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If you would like to ask Simon for some pet advice then log onto their interesting site www.ardmorevets.co.uk

Dogs being left in cars in hot weather

Simon Bailey

Vet Simon answers your questions

There is always a lot of news coverage about dogs being left in cars in hot weather. Unfortunately this year has been unusually heat for a longer period of time than usual. Consequently the practice has seen a number of cases of heatstroke and exhaustion. The advice is always the same, but it is easy to forget how hot it can get inside a car and how quickly it can occur. Temperatures can reach over 50°C and dogs can die from heatstroke in as little as 20 minutes. It is very important never to leave a dog unattended in the car in warm weather, even with the window open and water present, they can still suffer with heatstroke very quickly. When embarking on a car journey with a pet on board, make sure they have somewhere to sit away from the sunlight, allow them plenty of access to water and take regular breaks for fresh air. Also take into account if the animal has underlying health or disease which may make the situation worse. The same applies for exercising dogs; try to do this at the coolest part of the day i.e. the

I have been told I need to let my cat have a litter before it is spayed. It has been suggested, in the not too distant past, that cats should be allowed to have a litter before being spayed. The current evidence shows there are no health benefits to the cat in allowing it to have a litter before it is spayed. If you are not planning to breed from your female cat having them spayed will stop unwanted pregnancies, eliminate the sexual behaviour when in season, and stop the risk of diseases associated with the reproductive tract later in life. By far the most common presenting complaints from our patients at the moment involve grass seeds. Grass seeds in their ears, grass seeds in their eyes, grass seeds in their nose, grass seeds in

early morning or evening. If it is hot for us to exercise or sit in the sun it will be so for your dog also. Remember they can only really lose heat by panting and they are always wearing a fur coat!!

“ Temperatures can reach over 50°C and dogs can die from heatstroke in as little as 20 minutes.”

their feet ... Because of their shape, grass seeds tend to move in one direction and worm their way into everywhere and can be very painful for the affected individual. As well as causing discomfort they have the potential to cause a lot of damage. Those caught behind the third eyelid can damage the surface of the eye and those in the ears can damage the ear drum. Most grass seeds latch on when they become trapped in the fur during a walk in the fields. Therefore we would advise that all dogs should be checked thoroughly on their return home, paying particular attention to between the toes and around the ears. If there are any visible and easy to remove then do so, if very sore or difficult then get them checked at your vets as soon as possible.

My puppy has been diagnosed with ‘ear mites’, what are they and is it serious? Ear mites (or Otodectes cyanotis) as the name suggests live usually live in the ear canals of cats, dogs, rabbits and ferrets,

although they can survive of the skin surrounding the ears. The animal is usually infected by mites as a result of close contact with another infected animal. The mite is just about visible to the naked eye at about the size of a pinhead, and appears as a white speck moving against a dark background Ear mites are most common in kittens/puppies and juvenile animals, although any age can be affected. The signs they show are general irritation, rubbing at their ears, and shaking their heads. There is often a dark waxy discharge and occasionally the surrounding skin of the ear will have crusts or scabs present, usually as a result of excessive scratching by the affected animal. Ear mite infestations are usually diagnosed from the history of the signs shown and by the vet identifying the mite whilst examining the ear or earwax with a special lamp called an auroscope. Treatment is usually straightforward and involves applying eardrops to the ears of any cats or dogs that have been in contact with the affected animal. The drops are usually applied for 3 weeks to ensure both the adult and developing mites are removed.

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We’ve a New Look Magazine for you this month… An Animated must watch Video Cover and many more inside this issue. Some are promoting interes...

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