines, Jaquet Droz began a series of avian-themed watches in 2010 with a timepiece featuring a miniature painting of birds. In 2011 the brand used engraving and sculpture, and in 2012 it released a minute repeater with automata. The fourth instalment of this series — and a celebration of Jaquet Droz’s 275th anniversary this year — is The Charming Bird, which features a miniature of an automaton made by the brand in the 18th century, ensconced in a 47-mm-diameter case. When the mechanism is triggered by a push-button, the bird turns, flaps its wings, moves its head and tail, and opens its beak to chirp. The watch’s geartrain, bridges and plate are observed through the transparent sapphire dial, while a subdial shows hours and minutes. The handwinding mechanical movement offers 40 hours of power reserve. Only 48 pieces of the watch will be produced.


Patek Philippe Ref. 5200 Gondolo 8 Days, Day & Date Indication With its new Ref. 5200 Gondolo 8 Days, Date & Day Indication, Patek Philippe promotes not only manually wound movements’ capacity for precise adjustment, but also “the tactile experience of turning the crown between the fingertips” — a ritual held dear by aficionados. Fitting into the Gondolo line’s Art Deco aesthetic, the rectangular movement was developed specially for this watch and features day- and date-display disks that advance instantaneously at midnight within three milliseconds — faster than a blink of an eye. This requires much energy, which is why the watch offers eight days of power reserve compared to a similar Patek Philippe watch launched in 2000 that offered 10 days. The power-reserve indicator at the upper half of the dial contains the numeral ‘9’ in red to remind the wearer to wind the mainspring, which requires 134 revolutions of the crown each time. The watch comes in a white-gold case.

Ulysse Nardin Strangers Ulysse Nardin and electronic musician Dieter Meier have created the Stranger watch, which uses a music-box mechanism on a rotating disc with 10 blades to play the melody of Frank Sinatra’s Strangers in the Night. A pushbutton at 10 o’clock allows the wearer to set the music to be played every hour or not at all. Another push-button at eight o’clock lets the wearer play the melody on call. The self-winding, mechanical watch is based on the UN-690 calibre which uses silicium technology. Stranger softens its 1950s- and Sputnik-inspired design by using circular sub-dials and Roman numerals. An off-centred sub-dial tells the hours, while small seconds and the date are displayed at six o’clock. The 99-piece limited edition comes in a rose-gold case and has a power reserve of roughly 48 hours.

Zenith Academy Christophe Colomb Hurricane Few watchmakers are able to miniaturise the centuries-old fusée-and-chain mechanism to fit wristwatches, and Zenith has joined the club with its Academy Christophe Colomb Hurricane. The fusée-and-chain transmission system keeps a timepiece’s driving force stable throughout the duration of its power reserve (50 hours for this watch), enhancing its accuracy. The chain in the Academy Christophe Colomb Hurricane is 18-cm-long and composed of 585 parts, and can be seen through an open-worked dial. The watch also comes with a gyroscopic gravity control system — inspired by marine chronometers and compasses, and seen at six o’clock on the dial — that ensures the escapement is always in a horizontal position to avoid the negative effects of gravity on the timepiece’s rate. An hours and minutes sub-dial is seen at 12 o’clock, small seconds display at nine o’clock and power-reserve indicator at three o’clock. The movement comprises 939 components and is housed in a rose-gold case. Only 25 pieces will be made.

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LUXE MAURICIO CLAVERO KOZLOWSKI

THE DELICATE ART OF FRENCH CRYSTAL SCULPTURES

rench crystal brand Daum is known for evocative crystal sculptures designed in its own atelier, as well as in collaboration with artists from various fields, from furniture design to architecture. Creative director Mauricio Clavero Kozlowski is the man responsible for choosing these artists, and for driving the brand’s creative direction worldwide. Jetgala speaks to Mauricio, who has been visiting Daum’s Asian boutiques to get to know firsthand its clients in this part of the world.

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Blue Wild panther by Richard Orlinski


The Hawk Flight by Madeleine Van Der Knoop Monstera Magnum bowl by Emilio Robba Ornamental dish from the Havana collection

Q: Can you describe briefly the process of making a crystal sculpture from start to end — including the process of incorporating the ‘champagne bubbles’ in crystal that Daum is famous for? It is a hand-made process, initialised by making a plaster mould, then a silicon mould which is used to create a wax sample. The sample is covered by plaster and is put into a hot chamber to evacuate the wax — a process also known as the ‘lost wax’ technique. As a result, we obtain the negative mould, ready to fill with crystal paste or crystal rocks. The mould is placed in a very-high-temperature furnace for a week or more, depending on the complexity of the piece. Once the piece has cooled, the surrounding plaster is broken, and the crystal is polished. The ‘champagne bubbles’ are the result of three factors: temperature, colour and the size of the crystal rocks. Q: You recently released the Wild Kong sculptures that had an avant-garde look and used more hard edges than soft curves. Are you planning to produce more similarly contemporary pieces in the future? Indeed I am. Geometrical and rational work with crystal is part of my challenge not only with regards to shapes, but also colours and sizes. Q: What are the top three factors that have made Daum sculptures highly collectible? Their uniqueness, rarity and the fact that they are 100 per cent hand-made in France. Values rise as high as pleasure and emotions can go. After all, in Daum — as in life — it is all about emotion.

OUR ASIAN CLIENTS ARE DEMANDING AND SELECTIVE, GIVEN THEIR RICH CULTURAL BACKGROUND. THEY KNOW WHAT THEY WANT, AND WHAT THEY DON’T

Q: You’re also the creative director for Haviland and Cristallerie Royale de Champagne. How do you come up with concepts for all three brands, while making sure they’re unique? As a designer and artistic director, any conceptualisation process begins in my heart and in my spirit, which is constantly enriched and inspired by travelling, discovering, and observing nature’s creative process with no agenda — just looking with all my senses wide open. The material also plays a key role in creative diversity. The clients’ desires and requirements in different parts of the world drive a bit of the designing process, too. >> JETGALA

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LUXE Blue Wild Kong by Richard Orlinski

I’D LIKE TO CREATE A PIECE FOR THE LATE BRAZILIAN ARCHITECT OSCAR NIEMEYER. HE NEVER GAVE UP, NO MATTER HOW CRAZY THE IDEA WAS Q: Can you describe Daum’s Asian clientele, and how it has changed over the years? In general, our Asian clients are demanding and selective, given their rich cultural background. They know what they want, and more importantly, what they don’t. Our clients are receptive to elegant luxury and they know the genesis of the product [that has been designed for them]. Q: How do Western buyers of Daum pieces differ from the Eastern buyers? The most obvious difference is in the colour choices. Also, Eastern clients love pieces related to nature while Western buyers are more rational in their choices. Q: Which recent Daum crystal sculpture is the one that you’re most proud of, and why? The Orlinski Electric Blue Panther is a powerful piece. Q: Which pieces of Daum crystal have you chosen to decorate your home with? A beautiful Orlinski Electric Blue Panther sits in my home. I also have Emilio Robba´s Monstera wall-covering system to mimic a kind of crystal garden inside the house, and Jeff Leatham’s Aurum for its unique technique and versatility. Q: Is there anyone — dead or living — for whom you really wish to create a piece? I’d like to do one for the late Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer. He never gave up, no matter how crazy the idea was. He lived long enough to defend and enjoy his creations. Q: What is it that you enjoy most about working with Daum? I love the beginning of each project when the team and I think without limits [brainstorm]. I also love the creation of the pieces, and the fact that I’m constantly surrounded by a team of real artisans. 88

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UP CLOSE What does beauty mean to you? Rareness What is your biggest gripe about flying/travel? Going through security... And losing luggage with my porcelain in it What surprises people most about you? My availability What is the best gift you’ve received? The compass my father gave me the day I left my home country, Chile, to come to France, so that I will not lose my way back home What is your morning routine like? A banana and a macchiato before I head off to work very early in the morning What car do you drive? In Paris, a Mini Cooper Cabriolet which I will eventually customise with some tailor-made crystal pieces How did you earn your first dollar? Washing my dad’s car Words to live by — what are yours? Light, everywhere


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PEKING TO PARIS MOTOR CHALLENGE by Jeff Heselwood

NAVIGATING ROUGH ROADS AND EXOTIC LANDSCAPES IN VINTAGE CARS

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OPPOSITE PAGE Car 90 — a 1973 Leyland P76 — later won first place in the Classics category for cars built before 1975 THIS PAGE A native Mongolian looks on with his personal mode of transport

IN 1907, FIVE DRIVING TEAMS RACED THEIR CARS FROM PEKING (NOW BEIJING) TO PARIS, passing through remote parts of Asia — including trails that had previously been attempted only on horseback — with no maps. The prize for completing the 14,994-kilometre route in the shortest possible time? Bragging rights, and a magnum of champagne. The adventure was spurred by a challenge from the Paris newspaper Le Matin: “What needs to be proven today is that as long as a man has a car, he can do anything and go anywhere. Is there anyone who will undertake to travel this summer from Peking to Paris by automobile?” In the end, Italian Prince Scipione Borghese and his chauffeur won the race in a car by Itala, a Turinbased manufacturer in the early 20th century. Several reenactments have been staged since then, with the most recent one held from 28 May to 29 June this year by the Endurance Rally Association. Considered one of the

toughest vintage car races on earth, the Peking to Paris Motor Challenge tests the limits of both crews and machinery — especially since only classic and vintage cars may be used. This year’s rally featured 96 cars with drivers from 26 countries. Starting from the Great Wall in Beijing, they set out to conquer a 12,500-kilometre route in 33 days, passing through parts of northern China, Mongolia, Russia, Ukraine, Slovakia and central Europe towards the finish line in Paris. The diverse lineup included two unusual Chevrolet Fangio Coupés and two Porsche 356 versions (the 356 was Porsche’s first production automobile). Other rare vehicles were a 1979 car from now-defunct Russian manufacturer Moskvitch, a 1949 Chevrolet truck, a 1957 Jaguar XK150 and a 1913 Ford Model T with no roof — just like the cars used in the pioneer race. Australian teams added further variety with a 1974 Citroën DS23, 1936 Sports Derby Bentley and a 1939 4¼-litre MX Bentley saloon. >>

“WHAT NEEDS TO BE PROVEN IS THAT AS LONG AS A MAN HAS A CAR, HE CAN DO ANYTHING AND GO ANYWHERE” JETGALA

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LUXE FROM TOP Garratt and Brown take their place on the ‘throne’ with their trophy and prize British racers Bill Cleyndert and Mark van Hees competed with the American 1929 Ford Model A Speedster OPPOSITE PAGE CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT Phil Garratt and Kieron Brown won the race in their 1937 Chevrolet Fangio Coupe — Car 30 Car 49 — a 1964 Porsche 356C — crosses a wooden bridge in Mongolia New Zealand racers Stephen Patridge and Corgi La Grouw in a 1958 Morris Oxford kick up a mini sandstorm on an unpaved road Participants of the race proudly attach the Peking to Paris plaque on their vintage automobiles

STARTING FROM THE GREAT WALL IN BEIJING, THEY SET OUT TO CONQUER A 12,500-KILOMETRE ROUTE TO PARIS IN 33 DAYS

Phil Garratt and Kieron Brown, driving a red 1937 Chevrolet Fangio Coupé, won the race in 33 days. Garratt says: “The rally felt longer than we expected. We always knew Mongolia was going to be tough but it was Russia that was a real test of endurance. It was hot. While Mongolia was challenging, it kept you focused. The driving in Russia was relentless and it was easy to lose focus as you clocked up the kilometres.” He and Brown spent up to three hours each night checking their car to preempt mechanical issues. Their biggest obstacle was a broken clutch cable, which they quickly replaced with a spare that they had on-hand. 92

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The Chevrolet behaved almost perfectly throughout the race. “There were lots of faster cars in the rally than ours. Our Fangio Coupé had been used for the Peking to Paris rally in 2010 and had won, but it had been driven beyond its limit and we had to completely rebuild it for 2013,” says Garratt. They began working on the car right after the 2010 rally and used it in last year’s European Classic tour, as well as in Scotland earlier this year as a test. Both agree that getting to Paris was the highlight of the rally. “Your biggest threat throughout is yourself. It’s easy to feel you are losing your sense of control. You have to be disciplined to keep going and to keep the car going. A broken car doesn’t win — it’s as simple as that,” says Brown. This year’s race was hailed as the best-organised Peking to Paris rally so far, with a well-chosen route and assistance available in key places. This is in contrast to the original race, which pushed through even though the race committee had officially cancelled it. In 1907, no crews stood by to help out in case of emergency — only camels loaded with fuel. Yet some things haven’t changed, such as natural phenomena like snow, hail and flood, and fat cows blocking the road. And of course, a magnum of champagne awaiting the victors at the finish line.

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STEINWAY LYNGDORF by Jennifer Henricus

Model D twin dipole speakers that take eight weeks to assemble by hand

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IN THE SUMMER OF 1963, A 10-YEAR OLD BOY IN GRENNA, DENMARK, GOT VEXED WITH A TAPE PLAYER FOR DISTORTING THE MUSIC OF HIS FAVOURITE BAND, THE BEATLES. He set out to improve the recorded sound and started building speakers that enriched the music he heard. What began as a childhood frustration with poor sound has evolved into a near-obsession driven by the personal motto: “Make it (recorded sound) better if it is possible.” The boy, Peter Lyngdorf, is now hailed for transforming the way recorded music can be experienced. His numerous acoustic patents and inventions, including the first fully digital amplifier launched in 1998, have placed him at the leading edge of audio technology. He recalls those early years with pride: “All through high school I built speakers for my family and friends. It was a natural progression that 11 years later, at the age of 21, I set up my first limited company, AudioNord, which is still a successful operation.” In 2005 Lyngdorf teamed up with piano maker Steinway & Sons, promising to build a system that would make recorded music indistinguishable from that coming from a real piano, even to the ears of a blindfolded Steinway pianist. This was the Model D Music system, comprising dipole speakers that emit sound from both front and back. It was followed by the S Series, a compact but powerful audio system that now has an increasing following of audiophiles, particularly in Asia. Lyngdorf is thrilled by the number of people in >>

A collaboration between Peter Lyngdorf and Steinway & Sons was inevitable as both shared the same passion and vision for sound excellence Peter Lyngdorf has turned a childhood passion into a globally respected business The Model LS sound system was installed in the SilverScreen Theater at the Pacific Design Center in California

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>> Asia who are passionate about good sound, saying that some clients have opted to buy the S Series instead of a new car. He attributes a following in India to the complexity of the country’s music, as its nuances can be heard on Steinway Lyngdorf systems. His favourite Indian singer is the late Ravi Shankar, who was known for his contemporary works. The speaker systems are popular in China and Hong Kong, too. More recently his flagship company, Lyngdorf Audio, developed the first patented threedimensional acoustical mapping and correction system, RoomPerfect, that adjusts sound based on a room’s acoustics and size. What can aficionados expect in the future? “We are always working on different systems but can never make a timeline for a new product. We worked on the S series for four years; the mechanical design took two and a half years,” says Lyngdorf. Four out every five of the company’s projects don’t see the light of day as they fail to meet his quality standards.

FROM TOP Model D (back) and C (front) speakers are combined in a room to optimize supreme sound quality The versatile S-15 speaker can stand on its own, be placed on a bookshelf or hung on the wall

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Lyngdorf lives for the day when music is no longer mere ear candy, but also a treat for all the senses. He believes that improved recordings will bring on a “huge revolution in the overall sound of music”. He says: “My dream is to go for the ultimate perfection in sound reproduction, where no stone is unturned in pursuit of better sound, and where every aspect of our technologies is working together to create something that is even better than the sum of the parts.”

FROM TOP Model LS Left, Right and Center were installed into the walls of this room for a seamless look Steinway Lyngdorf speakers can be mixed and matched for optimum listening pleasure

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DWARIKA’S RESORT DHULIKHEL by Carol Lee

N ATU RA L HIGH SCENIC LUXURY IN THE HIMALAYAN WILD

Mother nature acts as a scenic backdrop for guests in the resort

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THINK OF NEPAL AND AN IMAGE OF MOUNT EVEREST COMES TO MIND. The Golden Triangle of Kathmandu, Pokhara and Chitwan also comes up, along with deeply spiritual and cultural experiences in scenic, albeit not very luxurious, lodges. A new resort aims to raise the bar and bring another town into the spotlight. Newly opened by The Dwarika’s Group, Dwarika’s Resort Dhulikhel aims to tap Asia’s growing luxury market. It is located in the town of Dhulikhel, which lies along an ancient trade route between the Kathmandu Valley and Tibet. More than 20 Himalayan peaks can be seen from Dhulikhel, while its old town is home to houses with windows and doors carved in the traditional Newari style. Rene Vijay Shrestha Einhaus, the resort’s director of business development and finance, is confident in Nepal’s “tremendous potential for high-end tourism” and hopes to make Dhulikhel a destination in itself. The resort lies amid lush foothills, just 45 minutes from Kathmandu and 35 minutes from Tribhuvan International Airport. It invites travellers to a place that cares “for nature and for one’s self; a place in which to contemplate, to learn and to explore the connectedness between mind, body and earth”. An easy thing to do when the Himalayas serves as your daily backdrop. Dwarika’s Resort Dhulikhel has 40 suites, comprising Junior, Executive and Royal Suites spread over 20 acres of land at an altitude of 1,300 to 1,650 metres. Every suite is uniquely designed and combines modern luxuries with rustic, nature-inspired, Nepali-style interiors. Guests can relax in plenty of outdoor living spaces. Guests can enjoy Himalayan spa treatments, detox, yoga, meditation, swimming and a variety of activities such as pottery, cooking and block printing. They can seek refuge in unique spaces such as the Chakra Sound Therapy Chamber, Himalayan Salt Chamber and Navagraha Vana (Garden of Nine Planets). Outside, there are opportunities for bird watching, butterfly tours, gentle hiking and cycling to nearby places with cultural and historical significance, such as Panauti and Namo Buddha. But this resort is not just any luxury hotel in the mountains. Promoting an eco-conscious philosophy, it is built with 100

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EVERY SUITE COMBINES MODERN LUXURIES WITH RUSTIC, NATURE-INSPIRED, NEPALI-STYLE INTERIORS


OPPOSITE PAGE Guests can lounge on daybeds and sofas in the vast outdoor spaces while admiring the lush Himalayan surroundings

THIS PAGE, FROM TOP Hiking and cycling tours are available for guests who wish to get up close and personal with nature Warm wooden tones add to the resort’s unpretentious rustic interior

THE TOWN OF DHULIKHEL LIES ALONG AN ANCIENT TRADE ROUTE BETWEEN THE KATHMANDU VALLEY AND TIBET

natural materials such as stone, wood and earth using traditional building methods, minimising the use of chemicals. Grey water treatment, solar lighting and sourcing food from a nearby organic farm also contribute to its environmentally sustainable vision. “At the resort, we have tried to preserve Mother Nature as much as possible. The spectacular beauty of Nepal needs protection. So this is our tribute to the natural beauty of Nepal, and our effort towards preserving and promoting it,” says Einhaus. During their stay, guests can also learn more about Nepalese culture, lifestyle and the country’s different ethnic groups. The resort aims to preserve and promote the country’s cultural heritage and encourages guests to explore a different side of Nepal. Einhaus says: “We are planning on dedicating each suite to one ethnic group of Nepal, which means that the suites will have information on them and their culture, giving guests more chances to know about the country and its diversity.”

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Photography by Adam Flipp Text by Charmaine Tai

CREATING CONTRAST FOR PHOTOGRAPHER ADAM FLIPP, SECLUDED LOCATIONS CREATE MORE IMPACT. His photo shoot for fashion brand Moss & Spy found him enjoying quaint Coogee beach along New South Wales, Australia, a place that has been “overlooked due to Bondi’s dominance”. He took advantage of the natural light flooding the beach. “Australia has this amazingly strong daylight. Winter also has a very high contrast level as the sun is so far north,” Flipp says. He used a filter to offset the contrast levels, resulting in strong visuals. The helicopter shoot at Bankstown Airport posed a greater challenge with restrictions in the aviation industry. A wind machine placed directly above the model didn’t make things easier, either. “The wind [generated] was so strong that the model lost her footing several times,” Flipp recalls. If not for photography, Flipp, who started shooting images while in high school, would have gone into the film industry. He says: “I love visuals and fantasy. I think it’s amazing these days with CGI; we are only limited by our imaginations.” Movies inspire him, as do television shows and travel. Flipp’s primary goal is to portray women “in a classic but contemporary way”. He has photographed personalities such as Mischa Barton and celebrity chef Curtis Stone, and hopes to work with world-renowned boxer Muhammad Ali one day. www.adamflipp.com

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“WE ARE ONLY LIMITED BY OUR IMAGINATIONS”

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“KEEPING ELEMENTS TO A HIGH LEVEL WITHIN CONSTRAINTS IS THE HARDEST PART OF THE JOB”

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HELICOPTER SHOOT Location: Bankstown Airport, New South Wales, Australia Stylist: Thelma Mcquillan Hair and Make up: Lucy Baldock Model: from Chic Management

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“MY PRIMARY GOAL IS TO MAKE THE WOMEN I PHOTOGRAPH LOOK BEAUTIFUL IN A CLASSIC BUT CONTEMPORARY WAY”

BLUE SKY SHOOT Stylist: Penny Mcarthy from Viviens Creative Model: Alexandra Argoston from Chic All clothing from Moss & Spy Glasses and Shoes from Prada

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AIRBORNEREVIEW

A LOOK AT BUSINESS AVIATION SHOWS, FROM EAST TO WEST

All ABACE images courtesy of ABACE Show Management

This year’s ASIAN BUSINESS AVIATION CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION (ABACE) was hailed as record-breaking for the young show — attendance reached 7,714, at least a 20 per cent jump from last year. Exhibitors numbered 180, with 40 based in the Asia-Pacific region — making the show a perfect platform to launch Jetgala’s China edition. The event took place from 16 to 18 April at the Shanghai Hawker Pacific Business Aviation Centre within Hongqiao International Airport, and its next edition is scheduled for 15 to 17 April 2014. MILESTONES The highest level of certification — Level D — was awarded to Gulfstream’s G450/G550 Full Flight Simulator by the Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC). The CAAC also gave Falcon 900EASy maintenance approval, making Dassault the first Original Equipment Manufacturer to have all current production models approved in China. The FAA approved Shanghai Hawker Pacific Business Aviation Centre (SHPBASC) as a Foreign Repair Station. An undisclosed Chinese customer signed an order for an Embraer Lineage 1000 ultra-large executive jet at the show. Boeing celebrated the completion of Nanshan Jet’s first Boeing Business Jet, a modified 737-700, at ABACE. It is the first BBJ for a Chinese customer designed with a traditional business jet interior. Meanwhile, Cessna announced plans to begin manufacturing business jets and turboprops in China. 114

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DEBUTS Nextant Aerospace, which re-manufactures business jets, brought its 400XT to China for the first time. President Sean McGeough is confident that the aircraft will gain popularity in the country, with its low purchase price and operating costs, as well as speeds of up to 460 knots. Also making a China debut were Gulfstream’s new G280 and G650. Comlux The Aviation Group — a charter operator that also provides cabin design and completion services, among others — joined the show for the first time. ISSUES A seminar at the show raised issues of pilot shortage, with the country needing 500 to 1,000 pilots based on its current backlog of orders. Operators typically require five pilots per aircraft. The government imposes quotas on the number of foreign pilots allowed to work in the country and restrictions to where they can fly — a complication further fuelled by language and cultural barriers. ACTION In response to China’s young but growing business aviation industry, Shanghai Airport Authority announced the creation of a new hangar and a 600,000-sq-ft exhibition hall at Hongqiao Airport, a new FBO at Pudong Airport and programmes to increase the country’s capacity for air-traffic control.


All EBACE images courtesy of EBACE Show Management

The 13th EUROPEAN BUSINESS AVIATION CONVENTION & EXHIBITION (EBACE) took place from 21 to 23 May this year. It had the third largest number of attendees — 12,353 — in the history of the show, 52 aircraft on static display, and more square footage than ever. Information on EBACE 2014 will be available in October. MILESTONES Ruag Aviation delivered a converted Bombardier CRJ200 airliner at EBACE. The transformed 10-seater VIP jet features wireless cabin entertainment, club seating and dining areas. Approvals were granted from the FAA and EASA for EASy II flight decks on Dassault’s Falcon 7X. The European Business Aviation Association recognised four European companies for safety achievements. Robert Bosch Corporation Aviation and Tyrol Air Ambulance were awarded Platinum Safety of Flight for completing more than 50 years of safe flying. VistaJet attained a gold award for 40 years without an accident, while FAI Aviation Group received a bronze award for 20 years of safe operations.

DEBUTS Pilatus PC-24 unveiled its twin-engine PC-24 business jet, with FAA certification planned for early 2017. Bombardier Aerospace presented the first production model of its light Learjet 75, an upgrade of the Learjet 45 that was announced in 2012. This aircraft has a maximum altitude of 51,000 ft and can fly more than 2,000 nautical miles. The Boeing Business Jet 3, based on the 737-900ER, was displayed at the show for the first time, and was made available for sale and for livery selection by the new owner. Embraer Executive Jets marked the world debut of the prototype of its mid-size Legacy 500, which features a six-foot stand-up cabin and full fly-by-wire technology. JETGALA

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AIRBORNEBRIEFING

Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation

has earned type certificate validation from the civil aviation authorities in China and Canada for its G280. This validation recognises that the aircraft is compliant with environmental requirements in both countries. The G280 had previously been certified in the United States, Israel and Europe. Its range of 3,600 nautical miles at Mach 0.80 is ideal for trips such as Shanghai to Singapore, and Montreal to London. The Gulfstream service centre in Beijing Capital International Airport has received authorisation to service Gulfstream aircraft registered in Hong Kong and Macau. Under the agreement, Gulfstream Beijing can perform maintenance and upgrades on airframes, avionics, power plants and interiors on the G550, G450 and G200. Gulfstream is in the process of applying for authorisation to expand its work scope in China.

An Embraer Phenom 300 light executive jet will join China’s Erdos General Aviation in the third quarter of 2013. The aircraft was certified by the Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC) in November last year. The delivery is the first of the model to be sold in the Chinese market. Since the manufacturer’s first delivery to China in 2004, Embraer Executive Jets has firmed up 31 other orders.

The Ohio-based company has also commissioned Argus, a US aviation consultancy, to identify potential market segments and desirable aircraft types to add to its product line. Previously in 2011, the study helped in the revamping of the Nextant 400XT. 116

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joint venture with the Sichuan Haite Group in Tianjin, China. Prior to that, Desgrosseilliers was chief representative for Jet Aviation, where he was responsible for developing the company’s services in the Chinese market. Gulfstream Aerospace Corp’s new G280 demonstration aircraft added yet

Metrojet has signed an agreement with China Eastern Airlines Executive Air (CEAEA) to provide exclusive maintenance and support. The

agreement includes providing training, inspection and heavy maintenance service support to CEAEA’s fleet of 13 aircraft, which includes Gulfstream, Embraer, Cessna, Hawker and Bombardier models. The provider of business aircraft services has also entered a joint-venture agreement with Zhuhai Hanxing General Aviation to create a maintenance, repair and overhaul facility at Zhuhai airport. Boeing Business Jets delivered its first

Nextant Aerospace plans to launch two of its re-manufactured business jets at NBAA in Las Vegas in October.

General Manager of ExecuJet Haite Aviation Services, the company’s

BBJ2 to a customer in China. The

aircraft is based on the Boeing 727-800 jet, and has a range of 5,520 nautical miles with an extended-range fuel tank system installed. Twenty-two BBJ2s have been ordered so far, with 15 currently in service. ExecuJet Aviation Group has appointed Paul Desgrosseilliers as

another city-pair record while on world tour. The super mid-sized business jet travelled 3,538 nm from Hanscom Field in Bedford, Massachusetts to Bydgoszcz Airport in Poland in just seven hours and 21 minutes. Previously, the G280 set two other city-pair records, including one from Teterboro Airport in New Jersey to Geneva International Airport. These records bring the G280’s total to 13 in 2013. In 2012, the G280 >> established 22 city-pair marks.


AIRBORNEBRIEFING

The Gulfstream G650 demonstrator aircraft landed at Paris’s Le Bourget Airport for the 50th annual Paris Air Show with three new city-pair records — from Savannah to Paris, Nice to São Paulo, and Las Vegas to Madrid. The flight from Savannah to Paris totaled seven hours and 12 minutes, shaving more than an hour off the Gulfstream GIV’s time of eight hours and 16 minutes. The G650, which entered service in January this year, has since visited 75 cities in 27 countries, and has covered more than 142,900 nautical miles. Bombardier Aerospace Business Aircraft’s market forecast predicts a demand for 24,000 more business aircraft worth about US650 billion from 2013 to 2032. About 9,800

business aircraft deliveries will be made in the same period of time in the segments in which Bombardier competes. Analysts predict that demand for large and medium jets will grow, with the large aircraft category demonstrating the fastest growth. Over the forecast period, Bombardier predicts that North America will receive the greatest number of new business jet deliveries, followed by Europe and China. Bangkok Airways has fitted one of its Airbus 319 jets with a private cabin to enter the executive jet charter business. Half of the A319’s fuselage has been converted into a cabin with sofas and tables, which can accommodate 12 passengers. When needed, the seating arrangement can be changed to accommodate day-to-day scheduled flights. The aft section of the aircraft will continue to contain regular airline seats. Gulfstream Aerospace Corp has opened a new sales and design centre in London, giving international customers more access to Gulfstream’s sales and design staff. It is the first company facility to be located outside 118

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the USA, and will complement other Gulfstream resources in the UK. The centre includes a showroom with choices of leather, veneer, fabric and carpet selections. Customers will be able to use Gulfstream’s DesignBookTM software, which displays images of a cabin in real time.

Supersonic Aerospace International (SAI) relaunched the Quiet Supersonic Transport (QSST) aircraft intended

The first Airbus 350 XWB landed back at the Toulouse-Blagnac Airport France after completing its maiden flight that lasted four hours and five minutes. Amongst the crew were Peter Chandler, Airbus’ chief test pilot; Guy Magrin, project pilot for the aircraft; and Pascal Verneau, A350 XWB’s test flight engineer. The flight marks the beginning of a test-flight campaign totalling 2,500 flight hours which will be conducted with five other A350s. The mid-sized, long-range aircraft is powered by two Rolls-Royce Trent XWB engines. It is projected to enter airline service in the second half of 2014 with Qatar Airways.

Eclipse Aerospace has received approval to double the service life of existing

The annual Father’s Day tradition at Concours d’Elegance on Rodeo Drive welcomed a full-scale Learjet 85 mock-up as part of Learjet’s 50th anniversary celebration. The aircraft is one of 25 business jets built using composites in both the wings and fuselage. It will feature a stand-up cabin, and will be able to fly at 3,000 nautical miles with a maximum speed of 871 km/h. The aircraft was designed by Bombardier Aerospace.

to operate as an all-first-class airliner, after a three-year hiatus. The Boeing 737-sized aircraft will have between 20 and 33 seats, a 4,500-nautical mile range, and a maximum take-off weight of 90,700 kg. Michael Paulsen, boss of SAI, is currently looking for investors to finance the two-year study phase, and is recruiting an OEM to oversee the four-year development and certification phase.

Eclipse 500 and under-development Eclipse 550 very light jets to 20,000

hours. This validation provides owners with over 50 years of flight operations and improved airframe residual value. This also recognises that the friction stir welding process used to assemble the aircraft’s fuselage and wings provides increased component strength and durability. The upgraded EA500 is scheduled for certification and entry into service later this year. SyberJet Aircraft is preparing to fly the upgraded version of the SJ30 business aircraft in the first quarter of 2014. The high-speed, light cabin jet will be fixed with a glass-panel cockpit, a dual flight management system and a moving map. It will also feature a SmartView synthetic vision with head-up display symbols in a head-down presentation on the primary flight display. The aircraft is expected to enter into service in 2015. Qatar Executive was awarded an air operator’s certificate by Qatar’s Civil

Aviation Authority. The all-Bombardierfleet company began its services in 2009 under the business aircraft services arm of Qatar Airways. Qatar Executive currently operates three Challenger 605s, two Global 5000s and one Global XRS. It has since signed a letter of intent for 10 additional Global 7000 and 8000 ultra-long-range jets. >>


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AIRBORNEBRIEFING

Standard & Poor raised Embraer’s corporate credit rating from ‘BBB-’ to ‘BBB’ on stronger credit metrics and operating efficiency. Standard & Poor’s Rating Services noted that the company was able to maintain efficient operations and stable margins while capturing new opportunities in commercial aviation, as well as placing its new products in the executive aviation and defense and security segments, which improved sales diversification. ExecuJet Haite Aviation Services China is now an authorised dealer for

avionics manufacturer Garmin in mainland China. This agreement enables ExecuJet Haite to promote, sell and support the full range of Garmin products and warranties in the country. China-based operators and customers will have greater access to local technical and parts support at the operator based at Binhai International Airport in Tianjin, reducing costs and aircraft downtime. The Embraer 170/190 family of E-Jets continues to set records after achieving 10 million flight hours in May, with an average mission conclusion rate of 99.9 per cent, and the completion of seven million flight cycles. Over 1,200 orders from airlines worldwide have been firmed up, and nearly 1,000 jets have been delivered to more than 60 airline companies. The flight hours began accumulating after the delivery of an E170 in 2004 to LOT Polish Airlines, the first E-Jet operator. Airworthy AutoGas LLC plans to produce and distribute a 93-octane premium unleaded, ethanol-free fuel as an alternative for aircraft that

do not require 100LL. The high-purity, low-vapour pressure fuel will be made available later in the year, and will act as an alternative for the majority of general aviation aircraft without compromising airworthiness. The patent-pending formula meets the 120

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requirements of ASTM D4814, Lycoming Engines SI-1070 ‘S’ specifications, and EAA and Petersen Aviation Supplemental Type certificates.

feature Rockwell Collins’ Pro Line 21 Advanced and a Multiscan Weather Radar to improve situational awareness. Aircraft delivery is expected to begin in 2014.

Cessna Aircraft Company announced the first production of its Turbo Skylane 182 JT-A at the company’s facility in Independence, Kansas. The aircraft is positioned to be the first modern single-piston-engine aircraft specifically designed to run on Jet-A fuel. Jodi Noah, senior vice president of single engine/propeller aircraft at Cessna, believes the aircraft will “change the way single-engine pilots approach flight planning due to the aircraft’s incredible performance envelope”.

Boeing Business Jets displayed its BBJ 3 for the first time during

ExecuJet Aviation Group has launched an iPad application for aircraft management customers. Called myExecuJet, the free app allows customers to locate their aircraft and access information such as fuel consumption, schedules and crew. Aircraft owners, managers and key account managers will be able to use the app to see their aircraft location on a world map in real time, view routes, aircraft usage statistics, weather forecasts and maintenance events for past and future dates. The app can display up to one year’s worth of data. Bombardier Aerospace has added a new Challenger 350 aircraft to its family of business jets, launched during EBACE in conjunction with NetJets(R) as the worldwide partner. The jet offers increased performance from the new twin Honeywell HTF7350 engines and aerodynamic efficiency with new canted winglets. The cockpit will

EBACE. The aircraft is based on the 737-900ER and has been fitted with custom VIP interiors at Jet Aviation in Basel. Amenities include a main lounge, smaller area for staff, a dining room, and a bedroom suite with an en suite bathroom. The BBJ 3 can carry 38 passengers and eight crew members. Jetex and Honeywell have announced a global trip support partnership

that will boost their respective flight planning, aircraft datalink, flight following and international trip support offerings to make it easier for business jet operators to plan and manage flights around the world. Under the agreement, Jetex customers will benefit from Honeywell’s Global Data Center Flight Support Services that include live tracking, while Honeywell customers will be able to tap into Jetex’s international trip planning services and local 24-hour support for flight logistics and concierge care. Rizon Jet has achieved FAR Part 129 Foreign Air Carrier Certification,

which permits unrestricted commercial operations into and within the United States. The luxury flight services company, which has its headquarters in Doha, Qatar, also operates flights within the Middle East, and to Asia and Europe.


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AIRBORNEGLOSSARY

ABSOLUTE ALTITUDE Measurable height of an aircraft above the actual terrain. ABSOLUTE CEILING The maximum altitude above sea level at which an aircraft can maintain level flight under Standard Air conditions. AGL (Above Ground Level) Altitude expressed as feet above terrain or airport elevation (see MSL). AILERONS An aircraft control surface hinged to the rear, outer section of each wing for banking (‘tilting’) the aircraft. AIRCRAFT MANAGEMENT Comprehensive services provided by a management company for an aircraft owner. Details vary. AIRFOIL The shape of any flying surface, but principally a wing, as seen in side-view (cross section). AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVE Official notification to aircraft owners/operators of a known safety issue with a particular model of aircraft. ALTIMETER A highly sensitive barometer that shows an aircraft’s altitude above mean sea level by measuring atmospheric pressure. ANGLE OF ATTACK The angle between the airfoil’s chord line and the direction in which the aircraft is currently moving. AOG (Aircraft on Ground) Aircraft unfit to fly, in need of repair. Owner’s worst nightmare. APPROACH (DEPARTURE) CONTROL Radar-based air traffic control, usually at an airport tower, providing traffic separation up to 40 miles. APRON Hard-surfaced or paved area around a hangar. Also, ‘ramp’. ATC (Air Traffic Control) Service providing separation services to participating airborne traffic and clearances to land, take off or taxi at airports. AVIONICS The electronic control systems airplanes use for flight such as communications, autopilots, and navigation. BLOCK RATES Pre-paid hours for air charter at a contracted price. CARBON OFFSET Monetary contributions to renewable energy research and production projects to ‘offset’ carbon emissions of an airplane.

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CHARTER The ‘renting’ of an aircraft with crew for a personal, business, or cargo flight from one point to another.

FBO (Fixed Base Operator) A business operating an airport terminal for non-airline, general aviation aircraft.

CHARTER CARD Pre-paid air charter plan, either for a block of charter hours at a pre-defined fee, or a set debit balance in dollars.

FERRY FLIGHT A flight for the purpose of returning an aircraft to base or delivering an aircraft from one location to another.

CLASS I NAVIGATION Operation of aircraft under visual meteorological conditions (VFR) primarily based on ‘see and avoid’ procedures. CLASS II NAVIGATION Any en route flight operation that is not Class I, i.e. instrumentbased navigation (IFR). CLEARANCE Formal instructions from air traffic control authorising a specific action (climb or descend, entry into controlled airspace).

FLAPS Hinged surfaces on the inboard rear of wings, deployed to increase wing curvature (and thus, lift). FLIGHT PLAN Filed by radio, telephone, computer, or in person with Flight Service Stations. FLIGHT TIME Portion of the trip actually spent in the air. FRACTIONAL OWNERSHIP The purchase of a ‘share’ of an aircraft.

CONTRAILS Streaks of condensed water vapour created in the air by aircraft flying at high altitudes; a.k.a. vapour trails.

FUSELAGE An aircraft’s main body structure housing the flight crew, passengers, and cargo.

CONTROLLED AIRSPACE An airspace of defined dimensions within which air traffic control service is provided.

GENERAL AVIATION Part of civil aviation comprising all facets of aviation except scheduled air carriers.

CRUISE SPEED The normal speed attained at altitude once the aircraft is no longer climbing and is en route.

GLASS COCKPIT See FIS.

CRUISING ALTITUDE A level altitude maintained by an aircraft while in flight. DEADHEAD To fly the return leg of a trip without cargo or passengers. DRAG Resisting force exerted on an aircraft in its line of flight opposite in direction to its motion. Opposite of thrust. DUTY TIME That portion of the day when a crewmember is on duty in any capacity (not just in the air), limited by regulations. EFIS (Electronic Flight Information Systems) Glass cockpit avionics that integrate all flight parameters into one optimised instrument. ELEVATOR An aircraft control surface hinged to both rear horizontal stabilisers, changing the aircraft pitch attitude nose-up or nose-down. EMPTY LEG Also known as ‘one-way availability’. Usually posted as available for travel between two airports during a certain time period. FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) The Department of Transportation’s agency for aviation.

GPS (Global Positioning System) Satellitebased navigation system operated by Department of Defence. GPWS (Ground Proximity Warning System) A System designed to alert pilots if their aircraft is in immediate danger of flying into the ground. GROUND SPEED Actual speed that an aircraft travels over the ground also called ‘shadow speed’. HANGAR An enclosed structure for housing aircraft. Originated with lakebased floating homes of the original German Zeppelin airships. HEAVY JETS See ‘Large-Cabin Jets’. HORSEPOWER The motive energy required to raise 550 lbs. one foot in one second, friction disregarded. HUD (Head-Up Display) A transparent display that presents data without requiring the user to look away from his or her usual viewpoint. IATA CODE International aviation code for international airports. ICAO CODE Civil aviation codes for airports.


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AIRBORNEGLOSSARY

IFR (Instrument Flight Rules) Rules for flights into clouds and low visibility, by reference to cockpit instruments and radio navigation. ILS (Instrument Landing System) A precision instrument approach system permitting aircraft to land with low ceilings or poor visibility. JOINT OWNERSHIP Purchase or lease of an aircraft by a number of owners, often through a partnership or limited company. KNOT (Nautical Mile per Hour) Common measure of aircraft speed equalling 6,080 feet or about 1.15 miles. (For mph, multiply knots by 1.15.) KTAS True airspeed, in knots. LARGE-CABIN JETS The largest size aircraft that doesn’t require a major airport runway. Typical capacity 9-15 passengers. LAYOVER A night spent in the middle of the trip in a city other than home base for the aircraft and crew. LEG Describes one direction of travel between two points. Commonly used in referring to a planned itinerary. LIGHT JETS See ‘Small-Cabin Jets’. MACH SPEED A number representing the ratio of the speed of an airplane to the speed of sound in the surrounding air. MAYDAY An international distress signal to indicate an imminent and grave danger that requires assistance. MID-CABIN JETS Typical capacity 7-9 passengers. MRO (Maintenance, Repair & Overhaul) Company licensed to provide services for the upkeep and airworthiness of airplanes. NAUTICAL MILE Defined internationally as equivalent to 1,852 metres or 1.15 statute miles. NDB (Non-Directional Beacon) A radio transmitter at a known location, used as an aviation or marine navigational aid. PAN PAN International call signal for urgency, indicating uncertainty and usually followed by the nature of the alert. PART 91 The parts of Federal Aviation Regulations on non-commercial operations covering corporate flight departments. PART 121 The parts of Federal Aviation Regulations on scheduled airline operations, including the publication of a schedule.

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PART 135 The parts of Federal Aviation Regulations on non-commercial operations covering charter carriers.

TARMAC A paved airport surface, especially a runway or an apron at a hangar.

PART 145 Certificate allowing an organisation to perform maintenance and alterations on US-registered aircraft.

TAXI TIME Portion of the trip spent rolling between the gate, terminal, or ramp and runway.

PATTERN The path of aircraft traffic around an airfield, at an established height and direction.

THRUST The forward force produced in reaction to the gases expelled rearward from a jet engine. Opposite of drag.

PAYLOAD Anything that an aircraft carries beyond what is required for its operation during flight.

TRAILING EDGE The rearmost edge of an airfoil.

POSITIONING Ferrying aircraft for departure from other than originating airport.

TRANSPONDER An airborne transmitter that responds to automated air traffic control interrogation with accurate position information.

RADAR System that uses electromagnetic waves to identify the range, altitude, direction, or speed of moving and fixed objects. RAMP The apron or open ‘tarmac’ in front of an FBO or terminal facility. This space is busy, used for deplaning, parking of aircraft, etc. ROLL One of three axes in flight, specifying the action around a central point. ROTATE In flight, any aircraft will rotate about its centre of gravity, a point which is the average location of the mass of the aircraft. RUDDER Aircraft control surface attached to the rear of the vertical stabiliser (fin) of the aircraft tail. Forces the plane to veer left or right. RUNWAY HEADING Magnetic direction corresponding to the centre line of the runway. SLATS Small, aerodynamic surfaces on the leading edge of the wings of fixed aircraft which allow the wing to operate at a higher angle of attack. SLIPSTREAM The flow of air driven backward by a propeller or downward by a rotor. SMALL-CABIN JETS Typical capacity 5-8 passengers. SQUAWK A four-digit number that a pilot dials into his transponder to identify his aircraft to air traffic controllers.

TURBINE Engine that uses compressed air to generate thrust to spin a metal shaft inside the motor, used in jet engines and turboprop aircraft. TURBOPROP An aircraft in which the propeller is driven by a jet-style turbine rather than a piston. VERY LIGHT JETS (VLJ) Small jet aircraft approved for single-pilot operation, maximum take-off weight of less than 10,000 lb (4,540 kg). VFR (Visual Flight Rules) A defined set of FAA regulations covering operation of aircraft flying by visual reference to the horizon. VOR (VHF Omnidirectional Range) Ground-based radio navigation aid. VORTICES Regions of high velocity that develop at the tip of a wing as it flies through the air. WIND SHEAR Large changes in either wind speed or direction at different altitudes that can cause sudden gain or loss of airspeed.

STATUTE MILE A unit of length equal to 5,280 feet.

WINGLET A small, stabilising, rudder-like addition to the tips of a wing to control or employ air movement, thereby increasing fuel economy.

SVS (Synthetic Vision System) A technology that uses 3D to provide pilots with intuitive means of understanding their flying environment.

YAW One of the three axes in flight, specifying the side-to-side movement of an aircraft on its vertical axis.

TAIL NUMBER An airplane’s registration number.

YOKE The control wheel of an aircraft, akin to an automobile steering wheel.


AIRBORNESHOWDIARY

EBACE Geneva

AUGUST 2013 14-16 AUG

LABACE 2013 (LATIN AMERICAN BUSINESS AVIATION CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION)

Congonhas Airport, S達o Paulo, Brazil

www.abag.org.br/labace2013

10-12 SEP

CIBAS 2013 (CHINESE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS AVIATION SHOW)

Flight Inspection Center of CAAC, Beijing Capital Airport, China

www.cibas-beijing.com

12-14 SEP

INTERNATIONAL BIZAV SHOW JET EXPO 2013

Vnukovo-3 International Airport, Moscow, Russia

www.2013.jetexpo.ru

SEPTEMBER 2013

OCTOBER 2013 22-24 OCT

NBAA 2013 (NATIONAL BUSINESS AVIATION Las Vegas Convention Center, Nevada, ASSOCIATION CONVENTION & EXHIBITION) USA

www.nbaa.org

29 OCT-03 NOV

SEOUL INTERNATIONAL AEROSPACE & DEFENCE EXHIBITION

Cheongju International Airport, South Korea

www.seouladex.com/eng

DUBAI AIRSHOW 2013

Dubai World Central, UAE

www.dubaiairshow.aero

BAHRAIN INTERNATIONAL AIRSHOW 2014

Sakhir Air Base, Bahrain International Airport, Bahrain

www.bahraininternationalairshow.com

SINGAPORE AIRSHOW 2014

Changi Exhibition Centre, Singapore

www.singaporeairshow.com.sg

INDIA AVIATION 2014

Begumpet Airport, Hyderabad, India

www.india-aviation.in

FARNBOROUGH INTERNATIONAL AIRSHOW

Farnborough Aerodome, Hampshire, England

www.farnborough.com

NOVEMBER 2013 17-21 NOV

JANUARY 2014 16-18 JAN

FEBRUARY 2014 11-16 FEB

MARCH 2014 12-16 MAR

JULY 2014 14-20 JUL

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SINGAPORE AIRSHOW 2014 HIGHLIGHTS

Organised by:

Official Media Partner:

Supporting Publications:

Supported by:

Held in:


AIRBORNETAILHOOK

FRENCH BEETLE by Rainer Sigel

THE SNECMA COLÉOPTÈRE (THE FRENCH WORD FOR “BEETLE”) WAS A VTOL AIRCRAFT DEVELOPED IN FRANCE IN THE 1950s. Designed as a single-person aircraft with an annular wing designed to land vertically, it was supposed to require no runway and very little space to take-off. Officially known as the C.450-01 Coléoptère, the aircraft’s annular wing permitted transition into horizontal flight. Directional control at take-off and landing was by pneumatic deflection of the main jet efflux, while directional control during normal horizontal flight was by four swivelling fins equally spaced around the rear end of the annular wing. Transitions from vertical to horizontal attitudes were facilitated by the use of two small, retractable fins mounted on the sides of the fuselage nose. The C.450-01 made its first free vertical flight on 6 May 1959 at Melun-Villaroche. On 25 July, during transition from vertical to horizontal flight, control was lost and the Coléoptère crashed and was destroyed. The pilot successfully ejected from his enclosed cockpit, which was fitted with a tilting seat that swivelled 90 degrees during the transition from vertical to horizontal flight, and was unhurt. It was stated afterwards that the accident occurred when the intended programme of flight tests concerning inclination had been carried out successfully, and that neither the jet control stabilisation system nor the annular wing aerodynamic formula was the cause of the crash. In total though, only two prototypes were developed and tested, after which the programme was stopped.

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Profile for ExecuJet Aviation Group

ExecuJet - Issue 07  

Inflight Magazine of the ExecuJet Aviation Group

ExecuJet - Issue 07  

Inflight Magazine of the ExecuJet Aviation Group

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