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NEW AGE OF KIDNAPPING PG. 14 Their reach has no boundaries, and ransoms cannot be traced.

VEGAN VITTLES RETURNS! PG. 17 A new cook takes up residence in our vegan kitchen.

TRICK-OR-TREAT SCHEDULE PG. 39

Fox Tale

Raising a pet fox can be challenging, but when Kit disappeared and was finally found with a gaping wound on her back, everything changed to a desperate effort to save her life. Pg. 4 A locally owned, independent publication dedicated to higher standards of journalism


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

VOLUME 4 NUMBER 9 JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM

Cyber Bullies by Amy Barnes As you will learn when you read the “From a Technical Mind” column this month, the entire computer system for Joy of Medina County Magazine was attacked by cyber criminals in a ransomware blitz attack. I turned off the computer one afternoon, and when I turned it back on that evening, everything except for a few random photos had been taken hostage. Just that fast. The attack took us completely by surprise since I had not clicked on any suspicious links or downloaded anything other than a virtual call app update. Nothing I had done was considered high-risk behavior. The cyber attack slowed us down, it frustrated us, it was a horrible experience, but it did not stop us. We still got the August issue published, thanks in large part to the efforts of Danny Feller who patiently waited for me to be able to recreate and send to him all of the parts of the magazine that were being held hostage so he could layout the magazine as quickly as possible. The print issues for the libraries and others were dramatically delayed, but the online issue posted close to the deadline. I did not pay the $800 ransom, which was demanded to be paid in the untraceable cyber currency called bitcoin. I do not pay ransoms. Ask my children, now grown, if I ever reward bad behavior. Cyber criminals are nothing more than overgrown bullies who try to use fear and desperation to profit. It is similar to when kids in school stole other kids’ lunch money, except now, the bullies are harder to track. When six computer techs could not release the thousands of files and folders from the grip of the ransomware, I took a deep breath, and gave the OK for the entire system to be purged in order to wipe out the ransomware. The one saving grace was that I had an old backup system that was not connected to the newer system. We all crossed our fingers that the files were still preserved on the old backup and could be retrieved. It was a nine-and-a-half-hour process to purge,

rebuild and attempt reinstallation. I held my breath while my most excellent computer tech, Tyler Hatfield, worked to reinstall those files. The attempt was successful. While I was lucky that not all files were lost forever, there are still many more hours of work ahead to recreate all of the folders and files that were not on the old backup. If I had it to do all over again, I still would not pay the ransom. There is no guarantee I would have been given a decryption key had I paid the ransom, after all, these were criminals we were dealing with. There also was no guarantee that they would not increase the ransom. There also was a chance that whatever they sent to decrypt the files would have included a nasty little installation of a backdoor into the computer system that would have given them future access. I am fed up and tired of really bad, awful people. I am tired of the nasty things people do because they think they can do whatever they want to in cyber space. A little ironic that I started the magazine to combat the darkness and the darkness reared up and attacked. Just days before the ransomware attack, the magazine and I were slandered on social media with a lot of lies and nasty comments. I let the comments sit for a short time so those who needed to see what had been posted could print them out and take appropriate action. Then I reported the comments, which were removed in fewer than 15 minutes. But I did not ever respond directly to the posts because that would have rewarded bad behavior. I find it amazing that for a magazine that does not do hard news or investigative pieces and only attempts to bring great stories to readers and help the community as much as possible, we sure get the attention of some pretty awful people. I guess it shows how big the darkness has gotten. But that does not mean I am defeated, it does not mean that the magazine will stop publishing. If anything, it only makes me even more determined.

PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC EDITOR Amy Barnes ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller PHOTOGRAPHERS FlashBang Photography CARTOONIST Jerry King CONTRIBUTORS Bob Arnold Kelly Bailey Hunter Barnard Tyler Hatfield Chris Pickens Michelle Riley Robert Soroky Kent Von Der Vellen MASCOT Rico Houdini ADVERTISING SALES AND OFFICE 330-461-0589 E-MAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com WEBSITE JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Learn more about the staff at Behind The Scenes, JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Open positions are listed on the website at Open Positions. JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256. It is distributed as an e-edition and in a print edition. Both editions can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Copyright 2020 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

HOME AND GARDEN

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VEGAN VITTLES

YUMMY OVERNIGHT OATS by Chris Pickens New vegan recipe columnist Chris Pickens starts off with a recipe for overnight oats, a fix-ahead choice for rushed mornings, a snack or even dessert.

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DIG IT!

GALLOPING GRASSES by Michelle Riley Ornamental grasses add beauty and challenges.

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BITE ME!

ULTIMATE COLESLAW recipe by Alan Parkhurst Famous for his floral designs, Alan Parkhurst also lends his creative flair to the kitchen. He shares one of his own recipes with us this month.

WATCHDOG

SHOPPING FOR CONNECTION by Amy Barnes When shopping for internet service, add these factors to your checklist for a successful fit.

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FOX ON THE RUN

HEALTH

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A KID’S ARGUMENT

FIXING THOSE INEVITABLE FLATS

COMMUNITY

by Amy Barnes

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THE NEW KIDNAPPING VICTIMS by Tyler Hatfield

THE NETWORKER

RECONNECT THROUGH MESSAGES

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by Amy Barnes While focusing on the nuts and bolts of running a small business, it is easy to forget the two “whys” integral to the operating of the business.

APPLAUSE! Celebrating local new hires, promotions, certifications earned, and announcements. On the front and back covers: front cover photo by MaryBeth Milchak back cover photo by Michelle Vokac Kit the fox is safe at home and finally healed.

by Kent Von Der Vellen

JOYFUL LETTER DETECTIVES CLUE BOX Read the clue, collect the letters trapped in magnifying glasses, and solve the puzzle!

JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

KIT’S ADVENTURE Can you find words quicker than a fox can run?

MIRTH AND JOY

Feeling like you are losing connections? Time to reach out with a caring message.

THE WHY

SOFTNESS OF LOVE

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

by Bob Arnold

THE IN BOX

GEMS The search for a soft hat led to the creation of an international organization.

FROM A TECHNICAL MIND Kidnapping is an old crime, but cyber criminals have taken it to a high-tech level with the use of untraceable bitcoin and file encryption.

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HEALTHY TRAILS Step-by-step instructions for changing a bike’s flat tire and a list of the tools needed

BUSINESS

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Ideas and tips for achieving daily happiness

by Robert Soroky

THE READING NOOK A poem presenting points in favor of a menu change

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FEELING HAPPY by Kelly Bailey

by Amy Barnes When Kit the fox disappeared, her owners turned to social media for help. Little did they know that her return would begin the biggest battle of all, the battle for her life.

OF MIND AND BODY

by Jerry King ROLL ’EM!

BATTLING BABIES by Hunter Barnard Conspiracies, adults acting like children, undercover action, and all delivered with a sense of humor!

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OH, SNAP! photos by Amy Barnes Spirits from the past lived for an evening on the square.

LET’S DO IT! Fall into fun with these community events, including the trick-or-treat schedules for around the county.

CELEBRATE! A clickable directory of vetted businesses who bring you JOY!

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

Fox On The Run Bill Vokac gently cradles an 11-week-old Kit on the drive home from the breeder. photo by Michelle Vokac

by Amy Barnes

book. He was mistaken. t started with a book report. It turned out that he ended up having to write a Well, to be more exact, it started with a boy trying completely different book report each week because to cut corners on the assignment of a weekly book the information about each fox breed was so report. different. When William (Bill) Vokac was in fifth grade, he He ended up learning a lot about foxes and wanting loved foxes and dreamed of having one as a pet. It so happened that when his teacher required the one as a pet even more. That was 25 years ago. students write a weekly book report, Vokac decided It was not until this year that his dream came true. to write his book reports on books about foxes. His wife, Michelle, gave him a belated Father’s Day “We used to have to do a book report every single gift of a fox pup. They named her Kit. week, and I did a different fox each week,” said While the ideal is to get a fox when it is 5 to 6 weeks Vokac. He figured that by choosing only books about foxes old, it turned out that Kit was at a breeder’s in Toledo who had sold all of his fox pups, but some of the that he could write the book report once and then buyers never picked up their foxes. While it meant add a new paragraph or two for the ones to follow the Vokacs could get a fox, it also meant that Kit because the information would be similar in each

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

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Michelle Vokac anticipates Kit’s next move as the sun goes down and Kit becomes more active. photo by MaryBeth Milchak

already was 11 weeks old when she joined their household. Almost immediately, Bill started building an outdoor enclosure for Kit so she would be able to spend time outdoors, as well as indoors, and have more room to play. As Bill finetuned the pen, Kit was enjoying exploring and playing in it. He called for Michelle to come inspect the enclosure to spot any possible escape routes. Unfortunately, what happened next was a cascade of things-that-can-go-wrong. When Bill called out to her, Michelle was busy making a wet food blend to feed to a special-needs chicken they had adopted. The chicken had a crossed beak and could not eat regular chicken feed. Michelle gave Bill the special food blend and he went to give the chicken, Bobby, his feeding bowl, but when he entered the chicken pen, he saw blood everywhere and found that the other chickens had attacked Bobby. He yelled for Michelle to come help.

Michelle rushed Bobby into the house to start doctoring his wounds. During all of the confusion, while Bill and Michelle were distracted with saving Bobby, Kit escaped her pen. Kit had been with them only six days. The Vokacs’ home on Ryan Road is surrounded by open fields and woods and widely spaced houses. Across the street from them is 100 acres of grass and woods. The first concern was that Kit, who had been born in captivity, had no idea how to take care of herself in the wild. The Vokacs knew there were coyotes in the area because they could hear them in the fields behind their house. An uneducated fox pup had little chance against any attacker, much less against the vehicles that pass the house at a high rate of speed. Adding to their fears was the fact that two days after Kit went missing, several of their chickens had been torn apart, two even had heads missing. It was not something that Kit was capable of doing at her continued, Page 6


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

continued from Page 5

While the story is usually that the fox got into the chicken pen, this time the chickens had a part in the fox getting out of hers. photo by MaryBeth Milchak If it had not been for Tillie refusing to leave the storm tile, Kit’s story would have had a much different ending. photo provided by Sheri White Hartman

Winnie the cat, a Vokac household resident. photo by Michelle Vokac Binx patrols the dining room table, watching for Kit. photo by Michelle Vokac


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

One of the traps that was set in the woods to try to catch Kit. photo by Michelle Vokac

Kit’s favorite treat is mini marshmallows. photo by MaryBeth Milchak

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Golden retriever Cash is somewhat disgruntled about being excluded from Kit’s photo shoot. photo by MaryBeth Milchak

Kitten anyone? Michelle juggles kittens she rescued with their feral mother. photo by MaryBeth Milchak continued, Page 8


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

continued from Page 7

photo by MaryBeth Milchak

size and age, but whatever did it was out there with Kit. After desperately searching for Kit for three or four days with no sign of her, the Vokacs decided they needed to call out for help, and they turned to social media. Their posts got immediate attention, with more and more people following the page, offering

suggestions, tactics, and encouragement. While there were a couple of typical social media negative posts, the majority were supportive. Still, no Kit. There were numerous possible sightings reported from all over the area and even into Akron, but none resulted in Kit’s rescue. Sheri Swank joined in the effort and helped set up


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

Cash talked English bulldogs Maggie, left, and Hooch into doing their cutest poses to try to join in the excitement of visitors and photos. photo by MaryBeth Milchak

traps and trail cameras. She laid trails of tuna and taught Michelle how to use the trail cameras. They connected the cameras to Michelle’s cell phone so she would get alerts in case Kit passed by, in an effort to at least begin to figure out where Kit was so they could narrow the search area. Michelle was to learn just how many animals in the woods are nocturnal, such as raccoons and opossoms, as the trail cameras repeatedly alerted her phone throughout the night, every night. Every alert woke her and she would anxiously grab for her camera in hopes of seeing Kit. She got to be so on edge and jumping every time her phone alert sounded, that Bill finally told her to shut off her phone and take a break. She tried but could not stand to take the chance of missing a sighting of Kit. Working from home enabled Michelle to spend more time searching for Kit, which was just as well since she could not think of anything else other than finding her. Bill works as a fuel hauler for a company that also contracts with FEMA, providing emergency aid to disaster areas. He is constantly being sent out on assignment, working 14- to 16-hour days for days or weeks at a time where he oversees fuel distribution lots in areas

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It is an uneasy standoff; Binx may look innocent, but he greatly enjoys teasing Kit by stealing her toys. photo by Michelle Vokac

hit by hurricanes, floods and tornadoes and other disaster areas. The fuel is needed for energy trucks, food production, rescue operations, and more. Michelle said she walked for miles in the woods with a speaker attached to her cell phone, playing videos of Kit making noises in hopes that it would make Kit come close or at least stay nearby. The days dragged into weeks, and it began to look like Kit was gone, either having run too far way or getting injured or killed by a predator or vehicle. Michelle and Bill were heartbroken, but still held out a faint hope for a miracle. “It was difficult to stay positive,” Michelle admitted. Bill supported Michelle’s search efforts, but both of them doubted they would ever see Kit again. She had been gone three weeks to the day when Tillie Mae entered the story. Tillie Mae was adopted from a shelter by Sheri and Ernie Hartman about four years ago. No one is sure what breed Tillie Mae is, but Sheri said she suspects she is a pit bull mix. The Hartmans were walking Tillie Mae, while Tillie Mae was enjoying sniffing a variety of things as she usually did. It was a most ordinary walk that was about to take a turn into the unusual. Suddenly, Tillie Mae dug in and refused to move. Despite her owners urging her to continue their walk, continued, Page 10


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

continued from Page 9

Kit likes to look out windows. She soon will have a play area outside. photo by Michelle Vokac.

Michelle Vokac plays with Kit in her temporary enclosure. photo by Amy Barnes

had heard about. They were close to the area where Kit had escaped. Whatever it was, it was so far into the pipe that all they really could see was a silhouette. Signs had been posted around the neighborhood advertising Kit’s disappearance, so they called the number on the sign. When the phone rang, Michelle and Bill were hanging out at a friend’s house, trying to take their minds off of Kit. Bill asked the Hartmans to see if they could block off the ends of the drainpipe in Kit looks at Michelle Vokac, confused as to why she can hear Bill but cannot get him out of the phone. photo by MaryBeth Milchak case it was Kit. Then Bill and Michelle rushed to the site. Tillie Mae absolutely refused to budge, digging in her It was Kit. heels and waiting for Sheri and Ernie to look at what Bill was the first to hold her. He also was the first to she had found in a drainpipe. see the horror of what had happened to Kit. Sheri laughed and said, “yes…my husband thought As his heart sank, he called out to Michelle, who it might be Timmy in the well…or thought it was a kept anxiously asking if Kit was OK. cat.” To their alarm, they found that the skin and fur on The couple saw that whatever was in the drainpipe half of Kit’s back was missing, not torn or scraped, had pointy ears and might be the missing fox they but completely missing. There was nothing left that


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

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As the day draws to a close, Kit starts to stretch and wake up, ready for a full night of play and squeaky toys. photos by MaryBeth Milchak.

could be stitched together. The gaping, open wound started on her back, included a puncture wound, and went around to under her tail, close to her intestinal track. A few more inches at any point and she would have died long before she was found. Maggots had heavily infested the wound. They saved Kit’s life, Michelle said, because they ate the bacteria and dead flesh. Suddenly, the energy being put into finding Kit was turned around to saving her life. Repeatedly, Kit’s wound had to be washed out to remove the multitude of maggots. She had to have regular bandage changes, medication, an intravenous drip, and constant care.

So many people kept asking about Kit that Michelle created a Facebook page called “Kit’s Recovery,” and people rallied with support, caring and offers of help, as well as cheers for Tillie Mae, the hero dog who found Kit. On September 11, Kit turned 22 weeks old. Her back has healed and has even grown back the missing skin and fur. It is hard to tell the trauma she has been through, except for the fact that she does not allow anyone to approach her from behind. She has reached sexual maturity now, which has added another roadblock to her taming and training, in addition to her being adopted at an older age and having run wild for three weeks. It is challenging, Michelle says, to tame and work continued, Page 12


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

continued from Page 11

toys they enjoy, or they will become bored and destructive. Foxes are nocturnal, which means that when the rest of the house is trying to sleep, a fox will be up and exploring. Kit’s favorite thing to do is to play wildly with her squeaky toys all night long. Each breed of fox presents its own challenges, making it important to learn ahead of time what to expect, Michelle said. Foxes have stink glands that can give off a skunklike scent once they become sexually mature. Foxes do not stop having an odor that is described by some as a combination of skunk and ammonia. Michelle said it takes a lot of training, hours and patience to have a pet fox. While gray foxes and fennec foxes are more trainable and sometimes can be successfully taught to use a litter box, that does not decrease the other challenges faced, Michelle said. “You can, and will, be bit,” Michelle said, remembering when Kit proved that point, recently. Michelle and Bill both are very grateful to have Kit back and to see her heal. They said they are overwhelmed with the kindness, support and donations Kit has been given from the community. “We’ve met so many amazing people through this,” said Bill, adding that there is a very long list of people who helped in posting posters, looking for Kit, and helping with her care after she was found. The long-term plan for Kit is to have a secure outdoor enclosure with a play tunnel, a variety of toys and activities, and even a trampoline. The outdoor enclosure will enable Kit to have outside romp and playtime, but she also will be brought inside the house for attention and play. Michelle and Bill still are carefully considering adding Kit’s brother to their household, with an awareness that any taming or training of him would be extremely challenging because of his advanced age.

with her. Michelle and Bill are considering adopting Kit’s brother but do not want to add him to the household and have two foxes hitting sexual maturity at the same time. Kit was scheduled for surgery in September to neuter her. When Bill calls home from a worksite, Kit tilts her head from side to side, staring at the phone and then grabbing at it as if she could get Bill to come out of that odd box. Bill said that when he was having a video chat with Michelle, Kit saw him and pounced the phone, nipping repeatedly at the screen. “I didn’t know if she wanted to eat me!” Bill said, laughing. While training Kit is challenging, Kit loves mini marshmallows and will do almost anything for them, so they have proven to be a good training aid. She eats a variety of foods, including walnuts, dates, dog food kibble mixed with canned food, and small amounts of raw meat. Videos and pictures of Kit have endeared her to fans and have inspired several others to get foxes as pets. Michelle cautions against getting a pet fox thinking it is all cute photos and funny videos. “People really, really, should do their research,” Michelle urges. In the state of Ohio, it is legal to have a pet fox, but you must have a permit to do so. The permit has to be renewed annually. Michelle said that it is important to have respect for the animals and what is in their nature to do. Providing outlets for their intelligence and energy is vitally important to a happy household, she advised. She said that foxes have an interesting combination of cat- and dog-like qualities and present a lot of challenges. According to pets.webmd.com, foxes mark their territory and resist house training; are extremely loud, even screaming like humans at night during mating season; and they need an enclosure of at For more photos and to keep updated on Kit’s progress least 25 square yards to thrive, among other factors. as well as information on a planned meet and greet in Michelle said it is a lot of work to have a pet fox and October, visit https://bit.ly/3tIPgK0 . to keep them happy. For one thing, they are high energy and must have constant entertainment. Their toys have to be changed on a regular basis and be


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

THE READING NOOK

by Amy Barnes

Tonight I wish Mommy would serve pancakes for supper instead of pizza

ph

ot o

by

Fa tim

a

Ak r

am

Pancakes rolled on their sides down the table landing with a rolling, wobbling plop onto a plate swimming with syrup So much more fun than triangles of pizza that just sit there blinking pepperoni eyes Pancakes float in syrup become life rafts for bacon become islands for fruit

ph

They have an edge for jumping off of into the syrup lake and can become peanut-butter-and-jelly sandwiches the next day

oto by ri So op nP a

Pizza has its sloppy melted-cheese edge and can only make banana pepper “O’s” in amazement at what a pancake can be


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

BUSINESS: FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

The New Kidnapping Victims by Tyler Hatfield recently attacked by cyber criminals using ransomware. The publisher refused to even acknowledge the ransom demand that was made through a file planted throughout the system. Part of the ransom demand made included a note that upon payment of the ransom, the cyber criminals would provide a decryption key and provide tips on how to avoid another ransomware attack. Most likely, those tips would have created a backdoor into the magazine’s system so the crooks could enter the system at will. The results of the ransomware attack was a devastating almost two-week long downtime and loss of files, despite proper backup planning, and attempts to reverse the damage. Typically, the ransom demanded on consumer devices is much lower, but it can vary from a few hundred dollars to tens of thousands, depending on which ransomware you are dealing photo by Dmitry Demidko with. Have you ever been bitten by a ransomware attack? If not, There are ways to avoid these attacks. then you are very lucky. While simple, being vigilant on the internet is your biggest Ransomware, one of the most damaging types of computer defense since most attacks from any kind of computer virus will viruses, has been on the rise for a long time and has grown come from downloaded files, suspicious emails and strange more than 350 percent since 2018. links. These viruses use randomly generated sets of encryption keys Avoid anything you cannot trust or are not familiar with, which to lock files and then demand a ransom for a supposed “fix.” will help you avoid the majority of ways these attacks happen. The locked files cannot be opened without the encryption Even with practicing caution, there are some things you cannot being removed, effectively stealing every file. The idea is that as help. long as victims can see the files and believe regaining the use of Skilled hackers can access devices remotely or over your home those files is possible, there is a chance the ransom will be paid. network without you knowing until it is too late, and, in these The reality is, just as in other kidnapping-ransom schemes, cases, your best option is to have a backup. there is no guarantee of a return of the kidnapped goods. Keeping an external hard drive around with your important You are taking the word of a crook as to whether a decryption files or a cloud backup of your documents is a great way to be tool actually exists or that files will be regained. Whether or not prepared in case of an attack so you will not lose everything. the fixes offered by the cyber kidnappers work is a pretty small Connect the external hard drive to your system only when chance as only a few ransomwares even have known patterns backing up data. and decryption codes. Payment is demanded in the form of No amount of preparation or diligence can provide protection bitcoin, an untraceable cyber currency, which means once the against every possible attack. So, if all else fails, and you notice ransom is paid, the crooks cannot be traced through the anything odd or out of place about your computer, shut it down payment. immediately and contact a local computer professional. These attacks are aimed at a wide range of computer users. Do NOT restart your computer until it has been cleared as safe On July 3, 2021, the Russian hacker group REvil used to do so by a professional because when a computer starts up, ransomware to shut down hundreds of businesses that used a or reboots, it can give the virus or ransomware exactly what it similar network system and demanded $70 million for a needs to surge throughout the entire database. universal decryption tool. The group claimed credit for the attack. However, according to reports, by July 13, Revil had Tyler Hatfield has a passion for technology that he would like to suddenly disappeared from the sites it maintained on the dark someday turn into his own business. He runs a small media web (https://nyti.ms/3DZT5iL) . group, hatsmediagroup.com, and works on computers on the Locally, on a smaller scale, the entire computer system and side. He can be contacted with questions and for server behind Joy of Medina County Magazine itself were recommendations at hatsmediagroup@gmail.com


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

BUSINESS: THE NETWORKER

Reconnect Through Messages

Bringing good people good companies

by Bob Arnold Do not forget the people in your life! We all share this life together and can find ourselves in situations where we are fearful or overly cautious about things and slip away from our networks. Then, BAM, we need something. We reach out and find we have been too out of touch. I understand we get busy and focused on work. However, continuity is one of the necessary conditions of a friendship and strengths of our networking partners. This means we need to consistently stay in touch and help those who comprise our networks. Whom have you been out of touch with lately? Shoot them a note, e-mail or card and let them know you are thinking of them. Do not make your note all about you. Be sure to bring up something that the two of you have shared. Also inquire about how that shared experience, hardship, illness, or love is going for them. You may be presently surprised by the results of your reach out. From another angle, you may have been in a position where you had to quarantine or isolate yourself for a while in order to keep your friends, family and networking partners safe from infection. This is a time when you especially need to keep in touch with your friends and network. Let them be supportive and help you through your ailment or seclusion. Do not downplay the necessity of friends and networks. They are there for you when you need them, and you are in their lives for when they need you. It goes both ways, and how you know a strong network or friend is in your life is when they care that you are not with them. Reminds me of the Diana Ross song, “Reach Out and Touch Somebody’s Hand.” Reach out today.

Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at https:// amzn.to/2KSy3Xm. More networking tips are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http://onwardnetworking.com/ or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

BUSINESS: THE IN BOX

The Why by Amy Barnes There are two “whys” that businesses need to be able to clearly state and explain to customers. One can create customer loyalty and the other a calmer acceptance of store policies. The first why is the reason you decided to start a business. People love a story, they love to know why you chose that particular business to open, why you open your doors every day, why you care, why you believe in the product or service. Were you inspired by a great aunt? Did you want to reach out to people in need of your product or service? What was your motivation? Write the story behind your business, frame it and hang it

It is important for employees to clearly understand the why of policy and procedure changes so that they can be educated ambassadors to help customers navigate and understand the changes. Transparency helps build trust and acceptance, which is why it is important for customers and clients to understand changes. People tend to have a knee-jerk reaction to not accept changes, explaining the why behind them helps to ease the transition and lead to acceptance. It can be the difference between a yelling, argumentative customer and one that is more accepting and cooperative.

where customers will see it. Think about it: How much more likely are you to be loyal to a business once you feel you are a part of its story? The second why is the reasoning behind store policies, especially when they have to change suddenly.

Have small business pointers you would like to share as a columnist? Contact Amy Barnes at Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com . Be sure to include information about your business experience and a sample column of no more than 350 words.

BUSINESS

New hires, promotions, certifications earned, and announcements Eric Sabo won the drawing for the free chofa (a combination of a sofa and a chaise lounge) from Wallace Home Furnishings, 883 N. Court Street, Medina. Tickets were given away for the drawing at the Medina County Fair and Medina Fest by Joy of Medina County Magazine and were posted on social media. Monica Callahan (featured in our February 2021 issue, https://bit.ly/3kN7bLq) placed first in her age group in the Tunnel to Towers 5k in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Orio ran with her. Chris Pickens has joined the staff of Joy of Medina County Magazine as the new writer for “Vegan Vittles,” the vegan recipe column. She has a background in nutrition and holistic health as well as being a vegan cook for five years.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

HOME AND GARDEN: VEGAN VITTLES

Yummy Overnight Oats by Chris Pickens This sweet treat can be served for breakfast, dessert or a snack. It is a healthy alternative and will not break the bank either! It is the ideal treat since it has a 5-minute prep time, too. 1 cup rolled or quick oats 1 1/2 cup plant milk (I prefer, oat milk, but any will work) 4 tablespoons creamy or crunchy peanut butter 2 tablespoons ground flaxseeds 1 teaspoon cocoa powder 2 teaspoons maple syrup 1 teaspoon vanilla extract mini chocolate chips, to taste Add oats, milk, peanut butter, flaxseed, cocoa powder, maple syrup, and vanilla to large bowl. Mix well. Scoop or pour mixture divided between two drinking glasses. Add chocolate chips to top of mixture. Refrigerate overnight for best results, although a few hours will work well, too. This recipe is for two servings. Note: For the plant milk, I prefer to use oat milk, but any will work. Chris Pickens is a certified holistic nutrition coach, a health and wellness coach, and a holistic health coach. She has been a vegan since 2016 and enjoys sharing her recipes. She can be contacted at momof4chris@gmail.com

photo by Melissa di Rocco

FREE!

Come meet Kit the fox, Ba Ba the blind sheep, Melvin the rooster, Gomer and Willet G. the goats, and many other animals! 2 p.m., October 23, 2021 Whispering Acres Farm Animal Sanctuary 7496 Norwalk Road, Litchfield Donations gratefully accepted to help fund caring for the animals. For more information and updates, go to https://bit.ly/2YKTIwa

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

HOME AND GARDEN: DIG IT!

18 to 24 inches in height. This grass spreads like water. Blue Dune is a messy character, and you really must enjoy a bit Galloping Grasses of controlled chaos to truly love this plant. Leading to the column and photos by Michelle Riley million-dollar question: Controlling plants, when to trim back Looking to add texture and color to your autumn décor? ornamental grasses? Ornamental grasses are a great addition to the fall garden and Grasses can be trimmed any time from October through early there are many applications for them. March, but before new growth begins in the spring. Large varieties that can be trimmed back and bundled in lieu of cornstalks would include Miscanthus sinensis strictus (Zebra Michelle Riley is a local horticulturist, landscape designer, and Grass, native to Asia) or Arundo Donax (Giant Reed Grass, native consultant. She is the founder of the gardening subscription to India). service, https://theplantmall.com/; https:// Beware, the latter grows much larger than the first and the michellerileyhorticulturist.com ; and https://neohiogarden.com strictus can easily reach 8 feet in height, if the burgundy seed She also is the president of All About You Signature Landscape heads are included. I will remind you of the days of childhood Design, Inc. Riley can be contacted at when monsters existed under the bed, these are much like the Info@MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com or by calling 234-678monsters we always worried about. 8266. If not a hardened gardener, I would suggest steering clear of these two grasses or their kin unless you are up for a hardy adventure. As an alternative to the monster grasses, Calamagrostis Karl Forester is a lovely well-mannered chap. Karl is a gem of a grass, reaching between 3- and 4-feet tall, Karl stays very compact and tidy. He carries very upright tan seed heads in late summer through the fall and creates a very striking display when planted in a soldier row. He is also a great companion to air conditioning units or utility boxes to soften them yet offer easy access for maintenance. The native Blue Stem is another beautiful grass that is a nice cover for a barren patch or hillside. It stays low and tidy, growing about 2 feet in height and spreading out neatly where it has been planted. Another native eye-catcher, Blue Dune Lyme grass, creates an ocean of waves across the landscape, reaching approximately Native Blue Stem Grass

Blue Dune Lyme Grass

Calamagrostis Karl Forester Reed Grass


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

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HOME AND GARDEN: BITE ME!

Ultimate Coleslaw recipe by Alan Parkhurst Sharing his special recipe for coleslaw this month is retired florist Alan Parkhurst. Parkhurst established a floral shop on Medina Public Square in 1973, then went on to become a published author and a floral design instructor around the globe. He studied floral design in the U.S., Austria and Holland. He considers his highest honor to be when he was tapped to be in charge of all of the florals for President Ronald Reagan’s inauguration in Washington, D.C. Currently a Medina resident, Parkhurst shared that he misses having daily contact with customers and friends.

Combine all ingredients in large bowl in order listed. Amounts can be adjusted for personal taste. Excellent served with sprinkled pistachio nuts over the top or fresh sliced strawberries and one can of crushed water-packed pineapple, drained.

1 14-ounce package chopped cabbage and carrots 1/3 to ½ cup sour cream 1/3 to ½ cup mayonnaise 2 tablespoons vinegar 1 to 2 tablespoons sugar ½ cup raisins ¼ cup dried cranberries ½ cup unsalted, roasted or raw sunflower seeds

modified and thus made your own. By submitting a recipe, you are guaranteeing it is one you have developed or modified and used. This is open to all ages who would like to submit a recipe.

Want to have your recipe featured in a future issue? Send it with your name, phone number (in case we have questions), the city you live in, and some information about you to: Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “recipe” in the subject line. Recipes MUST be your original recipe or one you have highly

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HOME AND GARDEN: WATCHDOG Shopping for Connection by Amy Barnes Lately, people seem to be complaining a lot about the cost of their internet service and asking on social media for everyone’s input on what company is the cheapest. There are several factors that are important to include on the checklist when comparing service companies. 1. When comparing prices, be sure to compare speeds and data limits. Just like you would include in your price comparison the actual pounds of hamburger for the price in the grocery store, you need to include speeds and data limits when comparing internet plans. 2. Include the delivery system of the internet service. Is it fiber optic cable? Regular cable? The difference between the two can be dramatic and not all companies are offering or able to offer the higher-grade fiber-optic cable. 3. If it is fiber-optic cable, does the fiber optic come directly into your house or business or does it hook into your existing internet cable? The best service is if it comes directly into your structure so it delivers fiber-optic service to your devices without the downgrade of connecting to older lines. 4. Most companies post the pricing for their different plans, along with download and upload speeds, on their websites. It is

a good place to check to fill in the blanks on your checklist. 5. Finally, compare customer service as much as possible. Ask people who have service with the companies you are considering to see if they get quick responses to service issues. Is customer service available 24 hours a day, seven days a week? Because the likelihood is that the worst problems will occur as soon as a customer service office closes for the day. Customer service hours should be posted somewhere on the provider’s website, but if not, it is worth a call to find out. 6. Find out where their customer service call centers are based. There is little that is more frustrating than having an emergency that affects your business or the peace of your household and not being able to understand what the customer service person is saying. 7. Are there extras included in service plans, such as allowances for occasional data overages, a free streaming service, expanded wi-fi coverage, or a lower rate for the first few months of service? Add this list to the list of features you are looking for and you have the best chance of getting the internet service that will fit your needs.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

HEALTH: OF MIND AND BODY Feeling Happy by Kelly Bailey

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Do you feel happy every day? You should. Maybe not all day, every day. But you should feel happiness every day. Unhappiness is epidemic in our modern lives, and it takes an enormous toll on our health. Forget about proper diet and working out in the gym. If you are chronically unhappy, you will get sick, even if you have the perfect diet-and-exercise regimen. Try these five tips to get happy in a hurry. Walk barefoot outdoors. This one hits three birds with a single stone. Earthing (having your bare skin against the ground) is shown to decrease stress, https://bit.ly/2Yz90Ej Walking is another proven stress reliever. Being outside in natural light, you guessed it, is another proven way to be happier and relieve stress. Smile big, fake it till you make it, if necessary. Studies show that the act of smiling activates happy pathways in the brain. So, even if you don't feel happy, this is one instance where you can fake it till you make it. Turn off the news, especially in the morning. It is one thing to be educated about what is happening in the world. But there is so much negativity, and we have little control over it. Take the news in smaller doses, later in the day. Connect with a friend. I do not mean "connecting" on social media. Try truly connecting with someone with a phone call or a face-to-face meeting. Biologically speaking, humans are pack animals. Community and relationships are essential to our well-being. A real-life conversation with another human can make you happy in a hurry. Give someone a compliment. Have you ever told someone they look great today? Or that you thought the idea they pitched to the boss was really smart? I bet you saw that person light up. You made their day, and I bet it made you feel pretty good, too.

A certified personal trainer and certified holistic nutrition coach, Kelly Baily owns and operates Kelly Bailey Wellness. Find her blog, visit the Food Freedom page, and contact her at https://www.kellybailey.fit/ Following any recommendations are solely at your discretion and responsibility. Consult your medical professional prior to undertaking any suggested diet, lifestyle or exercise change or routine.


photo by Daniel Cheung

Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

HEALTH: HEALTHY TRAILS

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Next, remove the inner tube from the tire and inspect it for damage. The location of the hole or tear in the tube can be a Fixing Those Inevitable Flats clue as to how the damage was caused. If the hole is on the tire side of the tube, it could be a thorn, column and photos by Robert Soroky If you ride bikes long enough, you know it is only a matter of piece of glass or metal shard that poked through the tire. If the time before Murphy’s Law drops an unexpected flat tire in your hole is on the rim side of the tube, it could have been caused by lap while out and about. a rim pinch or exposed spoke rivet. So, how do you handle it? Regardless of location, always inspect both rim and tire to be The first, and most important, step is to be prepared. No one thorough. Before putting a new tube in the tire, partially inflate wants to get a flat, but they will happen. it first to remove any twists or wrinkles. Carrying items like an extra inner tube, tire levers and a frame- Once the tube is in the tire, install the tire back on the wheel mounted pump can make all the difference. rim, one side at a time. Even if you are not mechanically inclined, someone out there If you are struggling to get the rest of the tire back on, use will be, and having the right tools will allow them to help get those plastic tire levers to help pop the beads back on the rim. you up and rolling. Inflate the tire to the recommended pressure indicated on the But what if you need to change that flat yourself? side of the tire. If the bike has rim-style brakes, they will need to opened up so As you are inflating the tire, especially if using a compressor, the wheel can clear the brakes. stop occasionally and check both sides of the wheel to ensure Some rim brakes require the brake cable to be popped out the tire is seating properly. from the end of one of the caliper arms, while others have a If everything looks good, replace the wheel on the bike, small lever to twist that will spread the calipers apart. tighten the skewer and brakes, and get back to riding! Next, flip open the lever on the hub skewer and turn it until If you have questions or need additional help, please feel free the wheel is loose enough to be removed from the drop-outs. to contact me. After the wheel is off, it is time to remove the tire from the rim. Use plastic tire levers to pop one side of the tire bead off the Robert Soroky is a lifelong cyclist regularly participating in long wheel rim. Once part of the bead is out, rake the tire lever distance charity rides and manager of the Century Cycles around the length of the wheel rim to completely remove that Medina location. Contact Soroky at side of the tire from the rim. This will make taking the rest of the robert@centurycycles.com to suggest column topics, for further tire off much easier. information or to chat about bikes.

Releasing the brakes.

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Using the tire lever to loosen the tire from the rim.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

COMMUNITY: GEMS

Softness of Love by Kent Von Der Vellen The inspiration for Knitting for Cancer came from when Jennifer Bystricky took care of her mother, Linda Coffman, during her three-year fight with cancer. Many cancer patients lose their hair and wear a hat for comfort and looks. The hat helps them keep warm, but a side effect of the treatment and disease is extreme skin sensitivity. This sensitivity would cause Coffman to not wear a hat because it was uncomfortable. Coffman’s skin became so sensitive that even pillowcases were uncomfortable to her. Coffman received a hat as a gift from the hospital, but it was so uncomfortable she could not wear it. Bystricky decided to find a solution. Bystricky visited a fabric store and rubbed yarns on her forearm to test them for softness. She would end up testing every yarn to determine the right one to make a cap that would not aggravate the sensitive skin on her mother’s head. Once she picked the yarn, Bystricky’s next step was to learn to knit. She turned to videos on the internet to learn. She spent hours watching, pausing and rewinding videos as she learned to knit. She then bought a loom to make a hat for her mother. Coffman wore the hat for the next two years, before she died in April 2016. A couple of years passed, and Bystricky was knitting and feeling sad. The more she knitted, the more she thought about her mother, and the sadder she felt. Then she realized that she could help other cancer patients the way she had helped her mother. As part of her job, Jennifer attended local networking events, and while there, she found herself talking about knitting the caps for cancer patients. People began volunteering to help or letting her know of someone who could benefit. Knitting for Cancer became Bystricky’s full-time passion and grew from one person knitting to an organization with more than 80 volunteers in five states and three countries. Senior communities have become involved in making the caps

and lap blankets. Inmates at Grafton prison also help. One inmate leads a group that crochets critters for young cancer patients through the Akron Ronald McDonald House. In two-and-a-half years, Knitting for Cancer has given handknitted hats to 9,000 cancer patients and is working to find more to help. Each patient receives a tote bag with a cap and a lap blanket. For more information, to donate, or to volunteer, visit the organization’s website https://bit.ly/3tikFm4 or go to https:// bit.ly/2YxGpPL . Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions Club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by e-mailing Gems@BlakeHousePublishing.com or by calling 330-421-0863. Learn what other area nonprofits need by visiting Giving Hearts under the Help tab at https:// www.joyofmedinacountymagazine.com/ . Knitting for Cancer 3399 Tyler Drive Brunswick, Ohio 44212 T 330-441-6907 Web address: Date of formation: 03/15/2019 Organization type: 501(c)(3) Description of Organization’s Purpose: Providing comfort items to cancer patients through knitted hats and blankets Is the organization's registration status current? Yes The financial information below is from the organization’s most recent filing within the on-line system. If the items below are blank, the organization has not yet filed information on-line or they may be exempt from filing an annual report. Reporting Year: 2019 Reporting Start Date: 1/1/2019 Reporting End Date: 12/31/2019 Total Revenue: Total Expenses: Total Program Expenses: Percent of Total Expenses: Total Assets:


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

Want more Joy? Subscribe to our e-edition and get Joy no matter where you go! Use this link https://bit.ly/30duSlB to start your subscription. Want to read Joy in print? Visit Medina County libraries where you can find Joy of Medina County Magazine as an official, cataloged publication in the Periodicals section of the library. Joy also can be found in the Medina Library’s Historic Archives! For more information about Joy of Medina County Magazine, visit our website: https://bit.ly/38WotiH

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Joyful Word Search

Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

JoyfulAdventure Word Search Kit's

MIRTH AND JOY

Kit’s Adventure

S W O L L A M H S R A M

S Q U E A K Y T O Y S M

R E S C U E D J I L K P

D O G C T D L F W K B K

T S O L A U E O O K D R

L B M G F R T D N X N Q

C D B Y X H E G N D L M

N A A A G T M D E U W Z

LOST FOX LOST WOUNDED FOX LOVED WOUNDED LOVED SCARED SCARED DOG DOG GRAY GRAY SQUEAKY TOYS SQUEAKYTOYS

J L T I L I Y V G N O V

P L N K N L O A Y Y L W

by Jerry King

L N Y R V L Z D R B T V

P T R B Y I X Z W G T M

CAT PLAYFUL CAT RESCUED PLAYFUL KIT RESCUED KIT NIGHT OWL NIGHTOWL MARSHMALLOWS MARSHMALLOWS BALL BALL TILLIE TILLIE

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Joyful Word Search September 2021 Answer Key for Last Month’s Search Sunny FACES Faces SUNNY

B P P H O T O S G Z R B

M R R P B Z D S Z Y E K

S D U R L Z S E T E N J

E E I S Z R Y E S X B B

L M J J Z E T K G K L D

L D I R H T N D L S R Z

P S V L T H D S E I Q X

O V E N F M O H W L M N

E G K R L R C G X Z D S

P B T R C N E B G N G D

P K L P E A Y T I I D L

P R Q B A V Y Q T R N L

X L R M W T R X M U D G

X J D P D D H D B P B S


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT: ROLL ’EM!

Battling Babies by Hunter Barnard I was very excited to check out the new Boss Baby movie because I liked the first one a lot. The movie was a little confusing in the beginning because everyone is grown up now, and it was weird to see them that way. Tim, who was the boss baby’s older brother, has kids now and he is an adult. For the first little bit of the movie we did not get to see the boss baby. He only shows up after Tina, one of Tim’s kids, calls him. It turns out that Tina is a boss baby, too, which I thought was really cool because she looked like she had a lot of fun doing it. Tina is the one who helps Tim and Ted, the boss baby, turn back into kids. They have a really fun time doing it, and I thought it was a really funny part of the movie. They turn back into babies to go undercover like spies into Tabitha’s, Tim’s other daughter, school. They are working for Baby Corp to find out what bad things are happening in there. Tim and Ted fight a lot in the movie, which I thought was really funny, they never mean it, but it really looks like they do. There are lots of different kids they get to meet when they are undercover, too. Lots of them are babies that are really funny, but they do not really know what they are doing yet so they ruin a lot of their toys. My favorite character was probably Ted, he is still a really cool baby. Tabitha also has a pet horse that is really funny, she only likes Tabitha and Ted. I like the movie because it had a really happy ending and everyone got to do what they wanted to, and all the babies got turned back to normal and got to be with their families again. Hunter Barnard is an energetic 8-year-old who is a former Brunswick resident who now attends Berea City Schools and likes to share his opinion. He is assisted in writing his column by his mother, Jessica Rapenchuk.

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“I like suburban areas best because it’s far enough from the city but still close enough to art supply stores.”

Girl to her boyfriend: “Congratulations! You have the sense of style of four weird men!”

“He’s old fashioned in the weirdest ways.”

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

The 25th performance of the annual A Walk With Spirits of the Past, a four-day celebration of history, had a strong turnout after being cancelled last year due to COVID concerns, said Marcia Aguiar, co-director. Attendees were led by lamplight to six different stops, and at each stop, actors portrayed a local historic character. The event is a fundraiser for the Medina County Historical Society, Medina County Show Biz and the Medina County Arts Council. Donna Bica also was a co-director.

Tour guide Linda Stalvey portrayed early settler Mrs. Zenus Hamilton.

Those who arrived early waited patiently for the show to begin. Seated on a retaining wall near the Medina County Administration Building were, from left, Vicki Kocher, Barbie Obermeier, Don Obermeier, and Olivia Obermeier.

Stationed in Old Towne Cemetery, Joe Boyle portrayed Ruffus Ferris, the land agent who sold Medina’s first settlers plots of land.

Attending the Spirit Walk for the first time were, from left, Ruby Mullen, Mary Mullen, Laura Mullen, Bella Chismar, Kelly Chismar, and Grace Mullen.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

Carl Becks was in charge of check-in for spirits and handing out lanterns.

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Walk co-director Marcia Aguiar chats with people waiting in line to buy tickets.

Waiting in line for tickets.

The early evening sun highlights petunias on the square.

From the steps of the old Medina County Courthouse, Charles Ramer portrayed Lathrop Seymour, a War of 1812 veteran, the city’s developer and Medina’s first sheriff. continued, Page 28


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

continued from Page 27

L. N. Sackett, portrayed here by Anthony Fleece, was a photographer in Medina from 1864 through 1873. He was the photographer who chronicled the fire of 1870, as seen in the Medina Town Hall and Engine House Museum, which was open to attendees during the walk.

Enjoying an evening on the square were Aimee and Christopher Quiring with daughters, from left, Avery, Hailey and Leigha.

Rose Gabriele portrayed Elizabeth Blake McDowell, who had the McDowell-Phillips house built at the west end of Washington Street in Medina. She was the daughter of Col. H. G. Blake who founded the first bank in Medina, the Old Phoenix Bank.

Signs were placed around the perimeter of the square asking for cooperation so the actors could be heard.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

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Torre and Mark Greathouse were enjoying the fresh air with their dog, Oakley. Oakley kept trying to hide from the camera, which meant no one could hold still for a picture! Mark is a lifelong resident of Medina.

Waiting to start their re-enactment of a Fourth of July celebration for audiences at the gazebo were, from left, in back: Gary Linden, portraying John Hickox; Germaine Wilson, portraying Mrs. Hickox; and Aidan Haggard, portraying Duthan Northrop. In front, were Kelsey Keys, portraying Mrs. Northrup, and Lincoln Marks, portraying a Northrop boy. No one was sure what the women’s first names were.

In front of the Medina Library, Kim Oliver portrayed Lucia Medley and Angela Wunderle portrayed local historian Joann King, who interviewed Medley about her life experiences.

A late-season moth visits flowers near the square.

Walk participants listen to the story of L. N. Sackett. Note that attendees included the skeleton in the decorated flowerpot.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

We’ve moved! 3323 Center Rd, Brunswick 330-273-6001


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

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photo by Priscilla du Preez

photo by Johannes Plenio continued, Page 32


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021 continued from Page 31


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

October 2021 Nonprofit Calendar Friday, October 1 World Smile Day American Red Cross Blood Drive, 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Medina Hospital, 1000 E. Washington Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/ 2ybO4Rp Saturday, October 2 Name Your Car Day A Healthy Dose of Nature: Hiking Series, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Vigorous 3- to 5-mile hike with naturalist, dress for weather, wear appropriate footwear, bring own water. Ages 10 and up. No registration, free. Free Paper Shredding, 9 a.m. to noon, American Legion Post 2020, Medina County Veterans Memorial Hall, 620 N. Broadway, Medina. Donations gratefully accepted. Harvest Festival, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Crafts, activities. Realm of the Reptile presentation at 11 a.m., hot cocoa bar at noon, magic show with Nate the Great at 1 p.m. Forever Amber Acres Fall Open House Fundraiser, noon to 3 p.m., Forever Amber Acres Animal Sanctuary, 1133 Granger Road, Medina. Demonstrations and meet the horses. Raffles, snacks, marshmallow roast, items for sale. Starry, Starry Nights with Medina County Park District and Cuyahoga Astronomical Association, 8 p.m. to 10 p.m., Letha House Park Lodge, 5800 Richman Road, Chatham Township. Use association telescopes to view deep-sky objects, observatory open, activities and displays in barn on cloudy nights. Questions welcomed. All ages. Free. No registration, first come, first served.

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National Truckers Appreciation Day, after all, if they do not deliver it, we will not have it! Kindergarten Week, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Kindergarten activities all week. Monday Movie Matinee: “News of the World,” 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Cosponsored by Soprema Senior Center. To reserve a space, call Soprema at 330-335-1513. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Trinity United Church of Christ, 215 High Street, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Paint Night: Intro to Cubism Painting, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn techniques and create a masterpiece. Grades 6 though 12. Register at https://bit.ly/3BoJnnN Tuesday, October 5 Do Something Nice Day and World Teacher’s Day Spooky Creatures, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park, 4985 Windfall Road, Medina. Short hike in search of native creatures with a spooky reputation. All ages. No registration, free. Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. Kindergarten Week, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Kindergarten activities all week. Create! Glass Bead Magnets, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Create magnet art using glass beads, pain, nail polish, and other media. Register at https://bit.ly/38w7og8 Walk and Roll Wednesdays, 6 p.m., contact info@ics-OH for location. Sponsored by Integrated Community Solutions, who serves developmental disabilities community. Free, all welcome. Travel to Italy, 6:30 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Explore Italy’s beauty. Register at https://bit.ly/ 2Y5RnM1

Sunday, October 3 Techies Day Medina County Historical Society Open House, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., John Smart House, 206 N. Elmwood, Medina. Learn about Dorothy Hart, who died in 1908 Cleveland Collingwood School fire, and her ties to Medina County. Also on display is a restored 1860 Lincoln/Wide Awakes banner. Masks optional. Senior citizens and society members, $4; adults, $5; and students aged Wednesday, October 6 7 to 18, $3. For more information, call 330-722-1341. Mad Hatter Day https://bit.ly/3mQzzia Monday, October 4


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021 Monthly Makers: Turtles, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., through October 10, Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. This month is turtles. For more information and to register, go to https:// bit.ly/2WsbEuZ Kindergarten Week, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Kindergarten activities all week. Meet Ripley the Therapy Dog, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Meet Ripley and his owner, ask questions. Grades 6 through 12. Harry Potter Club: Trick and Treat, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Games, pranks, and treats from the Treat Trolley. Register at https://bit.ly/3DzSkwh Family History and Learning Center and Makerspace Tour, 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway, Medina. Cosplay Coding: Costuming Electronics with Arduino, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn how to add lights and sound into costumes and props. Teens welcome. Body Image and Teens, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Sponsored by Cleveland Clinic. Doctor will discuss body image, teens, with question-and-answer session. Teens and adults welcome. Register at https://bit.ly/3Dvzu9J ORMACO: Qin Ying Tan: An Evening of Harpischord, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Suites from the Baroque era, new dance-inspired compositions. Link will be sent after registering at https://bit.ly/3yz9Vkm

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Advance Care Planning, 6:30 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Learn about advance care directives and how to share end of life care decisions. Register at https://bit.ly/3DvbUtA Chair Yoga, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Improve flexibility, concentration, strength. Register at https://bit.ly/2WAkBlE Friday, October 8 National Fluffernutter Day https://bit.ly/3gKVgN4 Monthly Makers: Turtles, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., through October 10, Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. This month is turtles. For more information and to register, go to https://bit.ly/2WsbEuZ Kindergarten Week, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Kindergarten activities all week. Pumpkin Painting, 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Paint a pumpkin. Grades 3 to 5. Register at https://bit.ly/3mLIHoz American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., St. Mark Lutheran Church, 1330 N. Carpenter Street, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Real Mom Nutrition With Sally Kuzemchak, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Ideas, strategies for good family nutrition. Register at https://bit.ly/2V0W88B

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Saturday, October 9 Curious Events Day https://bit.ly/3gKAahD Thursday, October 7 Fall Foliage Tour, see map and descriptions of stops elsewhere National Pumpkin Seed Day in this magazine. Monthly Makers: Turtles, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., through October 10, Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Opossums, Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. through October 24, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 Registered households are provided outdoor space each month S. Medina Line Road, Sharon Center. Learn about opossums, to set up displays according to that month’s theme. This month their history and benefits. Follow trail and read signs. One sign is turtles. For more information and to register, go to https:// has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the bit.ly/2WsbEuZ hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. All ages. Kindergarten Week, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 For more information, go to Center Road, Brunswick. Kindergarten activities all week. https://bit.ly/36XdMfK American Red Cross Blood Drive, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m., Homerville Monthly Makers: Turtles, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., through October 10, Grace Brethren Church, 8992 Firestone Road, Homverville. Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Registered households are provided outdoor space each month Tween Scene, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, to set up displays according to that month’s theme. This month Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Games, crafts is turtles. For more information and to register, go to for ages 9 through 14. https://bit.ly/2WsbEuZ Legal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Olive Meyer Room, Herb Infused Vinegars and Oils, 10 a.m. to noon, Oenslager Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Domestic Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Medina County Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a Herb Society demonstrates how to infuse herbs with vinegars lawyer in family court. First come, first served. Masks required. and oils. Sample tastings provided. Ages 12 and up. Register at https://bit.ly/3jrFMiM


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

A list of golf outings that benefit area non-profit organizations. To have your golf outing listed, send the information to joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late. Contact the hosting golf course for pricing, registration and sponsorships.

Baroque era, new dance-inspired compositions. Rain location, if COVID restrictions allow: Homerville Community Center Auditorium, 8964 Spencer Road, Homerville. Register at https:// bit.ly/3DwZnWv or livestream at https://bit.ly/2V3VXtc K-9 Kapers, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., River Styx Park, 8200 river Styx Road, Wadsworth. Socialize dogs while hiking. Dogs must be on 8-foot non-retractable leash. Bring towel for muddy feet and water bowl for dog. All ages, children must have accompanying adult. Free. No registration.

Monday, October 11 National Spread Joy Day https://bit.ly/3jpIIfy Use this day to share Joy with friends and family at https://bit.ly/3kzhwKM Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Opossums, Saturday, October 2 through October 24, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 Putts for Pets S. Medina Line Road, Sharon Center. Learn about opossums, 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. their history and benefits. Follow trail and read signs. One sign Benefits: Medina County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the Bunker Hill Golf Course hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. All ages. For more information, go to American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Hinckley https://bit.ly/36XdMfK Fire Department, 1616 Ridge Road, Hinckley. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Cleveland https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Clinic Family Health Center Brunswick, 3574 Center Road, Navigating Your Desktop, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Computer Brunswick. Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp about personalizing your computer, using and creating icons American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick and shortcuts. Register at https://bit.ly/2WAyOPx United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. Tales and Tails, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Meeting Room A, https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Therapy dogs Makerspace Mondays: Video Conversion, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 visit the children’s area to be read to. p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Watch a demonstration of how to use the equipment in the Makerspace Sunday, October 10 and Digital Lab. Register at https://bit.ly/3DzkWpo National I Love Yarn Day Art in the Afternoon: Paper Quilts, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Opossums, Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, through October 24, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 Wadsworth. Look at popular patterns, recreate them with S. Medina Line Road, Sharon Center. Learn about opossums, paper. No registration. their history and benefits. Follow trail and read signs. One sign Monday Night Intrigue: “The Haunting of Alma Fielding,” 7 has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the p.m. to 8 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. All ages. Street, Wadsworth. The investigation into the haunting of a For more information, go to woman. Register at https://bit.ly/3zMNMAJ https://bit.ly/36XdMfK Monthly Makers: Turtles, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., last day to register, Tuesday, October 12 Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. National Farmer’s Day Registered households are provided outdoor space each month Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Opossums, to set up displays according to that month’s theme. This month through October 24, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 is turtles. For more information and to register, go to https:// S. Medina Line Road, Sharon Center. Learn about opossums, bit.ly/2WsbEuZ their history and benefits. Follow trail and read signs. One sign Historic Marker Unveiling, 1 p.m., Weymouth Church, 3398 Old has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the Weymouth Road, Medina. Weymouth Church is the oldest in the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. All ages. county and was built in 1835. In the 1840s, the church was For more information, go to active in the anti-slavery movement, and, in 1854, hosted https://bit.ly/36XdMfK abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison. Monthly Makers Display: Turtles, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., through ORMACO Concert in the Country: Qin Ying Tan Harpischord, 2 October 16, Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, p.m., HeARTland, 8187 Camp Road, Homerville. Suites from the Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view turtles created Address Guide: Bunker Hill Golf Course 3060 Pearl Road, Medina 330-722-4174 or 216-469-9241


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

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by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s L theme. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. Afternoon at the Cinema: Classic Edition, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 A list of art shows in Medina County. Center Road, Brunswick. Showing is “And Then There Were To have a show listed, send the information to None” from 1945, starring Barbara Stanwyck and Gary Cooper. joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is Register at no such thing as too early, but there is too late. https://bit.ly/3kC21BU Historical Barns of Granger LGBTQ Spirit Day: Perler Bead Pride Flags, 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m., October 1 through 16 Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Granger area barns in multiple media Brunswick. Make Pride flags using Perler beads. Register at Highland Library Gallery 4160 Ridge Road, Medina https://bit.ly/3zzBFGT Author Visit: Julie Murphy, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. Cornucopia of Quilting Hosted by Medina Library. Author of “Dumplin,’” “Faith: Taking October 3 through 23 Flight,” “Dear Sweet Pea,” “If the Shoe Fits,” and more. Link will Highland Library Gallery 4160 Ridge Road, Medina be sent following registration at https://bit.ly/3kDo0s3 Alphabet Adventure: Y is for Yarn, 6:30 p.m. to 7:15 p.m., The Hill We Climb Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, October 4 through 31 Wadsworth. Make a yarn-wrapped letter, paint with yarn, make B. Smith Gallery Third Floor, Medina Library a yarn doll, more. Ages 2 to 6. Register at https://bit.ly/3t5CZi9 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina Local Author: Sue Hawley, Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Register at https://bit.ly/3gRKrst Wadsworth. Three executed witches come back. No registration. Wednesday, October 13 Organizing Files and Folders, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Computer Take Your Teddy Bear to Work Day and International Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn how Skeptics Day to create folders, organize files, and save to a flash drive. Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Opossums, Register at through October 24, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 https://bit.ly/2WEBvzF S. Medina Line Road, Sharon Center. Learn about opossums, History of Automobile Dealerships in Wadsworth, 7:30 p.m. their history and benefits. Follow trail and read signs. One sign to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the Street, Wadsworth. Sponsored by Wadsworth Historical Society. hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. All ages. For more information, go to Thursday, October 14 https://bit.ly/36XdMfK National I Love You Day Monthly Makers Display: Turtles, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., through Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Opossums, October 16, Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, through October 24, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view turtles created S. Medina Line Road, Sharon Center. Learn about opossums, by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly their history and benefits. Follow trail and read signs. One sign Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the space each month to set up displays according to that month’s hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. All ages. theme. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. For more information, go to Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Seasonal Discoveries, 10 https://bit.ly/36XdMfK a.m. to 11 a.m., Letha House Lodge, 5800 Richman Road, Monthly Makers Display: Turtles, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., through Chatham Township. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award, October 16, Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, naturalist will initial form at end of hike. For form and more Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view turtles created information, go to by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly https://bit.ly/3pD5P71 Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wadsworth space each month to set up displays according to that month’s YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. theme. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Camp Wired: Navigating the Medina County Library Website, Teen Movie Afternoon: “Hocus Pocus,” 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street,


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

Broadway Street, Medina. Learn how renew books, place items on hold, more, using the library’s website. Register at https://bit.ly/3DwAfiQ Tween Scene: Oh the Horror! 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Create Zombie survival plan, play Pin the Liver on the zombie and zombify ordinary toys. Register at https://bit.ly/3jvZZDW Forest Therapy Walk, 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 Medina Line Road, Sharon Center. Relaxed walk with Jason of Whisper Shifter to experience sensing, embodiment

A A list of runs and walks that benefit area non-profit organizations. To have your run listed, send the information to joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late.

Sunday, October 3

Harvest Walk and 5k Run begins at 9 a.m., 1k walk begins at 9:15 a.m., Mapleside Farms, 294 Pearl Road, Brunswick. Benefits the Kidney Foundation of Ohio, Inc. For fees and registration go to https://bit.ly/38kcRGZ Healthy Kids Running Series: Brunswick Last three runs in the series are October 3, 17 and 24 at Heritage Farm, 4613 Laurel Road, Brunswick. Each run has variety of distances. For fees, registration and more information, go to https://bit.ly/38j8gVk Healthy Kids Running Series: Medina Last three runs in the series are October 3, 10 and 17 at Cobblestone Park, 4765 Cobblestone Drive, Medina. Each run has variety of distances. For fees, registration and more information, go to https://bit.ly/3kqja1b

Sunday, October 17

Step Up to Prevent Suicide 1-Mile Walk, noon registration, walk starts at 1 p.m., Public Square, Medina. Hosted by Medina County Coalition for Suicide Prevention. Additional activities for those unable to participate. Free shirt for first 300 registered. For fees, registration and more info, go to https://bit.ly/3gGZSDR

Saturday, October 23

SPCA Paws for the Cause 5k Run/1k Walk Registration at 7:30 a.m., race starts at 9 a.m., walk starts at 9:15 a.m., Public Square, Medina. Benefits Medina County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. For fees, registration and more information go to https://bit.ly/3klQMNO

Sunday, October 24

The T-Strong Fall Dash Race begins 9 a.m., Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Benefits children fighting cancer. Registration ends October 22. For fees and registration, go to https://bit.ly/2XUUG8F

and appreciation for the natural world. Ages 5 and up. Register at https://bit.ly/3sZiSSJ Taste of Medina County, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., Weymouth Country Club, 3946 Weymouth Road, Medina. Benefits United Way of Summit and Medina County. Open bar, live music, ages 21 and older. Purchase tickets at https://bit.ly/2V8joBs Horror Movie Trivia, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Play individually or as a team. Bring smartphone or iPad to connect to the game. Register at https://bit.ly/3gNZgfD Explorastory: Go Away, Big Green Monster! 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Play monster game, feed a monster, make hat craft, try monster coloring and counting . Friday, October 15 National Grouch Day Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Opossums, through October 24, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 S. Medina Line Road, Sharon Center. Learn about opossums, their history and benefits. Follow trail and read signs. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. All ages. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/36XdMfK Monthly Makers Display: Turtles, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., through October 16, Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view turtles created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. 90s and Over Party, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Medina County Office for Older Adults, 246 Northland Drive, Medina. Annual tribute to those 90 and older. Register by October 8 by calling 330-725-9177. Northeastern Ohio Live Steamers: Halloween All Aboard!, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Lester Rail Trail, 3654 Lester Road, Medina. Ride miniature train around railroad and station house. Children encouraged to wear costumes but avoid flowing garments. All ages. Free. Saturday, October 16 National Dictionary Day Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Opossums, through October 24, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 S. Medina Line Road, Sharon Center. Learn about opossums, their history and benefits. Follow trail and read signs. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. All ages. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/36XdMfK Family Fishing, 9 a.m. to noon, Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Fishing is permitted at this park only during this program. Bring rod, reel, bait if possible. Limited number of fishing poles and bait available. No


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021 experience necessary, staff will help. Children must be accompanied by an adult. All ages. Free. Registration required at Monthly Makers Display: Turtles, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., last day, Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view turtles created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Call 330722-9364, for more information. Spooky Science, 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Sycamore North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Almost-scary experiments for Grades kindergarten through 2. Register at https://bit.ly/3kwiS8Y Web Design for Writers, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn how a website influences an author’s success and how to manage one. Also learn how a website differs from a blog, how to get a domain name and hosting service, and were to source website banners. Register at https://bit.ly/3zyQA40 Northeastern Ohio Live Steamers: Halloween All Aboard!, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Lester Rail Trail, 3654 Lester Road, Medina. Ride miniature train around railroad and station house. Children encouraged to wear costumes but avoid flowing garments. All ages. Free. Sunday, October 17 Wear Something Gaudy Day Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Opossums, through October 24, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 S. Medina Line Road, Sharon Center. Learn about opossums, their history and benefits. Follow trail and read signs. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. All ages. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/36XdMfK Mill Street Makers’ Market, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Mill Street alleyway between South Court and South Elmwood Streets, Medina. Handmade arts and crafts and food. More information and vendor form are available at https://bit.ly/3gagvrA ORMACO Concerts in the Courtyard. Live at the Library: Everybody Digs Bill Evans, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., Wadsworth Library courtyard, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Jazz music. Hiding in Plain Sight: Amazing Camouflage in Nature, 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Field biologist/naturalist Judy Semroc presents and discusses how animals and plants mislead and deceive to survive. Patterns, colorations, behavior and more will be discussed. Test your observational skills. Stroll grounds after presentation to look for examples. Ages 6 and up. No registration, free. Monday, October 18 National Meatloaf Appreciation Day

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Sunday, October 17

Summa Health Truck or Treat, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., 3780 Medina Road, Medina. Touch a truck, raffles, balloon artists, more.

Saturday, October 23

Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick 11 a.m., all ages, wear costume. Register at https://bit.ly/3mGNXd0

Monday, October 25

Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina, 6:30 p.m., all ages, wear costume. Candy donations appreciated. Register at https://bit.ly/3kHLY5H

Tuesday, October 26

Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi, 6:30 p.m., all ages, wear costume. Show off costume on runway, trick or treat, craft, games, balloon creations. Register at https://bit.ly/3zzisFs

Saturday, October 30

Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville, 10:30 a.m., birth to Grade 3, wear costume. Walk the red carpet, trick or treat around library, creepy crafts. Register at https://bit.ly/38ptfps Wadsworth, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Sunday, October 31

Brunswick, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Chippewa Lake, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Hinckley, not encouraged by township because of dark rural roads Medina, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Seville, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Opossums, through October 24, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 S. Medina Line Road, Sharon Center. Learn about opossums, their history and benefits. Follow trail and read signs. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. All ages. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/36XdMfK American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Fire Station 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Cubism Painting, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Learn about Cubism painting techniques and create a masterpiece. Grades 5 through 8. Register at https://bit.ly/38pW2u7


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

Tuesday, October 19 Evaluate Your Life Day Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Opossums, through October 24, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 S. Medina Line Road, Sharon Center. Learn about opossums, their history and benefits. Follow trail and read signs. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. All ages. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/36XdMfK Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. What is the Cloud? 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn what the cloud is, how to use it. Bring device. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., The Chapel Wadsworth Campus, 1391 State Road, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Escape Room: Franklin’s Curse, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina 1907 Room, Medina Library 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Work together to solve puzzles and escape or fall prey to Franklin’s Curse. Register at https://bit.ly/38rtnow Wednesday, October 20 International Sloth Day Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Opossums, through October 24, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 S. Medina Line Road, Sharon Center. Learn about opossums, their history and benefits. Follow trail and read signs. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. All ages. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/36XdMfK Ask An Attorney, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Office for Older Adults, 246 Northland Drive, Medina. Answers to elder law questions. Must schedule 20-minute appointment by calling 330-723-9514. Halloween is Coming! 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Decorate a jar for Halloween. Grades 6 through 12. Ohio’s Historic Haunts, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Paranormal investigator James A. Willis connects ghost stores and actual history. Register at https://bit.ly/3zvceGh Thursday, October 21 National Reptile Awareness Day Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Opossums, through October 24, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 S. Medina Line Road, Sharon Center. Learn about opossums, their history and benefits. Follow trail and read signs. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the

hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. All ages. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/36XdMfK Tales for Tots, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Story tells why leaves fall, hike through fallen leaves if weather permits. Ages 3 to 6 with adult. Dress for weather. Free. Camp Wired: The Care and Feeding of Your Computer, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Care tips for your computer. Scare on the Square and Wadsworth Thriller, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., downtown Wadsworth. Candy, costumes, and 300 dancing zombies re-enact Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” at 7 p.m. Volunteer by e-mailing teri@mainstreetwadsworth.org. Pumpkin Decorating Contest Drop Off, 4 p.m., Wadsworth Public Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Pick up entry form from library. Pumpkins will be on display for Scare on the Square. Pick back up at 7:30 p.m. Can You Escape? Don’t Get Deserted in the Desert, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. While studying in the Gobi Desert in Asia, a fellow scientist steals your research and deserted you. You must use your knowledge of Earth Science to escape. Register at https://bit.ly/3gRGZhr . Halloween Fashion Show, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. All ages are invited to strut in costume down the red carpet. Special treat and make-and-take craft available. Spooky Sea Chanteys, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Chanteys and ballads of the sea with a ghostly twist. Learn the origins and history of the songs. Singing along is encouraged. Link sent after registering at https://bit.ly/3DupQnH Beatles at Shea Stadium, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Presentation about the ins and outs of the first modern outdoor stadium rock concert. Register at https://bit.ly/3jtm6uJ Friday, October 22 Caps Lock Day https://bit.ly/3yoZRdD Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Opossums, through October 24, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 S. Medina Line Road, Sharon Center. Learn about opossums, their history and benefits. Follow trail and read signs. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. All ages. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/36XdMfK American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Medina Senior Center Movie Matinee: “The Founder,” noon, center dining room, 246 Northland Drive, Medina. Popcorn and drinks. Charge of 25 cents will be collected before the movie starts.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021 Monstercon, 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m., Community Room A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Trivia Murder Party, Galaxy Pumpkins, costume contest, music, games, more. Register at https://bit.ly/3BlaYGg Saturday, October 23 Mole Day https://bit.ly/2Wyk3Ne Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Opossums, through October 24, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 S. Medina Line Road, Sharon Center. Learn about opossums, their history and benefits. Follow trail and read signs. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. All ages. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/36XdMfK Spooky Halloween Show, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Comedy, singing, monster mash dance party, more. For children of all abilities and ages. Link sent after registering at https://bit.ly/3yBgrHy Halloween: Spooktacular Weekends, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Nature center will be decorated for Halloween, learn about misunderstood Halloween creatures. Costumes welcome. Family History and Learning Center and Makerspace Tour,1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway, Medina. Night Hike, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Allardale West parking lot, 401 Remsen Road, Medina. Naturalist leads walk to experience night sights and sounds, learn about moon and night vision. Ages 7 and up. Register at https://bit.ly/38kZjLi Sunday, October 24 National Bologna Day Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Opossums, last day, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 S. Medina Line Road, Sharon Center. Learn about opossums, their history and benefits. Follow trail and read signs. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. All ages. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/36XdMfK Halloween: Spooktacular Weekends, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Nature center will be decorated for Halloween, learn about misunderstood Halloween creatures. Costumes welcome. Monday, October 25 National No Workplace Drama Day, if you find that challenging, then put it in perspective with National Hope for Henry Day https://bit.ly/2Y9Iv8f American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., First Congregational Church, 114 Church Street, Lodi. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Brunswick 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sundays, June 13 through October 2, 2020 Produce, consumables and crafts Heritage Farm, 4613 Laurel Road, Brunswick Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2I4I5DV Medina 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays, May 1 through October 30 Produce, consumables, crafts, and knife sharpening Front parking lot, May 1 through 22 Main Market behind VFW Post, May 30 through October 30 Medina VFW Post 5137 3916 Pearl Road, Medina 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays, May 15 through October 16 Produce and consumables Medina Public Square Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/3vLZY2W Seville 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, May 29 through September 25 Produce, consumables and crafts Gazebo at Maria Stanhope Park, 73 W. Main Street, Seville Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/3r1v9ni Wadsworth 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, June 12 through September 25 Produce, consumables and crafts Central Intermediate School, 151 Main Street, Wadsworth Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/3r8trRd

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

Halloween Dance Party, 6:30 p.m., Highland Library, 4160 OMJ Workshop: Career Transitions, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Ridge Road, Medina. Visit the library to dance to spooky tunes in Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. your costume. Register at https://bit.ly/3BpiP5N Resume writing help. Register at https://bit.ly/3mIgZcd Intro to Cypress Resume Maker and Resume Tips and Tuesday, October 26 Resources, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room B, Wadsworth National Pumpkin Day Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Register at Paint and Pour Class, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Medina County Office for https://bit.ly/2V2R3fU Older Adults, 246 Northland Drive, Medina. Supplies included to make two projects on canvas, cost $15. Call Jenny, 330-725Friday, October 29 9177, to register. Hermit Day American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Holy United Methodist Church, 4747 Foote Road, Medina. Martyrs Church, 3100 S. Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Otaku Tuesdays, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. A discussion of all Saturday, October 30 things anime, for Grades 6 through 12. Do geekcrafts, learn National Speak Up for Service Day about Japanese culture, cosplay welcome! Register at American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., St. Mark https://bit.ly/3jAmKqB Lutheran Church, 1330 N. Carpenter Street, Brunswick. Harvest Hoedown, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Children’s Activity https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Listen Halloween: Spooktacular Weekends, noon to 5 p.m., Susan to a story, and play pumpkin golf, musical pumpkins, life-sized Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. tic-tac-toe, ring toss game. Make a scarecrow puppet and Nature center will be decorated for Halloween, learn about pumpkin party favor to take home. Register at misunderstood Halloween creatures. Costumes welcome. https://bit.ly/2WzgEOt Howl-O-Ween! 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Festive exploration into Northeast Wednesday, October 27 Ohio’s native canids. All ages. Register by October 28 at National Black Cat Day https://bit.ly/2XX7RWH Author Visit: Debbie Macomber, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. Genealogy Slam: Researching Your Family’s Property, 1 p.m. Hosted by Medina Library. Author of “Cottage by the Sea,” “Any to 4 p.m., Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 201 S. Dream Will Do,” “Rose Harbor Series,” and more. Register at Broadway Street, Medina. Join in person or virtually for https://bit.ly/3zHZuw4 exploring three avenues of property research. Register at https://bit.ly/3Dwehwp Thursday, October 28 ORMACO Live at the Library: Alla Bora, 8 p.m. to 9 p.m., OJ International Animation Day Work Auditorium, 151 Main Street, Wadsworth. Sponsored by American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Root ORMACO and Wadsworth Library. Almost extinct folk songs Candles, 640 Liberty Street, Medina. based on 1954 recordings paired with field recordings and https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp projected images showcases Italy’s folk music. Due to space Camp Wired: Uploading/Downloading Files and Folders, available, registration is recommended. For more information 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. or to register, call 419-853-6016. Broadway Street, Medina. Bring password to access e-mail, learn how to upload and download. Register at Sunday, October 31 https://bit.ly/3zwY0oC National Knock-Knock Jokes Day American Red Cross Blood Drive, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m., St. Ambrose Halloween: Spooktacular Weekends, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Church, 929 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Forest Therapy Walk, 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Green Leaf Park, Nature center will be decorated for Halloween, learn about 1674 Medina Line Road, Sharon Center. Relaxed walk with misunderstood Halloween creatures. Costumes welcome. Jason of Whisper Shifter to experience sensing, embodiment and appreciation for the natural world. Ages 5 and up. Register at https://bit.ly/3Bo443b Teen Halloween Night, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Wear costume, take selfies in spooky booth, make creepy craft, add lines to community scary story, snacks and games. Register at https://bit.ly/3gM5tJb


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2021

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Celebrate! Joy of Medina County Magazine thanks and celebrates these great companies who believe in community and make it possible for readers to enjoy this magazine for free. Please thank the following companies for bringing Joy to you! Cable, Internet, Phone

Armstrong

1141 Lafayette Road, Medina Contact: Sam Pietrangelo Community Marketing Manager Phone: 330-722-3141 Website: https://armstrongonewire.com/

Dentist

Landry Family Dentistry 5076 Park Avenue West, Seville Contact: Dr. Joseph G. Landry II Phone: 330-769-4470 Website: www.LandryFamilyDentistry.com

Fireplaces, Hot Tubs, Grills

The Place

2377 Medina Road, Medina Contact: Andrea Reedy Phone: 330-239-4000 Website: https://www.yourplace4.com/

Furniture

Wallace Home Furnishings

Job Services

Ohio Means Jobs 72 Public Square, First Floor, Medina 330-441-5341 Website: https://medinacountyworks.com/

Medical Massage

Knot Yourself

238 S. Elmwood Avenue, Medina (Inside GotMilt Health and Fitness) Contact: Rachael Hall Phone: 330-461-0769 Website: www.KnotYourself.com

Photographer

FlashBang Photography/ Videography Phone: 440-263-4502 Website: https://www.flashbangfoto.com/

883 N. Court Street, Medina Contact: David and Richard Wallace Owners

Phone: 330-723-3006

Want to join these great companies in sponsoring the best publication in Medina County? Contact Amy Barnes, Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com, 330-461-0589.

photo by: Mike Enerio


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Joy of Medina County Magazine 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256 E-mail: joy@blakehousepublishing.com Website: JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Phone: 330-461-0589

Profile for Joy of Medina County

Joy of Medina County Magazine October 2021  

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