Joy of Medina County Magazine March 2023

Page 1

HEY, IS THAT YOUR NEIGHBOR?

Inventive minds at work!

Pg. 12

NO ESCAPE

Wondering how a blocked caller got through? We know how.

Pg. 20

HOPPING THE BUNNY TRAIL

The Easter, bunny, eggs, dinosaurs and more!

Pg. 30

Community For All

MARCH 2023 VOLUME 6, NUMBER 2
A locally owned, independent publication dedicated to higher standards of journalism
Home ownership can be an elusive equalizer for those in the disabled community, but Lisa Morrison is working to hand them the key to independence and dreams come true. PG. 4

OneVoice

Bullies and Forgiving

If someone who bullied you very badly over several years somehow came back into your life, what would you do?

What if this were compounded by the fact that they not only never made an effort to apologize or prove they have changed, but still sent you a friend request through social media?

I know many who would say forgive and forget, several who would say that the bully forgot (there is no evidence of that) so the victim should let it go, and yet others who would say that the friend request is evidence enough of a change of heart.

It also could be said that since the bullying was decades ago, it should be set aside.

I disagree. Forgiving the bully and never holding them responsible for the damage they caused is not acceptable.

Just because something happened long ago, does not mean it did not happen.

By simply “forgetting” and now trusting this person will be different this time is dishonoring the self that was abused and never got validation, apologies or acknowledgment.

Far too often bullies get away with the abuse they dish out, and then, if met once again when adults, their former victims are expected to let bygones be bygones.

I am all for forgiveness, but not for the bully.

The forgiveness should be for those who were bullied forgiving themselves for being bullied.

It is not the fault of the bullied that bullying happens, it is the broken part inside the bully that is.

Responsibility of earning, yes, earning, forgiveness falls on the shoulders of the bully.

It also is the responsibility of the bully to mend themselves, to become better people, and to work to make amends to those they hurt, no matter how long ago.

To those who bullied me, know that I forgave myself long ago for being your victim, but you have done nothing to earn forgiveness from me.

To those who currently are being bullied, I know it is the hardest thing in the world to understand and believe right now, but take this from someone who was where you are and who almost did not survive.

Know that every single minute you continue onward and continue to be yourself, you defeat the bullies. While they focus all of their energy on hate and abuse, focus yours on what you love to do.

One day you will be successful and respected in whatever field of expertise you choose. When that day comes, look at where your bullies ended up. You will see they never grew to be more than what they were.

VOLUME 6 NUMBER 2

JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com

PUBLISHER

Blake House Publishing, LLC

EDITOR

Amy Barnes

LAYOUT DESIGN

Tyler Hatfield IT SUPPORT

Sara Barnes

Tyler Hatfield

PHOTOGRAPHERS

FlashBang Photography

CARTOONIST

Jerry King

CONTRIBUTORS

Bob Arnold

Kelly Bailey

Katrina Barnes

D.J. Barnett

Paris Deeter

Tyler Hatfield

Bryan Lefelhoc

Mary Olson

Chris Pickens

Michelle Riley

Rachel Shepard

Robert Soroky

Kent Von Der Vellen

MASCOT

Rico Houdini

ADVERTISING SALES AND OFFICE

330-461-0589

EMAIL

Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com

WEBSITE

JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com

Learn more about the staff at Behind The Scenes

Open positions are listed on the website at Open Positions

JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256. It is distributed as an e-edition and in a print edition. Both editions can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com

Copyright 2023 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.

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2 Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2023 Editorial

Contents

CREATING HOME

Lisa Morrison is dedicated to creating a way for disabled people to invest in home ownership rather than renting.

THE READING NOOK SEASONS

Traveling through the year

BUSINESS

THE NETWORKER A NETWORKING FABLE

A tale with a lesson on sharing APPLAUSE!

Celebrating local new hires, promotions, certifications earned, and announcements.

FROM A TECHNICAL MIND TECHNICALLY CLEANING

Add a robot and cleaning can present whole new challenges.

INVENTION CONVENTION

Patents recently granted to Medina County residents.

RISE AND SHINE

WOULD YOU WANT YOU FOR A BOSS?

Quitting a job to start a business does not mean there is no longer a boss.

DOING BUSINESS

A calendar of area networking events

THE INBOX VISION STATEMENTS UNIFY, SET TONE

Sharing the reason your business exists and what it is trying to accomplish can help achieve the goal.

HOME AND GARDEN

16 17 18 19

CRITTER CRAWL THE OTHER HISSING PET

Looking for an easy care, low-maintenance personal or classroom pet?

VEGAN VITTLES

BANANA WALNUT CHOCOLATE CHIP MUFFINS

A no-egg version of an old classic HEALTH OF MIND AND BODY RELATIONSHIP RED FLAGS

Trust your instincts and watch for these warning signs.

HEALTHY TRAILS SAFETY: THE BIKE

In Part 2, bike safety and maintenance are the focus.

COMMUNITY

GEMS PROTECTING DISABLED CHILDREN FROM ABUSE

The wide range of disabilities and how they affect individual children makes it challenging to teach self-protection.

WATCHDOG GLITCH ALLOWS BLOCKED CALLERS THROUGH

Wondering how that blocked caller still got through? It is easier than you would think.

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

OFF THE SHELF SEARCH FOR LOVE YIELDS MORE by Mary

A chance meeting 60 years ago inspires a hunt for what is missing.

GETTING REEL NEVER STOP FIGHTING by Amy

Action is worth plot holes, if you do not mind jumping over them.

MOVIE TIME BOX

Tired of converting movie minutes to hours and minutes?

JOYFUL WORD SEARCH WITH FRIENDS

Find the words of Lisa Morrison’s life.

MIRTH AND JOY by Jerry King

Our monthly cartoon

LET’S DO IT!

Time to spring with the daffodils!

JOYFUL LETTER DETECTIVES

DIG IT!

JEEPERS CREEPERS

Add a splash of color with a perennial that likes to bloom the distance.

Read the clue, collect the magnifying glass letters, and solve the puzzle!

HERE AN EGG, THERE AN EGG

Find local egg hunts!

CELEBRATE!

A clickable directory of vetted businesses who bring you Joy!

On the front and back covers: photos by Amy Barnes
Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2023 3 ? 4 4 10 11 12 13 14 15
Lisa Morrison is working to create homes and independence.
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Creating Home

There have been a lot of surprises in Lisa Morrison’s life, and she has learned to ride out the waves and to appreciate the times of calm. She grew up in Brook Park, as did her husband, Jim Morrison, until he was 12 when his family

moved to Columbia Station. Even though they are the same age, they did not meet until they were 25, Lisa said. Well, that is what they thought until Jim’s mother pulled out an old picture. The picture was of Safety Town, a program to

4 Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2023
photo by Amy Barnes

teach safety to schoolchildren. She pointed out Jim in the photo, and Lisa was stunned to see herself in the same photo, right in front of Jim.

The first meeting that Lisa and Jim remember is from when they were 25. Jim was a singer and songwriter for the band Jericho Turnpike and one of the venues they played at was Peabody’s Down Under in the Cleveland Flats.

Lisa was a bartender at Peabody’s and she caught on quick that the nights Jericho Turnpike performed were sell-out nights, and she could depend on great tips.

One thing led to another, and the two started dating.

At the time, Lisa was living in Tremont and eventually Jim joined her there; they married in 1977.

When they were expecting their first child, they moved to Rocky River and found they were quickly

growing their family with the addition of two more children.

In 2004, the Morrisons moved to Medina because they needed a bigger house.

“When I was growing up, Medina was all farm,” Lisa said, noting how much Medina has changed.

Having three disabled kids was challenging and Lisa said she was too tired and overwhelmed with childcare to make any more big decisions. She told Jim to just go find a house for them.

She said Jim picked Medina because he knew of it and thought it would be a good place to raise kids.

“He’s my rock, I couldn’t have done all of this without him,” Lisa said.

While Jim is in technology sales, Lisa was a supervisor in a research facility for child and adolescent psychiatry.

Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2023 5
continued, Page 6
An artistic rendering of Autumn Bridge Crossing, Lisa Morrison’s proposed pocket community for disabled adults where they would own their own homes. photo provided

continued from Page 5

At first, she took a leave of absence to have her first child, and then tried to return part time, but as quickly as she got pregnant again, it became too much.

She found work as a medical writer and contacted area colleges to become a teacher at Tri-C, the University of Akron, Lorain County Community College, and North Central State College.

With a background in psychology, her research was focused on children with mental issues. So, while Lisa realized there was something different with her children, she could not quite put her finger on what it was.

The children were finally diagnosed as autistic when they were between 3 and 4 years old. She said that back then the schools were hesitant to offer any diagnoses.

Lisa said that Jim is the perfect dad for their kids, he is very patient and understands them very well and also was always great entertainment for them.

“He just always knows what to do with them,” she said, “It was easy for them to be easy with him.”

Lisa served for seven years on the board for the Medina County Board of Developmental Disabilities because her kids were receiving services there and she wanted to give back.

As the years went on, Lisa became increasingly aware of gaps in the services provided for disabled children, such as day programming ending by 3

p.m., making it challenging for working parents to provide care.

She also noticed shortfalls in social outlets as disabled children aged out of the care system and became adults. With her husband’s support, Lisa founded Integrated Community Solutions and started offering social and art programs such as art groups, bingo, yoga, game and movie nights, a 5k running team, hayrides, apple picking, with more activities added as opportunity arises.

For disabled people who are interested, Lisa has volunteer opportunities where participants can learn employable skills.

Access the Arts also has helped with a couple of events, Lisa said.

“Our social program took off with a bang and spoke to a need,” Lisa said.

It was obvious to her that a community built for the needs of disabled individuals also was needed. Not one where they would rent homes, but instead own them and build independence and equity.

She also noticed a gap in educational opportunities for parents and wanted to help provide information on financial planning, Medicare, Social Security benefits, and other aid that is available.

Caregiver support is offered by ICS through various educational seminars.

Lisa said the question that keeps parents of disabled adults awake at night is: What will happen to their child when the parents are no longer able to

6 Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2023
Artist rendering of what the proposed homes within Autumn Bridge Crossing would look like. photo provided

take care of them?

When envisioning the future she would like for her children, she pictured them in homes where they could age in place, surrounded by family and friends, in a home they owned themselves, would build equity in, and could take pride in.

Through ICS, Lisa is planning to build exactly that. She currently is looking for land to develop a “pocket community” for disabled adults and their caregivers.

When Lisa looked around Ohio and did not find a community like what she envisioned, she looked at other states and found they had models that worked.

She became determined to create the first such model in Ohio.

While they may not yet have land, they do have a name for the proposed community: Autumn Bridge Crossing.

It is a name that Lisa is happy to explain.

The name comes from autumn, because it is a time of year with vibrant colors.

“Our participants are very vibrant and full of beauty, so autumn is a season that makes me think of them,” Lisa explains.

“Bridge” represents the supportive structure of a community, and “Crossing” represents crossing into a life of independence, with the goal of each person having as much independence as possible.

Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2023 7 continued, Page 8
Art Group: from left, Kevin Richards, Hannah Petrovich, Jacob Workman, and Luke Workman. photo provided Running Team: Coach Andy Sharp and Olivia Morrison. photo provided Walk and Roll Group: from left, Noah Morrison; Angelisa Sisson; Laura and daughter Elaina Gehlman; Olivia Morrison; Mark and his parents,Tom and Sharon Menyes; and Ben Morrison. photo provided

continued from Page 7

“My hope is that once we are up and running, people in other areas of Ohio look to this as a model,” she said.

She said no reservations are being accepted yet, but there already is talk of having more than one pocket community in the area.

Lisa is focusing on the first one for now. The plan is for the homes to be one, two or three bedroom in a condo style. ICS would own the land and exterior and thus be responsible for maintenance. There would be 25 to 35 homes, with the inside walls owned by the residents.

There would be a road that would circle the outside of the community, with a center courtyard area for residents to safely enjoy the outdoors. Plans include a community enrichment center with an art studio, a tech lab and a kitchen where activities and classes would be held. The space would be open for use to other groups in the area. Communal dining would be offered twice a week, Lisa said.

She added that a meal prep service for residents would be ideal, where they could pick up packages of uncooked food that could be easily prepared.

It would be an integrated community made up of residents of various levels of ability and caregivers and friends. Lisa said she already has been approached by a retired nurse and retired schoolteachers who are interested in living there and helping other residents.

“If you collaborate and pool your resources, you can meet a lot more needs,” Lisa pointed out.

It was her desire to ensure that not only her three now-adult children would have a place to call their own and be independent to the highest degree possible, but also for the same opportunity be available to other disabled individuals in the area.

“This is something we all want for our kids,” Lisa said. “I have no doubt that this is going to happen,”

This year, ICS will be kicking off its capital campaign, and Lisa said she wants to meet with anyone who can help make the dream a reality and add to their base of 10 volunteers.

“I want to be a good partner with the community,” she said.

While the long-term plan is for ICS to have a paid staff, Lisa said it will be all volunteer for several years yet. She plans to serve as the first community director and will do so for as long as she is needed. “As long as I am drawing breath, why not?”

8 Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2023
Yoga in action! From left: Nicholas Jackson; Olivia Morrison; Ashley Trojan balances on one foot with her hands above her head; in back is Coach Kara Wolff balancing on one foot while Molly Mzik is waving from the back. Front and center is Veronica Hamilton showing her great balance while Elaina Gehlman stands next to her. Behind Gehlman, Angelisa Sisson is enjoying the class with Alyssa Grimes in back. In front, Avery Zupanc presses her hands together while care provider Julie (last name unavailable) stretches, and Jacob Doubrava concentrates in the front. photo provided

One of the many activities that ICS hosts: Art Group. photos provided

Anyone interested in volunteering, donating funds or supplies, or who would like to participate in ICS programs can contact Lisa Morrison directly at 216-280-7755 or by emailing her at info@ics-oh.org. To learn more about the program, visit https://www. ics-oh.org/ or https://bit.ly/4266Qbn

Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2023 9
Angelisa Sisson Patrick Olah, who acts as the DJ for the art group, and Lisa Morrison Becca Piero Fiona Moore Katelyn D’Attoma Molly Mzik Hanna Petrovich and Kevin Richards Rachel, Ben and Joshua Phillips

Seasons

January, February, In the midst of Winter’s freeze. The days are cold, the nights are long, Snow and ice hang in bare trees.

Winter’s cold gives way to March winds, They blow wild with no relent. It roars in like a fierce lion, A meek lamb when it is spent.

With April comes the Springtime rains, Gently fall and warm the earth. Life’s cycle all begins once more, It’s renewal and rebirth.

In May the skies begin to shine, The bright flowers, sweet perfume. The farmers till and plant their fields, And prepare their crops to bloom.

Comes now June, July and August, The hot Summer months are here. Picnics, cookouts, Fourth of July, Our cares soon all disappear.

September comes, it brings the Fall, The kids all rush back to class. Farmers prepare, their final chore, Harvest time is here at last.

October’s here, the leaves soon fall, The air has a pleasant chill. Pumpkins and spooks and costumed kids, With Trick or Treat bags to fill.

November’s a time for family, Come by airplane, bus or car. To share, give thanks for all we have, Gather from near and from far.

December’s finally upon us, A time you might shed a tear. Christmas is done, New Years Eve as, We look back on the past year.

THE READING NOOK 10 Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2023
photo by Tomoko Uji D.J. Barnett lives in Hinckley with his wife, April; his son, Robert; and daughter, Skylar. He is 1975 graduate of Highland High School and recently retired from Century Cycle’s Medina location after being there for 20 years. He enjoys cycling and other outdoor activities.

A Networking Fable

There was once this book. It was called “The Network!”

As a man read it, he would become sad and disoriented.

He started seeing that as he did things to be liked, he became sadder.

This made him mad and perplexed, especially since he saw the book’s affect everywhere.

“How could it be?” he would say.

“The secret is not in what you do,” said the book. “It’s in what you share. When you meet someone and you are on different wavelengths, it is obvious, and you feel it right away. However, if the two of you hit a chord where you both can relate; now the game is on fire!”

The man looked questioningly at the book and said, “So, if I want friends, all I need to do is fake an interest in what they are talking about?”

“That’s one approach, and you may get along for a while, but there will come a time when it will be very obvious that you have no real interest in the topic.”

The man’s face got red, and he fumed, “But you said it was about what we share!”

The book turned a page and revealed, “Networking does not depend upon things; its real power is in how two people can connect over a topic. It is a mindset that is already programmed within each of them and when they meet, they connect, and they do not even realize why. They are too busy talking and laughing about how engulfed each of them are in some topic.”

“So,” the man reasoned, “I should just relax and simply find a topic or sport or activity that each of us is into and dig into that for a while.”

The book turned another page and there was a smile, “When the two of you connect over something you each love,

you will find that referrals, business and fun will all come together as you two bond over the common interest.”

This is the simple power of networking!

The man quickly found that it worked and his time at networking events became pleasurable and enchanting.

Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at https://amzn.to/2KSy3Xm. Learn more about Arnold at https://bit.ly/3VLzr1S Contact Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com

ApplAuse!

New hires, promotions, certifications earned, and announcements

Congratulations to local agent Thomas Muntean and American Family Insurance for recent recognition for best policies and customer satisfaction. Their life insurance policies were recognized by Nerd Wallet as one of best policies for children in 2023. Then, for the second year in a row, the company was named to the list of Forbes America’s Best Insurance Companies, earning recognition in every product category. All of which helps to show why Muntean is one of our gold-star advertisers.

Has your business or an employee done something that should get applause or does your nonprofit have an announcement? E-mail the information to Joy@ BlakeHousePublishing.com and put “Applause” in the subject line.

Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2023 11 BUSINESS: THE NETWORKER

BUSINESS: FROM A TECHNICAL MIND Technically Cleaning

With spring on the horizon and warmer temperatures hopefully in sight, thoughts turn toward the yearly tradition of spring cleaning.

To usher in a new season, some may have bought or received a robot vacuum in recent months.

While robot vacuums can be extremely helpful in cleaning floors, some simple tips and tricks can make a world of difference in how effective they can be.

For vacuums capable of mapping rooms and layouts, it is very important to ensure floors and doorways are as clear as possible, especially during the initial mapping phase.

Any spots missed during this time may be ignored later, even when clear.

It is also important to note that not all robot vacuums are created equal and some may struggle with switching between types of floors or areas that have different heights.

Robots that cannot map or “see” with a camera come with a special set of challenges.

These vacuums require some aid to clean larger areas effectively.

For general day-to-day dust and dirt, their bounce-aroundrandom pattern may be enough. If you find that a smaller room or section needs more focused cleaning, sectioning the area off by closing doors or putting furniture in the way of exits can help.

It also is important to remember that many of these machines cannot detect obstacles with great precision. Because of this, watching out for pet waste, large puddles and things small enough to vacuum up but large enough that they get stuck is a must.

Using these tricks and replacing consumable parts like brushes and filters appropriately can help avoid most of the common complaints of being a new robot vacuum owner.

Tyler Hatfield has a passion for technology and enjoys working on computers. To learn more about Hatfield, go to https://bit.ly/3Qr0LkH He can be contacted with questions and for recommendations at hatsmediagroup@gmail.com

Invention Convention

Patents recently granted to Medina County residents. Only county residents are included, although there may be additional people listed as patent grantees.

Patent for: Phasing Mechanism With Roller Ramps

To: Chris Luipold

City of Residence: Wadsworth

Patent for: Product Management Display System

To: Stephen N. Hardy

City of Residence: Wadsworth

Patent for: Product Management Display System With Trackless Pusher Mechanism

To: Stephen N. Hardy

City of Residence: Wadsworth

Patent for: Method of Forming Planetary Carrier Assembly

To: Justin Persinger

City of Residence: Wadsworth

Patent for: Sandwich (heart design)

To: Alain M. Marec

City of Residence: Medina

Patent for: Jamb Spray Mixes Including Fused Silica and Methods of Utilizing the Mixes

To: Lynn G. McGregor City of Residence: Brunswick

Patent for: Muntin Assembly and Method of Manufacture

To: William A. Briese

City of Residence: Hinckley

Patent for: Constant-On Double Coast Engagement Diaphragm Spring

To: Franco Filice

City of Residence: Medina

Patent for: Method for Detecting Anomalies on or in a Surface

To: Joseph C. Cobb

City of Residence: Medina

Patent for: System and Method for Beverage Line Cleaning

To: Justin Carson, Arthur J. Geigel III, and Christopher Armenio

City of Residence: Medina

Patent for: Torque Converter Assembly Including Thrust Washer

To: Joshua Verdier

City of Residence: Lodi

Patent for: Torque Converter With Balanced Turbine Thrust Loading

To: John Volcansek

City of Residence: Medina

Patent for: Wireless Sensor With Beacon Technology

To: Kevin Darrah

City of Residence: Medina

To: Kelvin L. Knipl Jr.

City of Residence: Litchfield

12 Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2023
photo by Pavel Neznanov

Would You Want You for a Boss?

Employees get to complain about the boss. That is sort of a baked-in “perk.” After a long day, the dinner table conversation might sound like this:

Husband: “Hi, honey, how was your day?’

Wife: “Oh, boy, my boss was on me all day. He just doesn’t get it.”

When considering leaving the workforce as an employee and becoming a boss in your own business, that conversation goes a little differently..

Husband: “Hi, honey, how was your day?’

Wife: “Oh boy, my boss was on me all day. He just doesn’t get it.”

Husband: “Um, aren’t you the boss?”

Which begs the question: If you are the boss, whom do you complain to?

Owning a business or being an entrepreneur means wearing a lot of hats: the line worker, the accountant, the salesperson and the customer services specialist. You also carry the roles of manager, boss and owner.

You are accountable to yourself for all roles.

Being your own boss means you have to boss yourself around. Can you do it?

Not feeling well today? Who do you call to call off work? Who will do the work if you are not there?

Running late? Maybe the manager will not know that you clocked in a few minutes behind schedule. Wait, she already knows! She is you!

Taking a vacation this year? Usually, your boss gives you a handbook with the number of days you can use and how you can use them. Perhaps there is a form to fill out or authorization to request.

But now? If you are the boss, it is up to you. Maybe the boss will not let you go!

Finally, as the owner, the money that comes in belongs to you. Depending on how you have set up your business, managing your personal money and your business money can be an issue. It might go something like this:

You: “Boss, I think I need a raise”

You: “No, I think you do not”

You: “Fine, I quit”

You: “No, you will not”

Some people think owning their own business means never having to answer to the boss again. Think twice.

You need to be able to motivate yourself, correct yourself, be demanding of yourself and be willing to work for someone like you.

It becomes hard to complain about the boss when the boss is you.

Bryan Lefelhoc is founder and president of Bryan Media Strategies LLC, a boutique “company of one” marketing firm. Learn more about Lefelhoc and his expertise at https://bit.ly/3FqMBfl Email Lefelhoc at bryan@bryanmediastrategies.com

Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2023 13 BUSINESS: RISE AND SHINE

Doing Business

Local business networking events, not category restricted

Greater Medina Chamber of Commerce Chamber membership requirement after two events.

Wednesday, March 15

Networking WOW! 8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m., Williams on the Lake, 787 Lafayette Road, Medina. No walk-ins. $12 member attendance charge, $15 non-member attendance charge. Register at https://bit.ly/3Jx1pv3

Thursday, March 16

Medina County Young Professionals Association: Speed Networking, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., The Tangled Vine, 3511 Center Road, Brunswick. Register at https://bit. ly/3YNPSMo

Friday, March 24

Chamber Chat, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m., Medina Chamber, 211 S. Court Street, Medina. Coffee and networking. https://bit. ly/3ZXFT7T

Tuesday, April 4

Monthly Luncheon: Something to Look Forward To, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Williams on the Lake, 787 Lafayette Road, Medina. Register at https://bit.ly/3YzKpZm

Northern Medina County Chamber Alliance Chamber membership requirement after two events.

Wednesday, March 15

Monthly Luncheon: Alternative Workforce Solutions and Strategies, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Diamond Event Center, 1480 Pearl Road, Brunswick. Members $25, nonmembers $30. Register at https://bit.ly/3Ffjxad

Wednesday, March 22

NMCCA Membership After Hours Social, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., The Courthouse, 1255 N. Carpenter Road, Brunswick. Register at https://bit.ly/3ZMz2Pi

Wednesday, April 5

Chamber Chomps, 7 a.m. to 2 p.m., The Tangled Vine, 3511 Center Road, Brunswick

Wadsworth Area Chamber of Commerce Chamber membership requirement after two events.

Tuesday, March 21

Member Coffee, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m., Wadsworth Chamber, 132A Main Street, Wadsworth. Free. Register at https:// bit.ly/3mIVSbJ

Thursday, March 23

Mochas and Mentors, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m., Community Room, Soprema Senior Center, 617 School Drive, Wadsworth. Register at https://bit.ly/3l6VymJ

Wednesday, March 29

Luncheon: Easter Basket Scholarship Auction, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., The Galaxy Restaurant Banquet Center, 201 Park Centre Drive, Wadsworth. $20 Register at https://bit.ly/428UKP4

Monday, April 3

Women in Leadership: Let’s Talk About Your Content, noon to 1 p.m., Community Room, Soprema Senior Center, 617 School Drive, Wadsworth. Register at https:// bit.ly/3YzLYGE

Seville Area Chamber of Commerce

Thursday, April 13

Quarterly Luncheon, 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m., Hawthorne Suites, 5025 Park Avenue West, Seville. $8 donation, pay at the door.

BUSINESS: THE INBOX Vision Statements Unify, Set Tone

Every great leader throughout history has had a vision. For example, Susan B Anthony had a vision that every woman in the United States would have the right to vote. Martin Luther King envisioned a world where his children would not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

Just like societal leaders start with a vision, most company founders and business owners start their businesses with a dream or vision. This vision is their reason for continuing; it is their primary purpose.

If the company you own does not have a vision or mission statement, there is no better time to create one than now.

The vision should answer the following questions: Why did you start the business in the first place? Why are you passionate about your product or service? What problem are you trying to solve? What impact are you trying to make? Starting with a vision helps us define our long-term goals.

Once our vision for the company has been established, it is important that this vision be shared among everyone within the organization.

When a shared vision is defined within a company, it helps everyone feel as if they are working toward a common goal.

A vision often reflects the core values of an organization. Employees buy into visions that align with their personal values.

A powerful vision statement is short, positive, specific, and motivating. There are several great examples of vision statements, and you will usually find them on company websites, with their logos, even in email signatures.

The most successful companies have a clear mission and vision that their employees believe in; this creates connection and a common goal. A shared vision is unifying.

Some of your employees will believe in your vision from the start. These vision ambassadors will help leadership cultivate buy-in from other employees. Once the vision statement is defined, share it with the world!

Rachel Shepard is the founder of LonaRock, LLC, and a Medina County resident. She specializes in helping businesses understand financials and access capital. Learn more about Shepard at https://bit.ly/3h0LFEY Shepard can be reached by email at rshepard@lonarock.com

14 Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2023

HOME AND GARDEN: DIG IT! Jeepers Creepers!

Creeping phlox (Phlox subulata) is for every garden. It comes in varieties that bloom from late spring through early summer and keeps the garden floor dancing with color.

Thriving in moist, well-drained soils, they can take quite a beating once firmly rooted. Truly enjoying full sun, their native brethren the Phlox stolonifera will tolerate partial shade.

Color combos such as flaming red, pure white, soft pink, and blushing coral crown the subulata family. Dra eye or misty blue.

Being an early bloomer, they are adored by an array of pollinators such as the swallowtail butterfly and early arriving hummingbirds.

Unlike their counterpart, the tall garden phlox (Phlox paniculata), deer will usually not bother with them and rabbits find them too tough for their palette.

Proper air circulation helps to prevent the onset of powdery mildew and too wet of an environment becomes an invitation for a slug banquet.

Creeping phlox is typically very flexible in hostile environments and normally a pest or mildew becomes the reason the plant may collapse.

Monitoring the phlox patch periodically can help to prevent a detrimental incident from occurring.

With a spread from 2 to 3 feet, it is a perfect perennial for the rock garden, hillside borders, planters, or to drape over raised beds.

Blooming for weeks on end, this plant becomes completely covered in blossoms. Once the bloom has finished, 4- to 6-inch deeply textured, mounding green foliage remains. A great alternative to the usual erosion control as it can dress any steep bank. Late spring to early fall blooming pansies (viola tricolor var. hortensis) mix well with creeping phlox for a striking display of bloom.

Hyacinth blooms before the phlox and can be planted underneath the foliage of the phlox to create a succession of bloom. Add perennial allium or daylily (Hemeracalis) for a later blossom, creating a baton passing of the blooms within a single space.

Creeping phlox is to a perennial garden what bread is to a sandwich, it is just not the same without it.

Michelle Riley is a local horticulturist, landscape designer, and consultant. She is the founder of the gardening subscription service, https://theplantmall.com; https:// michellerileyhorticulturist.com; and https://neohiogarden. com. She also is the president of All About You Signature Landscape Design, Inc. Learn more about Riley at https://bit.ly/3BavKLk Riley can be contacted at Info@ MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com or by calling 234-678-8266.

Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2023 15
B photo by Michelle Riley

HOME AND GARDEN: CRITTER CRAWL!

The Other Hissing Pet

Madagascar hissing cockroaches can be interesting and unique pets.

While many people tend to cringe at the thought of purposefully keeping cockroaches in their homes, these fascinating animals are filled with character.

Unlike other insects, they hiss by expelling air through tiny holes in the sides of their abdomens.

It is fairly simple to set up an enclosure for hissers.

Needed materials and supplies are:

• A tank, preferably at least 10 gallons in size

Like with any other animal, more space is better! A 10-gallon enclosure allows for a temperature gradient in the enclosure, allowing the cockroaches to better control their temperature and they are less likely to overheat that way.

• Petroleum jelly

These cockroaches can climb glass. A petroleum jelly barrier is the first line of defense against preventing escapes.

Line the top inch or two of the tank’s glass with a solid layer of petroleum jelly.

• A fine mesh lid

This is a second line of defense against escapes, in case they get past the petroleum jelly.

• A heat source and thermostat

This can either be a reptile heat pad, ceramic heat emitter, deep heat projector, reptile heat lamp, etc. Remember to keep the heat source connected to a thermostat, otherwise, the hissers can overheat and die.

Always ensure that any heat sources are out of reach of children and other pets to avoid fires or injury.

• Hides

Hides offer a sense of security, and should always be offered, no matter the species.

• Food

This can range from fish flakes to specialty food made by breeders to organic fruits and vegetables.

Hissing cockroaches benefit from having a variety of food in their diet. If you feed fruits and vegetables, always feed them organic. Inorganic foods have pesticides and can kill your roaches.

• And of course, at minimum, a pair of cockroaches

These cockroaches are a communal species from Madagascar. Because of that, they need to be housed in pairs at a minimum.

I highly recommend getting two males, as any adult females that have been introduced to males can and will produce offspring over and over again without the males present.

When set up right, this species is a fun and easy pet!

For more information, visit Oklahoma State University at https://tinyurl.com/2wxs58sv and the Oregon Metro Zoo at https://tinyurl.com/4bwj3773

Paris Deeter lives in Brunswick and has raised a wide variety of critters from spiders to rats. She welcomes questions and column suggestions, which can be sent to Joy@ BlakeHousePublishing.com with “Critter Crawl” in the subject line.

Inclusion Counts!

Medina County board of developmental disabilities

Working together today to grow a more inclusive tomorrow!

From the time a person is born with a developmental disability until the end of their life, the MCBDD is here to help them through life’s challenges. We help people by providing services, resources and opportunities to be involved, valued and included in the community.

16 Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2023
330-725-7751 • www.mcbdd.org
We Provide: Early Intervention Services • Educational Services • Employment Services • Community Inclusive Living • Family Resources • Funding MARCH IS DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITY AWARENESS MONTH
Hissing cockroaches enjoying their colony. photo by Amy Barnes

Banana Walnut Chocolate Chip Muffins

This recipe can be plain banana muffins by leaving out the walnuts and chocolate chips, though you will be glad, if not delighted to leave them in, I am certain of it!

• 1 tablespoon flaxseed

• 3 tablespoons water

• 4 ripened bananas, mashed

• 1/4 cup oil

• 1/2 cup date syrup or cane sugar

• 1 teaspoon vanilla

• 1 1/4 cups flour

• 1 teaspoon baking powder

• 1/4 teaspoon salt

• 1 teaspoon baking soda

• handful of chopped walnuts

• handful of chocolate chips

Preheat oven to 350° F. Mix flaxseed and water. Add bananas, oil, cane or date syrup (depending on which one you prefer), vanilla, flour, baking powder, salt, and baking soda. After they are mixed together, gently fold in walnuts and chocolate chips. Pour batter equally into 12-muffin tin. Bake. Check at 35 minutes and every 5 minutes after that until they are golden brown on top. If date syrup was used, for a more accurate test for doneness, insert knife into a muffin, and when it comes out clean, muffins are done! Let cool and enjoy!

Note: The flaxseed and water act as an egg replacement. If you use date syrup, the batter will appear brown even before baking.

Chris Pickens, a vegan since 2016, is a certified holistic nutrition coach, a health and wellness coach, a holistic health practitioner, and a holistic health coach. To learn more about Pickens, go to https://bit.ly/3FqhEId Email her at momof4chris@gmail.com, with “The Joy of Medina Attn: Chris” in the subject line.

Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2023 17 HOME AND GARDEN:
VEGAN VITTLES
Y

Relationship Red Flags

We have all been there. Maybe it was a friend. Maybe it was a love interest. But most of us have been involved in a less-than-ideal relationship at some point.

I try to refrain from using the word “toxic” because I think most troubled relationships occur between good people who simply are not a great match (see special note at the end). While it can be hard while in a bad relationship to recognize what is happening, there are potential red flags to watch for, listed here from the more minor to the more important ones.

6. The relationship is “off and on.” This often occurs after the “honeymoon phase” of a relationship is over, in both friend and romantic relationships.The push-pull feeling may be exciting, but inconsistent behavior in a relationship is harmful.

5. The more time you spend with them, the less safe you feel. As a relationship deepens there should be growing mutual respect, intimacy and comfort. Emotional safety is critical to healthy relationships.

4. You feel “off.” This is difficult because it is usually a vague feeling that you cannot explain rationally to another person. You simply feel that something is “not quite right” about a person or situation.

3. They move quickly. They want to know everything about you right away, and they may divulge too much information about themselves. In intimate relationships, the word “love” may arise quickly.

2. You assign qualities they have not yet proven. Examples would be: this person appears successful in business, so they must be great at managing money, or everyone seems to like this person so they must be nice/trustworthy.

1. I saved this for last because it might be the most important one: You enter into and/or stay in the relationship knowing it is wrong.

Realize that red flags are usually more about you than them.

What is causing you to be attracted to something that is not working? Or to someone who does not value you?

Unpack those child wounds. If you are seeking attention, validation, excitement, or love, give those things to yourself first!

Are you seeking someone to fill your emotional gaps?

Special note: Abuse is never OK and is never your fault. There are people in this world that put on a false facade to target and manipulate others. If a person uses abusive or manipulative methods to gain control over you, that is toxic, and is never OK. Recognize the behavior and do whatever you can to escape.

HEALTH: HEALTHY TRAILS Safety: The Bike

Much like pilots do a preflight inspection of their aircraft before taking to the skies, it is important to do a quick bike inspection before taking to the trails.

Here are a few things to check each time:

• Tire pressure: Make sure tires are inflated to the manufactures’ recommended pressures (indicated on the side of each tire). This should be done at least once a week as air naturally leaks from the tubes inside the tires over time. Riding on tires with low pressure creates more road resistance and increases the likelihood of pinch flats.

• Brakes: Test brakes before each ride. When the brake handle is pulled back on, the handle position should be roughly parallel to the handlebar grip when the brake pads make contact with the wheel rim (or rotor on disk brake bikes). If the handle is all the way back to the grip, the brakes will not perform at their optimal level. It is time for a brake adjustment.

• Drivetrain: This includes the chain and the front and rear gear sprockets. Keep the chain cleaned and lubricated, and the gear sprockets free of any dirt and debris, as this will help reduce wear and tear of these parts and ensure smooth operation. This should be done every few months.

• Shifters: Much like brakes, shifters can fall out of adjustment over the course of time. If there is a lot of clicking when riding, or it seems like the chain is not sitting on the gears properly, the shifters and derailleurs might be out of alignment. It is time for a shifter adjustment.

• Overall “tightness”: Check the wheels, handlebar, seat, and crankarm (what the pedals are attached to) to make sure they are all tight and secure.

Finally, pack tools. The tool kit should include things like tire levers, patch kit, tire pump, and a multi-tool. With those items along for the ride, it will be easier to be up and running when unexpected mishaps occur.

This may all seem like a lot, but safety is paramount. Get in the habit of taking care of your bike, and it will take care of you, allowing for years of cycling enjoyment.

A certified personal trainer and certified holistic nutrition coach, Kelly Bailey owns and operates Kelly Bailey Wellness. Find her blog, visit the Food Freedom page, and contact her at https://www.kellybailey.fit/ Learn more about Bailey at https://bit.ly/3B9HkGm Following any recommendations are solely at your discretion and responsibility. Consult your medical professional prior to undertaking any suggested diet, lifestyle or exercise change or routine.

Robert Soroky is a lifelong cyclist who regularly participates in long-distance charity rides and is the manager of the Century Cycles Medina location. To learn more about Soroky, go to https://bit.ly/3Vof7DX Contact Soroky at robert@ centurycycles.com to suggest column topics, for further information or to chat about bikes.

18 Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2023
HEALTH: OF MIND AND BODY
D

Protecting Disabled Children From Abuse

One of the roles of a parent is talking to their children about body autonomy and what is considered appropriate versus inappropriate touching by other people.

Nicole Moehring was having one of those discussions in 2016 with her 11-year-old son when he mentioned someone touching him.

Moehring realized as she listened to Evan, that what he was telling her was well beyond what a child his age would or should know.

Not knowing what to do, she reached out to a psychologist she knew. The psychologist immediately contacted children services, starting an investigation.

Since the alleged abuse did not take place in Medina County, the information obtained was sent to the authorities in Ottawa County.

After completing an investigation, the Ottawa County prosecutor did not think he could go any further with the case and charges were not filed.

In June 2017, the Moehring family had attended a graduation party and, after returning home, Moehring’s 17-year-old daughter told her she was sexually assaulted at the party by a 19-year-old.

Moehring immediately contacted children services. This time, the incident was in Cuyahoga County. Moehring and her daughter, Maci Lynch, had a completely different experience.

They said they felt that Maci was believed and cared about. They were kept informed with the process and what was happening.

This time, the perpetrator was found guilty, served jail time and must register as a sex offender for the next 15 years.

It was striking to Moehring how different the two cases were handled.

Moehring believes that Evan was not believed because he suffers from a Fragile X disability and autism. Disabled children may be at a higher risk of abuse and make them less likely to be believed, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, https://bit.ly/2TFmG8w

After many late nights discussing their experiences, Nicole and Maci turned to social media to share information about the threats of abuse, Nicole received a phone call from a woman who had suffered abuse and was distraught and suicidal.

After that call, Nicole and Maci decided they needed to do more.

They founded Voices of Change 2018 to educate about the threats of abuse and to offer help to abuse survivors.

As part of their efforts, they are creating a series of books called “Evan Says” to help parents of disabled children talk to them about proper touching and body autonomy.

Nicole said the books will be address specific issues depending on disability and whether the child is a boy or girl.

Part of the challenge of the books is that each child is affected differently by the same disability and disabilities range from physical, cognitive, to educational.

One may be a young girl with a physical disability in a wheelchair or a teenage boy who is cognitively 7 years old. While the overarching message may be the same, how it is communicated for each child and each disability will vary considerably. Despite the difficulties the books should be ready this year. Nicole said to coincide with these books will

be worksheets and other materials to help make learning enjoyable.

Voices of Change 2018 also is working with the Hinckley Police Department to develop a reference binder for victims and their caregivers.

When there is a case of abuse, police officers will be able to give the resource binder to the victims with information about available services and how to obtain. Once the resource binder is established, Nicole plans to partner with the other police departments in Medina County and have the resource binder available countywide.

In the future, Nicole wants to establish workshops for parents, law enforcement, educators, and social workers to educate about the threat of abuse that children with disabilities face in the hope that abuse will be stopped.

Fundraising for Voices of Change 2018 has been difficult because they obtained their 501c3 status in 2019, just before COVID hit in 2020.

The organization will host its second golf fundraiser at Ridge Top Golf Course, June 23.

For more information about the golf outing, donating, volunteering, or learning more about Voices of Change 2018, got to https://bit.ly/3YGzlcI or https://bit.ly/3YFg0c7 .

Kent Von Der Vellen has lived in Medina for more than 20 years and is cofounder of the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Learn more about Von Der Vellen at https://bit.ly/3Fg6PqQ Email him at Gems@ BlakeHousePublishing.com or call 330-421-0863. Learn about other area nonprofits at Giving Hearts

Voices of Change 218

1437 Edgehill Court, Hinckley, Oh. 44233

Phone: 440-864-7074

Date of formation: 7/23/2019

Organization type: 501c3

Description of Organization’s Purpose: Reduce the risk of sexual abuse of children with disabilities. By providing preventative education and training about sexual abuse of children with disabilities, we are able to provide knowledge and empower parents, guardians and children. By sharing our lived experiences and forming collaborations with other organizations and mental health professionals, we will build a foundation for advocacy, sexual abuse awareness, community resources, and support.

Is the organization’s registration status current? Yes

The financial information below is from the organization’s most recent filing within the on-line system. If the items below are blank, the organization has not yet filed information on-line or they may be exempt from filing an annual report.

Reporting Year: 2021

Reporting Start Date: 1/1/2021

Reporting End Date: 12/31/2021

Total Revenue: $0

Total Expenses: $0

Total Program Expenses: $0

Percent of Total Expenses: 0 percent

Total Assets: $0

Director or Board Member List:

Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2023 19 COMMUNITY: GEMS

Glitch Allows Blocked Callers Through

Think that blocking someone on your phone keeps them from making contact?

Think again.

I just educated several employees at a phone service center about this software glitch that apparently has existed for a while, yet it has not been fixed nor addressed.

Here is how it works: If you have been blocked by someone, call the number. Hang up when it starts ringing, then, as fast as you can, call them back. It is that simple.

The first call is blocked, but if you call back fast enough, the system has not had time to reset and thus lets the call through.

When you call them back, depending on the system, you will either go straight to their voicemail and be able to leave a message or you will be sent in as a regular call and, if they do not answer, you will then be sent to voicemail.

The first phone we tested this with was an I-phone. After a few practice runs, where we had to practice being fast enough to redial, it worked smooth as silk, we got through. We also tested different phone networks and found the same result.

Then we tried it on an Android phone. Again, it worked smooth as silk.

We even had employees at a local phone company office test it because they did not believe it was that simple to get past blocking. It worked for them, too.

It is far past time for the phone companies be called out on this issue. It is a problem that is being ignored and not being fixed. It needs to be fixed.

There also should be an option where either the blocked person does not know they have been blocked or you have a choice to have it announced to them when they call.

A message such as this, would be helpful: “Your calls have been blocked. Please cease and desist from any further attempts to contact this phone customer. It is against federal law to harass through the phone system and is considered by the courts to be a federal telecommunications charge.”

If you are looking for peace and escape from someone abusive, the last thing you need is for the phone blocking to not work the way it should.

Every phone customer should have the right to the peace of not being contacted by someone if they do not want to be, but that has been taken away by companies that cannot be bothered to fix a software glitch.

ENTERTAINMENT: OFF THE SHELF Search for Love Yields More

Book: “The Lost Ticket”

Author: Freya Sampson

Rating (out of 5 possible):

“The Lost Ticket” is a charming novel about a young woman, an old man and their unlikely friendship which begins on a London bus.

The novel explores themes of found family, loss and coming of age in an engaging, readable style.

Libby is nursing heartbreak after her longtime love Colin, whom she thought she would marry, grows bored with her and asks her to move out of their shared flat.

Since she is between jobs and strapped for cash, Libby takes an offer from her sister, Rebecca, to be her nephew’s caregiver in return for free room and board with Rebecca’s family.

Made to feel inferior and inept by her own family, Libby trudges through each day, wondering what her future holds.

On the 88 bus route, Libby finds herself seated near an older gentleman, Frank, who strikes up a conversation about his long career in film.

Frank is 82 years old with early dementia.

He confides in Libby that he rides this same bus route every day, hoping to encounter a woman he met only once nearly 60 years ago. She was “the one who got away,” because Frank fell in love at first sight, lost her phone number and never saw her again.

Inspired and touched by Frank’s quest, Libby offers to help and soon the pair are canvassing London and sharing their life stories.

Dylan, Frank’s in-home caregiver, along with a random assortment of bus riders and neighbors, join in the search for Frank’s lost love, knowing that time is not on their side.

An unexpected but not unwelcome development in Libby’s life inspires her to consider who her friends and family truly are, to set her own course and to make her own decisions.

As Frank’s dementia progresses, he is gifted with more friends and love than he ever would have expected.

Although the themes of this novel can be bittersweet, it is written in an optimistic tone that sets the reader at ease. The cast of diverse characters, who come together to help a stranger, are the heart of this delightful story.

Mary Olson is the readers’ advisory librarian at the Medina County District Library. To learn more about her, go to https:// bit.ly/3gZ1mg1

20 Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2023 COMMUNITY: WATCHDOG

ENTERTAINMENT: GETTING REEL Never Stop Fighting

Movie: “Interceptor”

Seen: Netflix

Rating (out of 5 possible):

Big action movies should always been seen on the big screen of a movie theater, but when such a movie never makes past the front doors, viewers are stuck with the only alternative: home screens and sound systems.

“Interceptor” had only a short theatrical release in Australia before being released on Netflix, mid-year last year.

If searching for an action movie with a touch of women empowerment and you do not care too much if parts of it are just plain cheesy, pop the corn and settle in.

Through scattered flashbacks and a few nasty cracks by fellow servicemen, we learn that US Army Captain J.J. Collins was attacked by a superior officer and, big surprise, when she reported him, she was accused of lying and trying to ruin his career.

She is threatened and thoroughly abused by her comrades in arms and finally is assigned to the remote offshore missile interceptor platform base.

Of course, her strength, resolve and determination to defend the US is severely underestimated by the operatives who take over the station.

Interestingly, at one point, she has a plan of action and requests permission from superior officers, strategists and the president who are tucked away in Washington, D.C. What struck me about this is that in the middle of a movie that makes the point that a rape victim who has been so mistreated is stronger than what is handed her, she asks permission to take action.

Is this because in the real world she would have to? Or is it an oversight that this was in the script? Because I cannot remember the last time I saw a male counterpart to her character ask permission for anything.

After all that she had done by that point and the fact that the powers that be were taking the advice of a game strategist in

their office, it just seemed odd that she was asking permission in a movie that suspended logic in several instances in order to make the story flow and be more exciting.

Overall, if you can switch your brain to “entertainment” mode and not insist on physics, logic or reality, it is an exciting, enjoyable story and the actors (except for Luke Bracey, who plays the main bad guy, Alexander Kessel) were spot on.

Bracey just kept coming across as not really dedicated to the role, but that might have been bad writing that seemed focused on emphasizing he was a spoiled rich boy.

Also, as an example of the glitchy plot, the torture of Collins’ dad, was sloppy and not the level that would be expected of someone (Kessel) who supposedly had excelled at torture in his military career and had been so enthused in his job that he had tortured two people to death. This is absolutely not someone who cuts off one finger of a victim and then says, “Oh, well, this isn’t working to get what I want, just kill the guy.”

If you are able to leap over plot holes and enjoy the action, grab the munchies and settle in.

MOVIE TIME BOX

How long is the movie?

93 minutes = 1 hour, 33 minutes

102 minutes = 1 hour, 42 minutes

106 minutes = 1 hour, 46 minutes

111 minutes = 1 hour, 51 minutes

126 minutes = 2 hours, 6 minutes

135 minutes = 2 hours, 9 minutes

Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2023 21
photo by Christian Wiediger

Joyful Word Search

“These pills will be much more effective. The pharmaceutical company hired better actors to be in the commercials.”

“The world would make so much more sense if it were the way I wanted it to be.”

“Are you trying

get my attention or are you just being you?”

22 Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2023 WITH FRIENDS VELOPMENTAL DEL EPENDENCE ABILITIES ME ULTS RTENDER PATIENT RESEARCH TEACHER PSYCHOLOGY SOLUTION WOOD OWNERSHIP R R N Y X R P T E P W R M S G N Y R T X N Y I M D N E K L R Z Z E E M H A L O I L E P A B M I D S T X D T H C N S N T T N R N Z E I U N V D Y S A N E X J E L A E L M V C P O N E B R I T D C D T Q H Z W L N M B E N R O H B S O O Y M U A P E S D A O E X L L T D S T P O T E T B W R O E J I V E I R L N A D B V G D D D D W T O L E J R Z M Y O G N Q P J R N R V P C D W M I P Z B K B N J V E N H Y R Y R T W X Y X J Y Z D N Joyful Word Search WITH FRIENDS DEVELOPMENTAL MODEL INDEPENDENCE DISABILITIES HOME ADULTS BARTENDER PATIENT RESEARCH TEACHER PSYCHOLOGY SOLUTION WOOD OWNERSHIP Answer Key for Last Month’s Search BETWEEN THE COVERS “
to
AND JOY
MIRTH
BETWEEN THE COVERS P I H S N O I T A L E R R T Z N M G P R G D N P G R R H T O R N N Z G K S X R Y N E B N I I I P E R K Y S C X A D P N R L X L T Q K V A A T E R G N T J N Y O H E R E E A O J R V B D O R O R E E R Y F Q J Q L B D I M B T V J D I R J Z J N M Y E N I O T R T B Q G G M X B J L L L W T M B A

Let's do it!

Wednesday, March 1

World Compliment Day

Suicide Prevention Poster Contest, January 1 to March 3. For students grades 6 to 8. Create a poster to educate people on the warning signs and ways to get help. Find contest rules at https://bit.ly/3PZ5UQK

Suicide Prevention Sticker Contest, January 1 to March 3. For students grades 9 to 12. Create a sticker to educate people on the warning signs and ways to get help. Find contest rules at https://bit.ly/3jmc9BG

Candy Sushi, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Create a sweet twist one sushi. This event is for students grades 6-12.

Thursday, March 2

National Old Stuff Day

Suicide Prevention Poster Contest, January 1 to March 3. For students grades 6 to 8. Create a poster to educate people on the warning signs and ways to get help. Find contest rules at https://bit.ly/3PZ5UQK

Suicide Prevention Sticker Contest, January 1 to March 3. For students grades 9 to 12. Create a sticker to educate people on the warning signs and ways to get help. Find contest rules at https://bit.ly/3jmc9BG

Camp Wired, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina.

Happy Birthday Dr. Seuss, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina.A special storytime to celebrate Dr. Seuss’ birthday.

One-on-One Tech Support, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Schedule 30 minutes with a staff member to go over computer basics. Register at https://bit.ly/3ZlT7v5

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m., Saint Ambrose Church, 929 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg

Tween Thursday: Cool Candy Experiments, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. For children ages 9-14.

March 2023

Nonprofit Calendar

Friday, March 3

National I Want You to be Happy Day

Suicide Prevention Poster Contest, Last day. For students grades 6 to 8. Create a poster to educate people on the warning signs and ways to get help. Find contest rules at https://bit.ly/3PZ5UQK

Suicide Prevention Sticker Contest, Last day. For students grades 9 to 12. Create a sticker to educate people on the warning signs and ways to get help. Find contest rules at https://bit.ly/3jmc9BG

Toddler Art, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Wear clothing to get messy. Event is for children ages 2-3. Register at https://bit.ly/41wh5FG

Saturday, March 4

National Pound Cake Day

Chatham Fireman’s Pancake Breakfast, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., 6299 Avon Lake Road, Chatham. Special recipe sausage and all you can eat pancakes. Entry ti $12 for adults, $11 for senior citizens, and $8 for kids under 10.

A Healthy Dose of Nature: Hiking Series, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., Holmesbrook Park, 660 College Street, Wadsworth. Vigorous 3- to 5-mile hike with naturalist, dress for weather, wear appropriate footwear, bring own water. Ages 10 and up. No registration, free.

Brunswick Area Historical Society 2nd Old School Trivia Night, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., 349 Pearl Road, Brunswick. Event includes pizza tasting competition, cash bar, trivia competition, gift baskets, and prizes. Tickets are $40 per person. Purchase tickets at https://bit.ly/3lXmnKi

Sunday, March 5

National Learn What Your Name Means Day

Valley City Fire Department Pancake Breakfast, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., 6700 Center Road, Valley City. All you can eat pancakes, eggs, and sausage. Tickets are $10 for adult, $8 for senior citizen, $5 for children under 13, free for children under 3, and $35 maximum for families.

Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2023 23

Medina County Historical Society Open House, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., 206 North Elmwood Street, Medina. Self-guided tour of the museum. Tickets are $5 for adults, $4 for medina county historical society members and senior citizens, $3 for students 7-18, and free for children under 7 with an adult. Get Wise About Wood Ducks, 2 p.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Hike through the habitat of ducks.

ORMACO Presents: World Tour of Music - The Leaves be Green: Springtime in England, 2 p.m., Akron Summit Library, 60 High Street, Akron. Cleveland-based early music ensemble, Les Délices, and young artists from Firestone Community Learning Center celebrate springtime with joyous music from the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Register at https://bit.ly/3xMeCcG

Monday, March 6

National Oreo Day

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Trinity United Church of Christ, 215 High Street, Wadsworth. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg

Monday Movie Matinee, 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Meeting Room A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Watch “Where the Crawdads Sing”.

Online Database 101, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Highland Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Learn how to find critical information for free from your library. Register at https://bit.ly/3YZZjci

Tuesday, March 7

National Cereal Day

Knitting and Crochet Circle, 10 a.m. to noon, Brunswick Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations.

One-on-One Tech Support, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Olive Meyer Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Schedule 30 minutes with a staff member to go over computer basics. Register at https://bit.ly/3EJgFSD

Preschoolers in the Garden: Let’s Be Gardeners!, 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Krabill Lodge, 7597 Ballash Road, Medina.Register at https://bit.ly/3J9FMkn

Naturebrary, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina. Explore, discover, and connect with indoor and outdoor activities. Register at https://bit.ly/41udjfX

Build a Butterfly, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Highland Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Learn about butterflies and their favorite flowers. Then, decorate the wings of a butterfly. Register at https://bit. ly/3Zsjrnn

Create!: Tunnel Books, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Register at https://bit.ly/3xVuutp

Card Making, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.,, Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Create 5 cards for a $20 fee. Please bring scissors and adhesive. Register at https://bit.ly/3Z5FTTi Spring Floral Door Hangers, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Create a door decoration using a straw hat and spring-themed accents. Register at https://bit. ly/3EBCoMg

Wednesday, March 8

International Women’s Day

Natural Discoveries, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 South Medina Line Road, Sharon Center. An easy walk to explore and observe the unfolding of nature all year long. Snacks and Studying, 12:15 p.m. to 1:30 p.m., Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina.

Overview of CPR, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Board Game Bonanza, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Play a variety of board games. Register at https://bit.ly/3kCPWQN

History of the Blue Tip Festival, 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Learn the history of the Blue Tip Festival, a 50 year long tradition in the city of Wadsworth.

Thursday, March 9

National Meatball Day

One-on-One Tech Support, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Olive Meyer Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Schedule 30 minutes with a staff member to go over computer basics. Register at https://bit.ly/3Z39Nb3

Camp Wired, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina. Register at https://bit.ly/3ISML0J

A list of art shows in Medina County

To have a show listed, send the information to joy@ blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late.

19th Annual Aquarius Exhibition

January 30 through March 5

Medina County Art League members exhibit two works each.

B. Smith Gallery

Third Floor, Medina Library

210 S. Broadway Street, Medina

Teen Juried Art Competitions and Scholarship Show

March 13 through April 9

Reception: March 15, 6 p.m.

B. Smith Gallery

Third Floor, Medina Library

210 S. Broadway Street, Medina

Student Art Show

April 1 through 15

Brunswick Middle School, 1483 Pearl Road, Brunswick

April 16 through 27

St. Ambrose School, 923 Pearl Road, Brunswick

One-on-One Tech Support, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Schedule 30 minutes with a staff member to go over computer basics. Register at https://bit.ly/3xYabM1

Tween Thursday: Art with Oil Pastels, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. For children ages 9-14. Tile Art, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Lodi Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Use sharpies and rubbing alcohol to create abstract patterns on tile. Register at https://bit.ly/3IWeTA9

Tree Identification, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Highland Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Register at https://bit.ly/41vbTlG

Wadsworth History: Stories, Landmarks, and Traditions Class #2, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. The topic for class #2 is original pioneers: Dean and Durham-Salmon Warner.

Friday, March 10

National Pack Your Lunch Day

Music and Movement, 10:30 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Children will enjoy music, dancing, and playing musical instruments led by a board certified music therapist.

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Holy Martyrs Church, 3100 South Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg

Saturday, March 11

National Oatmeal Nut Waffle Day

Basket Weaving, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Highland Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Register at https://bit.ly/3KHsWLc How to Catch a Leprechaun, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Event for students K-5. Register at https://bit.ly/3IAcdqm Tales and Tails, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Therapy dogs visit the children’s area to be read to.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2023 25

Getting to Know Ginger, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Learn about ginger, the 2023 herb of the year.

All About Amphibians, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. March 11, 12, 18, and 19. Learn all about amphibians during these open hours.

Our Town Video, 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Community room A and B, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina.

Mushroom Identification, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Highland Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Register at https://bit.ly/41r1NlF

ORMACO Presents: Come to the Cabaret, 6 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., Williams on the Lake, 787 Lafayette Road, Medina. This event features the Dane Vannatter Trio. Tickets are $60 per person. Purchase tickets at https://bit. ly/3IorVVJ

Sunday, March 12

National Plant a Flower Day

All About Amphibians, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. March 12, 18, and 19. Learn all about amphibians during these open hours.

Crafternoon: Clovers, 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Craft clovers from different materials. Register at https://bit.ly/41EoR0e

ORMACO Presents: Live at the Library, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Violinist Steven Greenman performs Eastern European Gypsy music. Register at https://bit.ly/3ZgxT1o

Monday, March 13

National Napping Day

American Red Cross Blood Drive, noon to 6 p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg

Makerspace Monday: Laser Engraver, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Makerspace, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina. Register at https://bit. ly/3ZpGJKm

Art in the Afternoon: Watercolor Silhouette Painting, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. History of Tarot, 5 p.m. to 6 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Learn the history and differences between tarot decks.

Monday Night Intrigue: “All That is Wicked” By: Kate Winkler Dawson, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Register at https://bit.ly/41GN7z4

Tuesday, March 14

Pi Day

One-on-One Tech Support, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Olive Meyer Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Schedule 30 minutes with a staff member to go over computer basics. Register at https://bit.ly/3IU0SD8

Afternoon Movie, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Enjoy refreshments while watching a movie.

Explorastory: Peter Rabbit and Friends, 6:30 p.m. to 7:15 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Register at https:// bit.ly/3Izfqqb

The Art of Pysanky: Ukrainian Egg Decorating, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Learn the history and tradition of pysanky.

Wednesday, March 15

National Everything You Think is Wrong Day

American Red Cross Blood Drive, noon to 5 p.m., Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg

Tabletop Ping Pong, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Play the Buckeye version of ping pong.

Teen Art Show Reception, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Room, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina. ORMACO Presents: An Evening of Irish Music, 6:30 p.m., Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina. Guitarist and vocalist Pat Masalko and violinist and vocalist Jamieson Bowman perform Irish music live. Register at https://bit.ly/3ksYyt8

Local Author: Clarence Bechter “Time of My Life”, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth.

Thursday, March 16

National Everything You Do is Right Day

A list of runs and walks that benefit area non-profit organizations.

To have your run listed, send the information to joy@ blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late.

March 18

Shamrock Run, 9 a.m. start, Second Sole, 122 Public Square, Medina. For fees, registration and more information, go to https://bit.ly/3SLFLpT

Sunday, April 23 through Sunday, May 21

Healthy Kids Running Series: Brunswick, 3 p.m.., Heritage Farm, 4613 Laurel Road, Brunswick. Each run has a variety of distances. For fees, registration and more information, go to https://bit.ly/3tWhiCi

Friday, May 5

2023 Medina City Schools Run.4.Fun, first run starts at 7 p.m., Medina High School, 777 E. Union Street, Medina. Runs include Kids’ Half-Mile run, 1-mile run/ walk, 5k run. Benefits Medina City Schools Foundation. For fees and registration, go to https://bit.ly/3YkfTCz

One-on-One Tech Support, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Olive Meyer Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Schedule 30 minutes with a staff member to go over computer basics. Register at https://bit.ly/3KFKDL7 Camp Wired, Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina.

One-on-One Tech Support, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Schedule 30 minutes with a staff member to go over computer basics. Register at https://bit.ly/3XY9xbW

Tween Thursday: Medieval Times, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. For children ages 9-14. Art History Craft Time, 5 p.m. to 6 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Learn about pop artist Keith Haring and make art based off of his artistic vision. Register at https://bit.ly/3Y5CYsL

Friday, March 17

St. Patrick’s Day

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg

Music and Movement, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Children will enjoy music, rhythms, dancing, and playing musical instruments.

Saturday, March 18

National Awkward Moments Day

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Hinkley Fire Old Station, 1410 Ridge Road, Hinckley. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg

Adapted Storytime, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., Story Time Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Storytime in a supportive environment for children with autism and sensory integration challenges. Register at

26 Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2023

https://bit.ly/3Y2iKzV

All About Amphibians, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. March 18 and 19. Learn all about amphibians during these open hours.

Build Your Own Dollhouse, 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., Medina Community Room A and B, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina. Register at https://bit.ly/3SvNk3E

Medina County Historical Society Fun Trivia Night, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., Medina Eagles Club, 696 Lafayette Road, Medina. Entry is $35 per person and includes entry to the event and dinner. Teams are up to 8 people. $200 cash prize to the winner. Send your name, phone number, email and checks payable to MCHS to 206 N. Elmwood, Medina, OH 44256 ATT: Trivia. 2023 Medina Jazzmatazz, 6 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., 851 Weymouth Road, Medina. Jazz concert which ends with raffle baskets and silent auction items.

Sunday, March 19

National Let’s Laugh Day

All About Amphibians, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Learn all about amphibians during these open hours.

Photography Workshop: Focus Stacking, 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Learn how and when to use focus stacking in photographs. Registration is $15 per person. Register at https://bit.ly/3mmklDF

Dorothy Fuldheim Program and Dessert Reception, 2 p.m., Weymouth Preservation Society, 3314 Myers Road, Medina. Tickets are $26 for society non-members, $22 for members. Mail check to Weymouth Preservation Society. For more information, call 330-697-4320

Monday, March 20

World Storytelling Day

Music and Movement, 10:30 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Children will enjoy music, dancing, and playing musical instruments led by a board certified music therapist. Make It Monday: Inspirational Pencils, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Makerspace, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina. Learn to use the laser engraver to make a set of 10 pencils with words of inspiration on them. Register at https://bit.ly/3kqKBw7

Card Making, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Highland Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina.. Create 5 cards for a $20 fee. Please bring scissors and adhesive. Register at https://bit.ly/3EG3RfS

Let’s Explore: The Science of Chickens, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Learn the science of chickens and how they live. Register at https://bit.ly/3m7bWUq

Tuesday, March 21

National Common Courtesy Day

Knitting and Crochet Circle, 10 a.m. to noon, Brunswick Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome.

Making Warm Up Medina County donations.

One-on-One Tech Support, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Olive Meyer Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Schedule 30 minutes with a staff member to go over computer basics. Register at https://bit.ly/41EZdZw

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., The Chapel Wadsworth Campus, 1391 State Road, Wadsworth. https://rcblood. org/32i1sbg

Wednesday, March 22

International Goof Off Day

Guess That Jelly Bean, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. For students grades 6-12. Forest Therapy Walk, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Princess Ledges Nature Preserve, 4361 Spruce Avenue, Brunswick Hills. Register at https://bit. ly/3KLPgDw

Beginning Family History Research, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Register at https://bit.ly/3ZpIxmC

Role of the First Lady, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn about the history of First Ladies from the First Ladies National Historic Site. Register at https://bit.ly/3Z24nNf

Thursday, March 23

National Puppy Day

One-on-One Tech Support, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Olive Meyer Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Schedule 30 minutes with a staff member to go over computer basics. Register at https://bit. ly/3ZsmNGZ

Camp Wired, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina.

One-on-One Tech Support, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Schedule 30 minutes with a staff member to go over computer basics. Register at https://bit.ly/3KNJ4uu

Tween Thursday: Magic Tricks, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. For children 9-14.

Wadsworth History: Stories, Landmarks, and Traditions Class #3, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Topic for class 3 is Connecticut Western Reserve.

Alphabet Adventure: O is for Orange, 6:30 p.m. to 7:15 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Register at https:// bit.ly/3KBWKJc

Friday, March 24

National Chocolate Covered Raisins Day

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Medina United Methodist Church, 4747 Foote Road, Medina. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg

Let’s Get Knotty: 4th Birthday, 6 p.m. to 11 p.m., The Aurora Inn, 30 Shawnee Trail, Aurora. Enjoy food, games, drinks, raffles, and auction packages. Tickets are $75 for one and $600 for a table for eight. Tickets include appetizers, a plated dinner, and one drink. Purchase tickets at https:// bit.ly/3JFc5Z1

Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2023 27

Saturday, March 25

National Waffle Day Basket Weaving 101: Spring Planting Basket, 9:30 a.m. to noon, Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. All materials are provided. To register call or email Emily Smith at 573-694-4126 or basketmakingfriends@gmail.com

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saint Mark Church, 1330 North Carpenter Street, Brunswick. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg

Cookies and Canvas, noon to 1:30 p.m., Medina Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina. Register at https://bit. ly/3IFQeyC

Do it Yourself Kaleidoscope, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Register at https://bit.ly/3SwHmzA

Sunday, March 26

National Spinach Day

Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Squirrels, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Learn about squirrels during this hike.

Monday, March 27

National Scribble Day

American Red Cross Blood Drive, noon to 6 p.m., Seville United Methodist Church, 74 West Main Street, Seville. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg

Art History Craft Time, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Lodi Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Road, Lodi. Create art based on one of Paul Klee’s paintings. Register at https://bit.ly/3EBfi8n

Introduction to Libby, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn how to use Libby to download ebooks and audiobooks. Register at https://bit.ly/3Iykz1Y

Tuesday, March 28

National Black Forest Cake Day

One-on-One Tech Support, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Olive Meyer Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Schedule 30 minutes with a staff member to go over computer basics. Register at https://bit.ly/41wkILO Otaku Tuesdays, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina 1907 Room, Medina Library,

210 South Broadway Street, Medina. A discussion of all things anime, for Grades 6 through 12. Do geekcrafts, learn about Japanese culture, cosplay welcome! Register at https://bit.ly/3ITJ7DU

Hide and Seek, 7:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m., Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Stay after the library closes to play hide and seek. For students grades 2-5. Register at https://bit.ly/3KGDvye

Wednesday, March 29

National Little Red Wagon Day

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Root Candles, 640 West Liberty Street, Medina. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg

Embroidered Cardstock Bookmark, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina

Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina. Register at https://bit.ly/3Syq9FV

Thursday, March 30

National Take A Walk in the Park Day

One-on-One Tech Support, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Olive Meyer Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Schedule 30 minutes with a staff member to go over computer basics. Register at https://bit.ly/3Z5KQvB Camp Wired, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina.

American Red Cross Blood Drive, noon to 6 p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg

One-on-One Tech Support, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Schedule 30 minutes with a staff member to go over computer basics. Register at https://bit.ly/41roENX

Tween Thursday: Arcade Electronics, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth.

Friday, March 31

National Crayon Day

Junior Engineering, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Explore handson engineering activities. For students grades K-5. Register at https://bit. ly/3SyKDyu

28 Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2023

Welcome to the Nest!

Thank you for showing your support and love for Joy of Medina County Magazine by becoming a magazine patron!

Eileen Funk Walker & Jocke Co., LPA Patent Law and Trademark Law

Three patron tiers are available: Excellent Egg, Cheerful Chick and Joyful Joy Bird

Each has wonderful perks with the highest tier including a print subscription to Joy of Medina County Magazine! Learn how you, too, can become a patron at: Patreon.com/JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine

EASTER EGG HUNTS and BREAKFASTS

Grab your basket and hop on over to these great events!

Saturday, April 1

Easter Bunny Breakfast

9 a,m, to 11 a.m.

9er’s Diner and Pub

63 Pearl Road, Brunswick Register at https://bit.ly/3YK4o7v

Fee charged

Brunswick United Methodist Church Easter Egg Hunt

Light breakfast, 9:30 a.m. to 10 a.m.

Hunt starts at 10 a.m.

1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick

Ages: Preschool to Grade 5

Face painting, crafts.

Bring basket and camera.

Donations accepted.

Register at https://www.brunswickumc.org/ Or call 330-225-3179

Free

Egg Hunt 2023

10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

2500 Plum Creek Parkway, Medina

Sponsor: the real estate Joy Team (not affiliated with this publication)

Register at https://bit.ly/3T4ON1p

Free

Third Annual Egg Hunt

1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Living Word Lutheran Church

3631 Hamilton Road, Medina

Free

Easter Egg Hunt 2023 on the Farm

10 a.m., noon, 2 p.m., and 4 p.m. Also April 2, 7, and 8

Majestic Meadows

4195 Abbeyville Road, Medina

Bring basket, find eggs and enjoy the farm’s animals. Register at https://bit.ly/4227tms

Fee charged

Sunday, April 2

Breakfast With the Bunny and Easter egg hunt

8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

White Birch Barn

7180 West Smith Road, Medina

Register at https://bit.ly/3l17d6G

Fee charged

Saturday, April 8

Easter Dino Egg Hunt 2023

10 a.m., 12:30 p.m., 3 p.m.

Williams on the Lake

787 Lafayette Road, Medina

Photos with Easter bunny and dinosaurs

Indoors and outdoors, rain or shine

Register at https://bit.ly/3FeHf6q

Fee charged

30 Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2023
photo by Tim Gouw

Celebrate!

Joy of Medina County Magazine thanks and celebrates these great companies who believe in community and make it possible for readers to enjoy this magazine for free.

Please thank the following companies for bringing Joy to you!

Cable, Internet, Phone Armstrong

1141 Lafayette Road, Medina

Contact: Sam Pietrangelo

Community Marketing Manager

Phone: 330-722-3141

Website: ArmstrongOneWire.com

Community Resources

Medina County Board of Developmental Disabilities

4691 Windfall Road, Medina

Contact: Patti Hetkey

330-725-7751

Dentist

Landry Family Dentistry

5076 Park Avenue West, Seville

Contact: Dr. Joseph G. Landry II

Phone: 330-769-4470

Website: LandryFamilyDentistry.com

Fireplaces, Hot Tubs, Grills The Place 2377 Medina Road, Medina

Contact: Andrea Reedy

Phone: 330-239-4000

Website: YourPlace4.com

Insurance

Thomas Muntean Agency/ American Family Insurance

451 W. Liberty Street, Medina

Contact: Thomas Muntean

Phone: 330-721-7716

Website: Bit.ly/39kwVN7

Photographer

FlashBang Photography/ Videography

Phone: 440-263-4502

Website: FlashBangFoto.com

Simulated Shooting Range

Engage Virtual Range

Locations in Medina and Avon Lake

Visit EVR website for information and to book appointments.

Website: EngageVirtualRange.com/r/b9aSrM

Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2023 31
to
these great companies
the best
Amy Barnes, Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com, 330-461-0589. The Col. H.G. Blake House photo by Amy Barnes
Want
join
in sponsoring
publication in Medina County? Contact

Joy of Medina County Magazine

1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256

E-mail: Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com

Website: JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com

Phone: 330-461-0589

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