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PROTECTING LEGACY PG. 16 Planning for business succession

A LIFE SAVED PG. 22 Nothing like a Marine and a Monday

NEW ADULT MOVIE REVIEW COLUMN PG. 25 It is not what you just thought.

Pasture of Peace Broken, deserted, dumped, mistreated, or simply looking for a home, they come to Whispering Acres looking for peace and end up giving it to all who visit. Pg. 4 A locally owned, independent publication dedicated to higher standards of journalism


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2021

VOLUME 4 NUMBER 10 JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM

Giving a Reel Welcome by Amy Barnes Many times over the past few months, I have rolled around the idea of having a movie review column written by adults. We already have a great one written from an 8year-old’s point of view with “Roll ’Em” by Hunter Barnard. It just so happened that, apparently, Bob Soroky, the magazine’s “Healthy Trails” columnist was having the same thoughts. So, this month a new column, “Getting Reel,” premieres. Once upon a time, it was not feasible for a monthly publication to do movie reviews. By the time a review would have published, the movie would have left the theater. Nowadays, with so many streaming services and channels to watch movies through, it makes much more sense. For each movie reviewed, it will be noted if the movie was watched at home or in a theater because it influences the whole watching experience. Neither the name of the theater nor the streaming service will be named because where the movie is showing can change suddenly. Plus, I break out in hives if free advertising is given to any company making more money than I am. Soroky and I will be taking turns writing the column, at times we might even coauthor it. It will run in the “Arts and Entertainment” section of the magazine and will be titled, “Getting Reel.” This means, of course, that there is a chance there will be two reviews on the same movie, one by one of us and one by Barnard, such as there is this month with the movie “Jungle Cruise.” We hope you enjoy this new addition to the magazine, and we hope we can do as good a job as Barnard does every month!

I am delighted to welcome two new staff members aboard. Chris Pickens joined us last month, and

Shannon Davis joins us this month. Pickens is the new writer for the “Vegan Vittles” recipe column. The column has been on hiatus for several months while I searched for a new just-right cook to take the apron strings. While I will normally fill in when needed, vegan cooking is not my specialty, and I knew better than to enter that kitchen! Pickens actually reached out to me, and we had a wonderful meeting discussing the column while I munched a chicken salad sandwich. Irony is never lost on me. With only a few days till deadline, Pickens jumped right in and started rattling pots and pans. I am thankful for Pickens moving into the vegan kitchen because I know many of our readers enjoy trying vegan recipes. Our second newbie on the block is Shannon Davis. Not only is Davis new to the magazine, she is new to the area, but she is very quickly learning her way around. We met at a networking event, following that up with a more relaxed one-to-one meeting to learn how we could help each other. One thing led to another, and it turned out she was interested in taking the reigns of the business column, the “In Box.” She might have temporarily regretted saying, “yes” to the offer when she found out she had 24 hours to turn out the first column! She pulled it off and proved just how quickly she can learn! Please give a warm reader welcome to these two new staffers. Also, please keep in mind, you are always encouraged to reach out to Joy of Medina County Magazine columnists for advice, information or guidance. Their contact information is at the bottom of each of their columns, and they truly love to hear from readers.

PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC EDITOR Amy Barnes ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller PHOTOGRAPHERS FlashBang Photography CARTOONIST Jerry King CONTRIBUTORS Bob Arnold Kelly Bailey Hunter Barnard Shannon Davis Tyler Hatfield Chris Pickens Michelle Riley Robert Soroky Kent Von Der Vellen MASCOT Rico Houdini ADVERTISING SALES AND OFFICE 330-461-0589 E-MAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com WEBSITE JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Learn more about the staff at Behind The Scenes, JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Open positions are listed on the website at Open Positions.

JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256. It is distributed as an e-edition and in a print edition. Both editions can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Copyright 2021 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2021

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DIG IT!

TREE TRANSPLANT TIPS by Michelle Riley Our gardener shares her hints for success when giving trees a home.

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BITE ME!

CAVATELLI WITH RAPINI AND TOMATOES recipe by Mark Bittler Army veteran and executive chef Mark Bittler takes a turn in the kitchen.

HEALTH

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THE OPEN GATE

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THE READING NOOK

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FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

THE NETWORKER

Is your networking growing, or is it rotting from neglect?

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THE IN BOX

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Celebrating local new hires, promotions, certifications earned, and announcements.

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On the front and back covers: photos by Amy Barnes Safe from the dinner table, the inseparable Stanley, left, and Walter strut their stuff.

ALONG FOR THE CRUISE by Hunter Barnard

by Amy Barnes

Bread or dessert? Make a batch, and see what you think.

Companies are inviting everyday people to become social influencers. Here are some tips to help keep you safe.

ROLL ’EM!

A MAGICAL LAND AND A BAD CRUISE

by Chris Pickens

by Amy Barnes

by Jerry King JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

GETTING REEL

VEGAN ZUCCHINI BREAD

UNDER THE INFLUENCE

MIRTH AND JOY

Movie has all of the cool things and action needed to be entertaining for everyone.

VEGAN VITTLES

WATCHDOG

Read the clue, collect the letters trapped in magnifying glasses, and solve the puzzle!

Find the words from the animals who found sanctuary at a small local farm.

HOME AND GARDEN

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JOYFUL LETTER DETECTIVES CLUE BOX

WHISPER OF HOME

by Shannon Davis

APPLAUSE!

FUND HONORS VETERANS AND OFFERS ASSISTANCE

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

PROTECTING YOUR BUSINESS LEGACY A will protects your family and assets when you pass, but what protects your company?

GEMS

by Amy Barnes He thought it was going to be a regular Monday, he had no idea what lay on the road ahead.

by Tyler Hatfield

by Bob Arnold

by Robert Soroky

WHEN A MARINE ANSWERS

CRYPTIC CRYPTO CLARIFIED

CONNECTION CHALLENGES LEAD TO GROWTH OR ROT

TRACK THIS

by Kent Von Der Vellen Nonprofit catches veterans who fall between the cracks. IN DEED

Confused by cryptocurrency? Let us help.

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HEALTHY TRAILS

COMMUNITY

BUSINESS

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by Kelly Bailey

Cycling computers help achieve goals with a wealth of information.

All are welcome at Whispering Acres, no matter the number of feet.

A selection of letters from youths in the Writers in Residence program at area juvenile detention centers who wrote letters to themselves, utilizing the therapy device used in “Dear Evan Hanson.”

BATTLING WINTER HUNGER HORMONES As the weather gets colder, we are signaled to store fat.

by Amy Barnes

DEAR ME

OF MIND AND BODY

“Shang-Chi” does not fulfill trailer promises, and if dreaming of hearing Dwayne Johnson tell dad jokes, we have the movie for you!

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OH, SNAP! photos by FlashBang Photography Celebrating Boy Scouts, sharing tales and skating to victory.

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LET’S DO IT! Jump into these leaves of fun!

CELEBRATE! A clickable directory of vetted businesses who bring you Joy!


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2021

Janine Smalley hugs Henry the troublemaker. Smalley’s mug is printed with “Who rescued who?” photo by Amy Barnes

by Amy Barnes

“T

new home. They were trying to remodel a bathroom in their Berea home. here were not going to be any goats,” at Since Scott owns a home renovation company in least for a while, said Janine Smalley, laughing, as Berea, he was doing the work himself. Janine was she glances at her husband, Scott. looking through real-estate listing photos for No goats at first because the farm-animal rescue bathroom remodeling ideas. was not supposed to grow as fast as it did, Janine That was when Janine found a listing for the kind of said. place she had dreamed of having since childhood but Scott stands in the barnyard of the 1 1/2-year-old had given up on ever having. sanctuary as chickens, geese, pigs, goats, turkeys, It was a 5-acre property with a log cabin, a fenced guinea fowl, and a duck mill around him, and he barnyard, a small pond, privacy, and located 6 miles chuckles somewhat wryly. He knew from the beginning that Janine’s big heart from shopping. The Smalleys decided to visit the property during would never turn away an animal in need of peace its open house. After all, it was not like visiting it and care. would cost them anything, they could check out the Janine admits, “I can’t say, ‘no,’ to an animal.” bathroom for design ideas, and it would give them a The couple was not planning on opening a farmpleasant outing. animal sanctuary, they were not even looking for a


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As fate would have it, their car broke down and stranded them on the property for the entire day. There was no turning back. In a whirlwind one-and-a-half weeks, Scott replaced both bathrooms and the bedroom closet at the Berea house so it would sell, making it so the Smalleys could purchase their log-cabin dream and move in February 2020. It did not take long for the property to gain the name Whispering Acres in a rather interesting way, according to Janine. “There’s a funny story that goes along with that. When it rained, I was out front in the yard, and the grass was making a gurgling noise because it was absorbing the water. I walked to the backyard and told my husband that the grass was talking. After he asked me if I was on drugs or drinking, he explained that it was the water absorbing into the grass. So, the joke became that the grass was whispering to me. So, Patsy Swine and Hennifer Lopez photo by Janine Smalley he will always say, “Shhhhhh, the grass is whispering’.” duck eggs for them. The Whispering Acres Animal Sanctuary gate There are a few animals that Janine meets and she opened in April 2020, only two months after the immediately knows she must add them to the Smalleys moved there, when Janine took in four sanctuary. chickens and had one small coop. Scott was a few steps ahead of Janine in the goat Janine’s plan was to slowly grow the animal barn at the county fair when he was stunned to hear sanctuary, and keep it small for a while. Plans, her voice behind him say, “I’ll buy him.” however, ended up changing quickly. He stopped dead in his tracks, and as his mind People kept calling and asking Janine if she could formed the word, “nooooooo!!!” he turned around to take in more animals. discover Janine with her arms around Henry while Some people have dumped animals on the his delighted owner was celebrating that Henry property, such as Fluster Cluck, a rooster that was would not be going to auction, where he likely would thrown over the fence. have been on the path to slaughter. At press time, there were 11 goats, two pigs, one Some animals join the sanctuary because their blind sheep, more than 120 chickens, and 30 owners were unprepared for what those cute babies roosters, not including the 45 roosters that were would grow to be, while others come from severe added to the barnyard from a recent rescue. rescue situations, like Baa Baa Blind Sheep did. Janine said she is working to rehome the recent Baa Baa is 16 years old. She was found one winter influx of roosters. by the side of the road with severely overgrown There are animals living at the sanctuary who have fleece frozen to her eyes and unable to walk. been surrendered by owners who could no longer There were approximately 45 pounds of wool care for them. They are the ones whose former removed from her, revealing numerous cysts and owners routinely call to check on their beloved sores on her body, said Janine. According to the former pets. Janine regularly sends them photos. International Wool Textile Organisation, a sheep will Turkeys Walter and Stanley were lovingly raised produce approximately 9 pounds of wool annually. together as a 4-H project, said Janine. She traded When Baa Baa joined the sanctuary, Janine was so

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Cooper, Martin and Mr. Doodle

photo by Amy Barnes

Nicholas Rooster photo by Amy Barnes

Willett aka Willie G. or Willet the Pot Stirrer photo by Amy Barnes

Buddy Kitty did not wait for an invitation to join the Molly G., left; Baa Baa Blind Sheep; and horned goat Gomer photo by Amy Barnes farm. photo by Amy Barnes


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2021

Lola, Shorty, Moose, Webster, Linda, and Benson are all Chinese geese.

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photo by Amy Barnes

Biscuit photo by Amy Barnes

Barack Obrahma

Penny

photo by Amy Barnes

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2021

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needs. She has to have first-cutting hay, fresh fruit and vegetables, and smashed bananas. She needs care three times a day. There is hope she may regain full sight because she has regained partial sight in her left eye, said Janine. “I want her to have the best in her life for the rest of her life,” said Janine. There is Marty the Chihuahua-pug mix dog, who was squeezed so hard by his former owners that they caused his eyes to actually pop from their sockets. He had to have surgery to fix the damage. Janine even rescues bees, learning about them as she goes. One day, she got a call asking her if she removes bee swarms. No experience, no training, but she was game. With a trash bag and a can-do attitude, Atilla the Hen, Cluck Norris and Mr. Doodle, who keeps a wary eye on the chickens, although who would not with names like those? photo by Amy Barnes she was ready to head out to try to bag the swarm when friend Tim Malena found worried about her survival that she slept with her, out and asked if she had ever moved a swarm. something Scott was not surprised by, said Janine. When she admitted she had no idea what she was “He expected that.” doing, he said he would go with her and teach her It takes $1,500 a month to provide Baa Baa with the how to safely move a swarm. The bees were eye drops, vitamins, medications, and food she rehomed into beehives at the back of Whispering Acres. The bees show their appreciation by producing honey that can be sold. “I’ve met the nicest people out here,” Janine said, “They are the most caring people ever.” In addition to the animals, people of all ages, from all walks of life, are welcomed into the barnyard to find peace and comfort. Janine said she has found that Whispering Acres has a profound effect on veterans, especially those with post-traumatic stress disorder, and people who are autistic. Scott and Janine have been mulling the possibility of building a few small cabins in the back of the property, by the pond, so those who would like to stay longer can. Before that, however, they have a more urgent project to complete: fencing more of the property in order to make it possible to take in more animals. They are counting on donations to make the additional fencing possible and also to help fund the Cheddar photo by Janine Smalley cost of caring for the animals.


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While Whispering Acres quickly grew as an animal sanctuary, it also became something else. It became the medicine that Janine needed. When she was 22, Janine was diagnosed with lupus, an autoimmune disease that can cause many symptoms such as inflammation, muscle and joint pain, rashes, fevers, and more according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, https://bit.ly/3iPjZ3A Within six months of moving to Whispering Acres, Janine Smalley and Kevin Bacon have a chat while Stanley the turkey and Roo Heffner listen in. This is how rumors start! photo by Amy Barnes Janine found that she no longer needed her medications for anxiety, depression and lupus. The only medication she has continued to take is one to protect her joints from the effects of lupus. She has found she even sleeps better. “It’s been life changing,” Janine said about the move to Whispering Acres. Whispering Acres also is a place for Scott to exercise his building skills even more than through his company alone. “I have to take care of every little thing that happens to him, and he builds everything,” said Janine. Two days after moving in, the drain got stopped up, Registered therapy dog Cooper the Wonder Pet, left, and Martin one problem led to another, and the next thing photo by Amy Barnes Janine knew, there were all new cabinets in the kitchen. barnyard. She asked Scott what in the world he was She said she has to watch Scott that he does not up to, and he said he was building the chicken coop. overwork himself and make a project much grander It is a coop any chicken would be proud to call than it has to be, such as with the chicken coop. home, admits Janine. When Janine mentioned she needed a bigger Using granite countertops from a tear-out job, large chicken coop as the flock grew, Scott sketched out a windows that arrived in the wrong sizes for a design for a new coop. He showed it to Janine for her renovation job, and more, Scott crafted a large walkapproval. Looked good to her, so she gave the goin chicken coop, with an extra room on the side for ahead without looking closely at the design. things like lawn tractors. Next thing she knew, she found Scott hard at work However, plans changed when the animals saw the pouring the footers for a large building in the

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Michelle Obrahma is mad and bobbing around because “her” nesting box is occupied by another hen who refuses to move. There were empty nest boxes available. photo by Amy Barnes

An authentic log cabin stands watch over the entrance to Whispering Acres. photo by Amy Barnes

new building. They moved right in, and the pigs took over the lawn-tractor side as their personal bedroom. Scott has plans to construct more buildings. Janine said Scott was upset that he had not been able to obtain her dream home sooner. Janine, however, looks at it differently, saying that the way things happened proves that “things will come to you when they are supposed to.” Much the same as it worked out when Janine and Scott met. Janine had been married previously and had two daughters, Ally and Samantha. Following her divorce, she tried online dating and was very disappointed in the results she was getting. In an effort to improve the results, Janine posted a complicated math story problem on her profile and said whoever could get the answer right would win a date with her. Perhaps not too surprising a move since she is a member of Mensa International. Scott attempted the problem and got the answer wrong. Janine said she would still go out with him, but Scott refused. He told her that he wanted to get the answer correct first, and he worked on it until he did. They met in person for their first date on December 5, 2008. They moved in together in January 2009. “I won the lottery with him, you couldn’t find a better person,” said Janine. Janine was working as a veterinarian technician, but when Scott learned she wanted to be a nurse, he gave her

support and encouragement to pursue a nursing career. Since then, Janine has amassed an 11-page resume of jobs, honors, references, degrees, presentations, memberships, and more. Among the jobs listed are intensive care unit nurse, mental health nurse and behavioral health educator. In her current position, Janine is the chief patient safety manager and mental health first aid instructor with the Department of Veterans Affairs in Cleveland. She also is a part of the Disaster Emergency and Medical Professionals who are deployed through the Federal Emergency Management Agency to assist the local VA in helping veterans affected by natural disasters. Scott and Janine have been married for 14 years, and since their first date, they have been apart only once. That was four years ago, when a hurricane hit Puerto Rico, and Janine was sent to the disaster area as part of her job. “I have never met so many wonderful people” as when in Puerto Rico, she said, adding there were “tons of veterans” there. She spent two weeks with her team, driving all over Puerto Rico looking for vets to ensure they


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2021

were taken care of, had their medications, and were transported to the hospital when necessary. When at her Cleveland office, Janine works 50-hour work weeks, some of which she is able to do from home. She said she loves working at the VA. “I can’t imagine ever leaving the VA,” Janine said. In the morning and evening, Janine takes care of the animals’ needs. When she telecommutes from home, she is able to take care of them again at lunchtime, otherwise her neighbor does. Once dreaming of joining the Air Force, but deemed ineligible because she is blind in her right eye, she said she loves helping veterans and has a particular interest in mental health issues for veterans. Janine’s grandfather was a World War II veteran who became an alcoholic in response to what he had experienced during the war. She said that, in 1976, her grandfather asked to borrow a gun from his son, a Parma police officer and Janine’s father, to get rid of some raccoons. Janine’s father did not give it a second thought, she said, and loaned his father the gun. The older man instead used the gun to commit suicide, Janine said. She said her father always blamed himself for his father’s death and could never overcome the immense guilt he felt. She said he sank into alcohol and drugs and died of a suspected overdose in 2017. As she grew up, Janine battled social anxiety and depression,

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Janine and Scott Smalley outside of the chicken coop Scott built. At the bottom of the photo is a very fluffy chicken, there are several of these on the farm and they are all named, “Jessica.” photo by Amy Barnes

Baa Baa Blind Sheep is 16 years old. photo by Amy Barnes

without treatment, help or support from her family. When she was 19, Janine moved into a century home on her own in Kirtland. It was October 16, 1995, and she decided, since it was a cool evening, to start a fire in the fireplace. No one knew the chimney was missing bricks. Janine fell asleep, and a few sparks later, the house was quickly engulfed in flames.

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It just so happened that Chris Gutka, an off-duty police officer, was driving by. He knew the house had been vacant awhile, but when he saw Janine’s car in the driveway and the flames, he took quick action and got Janine out of the house and to safety. When Janine tried to thank him, Gutka said to her, “Just make sure your life’s worth living.” Those words became a driving force in Janine’s life as she spends it helping the wounded of all species to thrive.

More information about Whispering Acres is available at https://bit.ly/3AxRqha and https:// bit.ly/3Byx3lx .To arrange a time to visit, call 440212-6769. Donations can be made at https://bit.ly/ 3lwVbiD Whispering Acres is a 501c3 organization.

Melvin survived being thrown from a moving car and came to roost at Whispering Acres. photo by Amy Barnes

Mama, Kayla and Lucy were rescued from starvation and neglect. At their previous home, Mama was jumping fences out of desperation to get to food so she could make milk for Kayla and Lucy because she was the only source of food for them. Kayla was named in honor of one of Janine Smalley’s friend’s cousin who was murdered. photo by Janine Smalley

From left, Henry, Toby VonGoatman and Gomer, Janine Smalley said she suspects Toby was deprived of oxygen at birth because he is intellectually and cognitively disabled.


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THE READING NOOK

DEAR ME

Untitled by Breylan

Dear Breylan, I know— how it is in life but just know it not your body telling u what to do it’s your heart telling u and your Editor’s note: As is shown in the play and now movie “Dear memories of the past self to do better to know your Evan Hanson,” as well as in the letters below, writing letters mistakes. The thing is that just follow your dreams and to yourself can help bring clarity, teach self-acceptance, just help the people in your life. P.S. To the one I love most and make goals more real. myself To the one the only Finn, this is your spirt telling This month’s guest writers are residents at area juvenile you this. detention centers. In some cases, the names of the writers have been changed in observation of privacy laws and regulations. Capitalizations, line breaks and spelling are Untitled are left to the creative choices of the individual writer. by Cody Reproduced with permission from the program’s Spring 2021 chapbook. Dear Cody, I can be whoever I want to be have learned that people can change and that change can be good, I have amazing Introduction Girl. Your kind respectful you cherish everyone who you by Zachary Thomas, program director come across. Don’t let anybody push you around. You are smart and an amazing Person don’t let anybody come in Writers in Residence is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization the way between of me and myself. Stay in Contact with that teaches creative writing to youths who are God incarcerated. Love, Cody The program’s mission is to empower the youths’ voices and to assist them in their re-entry into society. It also strives to reduce the recidivism rates of the residents and Untitled to participate in the transformation of the juvenile justice by Evan system. Originally founded as a student-run organization in 2017 To myself, a year from now I have to ask one main at John Carroll University, Writers in Residence currently question. Are you where you wanna be? If so, then great, partners with more than 10 colleges, universities and but knowing myself now You Probably wont. So what will juvenile facilities across Ohio including John Carroll you do about it? Is your relationship with all your family University, Oberlin College, Hiram College, and the better? Has your dad physacally said, “Im proud of You?” College of Wooster. Is your family outside your own blood still around? Do Support for the program is provided by the Anisfieldthey still mean everything to you like they do now? Have Wolf Book Awards and the Cleveland Foundation. Since you found a greater Purpose in life? Just make sure you 2019, more than 275 youths have participated in the better yourself and find motivation to move forward. program. Sincerely, Old Self Untitled by Anthony Dear Anthony, Remember when you were locked up and a lot of crazy things happened while you were away. Well you need to start doing things by yourself and start taking risks, because if you keep hanging out with “those” people then you’re not going to get anywhere in life. You can’t be trusting anybody cause they always gon do what benefits them. You need to learn from your mistakes and don’t think about peoples opinions cuz they aint facts.

Life by Miya Dear Miya, Get out of the system, stop doing things u know will get u introuble. You have a lot of potential weather u see it now or not and u can do great things & be successful like other people. Make your mom & dad proud, you’ve got this. Get back into sports, fix family relationships, be a better person. Don’t dwell on things u have no power over and change the things u do have power over. Sincerely, Miya background photo by Karolina Grabowska


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2021

BUSINESS: FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

Cryptic Crypto Clarified by Tyler Hatfield mentioned. What is interesting is that anyone can do this with their personal computer, but there is a catch or two. Processing cryptocurrencies requires a very powerful computer to generate coins at a reasonable speed. The process is called mining, and the speed at which coins are processed is referred to as the hash speed. The hash speed is very important because it directly affects how much money is being created. A powerful computer may mine up to $7 in coins per day, but the cost of the electricity spent producing those coins is often photo by Andre Francois McKenzie near or more than the amount earned. Because of this, cryptocurrency mining In last month’s column about ransomware, https://bit.ly/ has fallen out of favor with small or individual groups, while it 2Yr3HHj , the term “bitcoin” was briefly mentioned. But what is has continued to grow in large mining corporations that can it? produce currency on a much larger scale. Bitcoin is a digital currency or cryptocurrency used to pay for Then why do cryptocurrencies exist? Because they have many things online, and there are several different ones in existence. legitimate uses, as well as some less savory ones. These currencies exist only online, which is why they are On the positive side, cryptocurrencies are nearly impossible to called cryptocurrencies. They are traded the same as paper manipulate and very secure when stored correctly so they are money is online. They also have a specific value that allows great for investments; paying off large debts, like tuition; and them to be traded for real money, but this value is very volatile general online shopping. and changes by the second. However, on the dark side, because cryptocurrency The major difference with cryptocurrency is in how they are transactions and the coins themselves cannot be tracked, created and stored. cryptocurrencies are the top choice for things like online drug Unlike traditional paper money and funds stored digitally with transactions, human trafficking and scams. banks or credit cards, bitcoins are made up of long strings of As noted in last month’s column, a common bitcoin use is in encrypted letters and numbers. ransomware demands. Since it cannot be tracked, data These chains of encrypted data get stored in online pseudokidnappers cannot be tracked like they could be if ransoms banks that hold them on heavily secured and encrypted data were paid through debit cards or bank accounts. storage drives until the account holder “trades” them, the same Cryptocurrencies currently are not for the average person and way money is spent from a debit card. have few uses for people outside of special jobs and hobbies. What makes these currencies bizarre comes down to how they are made and handled. Rather than being printed like standard Tyler Hatfield has a passion for technology that he would like to someday turn into his own business. He runs a small media money, these coins are calculated by computers. group, hatsmediagroup.com, and works on computers on the This is done using a hash, which, in simple terms, is a very advanced mathematical formula. A computer runs the formula side. He can be contacted with questions and for recommendations at hatsmediagroup@gmail.com and, after some time, calculates one of the long strings that makes up a coin. These are then stored in the banks previously


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2021

BUSINESS: THE NETWORKER

Connection Challenges Lead to Growth or Rot

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Bringing good people good companies

by Bob Arnold Most of the smells that envelope you when out in nature are either from fresh growth or decay, like leaves, wood branches, trees, animals, and more. The fresh growth is found sprouting out of the ground or on tree limbs that usually start off as little beads on the branch that could be perceived as otherwise dead. But this eager little bud is yearning for something larger and grander. It will not be denied! Networking has been around since the dawn of humankind, and it will be around till we extinguish ourselves as a viable race. I am seeing some very interesting aspects of new growth in networking. This new growth is manifesting itself in a couple of ways: offline and online. The offline mechanics are changing a bit, yet still rely on the tried-and-true, ever-effective face-to-face encounter. It produces results. Many are seeing this in fresh ways. The online versions of networking also are refreshing. I am finding the most effective efforts are sprouting from programs like video chatting, where each person is in a little window in front of everyone else on the screen at the same time. We can see everyone, yet when we try to talk with one of them, everyone on the call hears what is said. Does that mean you have a bigger audience? Maybe! But that is not where I have found the real power. The private chat room is where the real power is, where there is the option to chat one-to-one with another person. I have used this feature to connect to someone about what they just said publicly that I would like to talk further with them about it. This action (eagerness?) has resulted in my gaining quite a few new friends and even a couple of people who have become clients. So, how does a networking room smell to you? Do you smell an eager freshness and opportunity, or do you smell rot? It is really up to you to produce the eagerness, so get to it, whether online or offline, and smell the roses.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2021

BUSINESS: THE IN BOX

Protecting Your Business Legacy by Shannon Davis One of the top reasons small businesses fail is poor planning. In business, we think of planning for financing, emergency reserves, management, and even planning to pivot when events dictate. But what about after we pass? In our private lives, many of us have a will and life insurance for our families after we pass on, but what about the same consideration for our businesses? Our health, fortitude and humanity have been tested at an exorbitant level over the past couple of years. We are more aware than ever that we need to plan for the unplanned. What if a key player in the company leaves for a new opportunity or gets sick or dies? What if a partner dies and the estate demands a buyout? How will the company survive when those key players are critical to success? A succession plan is not just for big corporations. A small business owner may have the dream of creating a legacy by passing the business on to future generations, but do the kids want that? Succession planning is defined as a strategy for passing on leadership roles, ensuring that the business continues to run smoothly after a company’s most important people move on, retire or pass away. If the desire is for a business to continue when the key players are unable to actively fulfill the roles required, both a shortterm plan, in case of accident or illness, and a long-term plan, in

case of death or incapacitation, should be conveyed clearly in writing. Initial steps include thinking about the people and positions in the company and start brainstorming. � Identify key positions and areas. What roles are critical to be filled? What are the tasks those roles fulfill? � Identify interested employees and assess capabilities. Who are the current employees or family members who could and want to fill those roles? � Develop and implement succession and training. Groom those people to seamlessly take over when necessary. � Evaluate effectiveness. Is this plan viable? What are the obstacles? � Review the plan annually or when there is a change in circumstances. � Enlist the help of an attorney and a financial advisor to help formalize and implement the plan Plan to succeed.

Shannon Davis is a financial advisor, entrepreneur and resident of Medina County. She is an advocate for financial literacy and a How Money Works educator. She can be reached by calling 303916-3864 or by visiting https://howmoneyworks.com/ shannondavis

BUSINESS New hires, promotions, certifications earned, and announcements

Congratulations to Michael, Connor and Alison Dempsey! The family’s photo was published on Page 6 of the feature story on the Lamphear sunflower field in our September issue, https://bit.ly/3hRb3dt At the time the photo was taken on August 14, Alison was pregnant. Baby Nolan made his appearance August 17, 2021, only three days after visiting the sunflowers!

Hospice of the Western Reserve is looking for volunteers for making phone calls, providing respite care, as well as licensed hairdressers and an attorney and notary, as well as volunteers with retail experience to help at the hospice store, Life’s Treasures Thrift Shop, in Medina. Volunteer training is offered monthly. For more information, call 216-255-9090 or fill out an application at https://bit.ly/3nDfHzP The Children’s Center of Medina County has announced that the fundraiser Pathway to Healing Walkway campaign has been completed with 54 pavers engraved with donors’ names. The fundraiser paid off the center’s mortgage for its location at 724 E. Smith Road, Medina. Has your business or an employee done something that should get applause or does your nonprofit have an announcement? Email the information to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com and put “Applause” in the subject line.

Big brother Connor says, “Ahoy!” to new arrival Nolan Dempsey. photo by Alison Dempsey


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2021

HOME AND GARDEN: VEGAN VITTLES

Vegan Zucchini Bread by Chris Pickens Though a surplus of zucchini is not an issue any more for this year, this recipe is a wonderful reason to pick up another zucchini. Some people are truly convinced that it is "just bread," and others swear it is a dessert. Bake a loaf, and you can decide for yourself. • • • • • • • • • • • •

¼ cup canola oil ⅓ cup oat or almond milk 1 tablespoon flaxseed 1 cup brown or white sugar 2 teaspoons vanilla* 1 cup grated or finely chopped zucchini 1 ½ cup all-purpose flour ½ teaspoon baking powder ½ teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon handful of walnuts and/or mini chocolate chips

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Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Whisk together canola oil, plant milk, flaxseed, sugar, and vanilla. Add zucchini and flour. Mix well. Add baking powder, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon. Mix together well. If adding walnuts or chocolate chips, fold in now. Line loaf pan with parchment paper or coat pan well with oil. Bake for 45-55 minutes, checking for doneness by inserting a knife into loaf at 35 minutes. You may need to check every five minutes to make sure to not overbake bread. If the loaf gets beyond golden brown, put foil on top of the loaf until done baking. Note: Imitation vanilla works just as well as the extract. Chris Pickens is a certified holistic nutrition coach, a health and wellness coach, a holistic health practitioner, and a holistic health coach. She has been a vegan since 2016 and enjoys sharing her recipes. She can be contacted at momof4chris@gmail.com

HOME AND GARDEN: WATCHDOG Under the Influence by Amy Barnes Once exclusively part of the world of celebrities, it is becoming more common for non-celebrities to be courted by companies to become online social influencers. How do you know if it is a legitimate offer, not just a way to get someone’s personal information to use for identity theft, running a scam, depleting the victim’s bank accounts, or other criminal actions? To avoid being scammed, it is vitally important to do due diligence. In other words, question and look up everything you can about the company that has approached you. Be sure your checklist includes the following points, as well as your own.

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1. Is the company registered to do business with the secretary of state where their home office is? This can be checked online. Ask the company where they are registered to do business, then go to that state’s secretary of state’s website and do a search. The link for Ohio’s is https:// businesssearch.ohiosos.gov/ 2. Check with the Better Business Bureau to see what their grade is and if they have complaints. If there are any, how were complaints handled? Companies can be researched here: https://www.bbb.org/ 3. Check to see if the company has legitimate followers or fake followers that have been purchased. To check if a follower is real, go to the company’s social media page, click on the followers, then click on a follower. Does the follower have any posts? Any friends? If the answer is no or very few, the follower is most likely fake. If the company has a high percentage of fake followers, they already are lying to you. Do you really want to do business with them? 4. Is there a charge for their services, for providing additional followers, for anything? You should not have to pay in order to work for them. 5. Do a search and find others the company has used as social influencers or ask the company for a list. Contact them and find out if they had a good experience, what they were paid, did they actually get paid, was it worth their time? 6. What is the compensation being offered? Cash? Products? Remember, any compensation, whether that is cash or products, would need to be reported to the IRS as income. 7. Are all posts paid for, no matter the response to them? Or is it an affiliate commission? An affiliate commission is based on how many people click from your post into the company’s website and make a purchase. 8. Carefully read over the contract and have someone you trust also read it. Make sure you understand it, that it makes sense, that it makes provisions for everything listed above, what provisions are made for ending the contract. Consider having a lawyer review the contract, most lawyers will do an initial 1-hour consultation for free. After taking the above factors into consideration and doing your own research, if you decide that this is an arrangement that is legitimate and advantageous to you, there is another precaution to take. Should you enter into an agreement with a company, it may be necessary to set up a payment method. It is important to have a payment method that will make it difficult for any scam attempt to succeed. One way to ensure your financial safety would be to set up an account at an online payment platform that is used only for influencer payments. If you decide to connect it to a bank account, make sure it is an account that is used only for transferring funds into, as an extra level of protection.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2021

HOME AND GARDEN: DIG IT!

Tree Transplant Tips column and photos by Michelle Riley Autumn rolls through with a woosh, as the first leaf takes a leap and cascades softly through the air, gently expressing the peace of letting go. In certain situations, we must let go. Other times, we choose to remember. The coming season gives us a constant nudging to remember. It is healing to express the love we are feeling while we are remembering. It is a healing experience to plant a tree in remembrance of someone you love, living or past. The right tree in the right place can make such a positive impact on the environment. When you plant a tree, you are taking a living, breathing entity, and offering it a generous life. If planted correctly, you are giving it a long, full and healthy life. Certain varieties of trees could very well outlive you. For the tree’s sake, plant it correctly so it may flourish. It does not matter if the tree is a ball-and-burlap or in a container, it gets planted the same way. Pick a spot that fits the proper requirements for the variety of tree chosen. Measure the height of the root ball or container and dig the hole a minimum of twice as wide and twice as deep as the root ball or container. Make sure the root ball is elevated a hair higher than the existing soil line. Mix the excavated soil with a mix of one-third peat moss or compost to two-thirds soil. Fill the hole to the height needed to elevate the root ball to the proper height. Tamp the soil in well to prevent the tree from sinking in the hole if the soil should settle. Place the tree in the hole. Make sure the pretty side faces the direction the tree will be viewed most.

The root ball after loosening its roots.

If the tree is in a container, massage the roots a bit to encourage them to stretch out. Finish backfilling around the root ball, and tamp the soil in firmly around the edges. Add a mulch ring and water generously. Michelle Riley is a local horticulturist, landscape designer, and consultant. She is the founder of the gardening subscription service, https://theplantmall.com/; https:// michellerileyhorticulturist.com ; and https://neohiogarden.com She also is the president of All About You Signature Landscape Design, Inc. Riley can be contacted at Info@MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com or by calling 234-6788266.

Ball-and-burlapped magnolia trees are ready to be added to a landscape.

S The root ball before being loosened.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2021

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HOME AND GARDEN: BITE ME!

Cavatelli With Rapini and Tomatoes

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recipe by Mark Bittler Chef Mark Bittler is a lifelong Ohioan with 27 years of experience as an executive chef, the last six of which have been with Brookdale Senior Living. So far, in his career at Brookdale, he has cooked thousands of meals for residents and mentored new team members. Bittler also is an Army veteran with 12 years of service. He learned his culinary skills at the Pennsylvania Institute of Culinary Arts. One of the highlights of his career was leading the catering team for seven different Ladies Professional Golf Association events.

tomatoes, matchstick style. The thinner they are sliced, the quicker they will cook. Chop or mince the garlic. Boil 2 quarts of water, add pinch of salt. Add cavatelli. They will start to float in approximately three to four minutes, indicating they are cooked. Drain, reserving pasta water. Heat 2 to 3 tablespoons olive oil on high heat. When hot, reduce heat to medium and add garlic, allow to cook. Add spoonful of pasta water and rapini, mix well. Add red pepper flakes, pinch of salt and pepper, tomatoes, and cavatelli. After a few minutes, add another spoonful of pasta water and butter. Combine. Remove from heat, top with Asiago cheese. Allow to sit for a minute, then serve.

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

Want to have your recipe featured in a future issue? Send it with your name, phone number (in case we have questions), the city you live in, and some information about you to: Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “recipe” in the subject line. Recipes MUST be your original recipe or one you have highly modified and thus made your own. By submitting a recipe, you are guaranteeing it is one you have developed or modified and used. This is open to all ages who would like to submit a recipe.

1 cup semolina flour ½ cup water salt rapini (broccoli rabe) 2 cups chicken stock or broth 1 squeeze of lemon juice 3 Roma or plum tomatoes 3 cloves garlic 2 to 3 tablespoons olive oil pinch red pepper flakes pinch pepper 1/3 stick butter Asiago cheese

On a cutting board, pour semolina flour in a mound and create a well in the middle. Slowly add water and a pinch of salt. Incorporate the water into the flour using the foldover-and-smash-down technique. Once combined, allow to rest for 30 to 45 minutes. Rinse rapini. Using only the top two-thirds of the rapini, cut into 1-inch strips, using both leaves and stems. Set rapini aside in a bowl. Boil the chicken broth and add a squeeze of fresh lemon juice. Add rapini. Stir well. Allow to cook for two to three minutes. Strain, and set aside. This will allow the rapini to tender as it cools. Sprinkle surface with small amount of regular flour and cut dough into small strips. Roll each strip to strip into a diameter slightly larger than a No. 2 pencil. Cut into 1 ¼ inch long pieces. Shape the dough into cavatelli, which looks similar to a miniature hot dog bun, by pressing a small hole into the middle of each piece or by rolling on a fork tine. While letting the pasta rest, slice the photo by Michele Blackwell


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2021

HEALTH: OF MIND AND BODY Battling Winter Hunger Hormones by Kelly Bailey The days are getting shorter, and are often cold, rainy and gray. Welcome to autumn in northeast Ohio! Ok, it is not all bad. Changing colors, cool hikes, bonfires, and hoodies are calling my name. But there is something else about fall that observant people often notice: They feel hungrier. Many people notice increased appetites and overeating at this time of year, and they are not imagining it. Take into consideration that the human body has evolved over thousands of years to deal with periods of feast and famine. The approach of winter, signaled by less daylight, signals our bodies to increase appetite and store body fat for the upcoming period of starvation. Of course, nowadays we do not experience winter starvation. So, we need to plan accordingly to handle increased hunger hormones. How? Glad you asked! 1. Eat warm and comforting foods. Is there any wonder we are drawn to soup when it gets cold? Soup is comforting and filling. Broth-based soups that include a lot of veggies are excellent for curbing an appetite. 2. Get outside and walk. Yes, even when it is cold. The fresh air, exercise and natural light will improve your mood and will reset circadian rhythms and hunger cues. 3. Stick with an eating schedule. Eating on a schedule regulates hunger hormones. Your body will learn to expect food only at certain times. Additionally, adhere to a timerestricted schedule. That means eating only between certain hours. For example, eating only between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Rather than limiting the types of foods you can eat, this eliminates bad eating habits, like late-night snacking.

A certified personal trainer and certified holistic nutrition coach, Kelly Baily owns and operates Kelly Bailey Wellness. Find her blog, visit the Food Freedom page, and contact her at https://www.kellybailey.fit/ Following any recommendations are solely at your discretion and responsibility. Consult your medical professional prior to undertaking any suggested diet, lifestyle or exercise change or routine.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2021

HEALTH: HEALTHY TRAILS

Track This by Robert Soroky When engaged in outdoor distance exercising, whether it be long walks around the neighborhood or a full afternoon on a bike, I always want to know what I have achieved. How far did I walk or ride? How fast or slow did I go? Technological advances now allow for tracking of every move. That may seem a tad creepy to some, but, used the right way, tracking technology can be a great tool for understanding and improving exercise output. Several devices can be used to track exercise efforts. A smart phone is the most obvious choice. The cycling apps available for download to a phone provide a wealth of useful information, everything from time, speed and distance to elevation gain and heart rate. The plus side is that almost all of them are free, usually charging only for more advanced features. The downside is that these apps can drain your phone battery relatively quickly, especially if the app is always running and turn-by-turn features are used. The better option is to use a dedicated cycling computer that mounts directly onto the handlebar or stem. These units range from basic models that give speed, distance, time, and trip information to more complex units with full map and downloadable route features, among other things. Cycling computers typically gather information in one of two ways. Either they rely on sensors and magnets mounted on the bike itself that transmit ride data to a display unit, or they use GPS tracking technology. For more sophisticated ride information, like pedal rpms or heart rate, separate sensor mounts may be required. Less expensive units are battery powered, with the batteries lasting approximately two years before needing replacement, while higherend units are rechargeable. Some higher-end units can be accessorized with headlights and taillights or radar devices that communicate with the display unit for

added riding safety. Whichever type of device is used, even having the most basic data, like distance and speed, can help define progress and push you to improve on your next ride. Robert Soroky is a lifelong cyclist who regularly participates in long-distance charity rides and is the manager of the Century Cycles Medina location. Contact Soroky at robert@centurycycles.com to suggest column topics, for further information or to chat about bikes.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2021

COMMUNITY: GEMS

Fund Honors Veterans and Offers Assistance by Kent Von Der Vellen Military veterans share a sense of family, and several veteran organizations in the area help promote those bonds by offering assistance to veterans. From time to time, a veteran may need help but not qualify for a government service or fit the guidelines of other veteran organizations, even though those organizations coordinate with each other and other community organizations to try to solve this problem. In 2015, Mike Jacobson decided more could be done. He wanted to try to ensure no veterans fell between the cracks of available aid. He became the driving force behind the creation of the Medina County Veterans Memorial Fund. One of the first acts of the MCVMF was to raise funds and partner with other area veteran organizations to bring the Moving Wall, a replica of the Vietnam Wall to Medina in 2019. When the Gold Star Memorial in York Township was vandalized, the MCVMF again partnered with other veteran organizations to raise funds for restoration work. Veteran referrals to MCVMF come from the various veteran organizations in Medina County. The fund has helped veterans by covering the cost of needed car repairs and paying for a flight so a veteran could see a dying family member, said MCVMF board member Ed Zachary. They also have sponsored more than 50 meals for veterans’ families; repaired a veteran’s home; kept a veteran’s family from becoming homeless; paid the medical bills for a severely ill veteran; and installed seven flag poles, one for each of the branches of service at the Medina County Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Currently, MCVMF is working with the Brunswick American Legion and Brunswick Veterans of Foreign Wars to raise funds to purchase veteran memorial flags to put on the sides of the roads. Even though founder Jacobson died June 7, 2018, MCVMF has continued its mission to serve veterans. The MCVMF board is currently made up of Zachary, Joe Destro and Jim Hoessle. Donations can be mailed to the Medina County Veterans Memorial Fund, P. O. Box 523, Brunswick, Ohio, 44212. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2YlOgjc or https://bit.ly/3uJZ4Us

Medina County Veterans Memorial Fund P.O. Box 523 Brunswick, Ohio 44212 440-567-5428 Web address: https://bit.ly/2YlOgjc Date of formation: 07/01/2015 Organization type: 501(c)(3) Description of Organization’s Purpose: To make a difference in the lives of veterans and/or their families in times of financial need and to promote and support veteran's activities throughout Medina County. Is the organization's registration status current? Yes The financial information below is from the organization’s most recent filing within the on-line system. If the items below are blank, the organization has not yet filed information on-line or they may be exempt from filing an annual report. Reporting Year: 2019 Reporting Start Date: 1/1/2019 Reporting End Date: 12/31/2019 Total Revenue: Total Expenses: Total Program Expenses: Percent of Total Expenses: Total Assets:

COMMUNITY: IN DEED

When a Marine Answers by Amy Barnes

It was 7:10 on a Monday morning and Jason Schlegel was headed to work on North Medina Line Road. Little did he know, as he neared the Medina and Summit County line, he was about to be very needed. What Schlegel saw in the road ahead made him immediately stop his truck. There was no hesitation, all the Marine knew was that he was in the right place at the right time, and he needed to take action. A baby deer was collapsed in the road, unable to move, in shock and too terrified by the traffic to even try. Kali Hindes of Granger was right behind Schlegel’s truck when it came to a sudden stop on the road, shielding the baby deer. When a large pickup truck with U.S. Marine Corps plates suddenly stops in front of you, you stop, too. Hindes got out of her car to offer help. The great kindness and love that she saw next made her post about it on social media. There was a 220-pound Marine on the ground with the fawn, holding her head in his hands. He pet her head, ears and body while speaking to her and praying. Schlegel would write later, on Hindes’ original post, that he sensed how shocked and scared the baby deer was. He was determined to get the fawn off of the road. “It’s people like that that remind us there are good people in the world,” Hindes wrote. Hindes’ toddlers were in the car with her, and she wrote that Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a she was grateful they got to witness the tenderness and caring Schlegel showed. volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the She was posting because she did not know his name but Medina Lions Club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob hoped he would see her post, because she wanted him to get F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen this message, “Thank you for your big heart! You are an by e-mailing Gems@BlakeHousePublishing.com or by calling incredible person!” 330-421-0863. Learn what other area nonprofits need by visiting As people responded, thanking her for posting and appreciating a positive story, one person posted, possibly Giving Hearts under the Help tab at https:// jokingly, that the rescuer must have been a hunter who was www.joyofmedinacountymagazine.com/ .


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2021 planning for the future. That was one post Schlegel could not let pass. He quickly responded by writing, “No…I am not a hunter, however, I have no ill will to those who do. Just in this particular instance I felt called to help a small creature of God.” Then he shared the rest of the story. Schlegel wrote, “After a few attempts we were able to get her far enough off the side of the road into the banks where I continued to comfort her, lay my hands on her and she fell asleep briefly in my arms.” He added, “I am so thankful in that brief moment if I was able to make a positive impact on those 2 little kids in the car to see a ‘strong’ man comforting a small, helpless, shocked, hurt and potentially dying creature of the Lord Almighty.” When Schlegel’s wife, Kara, heard about the post and the words of gratitude being posted, she reactivated her account so she could post, thanking everyone for their kind words. “My husband, Jason, is an amazing man and his actions to care for this baby deer doesn’t surprise me at all!”

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It was an unusual day for Schlegel and his family, who live in Copley. Within four hours that day, not only was Schlegel going to save the fawn, but his wife would unsuccessfully try to rescue a chipmunk from the family cat and a car would run over a mouse in their driveway, which his wife would hold and pray over until the little mouse passed. Later that evening, while his daughter played outside, a stray cat appeared out of nowhere, insisting on petting and attention. All of this caused Schlegel to write, “…makes me wonder what the rest of the week holds.” For his kind and caring act, Schlegel will be receiving a gift certificate from this magazine to The BookShelf, 105 W. Liberty Street, Medina. All proceeds from books sales benefit Project: Learn of Medina County, an adult literacy program. A special thank you to Hindes and to the Schlegels for giving permission to share this story with Joy of Medina County Magazine readers.


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Joyful Word Search

Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2021

Joyful Word Search

MIRTH AND JOY

Whisper Home Whisper of of Home

by Jerry King

T K N I O K R A B L

R L Y B K Q A T H

O D G C L A T O Y

N B A N B E N J M

S U T E I K A E L

Q A Y L D K L B C L WW O O T N Z M

OINK OINK BLEAT BLEAT BAAA GOBBLE BAAA GOBBLE CLUCK CLUCK QUACK

A D N B U B Z R K

A M Y D N Z O G C K WW T D T Y C R

HONK HONK BARK BARK SNORT SNORT CROWING CROWING MEOW MEOW MAAA

QUACK

MAAA

Joyful Word Search

Answer Key for Last Month’s Search

Kit’s Adventure Adventure Kit's S W O L L A M H S R A M

S Q U E A K Y T O Y S M

R E S C U E D J I L K P

D O G C T D L F W K B K

T S O L A U E O O K D R

L B M G F R T D N X N Q

C D B Y X H E G N D L M

N A A A G T M D E U W Z

J L T I L I Y V G N O V

P L N K N L O A Y Y L W

L N Y R V L Z D R B T V

P T R B Y I X Z W G T M

L M J J Z E T K G K L D


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2021

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT: ROLL ’EM!

Along for the Cruise by Hunter Barnard Movie: “Jungle Cruise” Viewed: movie theater Rating: I was really excited to see it because it is kind of based on a ride in Disney. It is about a lady named Lily Houghton and her brother, McGregor Houghton, who are looking for a tree that has very special flowers bloom on it. The flowers make sick people better and can even stop people from dying. The tree is really hard to find, though, because it is so special, and they have to hire a man who owns a boat to try and take them to it. His name is Frank Lopez de Heredia. He was probably my favorite character because he tried to be really funny. Sometimes he was, but sometimes he was not. Frank, Lily and McGregor are all following a map, but there is a bad guy, Prince Joachim, following them, who wants the flowers for himself. I think Lily should have the flower more because she is really smart and wants to try to do good things with it. Prince Joachim sends some people after them. They all end up meeting, and I thought that part was really cool. There also was a really big waterfall and a really cool temple, and I thought that it looked really cool. The end of the movie is always my favorite part as long as it is a happy ending. I thought this movie ended really well. It had lots of cool things in it and lots of action. It was pretty funny, too! I think it was a good movie for kids, moms and dads. Everyone should go see it. Hunter Barnard is an energetic 8-year-old who is a former Brunswick resident who now attends Berea City Schools and likes to share his opinion. He is assisted in writing his column by his mother, Jessica Rapenchuk.

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT: GETTING REEL

A Magical Land and a Bad Cruise by Amy Barnes Movie: “Shang-Chi and the Legend of the 10 Rings” Viewed: movie theater Rating: When a movie trailer shows one thing and a movie shows something else, I always feel lied to. If things change as a movie is edited, then change the trailer! After all, trailers are a contract between a studio and moviegoers that this is what a story is going to be about, pay your money and this will be the story you will see. The trailer showed Shang-Chi breaking ties with his father, Zheng Zu, because he realizes his father is a gangster and he uses the 10 rings for evil purposes. Nope, did not happen like that in the movie. I kept waiting for that scene. In the movie, the reason for the break between the two is

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completely different and has completely different effects on Shang-Chi. Second problem I had was that no one agreed to how long it had been since Shang-Chi had been on his own. Awkwafina’s character, Katy, who was Shang-Chi’s best friend after coming to America, claimed they had been friends for 10 years. Yet, Shang-Chi and his father kept saying he had left for America six years ago. Get it straight. Fix the script. I kept having to do the math and I hate doing math. The only other problem I had with the movie was the reason for Zheng Zu returning to Shang-Chi’s mother’s ancestral home, Ta Lo. Zheng Zu has lived for hundreds of years, and every day his entire driving purpose was gaining power. He is shown throughout the movie as being tough, unforgiving, demanding, and abusive except for one short period during Shang-Chi’s early years. We are supposed to then believe that the reason for his returning to Ta Lo has nothing to do with gaining power but because of a sad longing he has. Sorry, just could not buy it in this movie, and I am usually the first to accept a character can change. This movie did not make it in the least believable. In spite of the abovementioned flaws, the movie never stalls or drags, has some impressively choreographed fight scenes, good twists and turns, a vengeful forest, an assortment of unusual creatures, lots of flying-through-theair stunts, and even throws in a dragon for good measure. Movie: “Jungle Cruise” Viewed: movie theater Rating: If you really, really like dad jokes and you have always dreamed of listening to Dwayne Johnson deliver them, this is the perfect movie for you. This is one of the few movies that I wanted to walk out of about 15 minutes into it. I stayed because I could not believe it was not going to get better. It did not. I like Johnson, but I was less than impressed by this movie, which seemed to be a compilation of scraps from every other safari-adventure movie ever made. The scenes that did not make it into “Jewel of the Nile,” “Pirates of the Caribbean” and the Indiana Jones franchise, got knitted together here in a boring mess. After the movie, a theater employee asked what I thought of the movie, I told her. She said that she could not stand to watch Johnson and Emily Blunt together because they are both “eyebrow” actors and she wanted real acting, not that much eyebrow action. Made me laugh, and I had to agree. If you are desperate for a mild date movie where you are going to be making out and ignoring the movie anyway, this is the one for you. Amy Barnes, Joy of Medina County Magazine editor, is teased by her family for enjoying going to movie theaters so much that she loves all movies. Which means, if she finds a movie terrible, you know how bad it must be.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2021

National roller-skating champions recently performed at a fundraiser at the Brunswick Skate Station to support three local skaters who won placement on Team USA and were to compete at the World Games in Paraguay. The three skaters were Susanna Spatz, Michael Slowey and Tom Schneider. The rink also collects cans yearround to raise money for the regional, national and world competitions. photos by FlashBang Photography

Second place winners in the World Skate senior pairs, Michael Slowey and Susanna Spatz, perform at the fundraiser.

Soon after the fundraiser, Tom Schneider competed in the solo dance category for the World Class competition in Paraguay. To see a short video of his fundraiser performance, click here: https://bit.ly/3iqzb71


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2021

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From left, winning at nationals were local skaters Brittany Randolph, gold in figures and loops combined; Kylee Hayden, third in juvenile figures; and Emily Schell, first in the advanced long program and first in the freshman/sophomore short program.

Janet Ball and Bruce Lane (right) recently won bronze in two-team dance at the national competition level. Ball and Lane are the owners of Brunswick Skate Station, 1261 Industrial Parkway North, #4, Brunswick. John Quinn, left, won silver in figures, loops and combined and bronze in solo dance at nationals.

Susanna Spatz and Michael Slowey end each performance with an embrace. continued, Page 28


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Fundraiser attendees watching skating performances.

Michael Kent, left, and Justin Mitchel were enjoying the evening. To see the video, click https://bit.ly/3uzVDQd

T Children are invited to read stories to therapy dogs during “Tales and Tails” at the Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth.

Looks like 4-year-old Henry the golden retriever was enjoying his first time as a therapy dog at the library. Seated are owners Don and Linda Warner, beside Henry is 10-year-old Phoebe McRae. Waiting for a turn is 12-year-old Alister McRae and mom Trisha McRae. Siblings Colson Tonge, 2 years old, and Lilly Bell, 9 years old, read to Mr. Finn, a 6-year-old corgi who has been a therapy dog for four years and is owned by Roni Leatherman.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2021

Jack Scheffer, 7 years old, reads to lhasa apso Gizmo, while owner Ramona Wonov, right, and an unidentified woman watch.

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Jubilee Becker, 7 years old, with Mr. Finn

The local chapter of the Boy Scouts of America, once known as the Chippewa District and more recently as the Soaring Eagles District, gathered for a reunion. Everyone present had been in scouting for at least 20 years, and many had been in for 50 years.

From left, Robert Cripps, Shane Dean and Ed Martin continued, Page 30


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From left, John Burke, Carl Chudzinski, Dick Heilman, and Tom Boberg

From left, Bill Schafer, Ken Engle, Judy Engle, Pete Metzloff, Jane Eberhart, Chuck Newhauser, Pat Newhauser, and Dave Marvinney

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2021

November 2021 Nonprofit Calendar Monday, November 1 World Vegan Day https://bit.ly/3m77pOi and National Cook for Your Pets Day Comic Book Sneakers, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Decorate your shoes with comic book pages. Bring pair of white canvas shoes. Comic pages will be provided but you also can bring your own. Register at https://bit.ly/2ZzgzLD Tuesday, November 2 Look for Circles Day, which pairs perfectly with Cookie Monster’s Birthday Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. Create! Accesorize Your Phone, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. From charger holders to speakers, learn how to make phone accessories. Register at https://bit.ly/3ANqStn

Camp Wired: Search Engine Extravaganza, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn about different search engines, including those that offer specialized content. Register at https://bit.ly/3ihUurE Tween Scene, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. After-school activities, games, crafts for ages 9 to 14. Legal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina 1907 Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway, Medina. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served. Masks required. Seventh Annual Art With a Heart for Children, 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m., Blue Heron Conference Center, 3227 Blue Heron Trace, Medina. Benefits The Children’s Center of Medina County and the Medina County Juvenile Detention Center’s art therapy program. Art preview, appetizers, cocktails, music. Art includes pieces from community artists and from Medina County Juvenile Detention Center students. Auction begins at 7 p.m. Per attendee, $60. Get tickets at https://bit.ly/3uhvlCc

Friday, November 5 National Love Your Red Hair Day (that one is for our editor!) and Men Make Dinner Day Meditation and Mindfulness With Horses, 9 a.m., Forever Amber Acres, 1133 Granger Road, Medina. One-hour guided meditation with therapy horses in indoor, unheated horse arena. Free for military veterans and first responders, $20 donation requested from others. Chairs provided; masks requested. More information at https://bit.ly/3ifYWH4 Monthly Makers: Squirrels, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Display building. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. For more information and to register, go to https://bit.ly/3zJZaMD Grocery Bingo! 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Medina County Office for Older Adults, 246 Northland Drive, Medina. In-person and virtual players. Bring non-perishable grocery item. Must be center member to play, call 330-723-9514 for more information and to registger. Parachute Drop, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Story Time Room, Medina Library, Thursday, November 4 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Make a parachute and then drop it Use Your Common Sense Day Do not count on it! Monthly Makers: Squirrels, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Oenslager Nature Center, from the third floor skylight area. Each family or group gets 15 minutes. 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Display building. Registered households To register for a spot, go to https://bit.ly/39Is6do are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to Saturday, November 6 that month’s theme. For more information and to register, go to National Bison Day and World Numbat Day, look it up, it is an https://bit.ly/3zJZaMD adorable critter! Wednesday, November 3 National Accessory Day Monthly Makers: Squirrels, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Display building. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. For more information and to register, go to https://bit.ly/3zJZaMD Chapstick Lab, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Beeswax, essential oils and other ingredients provided. Grades 6 through 12. Family History and Learning Center and Makerspace Tour, 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway, Medina. The Fine Art of Napkin Folding, 7 pm. to 8 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Learn the hidden meanings in folded cloth napkins and learn how to fold napkins creatively. Register at https://bit.ly/3unzmoK WAITING LIST


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2021 Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Color Hike, through November 21, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Find late fall color, even if the leaves have all fallen. Follow the trail and read signs. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. All ages. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/36XdMfK A Healthy Dose of Nature: Hiking Series, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., Killbuck Lakes, 7996 White Road, Burbank. Vigorous 3- to 5-mile hike with naturalist, dress for weather, wear appropriate footwear, bring own water. Ages 10 and up. No registration, free. Monthly Makers: Squirrels, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Display building. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. For more information and to register, go to https://bit.ly/3zJZaMD Social Media 101, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn about the variety of social media options available. Covers what is good and not good of social media. Register at https://bit.ly/3CQQ2b9 Mittler’s Flea Market, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Kitten Krazy, 930 Lafayette Road, Medina. Huge indoor space, some outside when weather permits. All proceeds benefit Kitten Krazy, a nonprofit cat adoption center. Donations accepted of anything in clean, useable condition. Horses Empowering Women Self-Care, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Forever Amber Acres, 1133 Granger Road, Medina. Work with therapy horses to learn about self-care, delegating, making time for fun, and how to say, “no.” Ages 21 and up. Cost is $50 per person. Call 330-618-6010 for more information or to register. Mysterious World of Owls, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Medina Raptor Center presentation features owls and their unique features and abilities. Live owls will be present. Donations requested: paper towels, tissues, Dawn dish soap, bleach, zip top baggies, bird seed, suet, peanut butter, garbage bags. Further information at 330-722-9364. 118th Annual Turkey Dinner, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. Drive-through only because of COVID. Turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes, gravy, sweet potatoes, green beans, dessert for $12 per dinner. MUST bring receipt from e-mail to pick up food. Order meals at https://www.brunswickumc.net/ For more information, call 330-2253179. Daylight Savings Time ends at 2 a.m., November 7. Set clocks back one hour before going to bed. Sunday, November 7 Zero Tasking Day https://bit.ly/39K0S60 Daylight Savings Time ends at 2 a.m., set clocks back one hour if did not the night before. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 8 a.m. to noon, Litchfield Township Fire Station, 9487 Norwalk Road, Litchfield. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Color Hike, through November 21, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Find late fall color, even if the leaves have all fallen. Follow the trail and read signs. One sign has a code word to list on

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Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. All ages. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/36XdMfK Monthly Makers: Squirrels, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Display building. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. For more information and to register, go to https://bit.ly/3zJZaMD Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Petco, 1052 Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth. Monday, November 8 Tongue Twister Day and Abet and Aid Punsters Day Wow, that would be awesome to combine the two! Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Color Hike, through November 21, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Find late fall color, even if the leaves have all fallen. Follow the trail and read signs. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. All ages. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/36XdMfK Monday Movie Matinee: “Overcomer,” 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Cosponsored by Soprema Senior Center. To reserve a space, call Soprema at 330-335-1513. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Makerspace Mondays: Embroidery Machine Demo, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Watch a demonstration of how to use the equipment in the Makerspace and Digital Lab. Register at https://bit.ly/39IweKq WAITING LIST Art in the Afternoon: Birch Tree Paint Resist, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Use painter’s tape and paint to make fall art. Ages 5 to 12. No registration required. Autumn Nature Mobile, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Use pinecones, leaves and more to create autumn mobile. Register at https://bit.ly/2XUMTYL Meet Florence Nightingale, Mother of Nursing, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Nightingale was a member of the British aristocracy who founded modern nursing and was a social reformer who gained prominence during the Crimean War. Mission: STEMpossible, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. It is National STEM Day! Pick up a mission supply kit to complete top-secret, classified STEM challenges. Grades 3 and up. Register for kit at https://bit.ly/3CZPIqJ Monday Night Intrigue: “The Babysitter: My Summers With a Serial Killer,” 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. While her mother works in a motel and at night dances in bars, the motel’s handyman babysits little Liza Rodman. They did not know he was a serial killer. Adults. Register at https://bit.ly/3F0WxtY


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2021

Tuesday, November 9 Chaos Never Dies Day https://bit.ly/2Ztxcs5 No, no it does not. Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Color Hike, through November 21, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Find late fall color, even if the leaves have all fallen. Follow the trail and read signs. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. All ages. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/36XdMfK Monthly Makers Display: Squirrels; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday; noon to 5 p.m., Sunday; through November 28, Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view displays created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. Animal Tracks for Families, 10 a.m., Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Find and learn about various animal tracks and scat while hiking. All ages. WAITING LIST at https://bit.ly/2ZsyMdK American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Our Saviour Lutheran Church, 1605 Center Road, Hinckley. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Buying New Tech, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn ins and outs of what to look for when buying new devices. Afternoon at the Cinema: Classic Edition, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Showing “Meet John Doe” from 1941, starring Barbara Stanwyck and Gary Cooper. Register at https://bit.ly/39Oqmzr Alphabet Adventure: P is for Pajamas, 6:30 p.m. to 7:15 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Play pajama bingo, investigate moon sand, try parachute play, more. Wearing pajamas is welcome. Ages 2 to 6. Register at https://bit.ly/3zM1oLD Author Visit: Kristen Lepionka, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Author of the Roxane Weary mystery series. Debut book was “The Last Place You Look.” Meeting link will be sent after registration at https://bit.ly/3zP0PRc Local Author: Amy Grisak, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Grisak will join virtually from Montana, will share her love of nature and will discuss her book, “Nature Guide to Glacier and Waterton Lakes National Parks.” Adults. Register at https://bit.ly/2XT5X9A

Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view displays created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Seasonal Discoveries, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award, naturalist will initial form at end of hike. For form and more information, go to https://bit.ly/3pD5P71 Teen Movie Afternoon: “Catch Me if You Can,” 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Meeting Room B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. FBI agent pursues con artist. No registration. ORMACO Annual Dinner, 6 p.m., Pickle Mama’s, 7249 Wooster Pike Road, Seville. Celebration of ORMACO’s 11th anniversary. Appetizers, dinner, music. Cost: $35 per person. Call 419-853-6016 for tickets. DIY Journal: Owl Diaries, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Decorate a journal and create a pencil topper. Register at https://bit.ly/2Y2vkq6 Wadsworth Historical Society: The Mysteries in Rogues Hollow, 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Learn history of former mining village in Chippewa Township, known for hauntings.

Thursday, November 11 National Sundae Day All Medina County District Library locations closed for staff development day. Wadsworth Library is open. Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Color Hike, through November 21, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Find late fall color, even if the leaves have all fallen. Follow the trail and read signs. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. All ages. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/36XdMfK Monthly Makers Display: Squirrels; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday; noon to 5 p.m., Sunday; through November 28, Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view displays created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Call 330-722-9364, for more information American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Tween Scene: Etiquette Boot Camp, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Wednesday, November 10 Practice manners of being a host and a guest. Gratitude tree craft, giving National Forget-Me-Not Day https://bit.ly/3CNC4GR Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Color Hike, through and receiving gifts graciously, and more. For ages 9 to 14. Register at November 21, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard https://bit.ly/3EZoZfu Valley Road, Seville. Find late fall color, even if the leaves have all fallen. Follow the trail and read signs. One sign has a code word to list on Friday, November 12 Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Fancy Rat and Mouse Day https://bit.ly/3CLCGgg Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Color Hike, through Discoveries award. All ages. For more information, go to November 21, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard https://bit.ly/36XdMfK Monthly Makers Display: Squirrels; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Valley Road, Seville. Find late fall color, even if the leaves have all fallen. Saturday; noon to 5 p.m., Sunday; through November 28, Oenslager Follow the trail and read signs. One sign has a code word to list on


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2021 Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. All ages. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/36XdMfK Monthly Makers Display: Squirrels; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday; noon to 5 p.m., Sunday; through November 28, Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view displays created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina United Methodist Church, 4747 Foote Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. till ?, Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass/country bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. Saturday, November 13 World Kindness Day Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Color Hike, through November 21, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Find late fall color, even if the leaves have all fallen. Follow the trail and read signs. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. All ages. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/36XdMfK Craft Fair, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. No admission charge. Monthly Makers Display: Squirrels; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday; noon to 5 p.m., Sunday; through November 28, Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view displays created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. K-9 Kapers, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Plum Creek Park South, 2500 Plum Creek Parkway, Brunswick Hills. Socialize dogs while hiking. Dogs must be on 8-foot non-retractable leash. Bring towel for muddy feet and water bowl for dog. All ages, children must have accompanying adult. Free. No registration. Author Visit: Andrea Wang, 11 a.m. to noon, virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Author of “Watercress,” “Magic Ramen” and “The Many Meanings of Meilan.” Meeting link will be sent after registration at https://bit.ly/3kOAI8P Mittler’s Flea Market, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Kitten Krazy, 930 Lafayette Road, Medina. Huge indoor space, some outside when weather permits. All proceeds benefit Kitten Krazy, a nonprofit cat adoption center. Donations accepted of anything in clean, useable condition. Bird Retweet, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Get help, answers for how to best feed feathered friends. Bird information displays. All ages. Sunday, November 14 Pickle Day

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I A list of art shows in Medina County. To have a show listed, send the information to joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late.

From Plein Air Study to Studio Painting November 8 through December 5 B. Smith Gallery Third Floor, Medina Library 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina 20th Annual Nature Art Fest 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., November 13, 2021 Noon to 4 p.m., November 14, 2021 Medina County Park District Oenslager Nature Center 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Color Hike, through November 21, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Find late fall color, even if the leaves have all fallen. Follow the trail and read signs. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. All ages. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/36XdMfK Bird Retweet, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Get help, answers for how to best feed feathered friends. Bird information displays. All ages. Monthly Makers Display: Squirrels; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday; noon to 5 p.m., Sunday; through November 28, Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view displays created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Petco, 1052 Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth. ORMACO: Bridges and Dances, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Homerville Community Center, 8964 Spencer Road, Homerville. Featuring Rebecca Shasberger, cello. For more information, call 419-853-6016. Weymouth Preservation Society Autograph Books and Local History Exhibit, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., 3314 Myers Road, Medina. Autograph books from 1824 to 1930s, items from Weymouth church and stores. Period games for children. Free. Monday, November 15 I Love to Write Day (and then send in your writing for a chance to be published in The Reading Nook in Joy of Medina County Magazine! Email submissions to: Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com ) Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Color Hike, through November 21, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Find late fall color, even if the leaves have all fallen. Follow the trail and read signs. One sign has a code word to list on


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2021

Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. All ages. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/36XdMfK Digital Lab Takeover, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Digital Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway, Medina. Teens take over lab to create photo strips and bookmarks. Register at https://bit.ly/3CV79bA Let’s Explore: Thanksgiving Science, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Experiments with cranberries, read a story, do a craft, try to make corn dance, more. All ages. Register at https://bit.ly/3zRegzT Meet Chassie Chadwick, High Priestess of Fraud, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Chadwick used her talent for deception to gain millions of dollars by convincing banks and people she was Andrew Carnegie’s illegitimate daughter. Tuesday, November 16 Button Day Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Color Hike, through November 21, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Find late fall color, even if the leaves have all fallen. Follow the trail and read signs. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. All ages. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/36XdMfK Monthly Makers Display: Squirrels; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday; noon to 5 p.m., Sunday; through November 28, Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view displays created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. Bookish Bites: “Escape from Mr. Lemoncello’s Library,” 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Games, crafts, hands-on activities. Untangle puzzles, clues and ciphers before time runs out. Register at https://bit.ly/3CX5vqh Outlander Trivia and Discussion, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Discussion, trivia games to celebrate ninth book in series. Wednesday, November 17 Homemade Bread Day and Unfriend Day Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Color Hike, through November 21, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Find late fall color, even if the leaves have all fallen. Follow the trail and read signs. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. All ages. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/36XdMfK Monthly Makers Display: Squirrels; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday; noon to 5 p.m., Sunday; through November 28, Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view displays created by local families. Get inspired and consider

becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Pop Tart Pillow, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Make a pillow that looks like a Pop Tart. Register at https://bit.ly/3AS2k2f Instant Pot 101, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Seville Library. Presented by OSU Extension Office. Tips and tricks, learn how to use one. Register at https://bit.ly/3ifTnsa Intro to Microsoft Excel, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn Excel basics. Interactive class for beginners. Register at https://bit.ly/3odCJNJ Book Page Holiday Ornaments, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Make ornaments using pages from old books. Materials provided. Register at https://bit.ly/39N7OiM Thursday, November 18 Use Less Stuff Day Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Color Hike, through November 21, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Find late fall color, even if the leaves have all fallen. Follow the trail and read signs. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. All ages. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/36XdMfK Monthly Makers Display: Squirrels; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday; noon to 5 p.m., Sunday; through November 28, Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view displays created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. Camp Wired: Shopping Online Safely, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn safety tips, how to get best prices, shipping costs returns, more. Register at https://bit.ly/3CUqNER American Red Cross Blood Drive, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m., St. Ambrose Church, 929 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Can You Escape? The Color Scheme, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. You will need your color knowledge and you will need to work with a team to rescue the paints. Register at https://bit.ly/3EXoZwF Family Law Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. By reservation only. Contact Scott Newman, snewman@medinaco.org for an appointment. Legal forms, books and other legal resources made available. First come, first served. Turkey Tales, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Enjoy turkey stories and rhymes. Link sent after registering at https://bit.ly/3zQYa9J Explorastory: “Five Little Monkeys,” 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Play Monkey See, Monkey Do; make monkey puppet; sing songs; more. Register at https://bit.ly/3kLw3Er


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2021 As American as Pumpkin Pie, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Food historian Sarah Wassberg Johnson demonstrates pie roasting, historical overview of pumpkin, more. Link sent after registering at https://bit.ly/3CXzKNt

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All proceeds benefit Kitten Krazy, a nonprofit cat adoption center. Donations accepted of anything in clean, useable condition. Bird Retweet, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Get help, answers for how to best feed feathered friends. Bird information displays. All ages. Friday, November 19 Medina Candlelight Walk Parade of Lights, 5:30 p.m. Parade lines up National Have a Bad Day Day https://bit.ly/39FiSig at 4:30 at Medina High School at corner of Union and Spring Grove and Medina Candlelight Walk https://bit.ly/39Lpcod travels toward and around Public Square. No candy will be thrown as Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Color Hike, through per city ordinance. November 21, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Find late fall color, even if the leaves have all fallen. Sunday, November 21 Follow the trail and read signs. One sign has a code word to list on World Television Day Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Medina Candlelight Walk https://bit.ly/39Lpcod Discoveries award. All ages. For more information, go to Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Color Hike, last day, 8 https://bit.ly/36XdMfK a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Monthly Makers Display: Squirrels; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Seville. Find late fall color, even if the leaves have all fallen. Follow the Saturday; noon to 5 p.m., Sunday; through November 28, Oenslager trail and read signs. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural trail to view displays created by local families. Get inspired and consider Discoveries award. All ages. For more information, go to becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided https://bit.ly/36XdMfK outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s Monthly Makers Display: Squirrels; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through theme. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. Saturday; noon to 5 p.m., Sunday; through November 28, Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker Saturday, November 20 trail to view displays created by local families. Get inspired and consider National Absurdity Day https://bit.ly/3lUh7Dq The perfect day for becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided around here! How about where you are? outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s Medina Candlelight Walk https://bit.ly/39Lpcod theme. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Color Hike, through Bird Retweet, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 November 21, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Get help, answers for how to best feed Valley Road, Seville. Find late fall color, even if the leaves have all fallen. feathered friends. Bird information displays. All ages. Follow the trail and read signs. One sign has a code word to list on Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Petco, 1052 Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth. Discoveries award. All ages. For more information, go to Turkey Tales, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge https://bit.ly/36XdMfK Road, Sharon Center. Go on a short hike with a naturalist to look for wild Monthly Makers Display: Squirrels; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through turkeys. All ages. Free. Saturday; noon to 5 p.m., Sunday; through November 28, Oenslager ORMACO Live at the Library: Janet Becker: Holiday Flute, 2 p.m. to 4 Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, trail to view displays created by local families. Get inspired and consider Wadsworth. Becker plays a variety of flutes to demonstrate the variety becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided of sounds they can provide. Reserve space by calling 419-853-6016 or go outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s to https://bit.ly/3od9A5j theme. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. Comrades in Arms Horses and Veterans, 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Forever Monday, November 22 Amber Acres, 1133 Granger Road, Medina. Quiet grooming, team Go for a Ride Day building/trust exercises, mindfulness activities with horses. Dress for American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville United weather and hard, closed-toe shoes. Register at https://bit.ly/3iii2MV Methodist Church, 74 W. Main Street, Seville. Winter Centerpiece, 10 a.m. to noon, Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Instructions and supplies provided by DIY Corn Husk Dolls, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville Library. Library provides Medina County Herb Society to create centerpiece with foliage, firs, supplies for child accompanied with an adult. Register at pines. Ages 12 and up. Cost is $35 per person, pay at the door. Reserve https://bit.ly/3o9YZIx space at https://bit.ly/2ZsAWKm Sensory Friendly Story Time, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Children’s Activity American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., St. Mark Lutheran Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Designed for Church, 1330 N. Carpenter Street, Brunswick. children on the autism spectrum or with sensory integration challenges https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp and their families and caregivers. Register at https://bit.ly/39GqfWD Mittler’s Flea Market, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Kitten Krazy, 930 Lafayette Road, Medina. Huge indoor space, some outside when weather permits. Tuesday, November 23 National Cashew Day (bless you!)


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2021

Monthly Makers Display: Squirrels; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday; noon to 5 p.m., Sunday; through November 28, Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view displays created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. Otaku Tuesdays, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. A discussion of all things anime, for Grades 6 through 12. Do geekcrafts, learn about Japanese culture, cosplay welcome! Register at https://bit.ly/3m7P8A8

Mittler’s Flea Market, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Kitten Krazy, 930 Lafayette Road, Medina. Huge indoor space, some outside when weather permits. All proceeds benefit Kitten Krazy, a nonprofit cat adoption center. Donations accepted of anything in clean, useable condition.

Sunday, November 28 Make Your Own Head Day https://bit.ly/3lVAcoK Monthly Makers Display: Squirrels; noon to 5 p.m., last day, Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view displays created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s Wednesday, November 24 theme. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. Celebrate Your Unique Talent Day Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Petco, 1052 Monthly Makers Display: Squirrels; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth. Saturday; noon to 5 p.m., Sunday; through November 28, Oenslager E Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker Monday, November 29 trail to view displays created by local families. Get inspired and consider Square Dance Day becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick United outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. theme. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Fire Station American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Trinity United 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Church of Christ, 215 High Street, Wadsworth. All county libraries close at 6 p.m. for Thanksgiving. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Arduino Challenge, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Thursday, November 25 Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn programming, Thanksgiving design, engineering, prototyping with Arduino-based projects. Grades 6 All county libraries closed. through 12. Register at https://bit.ly/3ATMl3Y Monthly Makers Display: Squirrels; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Holiday Ornament Making, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Community Room, Saturday; noon to 5 p.m., Sunday; through November 28, Oenslager Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Register at Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker https://bit.ly/3zQ3zO6 WAITING LIST. trail to view displays created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided Tuesday, November 30 outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s Stay at Home Because You are Well Day theme. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Friday, November 26 Making Warm Up Medina County donations. National Day of Listening American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Root Candles, 640 Monthly Makers Display: Squirrels; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Liberty Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Saturday; noon to 5 p.m., Sunday; through November 28, Oenslager American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., The Chapel Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker Wadsworth Campus, 1391 State Road, Wadsworth. trail to view displays created by local families. Get inspired and consider https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided Wimpy Mania, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Decorate a journal, theme. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. play truth or dare, make Wimpy Kid mask, play Wimpy Kid trivia bingo, more. Register at https://bit.ly/3kMUstk Saturday, November 27 National Craft Jerky Day Gotta do something will all of those turkey leftovers! Monthly Makers Display: Squirrels; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday; noon to 5 p.m., Sunday; through November 28, Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view displays created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Call 330-722-9364, for more information.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2021

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Joy of Medina County Magazine 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256 E-mail: joy@blakehousepublishing.com Website: JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Phone: 330-461-0589