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john g simenic •  portfolio

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TABLE OF CONTENTS portfolio

John G. Simenic • Portfolio


GRADUATE WORK 6 Kline Lot 18 Kit of Parts Winery 24 deNode #2 32 Scent Camera #9 38 Innovatrium UNDERGRADUATE WORK 52 Confrontation Workshop 58 Hickman Chapel 64 Green Communities Competition 70 Techtown 76 Selected Works

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John G. Simenic • Portfolio


GRADUATE WORK The University of Michigan, 08.10 - Present

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KLINE LOT designing a mixed-use, walkable environment Located on the southwest corner of the downtown district in Ann Arbor, Michigan, the Kline Lot lies between a low-density residential neighborhood to the southwest and a mixed-used Main Street and downtown to the northeast. Working with Kyle Hoff, we sought to mediate this urban situation through a 217 unit, mixed-use, perimeter block, housing complex. The perimeter block housing on the first four-stories contains street-front retail in order to promote a healthy, walkable environment and also allows for a series of inner courtyards that not only add green space but cross ventilation, day-lighting, and views for tenants. In addition to this we divided the site in the center with a public plaza in order to create an easy-access route to Ashley Street to the west. Above the perimeter block housing, two doubleloaded corridor towers also reside on the site but are raised on a series of stilts. We employed this strategy in order to create a subtle scale gradient between the low-rise, low-density residential neighborhood to the southwest and the dense downtown to the northeast.

John G. Simenic • Portfolio

Right: Rendering of the final housing design. Created using Rhino, VRay, and Photoshop.


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ALLEY

UP UP UP UP UP

UP

SEMI-PRIVATE COURTYARD

UP

UP UP

MAIN STREET

GREENWAY EXTENSION

ASHLEY

UP

PUBLIC PLAZA

FOOD CARTS

UP UP

LIVE/WORK ALLEY UP

SEMI-PRIVATE COURTYARD

UP

UP UP

Left: Site plan of the Kline Lot created using AutoCAD.

UP UP

DN

Above Right: Rendering of the public plaza. Created using Rhino, VRay, and Photoshop.

DN

DN DN

UP DN

KLINE_SITE PLAN 1/16” = 1’

DN

John G. Simenic • Portfolio

WILLIAM STREET

RIght: Rendering of the activated alley. Created using Rhino, VRay, and Photoshop.


INE

n it s /a c d s /ac /a c

EA: 1 .7 6 ac 1 23 . 3 u n i ts / ac 1 92 b e ds /a c 2 8 8 ppl / ac

GROS S AR EA:

TYPE

AFFORDABLE MARKET RATE AFFORDABLE MARKET RATE MARKET RATE MARKET RATE AFFORDABLE AFFORDABLE AFFORDABLE AFFORDABLE MARKET RATE

UNITS

STUDIO STUDIO 1 BR FLAT 1 BR FLAT 1 BR LOFT 2 BR FLAT 2 BR FLAT 2 BR LOFT 2 BR L/W 3 BR 3 BR

UNIT COUNT 36 24 15 27 8 50 22 8 13 9 5

QTY

1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5

/BED

54 36 22.5 40.5 12 150 66 24 39 40.5 22.5

Kline

360 sf 360 sf 540 sf 540 sf 600 sf 930 sf 850 sf 850 sf 1,130 sf 1,100 sf 1,400 sf

SQ FT

1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 3 3

TOT

36 24 15 27 8 100 44 16 26 27 15

BEDS

/UN

W AL K S C O R E

FA R

OCCUPANTS

U N I TS

21 7 507 6.1 95

OCCUPANTS

i l l i a m a n d A sh l e y S tr e e t , K l i n e s t e i n i s a 21 7 u n i t h ou s i n g c om p l e x , M a d e of t w o l ow e r e xn g s , a t a l l , a n d a l on g e x tr u d e d to w e r t h e b u i l d i n g a s s e m b la g e w i l l b e h o me to mi x o f u n i t o m e l e v e l s. By p o s i ti o n i n g f o u r -s t o r y e x t e r i o r b lo c k b u i l d i ng w i th c o m m e r c ia l a t t he b a s e, n c ou r a g e s a w a l k a b l e , h u m a n sc a l e s tr e e t f r o n t . T h e t a l l er b u i l d i n gs a r e th en s t il te d a nd d s th e i n te r i o r o f t h e b l o c k t o to p u l l th e l a r g e r s ca l e a w a y f r o m th e u s er s on th e s tr e e t. b l oc k s t r a te g y l i k e w i s e o p e n s u p t h e i n t er i o r b l oc k t o s em i- p r i v a t e c om mo n s p a c e f or u s e n t s . T h e s i te a l s o of f e r s a n a m p l e a m o u n t o f p u b l i c s p a c e b o th a s a c o nt i n u a t i on of A nn w a y a n d a p u b l i c p l a z a . T h e p l a z a o n M a i n e n ga g e b o t h t h e b u s y s h op p in g d i s t r i c t o f Ma i n s m a l l e r l i v e / w o r k s h op s o w n e d b y r e s i d e n t s o n th e K l in e A l l e y . T h e s i te w i l l l i k e w i s e b o a s t v i r o n m e n t a l l y c on c i ou s s t r a t e g i e s f r om p h o to - v o l t a i c s t o s to r m w a te r m a n a ge me nt th r o ug h ips and porous pavers.

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Left: Transverse section thru courtyard of north building complex. Created using AutoCAD and Ilustrator. Above Right: West elevation

C R O S S S EC T IO N _ 1 /8�

John G. Simenic • Portfolio

Right: Longitudinal section thru site.


ON _ 1/ 8 ” ON_1/8”

WES T ELEVATION_1/ 16” W E S T E LE V ATIO N_ 1 /1 6”

LONGITUDINAL S ECTION_1/16” LO NGITUDINAL S E CTIO N_ 1 /1 6”

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KL INE_BUIL DING EL EVATIONS/SECTIONS K L I NE _ B U I L DI NG E L E VA T I O NS / S E C TI O NS


p or ch

po r ch

l i v i ng l i vi ng s p a ce b ed r oom bedr o o m

li v i n g spac e

bedr o o m

w/d bath

kitchen

b a th

S T U I D I O _ 1 / 8”

ki tchen

T WO B EDR OOM F L A T _1 /8 ”

UP

UP

bedr o o m

b el ow

l i v i ng space

l of t b ed r oom

bath

b a th

w a lk way

p or ch

DN

w/c

DN

DN

w/d

k it c h e n

bath

O N E B E D R O O M FLAT_1 /8 ”

UP

UP

liv in g sp a c e

k i tchen

w/d

ki tchen

w/c

bedr o o m

wal kway

po r ch

1/2” = 1’

John G. Simenic • Portfolio

T WO B EDR OOM S T A CK ED_1 /8 ”

A I LS

O N E B E D R O O M LO FT_1 / 8 ”


p or ch ki tchen l i vi ng

l i v i ng space

b ed r oom be dro o m

e d room k i tchen

bedr o o m bat h bath

b ed r oom b a th

b a th

w/d

DRO O M F L A T _ 1 / 8 ”

TH R E E B E D R O O M FLAT_1 /8 ”

ONE B EDR OOM F L A T _1 /8 ”

p or ch

m bath

w/c

w/c

k i tchen

bedr o o m

DN

DN

DN

DN

h w/d

w o rk s p a ce l i vi ng s p a ce

UP

UP

UP

STA C K E D _ 1 / 8 ”

bedr o o m

UP

m

T WO B EDR OOM L I VE/WOR K _1 /8 ”

KLI N E _U N I T P LAN S 1/4” = 1’

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Left: Section facade detail created using AutoCAD. Right: Rendering of tower apartment unit. Created using Rhino, VRay, and Photoshop. John G. Simenic • Portfolio


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Spread: 1/16� scale massing model made from laminated poplar. Surrounding context made from laminated MDF. Each laminated layer represents one-story.

John G. Simenic • Portfolio


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KIT OF PARTS WINERY discovering space through tectonic exploration

John G. Simenic • Portfolio


Left: Exterior perspective of the winery. Created using Rhino and Photoshop. Right: photos of early studymodels that display the relationship of the tilt-up concrete to the horizontal post-and-beam planes.

The goal of the Kits of Parts Winery was to explore design by working with basic tectonic systems. My partner, Ben Marder, and I explored two tectonic systems: tilt-up concrete construction and postand-beam construction. Our aim was to push the limits of these tectonic systems in way that would fulfill the programmatic requirements of a winery and at the same time challenge the standard conventions of what a winery is and what a winery can do. Within the design, the post-and-beam construction offers usable rooftop decking space that mediates the cut-and-fill landscape and the cellar below. The tilt-up construction functions not only as retaining walls but also as an insulative system that can facilitate an indoor climate suitable for vinification. The large tilt-up concrete towers not only operate as cooling towers to maintain a stable interior cellar climate below, but also operate as artifacts. The towers stand symbolically as artifacts denoting the nature of wine as an artifact and also as artifacts to the construction process that brought about the modified landscape condition of this project.

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100’

0’

10

90

FFE 90’

FFE 94’

10 0’

100

FFE 91’

0’

10

100’

10

0’

90’

FFE 99’ FFE 93’

FFE 96.5’

Left: SIteplan AutoCAD.

created

using

Far Right: Interior perspective of the fermenation room. Created using Rhino and Photoshop.

John G. Simenic • Portfolio

Page 10-11: photograph of 1/16” scale site model. Created using chipboard, birch plywood, and basswood.


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John G. Simenic • Portfolio


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deNODE #2 nodal surface description deNODE explores developable surface approximation through the use of self-restrained, triangular nodes. To assist in this process, our group, made up of Kyle Hoff, Torrey Law, Alex Saroki, and myself, utilized scripting techniques in a program called Grasshopper. Using this program, we were able to break down a doubly-curved surface into constituent points, line segments, and eventually hexagons. This process then gave us the ability to create this surface out of flat 18ga steel strips which were cut on a CNC abrasive waterjet. Constructing the form involved a highly organized process in which we carefully rolled and spot-welded each steel strip together, eventually forming the doublycurved surface we had initially created in Rhino.

John G. Simenic • Portfolio


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What is happening at the node?

Forces

Top of Page: Diagram of how a node works. Created using Rhino and Illustrator. Above: Early study models. Far Right: Diagram of our script. Created using Rhino and Illustrator. John G. Simenic • Portfolio

Double Curvature


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2.

1. Photos of our fabrication process: 1. CNC waterjet pieces from 18ga steel sheets. 2. Label each strip. 3. Remove each strip from the sheets. 4. Spot-weld each set of three strips into a node. 5. Spot-weld each node into a series of long nodal strips. 6. Spot-weld each nodal strip together. 7. Bolt final construct to custom fittings on plywood base.

5. John G. Simenic • Portfolio

6.


3.

4.

7. 29


John G. Simenic • Portfolio


Left: Photo of our final construct Right: Photos of custom steel fittings used to attach our construct to the plywood base.

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SCENT CAMERA #9 constructing a scent For the second project of my inital graduate semester, our studio was given a photo of a flower and asked to construct an 11”x 11”x 37” tall piece based on the image of a flower. We were also asked to think about the picture in terms of its possible olfactory capabilities, hence the title, Scent Camera. Given the ninth flower photo in a series of flower photos (shown right), I began to think about synergy and the relationship between the micro and the macro. When thinking about the photo in terms of a scent, I began to question the biological breakdown of the flower in terms of its cellular structure and its relation to the creation of scents and fragrances. How are the cellular blocks broken down and then reconfigured to create something similar and yet entirely different to the original configuration? My launch into this investigation focused on the creation of “cells,” or tiny hollow blocks, which I configured in layers and then stacked until I filled the project dimensions (initial study model shown on p34). From this study model, I began questioning the spatial configuration and the types of spaces that are created. I also noticed that using colored cardboard created very interesting secondary and tertiary spaces within the construct. When scaling up the study model for the final, I decided to use sheet metal due to its thinness and light reflecting qualities, which I thought would bring about that color and texture created within the cardboard study model. I also created a set of rules by which to construct the final piece: 1) I could use between 9 and 11, 2.5” cubes per layer in the construct. 2) I would only use only one method of joining via steelstud punch-crimper, which limited the possible methods of joining. Given these rules, I questioned what types of spaces could be created at different scales. In other words, I questioned how the construct would read from 25’, 10’, and less than 1’. John G. Simenic • Portfolio

Above: Flower image number 9. Far Right: sketch.

Early

conceptual


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Above Left: Early concept model made from empty cereal boxes and empty beer cases. Above Right: Final construct made from 24 gauge sheet steel and mylar. Construct measures 11”x 11”x 37.” Connections were made using a steel -stud crimping tool.

John G. Simenic • Portfolio


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John G. Simenic • Portfolio


Right: Reflection drawing based on reactions from final constructs. Created using Photoshop and Illustrator. Printed drawing measures 24�x 36.�

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INNOVATRIUM disrupting Dundee, Michigan Located on the outskirts of the newly developed Dundee, Michigan, the innovatrium seeks to enhance this location which contains Michigan’s largest tourist site, Cabela’s. With more than 6 million visitors per year, Cabela’s has spawned a small strip mall agglomeration that is entirely familiar, yet entirely alien to all who have never been to Dundee, Michigan. The innovatrium seeks to not only enhance Dundee but to extract data from flowers in order to create the flavors and fragrances of the future. The design for the innovatrium plays the game of the big-box store in the experience economy and at the same time denies it. The innovatrium projects forth images of flowers along its façade with gleaming light, playing the same game of the large bear statue and water tower that rest adjacent to Cabela’s. The innovatrium denies the big-box entrance typology though by being raised off the ground, offering no clear entrance. This sets up a disruptive contradiction where the innovatrium creates a large amount of attention yet is completely uninviting for any person yearning to visit. In terms of robotic design, the innovatrium contains extraction pods which are efficient clean-room spaces for robots to extract as many flavors and fragrances from flowers as possible. In a voracious capitalist economy where a 3% annual return is expected by shareholders, the extraction pods need to function at maximum capacity. Therefore human-interaction with these extraction pods is completely limited to a maintenance hatch in the event that a robot breaks down, and an exchange window, where humans can garner the yields of the robotic extraction pods.

John G. Simenic • Portfolio

Below: Early concept sketches Right: Early photomontage representing ideas behind the innovatrium. Created using Photoshop.


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John G. Simenic • Portfolio


The extraction pods also rest in a seemingly adhoc configuration on the site as if springing forth at random like wildflowers in a field, calling attention to themselves with their clumsy stance, denying the stratified strip-mall mentality of their surroundings. The rest of the innovatrium surrounds the extraction pods in a clumsy faceted manner, as if it is only there to house the extraction pods and maintain them. The interior of the innovatrium remains unfinished with exposed beams, wiring, and mechanical equipment strewn about, reinforcing the idea that the space surrounding the extraction pods exists in order to maintain maximum extraction and also reinforcing that this is not a place for the superconsumer.

Cabela’s

Innovatrium

site plan

Above: Siteplan showing the relationship of the innovatrium to Cabelas. Created using AutoCAD and Illustrator. Far Left: Rendering showing delivery of first extraction pod to the site. Created using Rhino and Photoshop. Left: Rendering of extraction pods during delivery phase. Created using Rhino and Photoshop.

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Open to Below

DN

UP

Open to Below

Open to Below

DN Open to Below

UP

L2

L1

floor plans

Weeping Wilow Tree FACTS & PERFROMANCE GENERAL MaximumLength Maximum Girth Growth Rate

70ft 0in (21.36m) 60ft (18.28m) 10ft/yr (3.1m/yr)

SUNLIGHT Weeping Willows grow best in full sunlight. 50’-70’

SOIL CONDITION Weeping willows grow easily in almost any soil conditions. They grow best in moist soil PERFORMANCE Weeping Willows grow primarily in the northern hemisphere. There are over 400 varieties, and are capable of cross-multipying with ease, constantly creating new species. Source: http://garden.lovetoknow.com/wiki/Weeping_Willow_Tree_Facts

John G. Simenic • Portfolio

scale 3/32” = 1’ 0

5

10

20


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Far Right: Detailed section of extraction pod showing the robot and the robot’s movement area. Created with AutoCAD and Illustrator. Below: Photos of ABS model (3d print) which measures roughly 3”x 5”x 4” tall.

John G. Simenic • Portfolio


29’-9”

24’-2”

6’- 9”

19’-2” 3’-10”

23’-5” 6’- 0”

5’ - 0”

5’- 4”

22’-1”

45’-0”

5’-9”

40’-6” 20

20’-5”

Extraction Pod

DESIGN, WEIGHTS, & PERFROMANCE GENERAL MaximumLength Maximum Girth Extraction Area*

4’-6”

11’-3”

45ft 0in (13.7m) 29ft 9in (9.1m) 1225.7sq. ft (113.9sq. m)

*based on surface area of cantilevered levels MATERIALITY Interior:epoxy resin paint Exterior: corten steel paneling Frame: steel GROUND CONNECTION Connection Diameter Depth Below Grade Connection below grade ...

4ft x 8ft panels .25in thick (1.21m x 2.84 m) 6.35mm thick

6ft 6in (1.98m) 2ft 7in (.8m)

EXTRACTION MECHANISM (KUKA robotics K120p-) See bb PERFORMANCE Operation Hours 24hrs Extraction Pods are completely prefabricated. Once placed on site and connected to the network, Extraction Pods are able to work around the clock without interuption. Any waste produced is collected in the bottom of the Pod and removed at regular intervals via maintenance/unloading hatch.

2’-7”

3’ -10”

aa

10’ -8” 6’ -6”

scale 1/4” = 1’ 0

5

10

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John G. Simenic • Portfolio


Above: Interior rendering from inside of an Extraction Pod looking out into the interior workspace. Created using Rhino and Photoshop. Far Left: Interior rendering showing workspace in relationship to Extraction Pods. Created using Rhino, Illustrator, and Photoshop.

L1

key plan

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key plan Right: Exterior rendering showing the Innovatrium projecting images at sunset. Created using Rhino, Photoshop, and Illustrator.

John G. Simenic • Portfolio


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John G. Simenic • Portfolio


UNDERGRADUATE WORK Miami University, 08.06 - 08.10

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CONFRONTATION WORKSHOP exploring communities in Istanbul.

The goal of the Confrontation Workshop was to address a diverse but largely impoverished neighborhood in Istanbul, Turkey. Working with Turkish design students, our studio sought to address the underlying cultural fabric that made up the neighborhood and adjacent neighborhoods, and after an in-depth study, design a community center that addressed the needs of the neighborhood. The neighborhood is located in an area that is between three layers of confrontation. Acting as a major line of confrontation to the east is the famous Istiklal Street which is an agglomeration of high-end and low-end shops and restaurants. Also lying to the east is a major line of cultural confrontation where many people from both eastern and western Turkey have settled creating a mixed community in terms of geographical, religious, and economic backgrounds. Acting as a physical barrier to the west is a six-lane street known as Tarlabasi Avenue which completely separates the adjacent neighborhoods.

Left: Early concept sketch. Right: Map of a small district in Istanbul, Turkey just north of the Golden Horn. John G. Simenic • Portfolio


line of physical confrontation

line of cultural confrontation

line of economic confrontation

the site

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John G. Simenic • Portfolio


My proposal was a community center that focused on weaving together the cultural fabric of the neighborhood into one gathering space that would bring together the diverse population of the surrounding neighborhoods. Left: Exterior perspective from street level. Created using a hand drawing underlay with Photoshop Top Right: Exterior perspective from raised entrance. Created using Revit. Bottom Right: East elevation

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Above: Longitudinal section through the community center. Created using Revit. Right: Rendering showing second floor gallery. Created using Revit and Photoshop.

John G. Simenic • Portfolio


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HICKMAN CHAPEL

reviving a chapel, a community, and a history.

After measuring, observing, and documenting Hickman Chapel for the Historic American Building Survey, our studio was asked to work individually and think of ways to refurbish the chapel into a space that would not only serve as a chapel but also as a community space for hosting homecoming events that were once a staple in the Mill Run community.

John G. Simenic • Portfolio

Above Left: sketches.

process

RIght: Longitudinal site section. Created using FormZ and Photoshop.


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Sitting just miles away from Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater, I began designing using the Froebel process. This involved using a kits of parts and establishing how design elements could be arranged with select site elements in the landscape. The overall design centered around refurbishing the basement into a useable community area. Within the design, a large outdoor hearth sets up a synergetic relationship between the interior and exterior spaces while sliding doors allow the space to completely open up to the environment. Warm, natural materials are also used to make the basement and patio blend into the landscape so that the stark white chapel remains the focal point of the hillside.

John G. Simenic • Portfolio

Above: Interior perspective created using FormZ and Photoshop. Right: Exterior perspective showing outdoor gathering terrace. Created using FormZ and Photoshop.


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Above: Transverse section looking out into the landscape. Created using FormZ and Photoshop. Right: Exterior perspective showing the outdoor terrace and addition. Created using FormZ and Photoshop. John G. Simenic • Portfolio


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GREEN COMMUNITIES COMPETITION the greenest brick is the one that is already there. The goal of the 2009 Green Communities Competition was to rethink current communities and their relationship with the environment. Our group, consisting of Alex Libengood, Sylvia Piszczor, Eric Sicks, Lauren Wetula, and myself sought to rethink a community in Cincinnati, Ohio known as Over-The-Rhine (OTR). Located adjacent to the downtown, OTR was once a flourishing community. Today, approximately 60% of the standing buildings are vacant, making a dense urban fabric that is not so dense at all. Using the concept that the greenest brick is the one that is already there, our group came up with ideas on how to preserve and reinvigorate a once thriving community that could set an example for communities to come. Looking at OTR as the focal point of the competition, our group examined Cincinnati on multiple scales while looking for opportunities to rethink sustainability in the community. Knowing that sustainability is not about small production systems, our group sought larger concepts on how OTR can function on a more sustainable level by working with the barebones of what is already there. In the end, our group ended up placing with an Honorable Mention in the competition and an article in Architectural Record.

Right: Final competition board #1 (original size: 20” x 20”). Our graphics were constructed using AutoCAD, PhotoShop, and Illustrator. Below: Site pictures of Over the Rhine in Cincinnati, Ohio.

John G. Simenic • Portfolio


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John G. Simenic • Portfolio


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John G. Simenic • Portfolio


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TECHTOWN

designing for the creative class. Resting on the banks of the Mad River and just blocks away from downtown Dayton, Ohio, Techtown is the site of a future business park which will eventually contain fifteen multi-functional, low-rise office buildings. Using an existing HOK masterplan, our studio, was asked to design an efficient office building for the rising creative class as defined by Richard Florida’s book The Rise of the Creative Class. Thinking in terms of efficiency and economy, I began the design process by coming up with a simple kit of parts that consisted of a simple cube and simple 1:2 and 1:3 proportions. Working from this kit of rectangular parts I began to play with ideas of framing and movement. The result is three major forms; a tall central form and two rectangular forms that intersect and slip past and through the central form.

Above: Building parti Above Left: Early sketch perspective

process

Right: Rendered perspective of southwest corner. Created using FormZ and Photoshop John G. Simenic • Portfolio


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John G. Simenic • Portfolio


Far Left: Floor plans. Created using AutoCAD and Illustrator Bottom Left: Longitudinal section. Created using AutoCAD and Illustrator. Above: Rendered perspectives. Created using FormZ and Photoshop

The central form functions as the circulation core, while the two adjacent rectangular forms serve as tenant spaces. Working from a simple palette of materials I sought to express each form with a distinctive material so as to create a compelling spatial composition. I also wanted the tenants to have a sense of connection to the downtown area, the Mad River, and the outdoor environment. A large fenestrated southwest facade serves the function of connecting the tenants to downtown, while large cut-out patios provide connections not only to the outdoors but framed views to downtown Dayton and the Mad River.

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West Elevation

East Elevation

Above: East and west elevations. Created using AutoCAD and Photoshop. Right: Rendered perspective. Created using FormZ and Photoshop.

John G. Simenic • Portfolio


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SELECTED WORKS paintings and graphite.

Left: Graphite drawing of the Kanyon Mall in Istanbul, Turkey. Original rendering is 8”x12”. Right: Close-up view of the Kanyon Mall graphite rendering.

John G. Simenic • Portfolio


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Below: The Whirling Dervishes. A series of 3 x 8”x10” acryllic paintings. Right: Close-up of the center dervish painting.

John G. Simenic • Portfolio


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Below: Der Fortschritt, “The Progress”. 18”x24” acryllic painting completed with Ben Romero and Lauren Wetula. Right: Close-up of Der Fortschritt.

John G. Simenic • Portfolio


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CONTACT John G. Simenic 507 S. 5th Ave. Apt#3 Ann Arbor, MI 48104 Email: john.simenic@gmail.com Phone: 440.223.2620

John G. Simenic • Portfolio

Portfolio  

Portfolio of my work from Miami University and The University of Michigan