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PRINTER PRINTING? PG. 24 Print from home without frustration.

ROSE RAVIOLI PG. 29 Looking for a fun and tasty recipe?

SMART SNACKING PG. 31 Strategies for satisfying snacking.

Tender Tenaciousness The deep desire to help others and a brain that never stops searching for how to make things better led Katy Fuerst to become the new leader of Feeding Medina County. Pg. 4 A locally owned, independent publication dedicated to higher standards of journalism


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2021

VOLUME 4 NUMBER 4 JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM

Where the Stories Live: A Childhood Promise by Amy Barnes I remember all too clearly the day my mother walked into my bedroom and discovered that I had made a road constructed of books for my Hot Wheels cars. When she walked into the room, I was happily running my cars all over the book covers, regardless of any wear or damage the cars were causing. She was furious. There was no understanding or sympathy from her, either, when I explained that the old shag carpet was not conducive to travel and our wood blocks were a little too narrow (they did not allow space for passing cars!). Plus, on the farm, there were no sidewalks and the driveway was made of huge, lumpy gravel. With books so highly valued, my sister and I learned a deep appreciation for all books when very young. Going to the library was magical. Since we had to travel a half hour to get to the nearest large library, trips were rare and treasured. The library was so bright and clean with a breathtaking number of books available. So many books to choose from, my sister and I would come stumbling out with armloads of books that we could not wait to read, while agonizing over the ones we had to leave behind. We had to read the books quickly so they could be returned the next time our aunt made a shopping trip to the grocery store, located near the library. If we held back a book, it would go past its due date, which was considered on the level of committing a sin, partly because we were not honoring our “contract” with the library and partly because our family could ill afford to pay the fines. A library was a door to magical worlds, to learning all kinds of facts about all kinds of places, to fantasy, to reality, to stories waiting to be discovered. It is one of the things I love most about books, they do not nag, they do not demand attention, there is no deadline. They wait patiently for someone to read them and become a part of their stories once again. It is because of how much libraries meant to me then that I promised myself that if I ever had the chance to help a library, I would. When the magazine launched, I was determined to donate print copies of the magazine to each library in the county. Today, on the shelves beside the national publications in each library in Medina County, Joy of Medina County Magazine proudly holds its place as a cataloged, you-have-to-checkit-out-to-leave-with-it part of the library. Past issues at the Medina Library get stored in the historic archives, where the feature stories have captured people of our times for people now and in the future to enjoy. Of course, the magazine also is available in digital form for free or you can purchase your own print copy at https://www.joyofmedinacountymagazine.com/ What happened with my Hot Wheels road building? The next Christmas after my mother had discovered my unique road construction, there was a Hot Wheels racing track set, complete with the giant loops, under the Christmas tree.

PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC EDITOR Amy Barnes ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller PHOTOGRAPHERS Allison Waltz-Boebel FlashBang Photography CARTOONIST Jerry King CONTRIBUTORS Bob Arnold Kelly Bailey Hunter Barnard Tyler Hatfield Michelle Riley Robert Soroky Kent Von Der Vellen MASCOT Rico Houdini ADVERTISING SALES AND OFFICE 330-461-0589 E-MAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com WEBSITE JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Learn more about the staff at Behind The Scenes, JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Open positions are listed on the website at Open Positions. JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256. It is distributed as an e-edition and in a print edition. Both editions can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Copyright 2020 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2021

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THE NETWORKER

INCREASING BUSINESS THROUGH NETWORKING by Bob Arnold When looking for networking opportunities, keep in mind that any event can become a networking event.

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THE IN BOX

DO YOU COPY MORE? by Amy Barnes This month’s column is a continuation of last month’s column, with more tips to decrease printing pain.

HOME AND GARDEN

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DIG IT!

SPRING BONNET REPLACES MULCH by Michelle Riley It is the perfect perennial for creating tree rings, if you can get it to grow.

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BITE ME!

ROSE RAVIOLI WITH ARTICHOKE CREAM SAUCE recipe by Ben Lewis-Ramirez Wielding pots and pans in the Joy kitchen this month is Ben Lewis-Ramirez, chief marketing officer for Medina Fiber. He is sharing a recipe that is a big hit with his family.

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HEALTH

KATY DID by Amy Barnes As fast as she sets goals and knocks them down, Feeding Medina County Executive Director Katy Fuerst is ready for the challenge of new ones, but she’s never too busy to pause and sniff a horse!

BOWLED OVER by Amy Barnes photos by Allison Waltz-Boebel As Feeding Medina County gets ready for its annual fundraiser, youths are working to create bowls and creative writing pieces that will be gifts for donors.

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THE READING NOOK

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photos by Amy Barnes and FlashBang Photography

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FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

by Robert Soroky OF MIND AND BODY

HEALTHY SNACKING STRATEGIES by Kelly Bailey

COMMUNITY

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GEMS

SENDING LOVE by Kent von der Vellen It all started with the request for one doll for a sick child.

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

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Late spring brings wacky weeds, leaping lambs, funny frogs, and puffing cattails.

BUSINESS

BRAKING PAD CHOICES

Snacking calories can add up fast, but there are ways to continue snacking and still cut calories.

by Amy Barnes

OH, SNAP!

HEALTHY TRAILS Learn the differences between rim brakes and disc brakes and how to determine which is better for you.

THE BLESSING The shuffling, muttering old man was going to be a needy, time-consuming customer, but he also was about to be something else.

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JOYFUL LETTER DETECTIVES CLUE BOX Read the clue, then gather and unscramble the magnifying glass letters to solve the puzzle.

ROLL ’EM!

SAVED BY A SQUIRREL by Hunter Barnard When a girl fascinated by superheroes rescues a squirrel, who turns out to be more than she expected, the adventure is just beginning.

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JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

CARING KATY

EXTENDING A PRINTER’S LIFESPAN

Find the words that are a part of the life of Katy Fuerst, who seeks creative ways to get food to those in need.

by Tyler Hatfield

MIRTH AND JOY

Tired of documents not printing? Of replacing printers? Here are a few tips to achieve printing success. On the front and back covers: photos by Amy Barnes Katy Fuerst at the Feeding Medina County headquarters on Smith Road, Medina.

by Jerry King

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LET’S DO IT! Enjoy some of the best activities Medina County has to offer.

CELEBRATE! Our clickable directory of vetted businesses who bring you Joy!


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2021

Katy Did Katy Fuerst, Feeding Medina County executive director, has a lot of energy, ideas and plans to move the organization forward. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel

by Amy Barnes

how much she loves to sniff a sweaty horse, but more about that later. et a goal. Work until it is accomplished, no matter how long it Fuerst’s story begins in Parma, where she grew up. When her parents divorced, her father moved to the takes. country, which suited Fuerst much more than living Mark it: Katy did. in a city. So goes the philosophy of Katy Fuerst, the new When she graduated from Holy Name High School leader of Feeding Medina County and a woman with in Parma, she was interested in so many things, she a soft heart for those in need, a quick smile and could not seem to pick just one to focus on for her sparkling eyes. When talking to her, the snapping and crackling of college career. “I did not know what I wanted to do,” Fuerst said. her quick mind is almost audible as she talks It took her five years to complete a three-year excitedly about her ideas on how to take Feeding Medina County on its next steps forward in providing degree because she kept finding more and more to be interested in, taking classes that were not food for county families who face food insecurity connected to achieving her goal of a sociology daily. degree. She said she took a lot of classes, such as art, Her mind quickly jumps from one subject to just because her mind was hungry to learn more another, and she is very open to sharing, including

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2021

about the subject. In 2009, she graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in sociology from Cleveland State University. While working to earn her degree, she was working first as a pet store manager and then as an adoption supervisor with the Cleveland Animal Protective League. One day, as she was stocking inventory at the pet store, she suddenly realized that this could be her life, a job that did not have enough purpose to satisfy her. “I didn’t want to just make money, I wanted to do something with purpose,” she said. Yet, she did not feel she was ready for a nonprofit management position, partly because of not understanding how nonprofits work and partly

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because she lacked confidence. The best way to learn how nonprofits function, she decided, was to get a boots-on-the-ground position. She graduated, left the APL and worked for various nonprofits over the years as a retention specialist, a resolution specialist, and an advocate. Through working in those roles, Fuerst realized that she would never be satisfied being anything less than a leader. “I need to be a leader because I have a big personality,” Fuerst said, with a big smile. It was while she was a director with the HFLA in Beachwood that she started working toward earning her Master of Nonprofit Administration degree from John Carroll University. She graduates this month. She was living in Shaker Heights with her husband,

Katy Fuerst perches on a pallet in Feeding Medina County’s warehouse to examine some of the donations that have been made to the organization. photo by Amy Barnes continued, Page 6


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Some of the foods donated to help feed area needy families. photo by Amy Barnes

Mark, and their three children and it was time for a new goal list. Goal one was to move to the country. Goal two was to work in a leadership role for a nonprofit. “The rest is fate,” Fuerst said. With the goal of moving to the country, Mark said he was willing to move up to an hour and a half away from his auto repair shop in Cleveland. While others might find such a drive daunting, Fuerst said the advantage would be that her husband would spend more time with the family since he would have to have set times to go to work. Mark’s business partner happened to move to Hinckley and convinced the Fuersts to move into the Highland School District, as well. The challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic took a turn for Fuerst in March 2020 when she broke her ankle. “You know what the worst part was? Everybody loving going for walks,” said Fuerst, pointing out that she was unable to go for a walk for more than two months.

One positive result of COVID was that Fuerst’s classes for her master’s switched to virtual classes, which worked perfectly with her having a broken ankle. The family found a new home in Sharon Center, but selling their current house presented a new set of challenges. Every time the real estate agent called to show their house, Fuerst, with a broken ankle, would rush their two 80-pound golden retrievers, two cats, and three elementary-age children into her van and park around the block until the house showing was over. One particularly trying day, there were seven showings. With the first goal of moving to the country accomplished with the move to Sharon Center in April 2020, it was time to focus on the second goal: a leadership role with a nonprofit. Fuerst saw a posting for the Feeding Medina County executive director position, an opening caused by the retirement of then-current executive director, Sandy Hinkle.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2021

With all of the jobs that Fuerst had held, she had noticed one constant commonality: food insecurity. “Food insecurity has always been a problem for my clients,” she said. Feeding Medina County seemed to be the perfect fit, yet she hesitated, questioning if she were ready to take the reins of leadership at a nonprofit. Fuerst reached out to her mentor, Dani Robbins, program director at John Carroll, who had pushed her to succeed all through earning her master’s. “She really kicked me in the butt,” Fuerst said, adding that Robbins would say to her, “I don’t understand what you are waiting for.” ‘She always would make me give good reasons,” Fuerst said. Every time Fuerst would come up with a new excuse, Robbins would challenge her. When Fuerst said she was going to wait until she had finished her master’s to apply for a nonprofit leadership position, Robbins gave her usual response, “Or not.” When Robbins said it was time for Fuerst to step into a leadership role. Fuerst submitted her application. Fuerst found the Feeding Medina County search committee impressive. “They asked good questions,” said Fuerst. The interview process began with virtual meetings, with an in-person interview in November 2020. She officially became executive director January 2021. Goal two accomplished. “For the first time in my life, I feel like I am in a position to make a difference,” Fuerst said. She is impressed with the dedication of Feeding Medina County volunteers and the generosity of the community throughout the pandemic. “I think it’s exciting to know how many people continue to volunteer and how many donated,” she said. Feeding Medina County, after a decade of helping, is now at a pivotal point, Fuerst said. While it is doing

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great things, Fuerst is searching for better ways to collaborate with the community and is setting new goals to accomplish that. One idea is to start distributing information about other area nonprofits in the monthly food bags. Fuerst also is planning to start a quarterly newsletter and an annual report and has plans for much more. Another idea, that already has been implemented, is a food distribution in addition to the monthly one at the Medina County Fairgrounds. Nate Eppnik, Medina County Park District director (see story on Eppnik at https://bit.ly/3nHikyl), reached out to Fuerst with the idea of holding a monthly food bank at Hidden Hollow Camp, 8672 Richman Road, Lodi. The Lodi distribution is run in a similar fashion as the monthly food distribution at the Medina County Fairgrounds, only smaller, Fuerst said. At the first park distribution, 60 pounds of food were distributed to each of 47 families, said Fuerst, adding that the 47 families equaled 119 individuals. She pointed out that not only did families who find it difficult to get to the monthly distribution at the fairgrounds got food, but the park was highlighted as well. “I thought it was fantastic,” said Fuerst. Every accomplishment makes Fuerst more confident and more determined to solidify partnerships within the community to better aid those in need. In the meantime, she has found not only her dream job, but her dream home. Fuerst is delighted to be living in the country with fresh air and the smell of farms. “There’s a farm across the street with sheep!” The Fuerst family recently adopted a horse named Churro, who is boarded at a local stable. The mention of Churro causes Fuerst to happily proclaim how satisfying and enjoyable she finds the smell of horse sweat. “Oh, my gosh, I’m just living the dream,” happily gushed Fuerst.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2021

Bowled Over June Fundraiser to Fight Hunger and Food Insecurity by Amy Barnes photos by Allison Waltz-Boebel background photo by Julissa Santana

With COVID-19 restrictions still in place, Feeding Medina County’s annual fundraiser will be virtual this year. Bowls, symbolizing the empty bowls of families who face food insecurity, were made by volunteers and will be given away to the first donors who donate $150 or more at https://bit.ly/3taMRFN and put “bowl” in the special notes section during Feeding Medina County’s fundraiser, which will begin June 15 and continue until supplies run out. The bowls featured here were created by youths incarcerated at the Medina County Juvenile Detention Center. Several more bowls, created by the youths and community members, also will be available. The youths were assisted with materials and in the production of the bowls by Julie Spaite with Access the Arts and were fired by All Fired Up! on Medina Public Square. Learn more about Access the Arts at https://accessthearts.net/ Donors also will receive creative writings by incarcerated youths who participate in the Writers in Residence program. For more information about the program, go to https://bit.ly/3t7cN5i Proceeds from the fundraiser will be split between Feeding Medina County and Writers in Residence. Donations are tax-deductible, reminded Katy Fuerst, Feeding Medina County executive director. More information about the fundraiser will be posted at Feeding Medina County’s website at https://feedingmedinacounty.org/ or call 330-421-4816.


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THE READING NOOK

by Amy Barnes

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t takes so little to turn an ordinary day into something completely different. Sometimes, it is something heartbreaking, a car accident, a sudden death, plans fall through, a text with words you had hoped to not see. Other times it is something spirit lifting, such as a proposal acceptance, winning a contest, an expression of caring, hearing from a friend long missed. On this particular, ordinary day of demanding and cranky customers at the business center, the change would be delivered in the form of a very quiet, shuffling old man who was confused. He muttered several things that Vanessa couldn’t hear. The only words that were clear at all were that he wanted to send a fax. Vanessa sighed. One look and she knew from experience that this was going to be a customer whom she would end up helping very slowly through every step through the self-serve fax machine, not only taking time away from other projects that were quickly approaching deadline but also would increase the chances of her getting reprimanded by her boss who wanted her to spend less time with self-serve customers. She smiled, the crinkling at the corners of her eyes being the only indicator of the smile since the government mandate to wear masks in the fight against the latest pandemic was still in place. The old man started shuffling toward the fax machine at Vanessa’s direction. She stood

patiently by the machine while she waited for his arrival from six feet away. In reality, inwardly she was feeling panicked over getting the full-service jobs done, but she was doing her best to be kind and patient toward the old man. After all, it wasn’t his fault that she had jobs waiting, and he obviously was doing the best he could. He mentioned he had left his wife in the car, and he was worried she would mind it taking him so long to send the fax. The paperwork was to refinance their home, which seemed like an odd choice to Vanessa since he looked and moved like he was at least 90 years old. She inwardly shrugged, people make interesting choices all of the time and she certainly saw enough of them at the business center. She talked him through the three steps of the faxing procedure and left him waiting for the delivery report sheet while she returned to her other jobs, keeping an eye on him. Other customers momentarily distracted her, the next thing Vanessa knew, the old man was standing forlornly at the counter, waiting very quietly and patiently for help. The fax report said the paperwork had not gone through. The old man became agitated. The paperwork was important, but his wife was waiting in the car and he already had been away from her for too long. It was terribly apparent that he was torn between the two large responsibilities on his shoulders. Once again, Vanessa helped him load and send the documents, and reminded him it could take another 15 minutes for the fax report to come


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back. The old man was even more upset at the thought of waiting for the report. So, Vanessa told him, at her supervisor’s suggestion, that he could leave and they would keep an eye out for the send report to arrive, and then they would call him to let him know the fax had gone through. It took telling him four times, each one at a louder volume, to get him to hear and understand what was being said and why they wanted his phone number. He was greatly relieved and thankful and shuffled his way out of the center, into the parking lot to rejoin his wife. It was a few hours later, after having worked through a huge surge of customers, machine malfunctions, and trying to calm customers who had come in to vent their anger at the world on the center employees that Vanessa remembered the old man and the fax. She grabbed the fax report from where she had laid it without reading it when it came through. It showed that his documents had been successfully sent. Vanessa heaved a sigh of relief that she was going to be able to tell him good news. She dialed the number and waited, wondering how in the world she was going to get him to understand over the phone when he understood so little in person. The voice at the other end of the call surprised her. It was the kind of dramatic character change that is seen only in fairy tales or fantasy stories. The voice that answered the call was strong, confident and clear. She verified she was speaking to the old man who had been in earlier. Yes, the answer was quick and sure. While Vanessa’s mind spun with the huge difference, she let him know his fax had gone through. The old man started stuttering and stammering thanks mixed with surprise and delight that not only had the fax gone through but that Vanessa

had remembered and taken the time to call and let him know. It was in the next moment that Vanessa’s life was changed, and yet it was such a small thing on the surface that caused it, most probably would not have even taken note. In that moment the shuffling, muttering, barelyable-to-be-heard old man who had changed so dramatically into a clearly speaking, strongvoiced man delivered a message to Vanessa. “Your life will now be forever blessed,” he said, clearly, strongly, emphasizing the “now.” Vanessa had just enough time to stammer out a “thank you,” before he hung up the phone. She stared in stunned surprise at the phone, after all, she had grown to expect very much the opposite of being blessed from customers in the center. As his words sank in, Vanessa felt as if a glowing light was completely surrounding her and a curse had been removed. The sorrows, regrets and pain that had been interwoven through so much in her life were suddenly gone. She kept having the persistent thought that she had passed a test and the old man had been the final exam, much like what happens in fairy tales. At the same time, she chastised herself for being silly. Yet, despite her trying to downplay the blessing, the feeling of being engulfed by a glowing light did not go away, and the weight of deep regrets and sorrow that had been lifted, the weight that no amount of time or therapy had been able to heal, was gone. This story is as true as you would like it to be.

Have you written a fiction or nonfiction story (short or chapter) that you would like to share with Joy’s readers? Go to https://bit.ly/2Zmc98z for details on how to submit it.


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Nichole Schill shows off her new friend, a brown snake, she found while pulling garlic mustard. She is a Medina County Park District employee; we think the snake is a volunteer.

Pest Pesto Volunteers recently joined in on the fight against the invasive garlic mustard growing in sensitive habitats in the Medina County Park District parks. One location that was part of the Woodland Health Day of Service was Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Volunteers said that the weed is good to use when making pesto. photos by FlashBang Photography

Volunteer Ron Hank concentrates on pulling garlic mustard.


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Tim Bakan also volunteered for the garlic mustard battle. He and Michelle Tognetti met when working as volunteers for the park district.

Michelle Tognetti chats while combating garlic mustard.

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Ewes and their lambs were enjoying sunshine and warm weather at MKS Farms and Show Lambs on Hubbard Valley Road in Seville. Six of the Suffolk-Hampshire lambs will be 4H projects and will be shown at the Medina County Fair. Kelsie Sulzener, a third grade teacher in the Cloverleaf School District, said she and her husband, Matt Sulzener, went through 42 hours straight helping ewes who were lambing. photos by Amy Barnes

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BUSINESS: FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

Extending a Printer’s Lifespan by Tyler Hatfield When buying a new printer, especially at current prices, you want it to last as long as possible. However, most people do not realize that home printers are rated to last only three to four years. Factors that can affect a printer’s lifespan include the type of printer and the amount of printing done. Laser printers, for example, typically last closer to six to nine years, even with heavier use. If an inkjet printer is used to print only a few sheets a month, the ink will dry and clog in the inkjets, and buying new ink will not solve the problem. The ink or toner quality also has a very large impact on printer

may be a better idea to save some money and get a printer without options you will not use. There are some simple ways to help keep a printer happy in the long run. First, spend a little extra and get the official ink or toner for the printer. Official ink cartridges and toner packs have high quality-control standards that help protect the device. It also helps to keep a printer’s printing bits clean. For inkjets, run the built-in cleaning tools periodically to clean the printheads. After a few years of heavy use, it may be necessary to manually clean the printheads, but it is a good idea to have this done professionally.

life. This is more important for inkjets, but low-quality ink and remanufactured or recycled ink cartridges can clog or damage printheads over time. Ink quality also is influenced by time and storage conditions, which is why ink cartridges have expiration dates. While they are not strict, and ink still can be used past its expiration, it is a good idea to check the package for the expiration date and not install the cartridge if it is more than two months past expiration. Because there are so many factors that go into how long a printer will last, it is important to consider how much you are willing to pay and what features you really need. While that fancy printer full of options may be nice now, you may be out of luck in four years when the belts fail or the printhead clogs. It

For laser printers, check to ensure toner powder is not building up anywhere from time to time. If it is, just dust it out carefully. In the end, it comes down to simple maintenance, just like a car that needs its oil changed regularly. If a printer gets what it needs, it will last longer and keep making quality prints throughout its lifespan.

Tyler Hatfield has a passion for technology that he would like to someday turn into his own business. He runs a small media group, hatsmediagroup.com, and works on computers on the side. He can be contacted with questions and for recommendations at hatsmediagroup@gmail.com

That feeling when your document will not print no matter what you try. photo by Kyle Hanson


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BUSINESS: THE NETWORKER

Increasing Business Through Networking by Bob Arnold Are you looking to start networking more often but do not know where to look for events to attend? First, understand networking is important for your business and well-being. Many business owners worry over how to get people through

links provided and attend. Also, check out the contests or special days listed. These get you involved with others who have common interests and are a fun way of providing connections for you to pursue. 2. Check the Main Street Medina calendar of events at http://

the door of their businesses or to visit their websites. They tend

www.mainstreetmedina.com/ where you will find specific

to think that everyone notices them right away and will be

events centered on the business district of the City of Medina.

visiting them quickly.

3. Also, check out https://www.medinacountyevents.com/ for

Then, the truth sets in, as they sit and wait for customers.

countywide event options.

One very efficient solution to this situation is networking. The

4. Finally, do an internet search for “Medina county events”

value of networking is well established; however, there are a lot of business owners who get very anxious about it. Here is an easy solution, with a twist to it. Find an event you

and discover many other choices. I encourage you to find a couple of events for this month and check them out. Do not be afraid to involve yourself, the

would like to attend and take a friend with you. When you get

organizers of these events want to see you benefit from what

there, split up and meet people. Introduce some of your new

they have organized.

friends to your event companion. This also makes it easier to

Happy Networking!!

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get to know them better as the three of you talk. It takes some of the pressure off and creates a more natural conversation. Keep in mind that any event can be a networking event, even if it is not promoted as such. Now, the big question, how to find an event to attend? Here

Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at

are a few suggestions:

https://amzn.to/2KSy3Xm. More networking tips are available at

1. Go to the “Let’s Do It!” section of Joy of Medina County

“Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http://onwardnetworking.com/ or

Magazine and look through the nonprofit events listed. Click the by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2021

BUSINESS: THE IN BOX

Do You Copy More? by Amy Barnes Part II, continued from last month’s “The In Box.” Part I can be read in the April issue at https://bit.ly/3d7enzj It also will load faster for printing your order if the drive is not loaded with all sorts of extra items like the hundreds of photos from Aunt Betty’s picnic three years ago, documents from your child’s home schooling, and so forth. Fifth, be aware and accepting of the fact that despite a lot of advances in printers, many times the way colors look on a computer monitor can vary greatly from what will actually print. The variance is caused by the fact that one color system (RGB) uses colors generated by light, such as on a computer monitor, and it is another color system (CMYK) that is used to produce colors on a printed page. Sixth, do not take a flash drive that has the only copy of all of your office files or a flash drive that is a collectible that is dear to your heart, or one that has the only picture of Uncle Bob who died 10 years ago. Once that flash drive leaves your home or office, it is open season. There are no guarantees that it will not end up somehow close to a magnet that will wipe it clean (there are magnets close to checkouts), that it will not be lost in a car seat gap, forgotten in a pocket and end up in the wash, or that it will not somehow become corrupted so files can no longer be accessed. Always back up everything. What is on the flash drive that is taken outside of home or office should only ever be a copy of something that has been saved elsewhere as well. Finally, to help ensure a perfect product that represents you well, allow extra time for the order to be filled. In other words, prepare for the unexpected. There can be unexpected machine breakdowns, mistakes in placing or processing the order (yours and employees), for materials to be obtained in case your order requires special materials. Better to have presentation materials ready and waiting several days ahead of time than to be rushing to a copy shop to pick up an order on the way to that important event or meeting. Always allow enough time to double check your order while still at the copy shop to ensure it is exactly what you expected and for the order to be reproduced should there be an error. Have small business pointers you would like to share as a columnist? Contact Amy Barnes at Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com Be sure to include information about your business experience and a sample column of no more than 350 words.

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HOME AND GARDEN: DIG IT!

Spring Bonnet Replaces Mulch column by Michelle Riley

photo by Jeffrey Hamilton

photo by Michelle Riley

We hold our breath for the last hard frost, the month of May creates an aura of anticipation combined with hesitation. We become easily distracted, allowing our eyes and minds to dance through spring, every blossom bolstering our excitement. Enjoying every bloom. Spring has finally arrived with lily of the valley (Convallaria majalis) the perfect harbinger. It is said to be the flower of the month of May. An herbaceous perennial (dying back to the soil line in winter), they can become a quick spreading groundcover. Spreading by underground rhizomes (root-like structures some plants use to spread) this plant enjoys moist, welldrained soils. This beauty will thrive in dappled shade and at the base of a tree. She is a woodland plant, a spring bloomer, and grows 8 to 12 inches tall. The flowers remind me of tiny white bonnets held by gentle green stems. She is hardy in Zones 3 to 8, and her sweet fragrance attracts a multitude of pollinators. Blooms last three to four weeks and are great for cutflower arrangements. You also can dig a mature clump up to place in a pot for décor while it is blooming. In many instances, lily of the valley can be quite invasive. It is said to be able to tolerate many types of soils, though it seems some win and some lose when it comes to this fickle perennial. Originating from Europe, this plant is highly toxic to people and pets. It contains numerous cardiac glycosides, which can slow the heart and cause irregular heart rhythm. Many people think lily of the valley is in the lily family, however it is not a true lily. It is a monotypic, meaning it stands on its own. My kind of perennial! If you want more bang for your bloom, pair lily of the valley with vinca or a May-blooming shrub. She co-exists perfectly as a tree ring and eliminates the need to mulch. Correctly planted, lily of the valley is quite a lovely addition to the garden. She has an evil side for those who love her, yet she refuses to grow, and for those who abhor her and she refuses to go. Michelle Riley is a local horticulturist, landscape designer, and consultant. She is the founder of the gardening subscription service, https://theplantmall.com/; MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com; and NeOhioGarden.com. She also is the president of All About You Signature Landscape Design, Inc. Riley can be contacted at info@MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com or by calling 234-678-8266.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2021

HOME AND GARDEN: BITE ME!

Rose Ravioli With Artichoke Cream Sauce recipe by Ben Lewis-Ramirez Stopping by the kitchen this month is Ben Lewis-Ramirez. He is the chief marketing officer for Lit Communities, also known as Medina Fiber. He made this dish for Valentine’s Day, and said it was a bit hit with his whole family. He also said the recipe is time consuming, but it is fun and tasty, making it well worth the effort. If you would like to learn more about Medina Fiber, go to https://bit.ly/3wPUrZs, Lewis-Ramirez is the third from the left. Dough: • 2 cups pastry or all-purpose flour • 1 teaspoon extra virgin olive oil • 2 medium eggs • 2 tablespoons pureed, boiled beet • pinch of salt Filling: • 8 ounces ricotta cheese • 4 ounces of softened or room-temperature cream cheese • 1/2 cup shredded Parmesan • 1/2 cup Pecorino Romano cheese • 2 tablespoons minced fresh basil • 1/2 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper • pinch of salt Sauce: • 1 jar tomato sauce* • 1/4 cup of half-and-half or heavy cream • 1/4 cup ground Parmesan • 1 dozen whole artichoke hearts, rinsed if brined in a heavily seasoned oil mixture • salt and pepper to taste Mix dough ingredients until completely blended, wrap in plastic and chill for an hour. Mix all filling ingredients together. Roll dough mixture flat, to about the thickness of a nickel, and cut into 2-inch wide strips, about 6-inches long. Be careful not to make them too thick, the thinner the dough is flattened, the better the final texture of the ravioli will be. Cut alternating wavy edges along both long ends of the strips. Spread a thin layer of filling along the center of each strip. Fold along the length of the dough, encasing the filling, and then roll into “rose” shapes. Pre-boil the ravioli for three to four minutes. Finish the ravioli by baking at 350 degrees for five to 10 minutes. Serve with sauce and artichokes. Garnish with fresh basil and shredded Parmesan. *Note: Lewis-Ramirez likes to use an already creamy vodka sauce. Want to have your recipe featured in a future issue? Send it with your name, phone number (in case we have questions), the city you live in, and some information about you to: Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “recipe” in the subject line. Recipes MUST be your original recipe or one you have highly modified and thus made it your own. By submitting a recipe, you are guaranteeing it is one you have developed or modified and used. This is open to anyone who would like to submit a recipe.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2021

HEALTH: HEALTHY TRAILS

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Braking Pad Choices by Robert Soroky When it comes to stopping a bike in motion, disc brakes are a great option, as opposed to the more familiar rim brakes.

than rubber pads. Secondly, rim brakes require the brake calipers be opened up

Although nothing new to the cycling world, it is wild to see the to allow the tire, which is wider than the rim, to pass between look on some customers’ faces at the mention of disc brakes on

the brake pads. Opening and closing these calipers can be

bikes.

challenging with some rim brake styles.

The differences between rim brakes and disc brakes start with the materials used and how they are designed to function. Rim brakes, which are the more familiar braking system, are comprised of rubber brake pads that are designed to clamp against the wheel rims in order to slow a bike down. Disc brakes use metal or resin brake pads that clamp against small metal rotors attached to the outside of wheel hubs.

With disc brakes, you simply open the quick-release skewer or thru axle and slide the wheel out. Care is needed when guiding the rotor back between the calipers, but that still is easier than manipulating the rim brake. Unfortunately, retrofitting disc brakes on a bike set up for rim brakes is involved. It requires a different set of wheels that have rotor mounts on the hubs. Also, disc brake calipers are in a

So, what are the benefits of the disc?

different location and attached directly to built-in mounts on

For starters, disc brakes provide significantly more stopping

the frame and fork. These mounts are not part of rim-brake

power. The majority of disc brake pads are made of metal fibers, bikes. so the metal-on-metal contact between brake pad and rotor generates more bite, leading to more responsive braking. Rubber brake pads, by contrast, tend to have more give,

If you are thinking disc brakes are for you, then it is best to buy the bike that already has them installed. Trust me, it is worth the investment!

creating a modulated brake feel and slower braking. This difference is more pronounced when rain is introduced. Wet rubber against a wheel rim tends to prolong modulated braking, whereas the metal-on-metal setup of disc breaks bites easily through the water, providing continued, maximum stopping power. Metal and resin pads also tend to last longer

Robert Soroky is a lifelong cyclist regularly participating in long distance charity rides and manager of the Century Cycles Medina location. Contact Soroky at robert@centurycycles.com to suggest column topics, for further information or to chat about bikes.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2021

HEALTH: OF MIND AND BODY Healthy Snacking Strategies by Kelly Bailey Are you a snacker? Or a three-squares person? In my years of working with people in the field of health and wellness, I have learned that people tend to lean toward one of those two categories. One is not necessarily better than the other, but awareness is helpful in modifying behavior and creating an individualized plan of eating that will successfully work for you. If you like to snack, there are ways to munch healthfully. Snacks should be fewer than 200 calories. The biggest problem snackers face is eating more calories than they need each day. It is understandably easy to overeat when you nibble food all day. People tend to underestimate how much and how often they eat. Planning ahead and pre-portioning snack items will help tremendously in controlling and raising awareness of how much food is consumed in a day. Another technique that helps control how much food is consumed daily is keeping the main meals small, too. Most people who graze all day are still eating main meals in addition to their snacks. This also can easily lead to overeating. If snacking is your thing, and you are also eating large meals, be mindful of portion sizes. Snacks should contain a mix of protein, carbohydrates and healthy fats. Bonus if the snack is high in fiber. A snack containing the right balance of macronutrients will be more satisfying for longer. Because snackers tend to grab a handful of food here and there, a great strategy to improving snacking habits is to keep healthy snacks visible and within easy reach. By doing so, it makes it less likely that the open dish of candy on a coworker’s desk will be as tempting. Some foods that make excellent healthy snacks are: • peanut or almond butter on apple slices or celery sticks • raw broccoli, carrots and cauliflower with hummus • a handful of almonds or walnuts • string cheese and an orange

A certified personal trainer and certified holistic nutrition coach, Kelly Baily owns and operates Kelly Bailey Wellness. Find her blog, visit the Food Freedom page, and contact her at https://www.kellybailey.fit/ Following any recommendations are solely at your discretion and responsibility. Consult your medical professional prior to undertaking any suggested diet, lifestyle or exercise change or routine.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2021

COMMUNITY: GEMS

Sending Love Through Handmade Dolls

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column and photos by Kent Von Der Vellen Someone living in Connecticut called Jan Householder wanting to learn more about the Giving Doll, Householder’s organization that provides dolls to comfort children. It was December 14, 2012. Later that same day, Jan was horrified when she heard about the events at Sandy Hook where a gunman had killed 20 schoolchildren and six adults. Householder called the woman with whom she had spoken to earlier in the day and asked if she knew anyone connected with the school and if the Giving Doll could help. The woman said she would reach out to the school through someone she knew.

the woman played in helping the Giving Doll comfort children in need. The Giving Doll provides handmade dolls to children to bring them faith, love, joy, and hope, said Householder. Through the dolls, the group has helped children who survived house fires, as well as those suffering from illness, the loss of a loved one, and separation from a deployed military parent. It all started in 2006 when Householder was asked to make a doll for Katherine, the 11-year-old daughter of one of Householder’s former student teachers. Katherine was suffering from an inoperable brain tumor and receiving experimental treatment from St. Jude’s Hospital.

Householder called her friends and volunteers with an urgency to make dolls for the siblings who had lost brothers and sisters in the shooting. They quickly assembled 67 dolls while waiting to hear back from the Connecticut woman. Then the call came back from Connecticut with a request for exactly 67 dolls. Householder does not remember the name of the woman who had reached out to her, but she well remembers the crucial part

Upon seeing Katherine’s doll, 12 more patients who also were receiving the experimental treatment had requested dolls, too. Householder, who is a retired home economics teacher from the Wadsworth City School District, made each of the 12 dolls. As interest for the handmade dolls grew, she recruited friends to help meet the requests. Householder approached the Wadsworth Office for Older Adults for help in making the dolls and the seniors became volunteers. By 2008, the Giving Doll had become a licensed nonprofit organization. The Giving Doll has grown from Householder’s bedroom to chapters in 10 different states. During 2020, they exceeded 60,000 dolls made and have given dolls to children in all 50 states and in 64 different countries. Patterns for the dolls were created and copyrighted by Householder. All of the dolls are handcrafted by volunteers and include a blanket and a tote bag. Katherine’s mother had requested that pockets be added so that she could tuck poetry she had written into them. For this reason, the clothing for every doll must have pockets. There are dolls for girls and boys, and they come in three different colors: brown, white or tan. There are specific instructions on how to make each doll, even detailing the number of stitches for each section.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2021 The Giving Doll participates in the Akron Children’s Hospital annual radiothon where callers sponsor a doll to be given to a child at the hospital. Householder said one doll was sponsored four years in a row because, each year, the previous child donated the doll back for another child in need. One young girl living in Arizona insisted to her mother that they return to Akron to give the doll to another child in need.This comfort doll helped four children and was returned to Householder after the fourth little girl passed away. Touched by the amount of comfort this doll brought to four little girls, Householder said she could not give it out again, and it now sits in the Giving Doll Hall of Fame. In fall 2019, Norton 16-year-old Emma Pfouts went into a coma after suffering a severe asthma attack. The following January, the Giving Doll decided to make an Emma doll to be used for the Akron Children’s Hospital radiothon fundraiser. Many of Emma’s

Giving Doll, Inc.

family and friends volunteered to help make Emma dolls. There would be one doll made for each day Emma stayed at the hospital. While making the dolls, a young volunteer noticed something different with the doll she was making. She called Householder over to show her the doll had a heart shape on its chest. The heart came to represent the caring that goes into each doll made. In 2019, the Giving Doll was given three months to relocate from the space they were renting. They found a place in Norton and were helped in obtaining a loan to purchase the building while other friends completed needed upgrades. The Giving Doll relies on the community for donations of money and materials to make the dolls. Householder mentioned the cost of shipping and buying materials has always been there, and now they also have the cost of the mortgage and related building expenses. To donate, volunteer or learn more about the Giving Doll, visit https://bit.ly/3xwgNzx or https://bit.ly/32Vw0MM.

Total Program Expenses: $12,066.00

Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions Club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by emailing Gems@BlakeHousePublishing.com or by calling 330-4210863. Learn what other area nonprofits need by visiting Giving Hearts at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com.

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2561 Wadsworth Road Norton, Oh. 44203 330-336-7246 www.thegivingdoll.org

Date of formation: 07/04/2008 Organization type: 501(c)(3) Description of Organization’s Purpose: Is the organization's registration status current? Yes Reporting Year: 2020 Reporting Start Date: 1/1/2020 Reporting End Date: 12/31/2020 Total Revenue: $29,564.00 Total Expenses: $19,639.00 Percent of Total Expenses: 61 percent Total Assets: $103,969.00 Director or Board Member list (10): Jenny Young Nicole Dewitt John Dalessandro Debbie Bard Roxanne Morehead Ron Nagy Jan Householder Lynda Bowers Kathy Bryne Peggy Dunn

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2021

Want more Joy? Subscribe to our e-edition and get Joy no matter where you go! Use this link https://bit.ly/30duSlB to start your subscription. Want to read Joy in print? Visit Medina County libraries where you can find Joy of Medina County Magazine as an official, cataloged publication in the Periodicals section of the library. Joy also can be found in the Medina Library’s Historic Archives! For more information about Joy of Medina County Magazine, visit our website: https://bit.ly/38WotiH


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2021

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT: ROLL ’EM!

Saved by a Squirrel by Hunter Barnard “Flora and Ulysses” is a new Disney Plus movie that I was really excited to watch. The movie is about a girl named Flora, who is really interested in superheroes. She rescues a squirrel who turns out to have superpowers. It was really silly and funny, and it made me laugh a lot! It also was a little weird, but that is not a bad thing. My favorite character is Ulysses, he is the squirrel with superpowers. He cannot talk or anything, but he can fly, has super strength and can type poetry. He is a very silly character, which is why I liked him a lot. Flora found Ulysses and helped him, which is how they became friends. She found out he had super powers when he typed her a poem about who he is. The movie is mostly about Ulysses and Flora trying to find out why Ulysses is a superhero. They also go and do all sorts of things to try and find his purpose. But while they are doing that, someone sees him and thinks he has rabies.This made it so then they had to try to avoid Ulysses getting taken away. I really liked this movie because Flora’s dad writes comics, and the movie was set up a lot like a comic book. Throughout the movie, there was an adventure and bad guys and funny things happening along the way. My favorite part was when a mean cat attacked the bad guy and that let Ulysses and Flora get away, that part was really funny. I did not really have a least favorite part, I thought the whole movie was very good. I think that if everyone gets a chance, they should watch this movie. There is something in it for everyone. I thought it was really funny and had a very good story, too!

Hunter Barnard is an energetic 7-year-old who attends Berea City Schools and likes to share his opinion. He is assisted in writing his column by his mother, Jessica Rapenchuk.

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Joyful Word Search April 2021 Answer Key for Last Month’s Search Getting Sticky Getting Sticky

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“I never realized how much copies cost until I had to pay for them; I always just used the company’s copier!”

“How am I supposed to know anything if I don’t time everything?”


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2021

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May 2021 Nonprofit Calendar Saturday, May 1 World Naked Gardening Day https://bit.ly/3xMyQlu About as organic as you can get! Free Paper Shredding, 9 a.m. to noon, American Legion Post 2020, Medina County Veterans Memorial Hall, 620 N. Broadway, Medina. Donations gratefully accepted.

how to make sunflower house, about the life cycle of a flower, make sunflower craft. https://bit.ly/3nWWoPC Writers Series: Inside a Publisher’s Mind, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Learn about publishing industry, the steps to becoming a bestseller. Presented by former Penguin Random House publishing executive. Meeting link sent by e-mail once registered at https://bit.ly/33huOn8

Sunday, May 2 World Tuna Day Sounds like a holiday the cat thought up!

Friday, May 7 National Roast Leg of Lamb Day, which goes well with National No Pants Day https://bit.ly/2RtIKrd Monday, May 3 National Lumpy Rug Day https://bit.ly/3tlGaRv Celebrate by serving American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Holy Martyrs lumpy mashed potatoes! and World Press Freedom Day A tip of the hat Church, 3100 S. Weymouth Road, Medina. to all of the journalists who risked so much and to those who lost their https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp lives in the pursuit of truth. Saturday, May 8 National Train Day https://bit.ly/3gYZTDV Tuesday, May 4 Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: No Bones, 6:30 a.m. to Star Wars Day https://bit.ly/3b2vpgD 8:30 p.m., through May 23, Schleman Nature Preserve, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Yellow nature trail teach Wednesday, May 5 National Cartoonist Day https://bit.ly/3umuvmJ Just for our about animals that do not have bones; one sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward cartoonist, Jerry King! Have a great one, Jerry! Monthly Makers: Snails, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday through Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to Saturday, last day. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh Wadsworth. Registered households are provided outdoor space each Celebrate World Migratory Bird Day! 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., Hidden month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. This month Hollow Camp – Day Use, 8672 Richman Road, Lodi. Park is usually is snails. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. For more closed to the public with reservations required for access. Visitors are being allowed for one week for bird watching. Park naturalists start the information and to register, go to week with displays, biofacts, experienced birders to help locate hard-tohttps://bit.ly/39yiGlq Author Visit: Mike Chen, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. Lifelong writer find birds. from the San Francisco Bay Area. Wrote “A Beginning at the End” and Sunday, May 9 “We Could be Heroes.” Meeting link sent by e-mail once registered at National Lost Sock Memorial Day https://bit.ly/2RtWDWn Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: No Bones, 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., through May 23, Schleman Nature Preserve, 6335 Thursday, May 6 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Yellow nature trail teach National Nurses Day https://bit.ly/2RqV1wR American Red Cross Blood Drive, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m., St. Mark Lutheran about animals that do not have bones; one sign has a code word to list Church, 1330 N. Carpenter Street, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/ on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to 2ybO4Rp Sunflower House, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Wadsworth https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh Library. Listen to the “Sunflower House,” learn how to plant sunflowers, Monday, May 10


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2021

Clean Up Your Room Day Hmmmm, we could name names… . Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: No Bones, 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., through May 23, Schleman Nature Preserve, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Yellow nature trail teach about animals that do not have bones; one sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Art in the Afternoon: Monet’s Garden, 4 p.m. to 4:15 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Wadsworth Library. Learn about Claude Monet and how to make own impressionistic masterpiece. View program at https://bit.ly/3nWWoPC Monday Night Intrigue: “The Adventurer’s Son,” 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., virtual. Sponsored by Wadsworth Library. Focus is on true story of the disappearance of Alaskan scientist Roman Dial in the Corcovado National Park, an untracked rainforest in Costa Rica that was known to have miners, poachers and drug smugglers. Register for link at https://bit.ly/3xOcKib Tuesday, May 11 National Foam Rolling Day https://bit.ly/3vUF3dp Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: No Bones, 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., through May 23, Schleman Nature Preserve, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Yellow nature trail teach about animals that do not have bones; one sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh Monthly Makers: Snails, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday, through May 22. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view snails created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. Alphabet Adventure: M is for Mom, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Wadsworth Library. Stories, M mosaics, match baby animals to mothers, play memory game, make shapes with marshmallows and toothpicks, learn about mom, make handprint art. Materials pickup available at library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth, May 4 through 18. Register at https://bit.ly/33fjkAn View program at https://bit.ly/3nWWoPC Play Character Bingo!, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. Create own book character bingo card and register to play. Winners will be sent treats. Grades 1 to 5. Meeting details sent following registration at https:// bit.ly/2SrjJ0x Wednesday, May 12 National Limerick Day https://bit.ly/3teH3uZ

I Brunswick 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sundays, June 13 through October 2, 2021 Produce, consumables and crafts Heritage Farm, 4613 Laurel Road, Brunswick Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2I4I5DV Medina 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays, May 1 through October 30 Produce, consumables, crafts, and knife sharpening Front parking lot, May 1 through 22 Main Market behind VFW Post, May 30 through October 30 Medina VFW Post 5137 3916 Pearl Road, Medina 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays, May 15 through October 16 Produce and consumables

Medina Public Square Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/3vLZY2W Seville 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, May 29 through September 25 Produce, consumables and crafts Gazebo at Maria Stanhope Park, 73 W. Main Street, Seville Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/3r1v9ni Wadsworth 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, June 12 through September 25 Produce, consumables and crafts Central Intermediate School, 151 Main Street, Wadsworth Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/3r8trRd

Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: No Bones, 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., through May 23, Schleman Nature Preserve, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Yellow nature trail teach about animals that do not have bones; one sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/ 3mDq7eh Monthly Makers: Snails, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday, through May 22. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view snails created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more information.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2021 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Weymouth Country Club, 3946 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., Habitat for Humanity parking lot, 233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Open to all antique, classic or collectible cars. Weather permitting. Free. Mobile Device Q&A, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Commonly asked mobile device questions answered, questions also welcomed. Meeting link sent following registration at https://bit.ly/2QLIxQx Thursday, May 13 Frog Jumping Day https://bit.ly/3gZ0QvZ Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: No Bones, 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., through May 23, Schleman Nature Preserve, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Yellow nature trail teach about animals that do not have bones; one sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh Monthly Makers: Snails, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday, through May 22. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view snails created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. Ask An Expert: Alzheimer’s Q & A, noon, virtual event. Hosted by Alzheimer’s Association with guest Dr. Cierra Keith. Register online at http://bit.ly/MAYAAE Woodland Health Day of Service, noon, Hidden Hollow Camp - Day Use, 8672 Richman Road, Lodi. Volunteers needed to pull garlic mustard, an aggressive weed, from sensitive habitat. Ages 7 and up. Dress for weather. For more information and to register, go to https://bit.ly/3ufVbWe American Red Cross Blood Drive, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m., St. Ambrose Church, 929 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Friday, May 14 Dance Like a Chicken Day https://bit.ly/33gEoGQ Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: No Bones, 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., through May 23, Schleman Nature Preserve, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Yellow nature trail teach about animals that do not have bones; one sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh Monthly Makers: Snails, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday,

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up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., St. Mark Lutheran Church, 1330 N. Carpenter Street, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Saturday, May 15 International Day of Families Be a Bird! 6 a.m., through May 31, Allardale West parking lot, 401 Remsen Road, Medina. Follow signs along paved trail (teal rectangle) to enjoy play features creating an interactive adventure into being a bird. All ages, no registration. Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: No Bones, 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., through May 23, Schleman Nature Preserve, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Yellow nature trail teach about animals that do not have bones; one sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh Monthly Makers: Snails, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday, through May 22. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view snails created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Hinckley Fire Old Station, 1410 Ridge Road, Hinckley. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Magic of Matter, 10:30 a.m. to 11:15 a.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Learn science through magic tricks with the Great Lakes Science Center, for Grades 1 to 3. Meeting link sent following registration at https://bit.ly/3tevCDP Sunday, May 16 National Love a Tree Day Be a Bird! 6 a.m., through May 31, Allardale West parking lot, 401 Remsen Road, Medina. Follow signs along paved trail (teal rectangle) to enjoy play features creating an interactive adventure into being a bird. All ages, no registration. Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: No Bones, 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., through May 23, Schleman Nature Preserve, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Yellow nature trail teach about animals that do not have bones; one sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh K-9 Kapers, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Bluebell Valley, 8504 Richman Road, Lodi. Socialize dogs while hiking. COVID restrictions observed. Dogs must be

through May 22. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, on 8-foot non-retractable leash. Bring towel for muddy feet and water Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view snails created by local bowl for dog. All ages. Registration is limited, register at families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. https://bit.ly/2QKTl1f Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set Monday, May 17


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2021

National Walnut Day Celebrate by planting some walnut trees or just one. You do not have to grow a pair to get nuts. Each walnut tree has both parts needed to make nuts. Be a Bird! 6 a.m., through May 31, Allardale West parking lot, 401 Remsen Road, Medina. Follow signs along paved trail (teal rectangle) to enjoy play features creating an interactive adventure into being a bird. All ages, no registration. Let’s Explore: Our Solar System, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Wadsworth Library. Learn about the solar system, moon phases, planet names. Make puffy paint moon and solar system hat. Pick up materials packet May 10 and May 24 at the library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Register for packet and instructions at https://bit.ly/2QLQ2qD Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: No Bones, 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., through May 23, Schleman Nature Preserve, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Yellow nature trail teach about animals that do not have bones; one sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward

Be a Bird! 6 a.m., through May 31, Allardale West parking lot, 401 Remsen Road, Medina. Follow signs along paved trail (teal rectangle) to enjoy play features creating an interactive adventure into being a bird. All ages, no registration. Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: No Bones, 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., through May 23, Schleman Nature Preserve, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Yellow nature trail teach about animals that do not have bones; one sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh Monthly Makers: Snails, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday, through May 22. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view snails created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more information.

Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Root Candles, 640 Liberty Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., Habitat for Humanity parking lot, 233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Open to all antique, classic or collectible cars. Weather permitting. Free. Golden Age of Shopping, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual, hosted by Medina Library. Learn about Cleveland’s heyday of glamorous department stores, grocers, giant palaces, more. Presented by Western Reserve Historical Society. Meeting link sent following registration at https://bit.ly/33d4aLR

Tuesday, May 18 National No Dirty Dishes Day and National Cheese Souffle Day Really?!?! Go ahead, celebrate both, good luck! Be a Bird! 6 a.m., through May 31, Allardale West parking lot, 401 Remsen Road, Medina. Follow signs along paved trail (teal rectangle) to enjoy play features creating an interactive adventure into being a bird. All ages, no registration. Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: No Bones, 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., through May 23, Schleman Nature Preserve, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Yellow nature trail teach about animals that do not have bones; one sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh Monthly Makers: Snails, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday, through May 22. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view snails created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., The Chapel Wadsworth Campus, 1391 State Road, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Feeding Medina County: Get Help, Give Help, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual, hosted by Medina Library. Learn all about the nonprofit, how to get services and how to get involved. Meeting link sent following registration at https://bit.ly/3eWskzF Wednesday, May 19 World Plant a Vegetable Garden Day

Thursday, May 20 National Rescue Dog Day https://bit.ly/3ujKHVL Be a Bird! 6 a.m., through May 31, Allardale West parking lot, 401 Remsen Road, Medina. Follow signs along paved trail (teal rectangle) to enjoy play features creating an interactive adventure into being a bird. All ages, no registration. Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: No Bones, 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., through May 23, Schleman Nature Preserve, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Yellow nature trail teach about animals that do not have bones; one sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh Monthly Makers: Snails, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday, through May 22. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view snails created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more information.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2021

A list of runs and walks that benefit area non-profit organizations. To have your run listed, send the information to joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late.

Friday, May 7, 2021 Run 4 Fun, first run starts at 7 p.m., Medina High School. Runs include half-mile Fun Run, 1-mile run, 5k run. Benefits Medina City Schools Foundation. For fees and registration, go to https://bit.ly/3132Eef Saturday, May 22, 2021 Wooster Golden Gloves 5k, 8:30 a.m., McConnell Field, Wooster High School, 625 Oldman Road, Wooster. Benefits Golden Gloves 15u traveling baseball team. Get T-shirt, water bottles during race, post-race refreshments, awards. For fees and registration, go to https://bit.ly/311lu5p Registration ends May 21, 2021. Saturday, May 29 2021 Medina Runs Down Cancer: Medina Half Marathon and 5k Expo, 6:30 a.m., Medina Square. Expo is 3 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Summa Health Medina Medical Center, 3780 Medina Road, Medina. Benefits Mary Grace Memorial Foundation, Collins Cares and Medina County Road Runners Memorial Scholarship Fund. Further information and registration at https://bit.ly/3c9tesJ

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Be a Bird! 6 a.m., through May 31, Allardale West parking lot, 401 Remsen Road, Medina. Follow signs along paved trail (teal rectangle) to enjoy play features creating an interactive adventure into being a bird. All ages, no registration. Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: No Bones, 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., through May 23, Schleman Nature Preserve, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Yellow nature trail teach about animals that do not have bones; one sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh Monthly Makers: Snails, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday, through May 22. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view snails created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Introduction to Job Searching, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Wadsworth Library. Learn search strategy, navigating online job boards. Register at https://bit.ly/3h7RKgN Saturday, May 22 Buy a Musical Instrument Day We hear kazoos are popular! Be a Bird! 6 a.m., through May 31, Allardale West parking lot, 401 Remsen Road, Medina. Follow signs along paved trail (teal rectangle) to enjoy play features creating an interactive adventure into being a bird. All ages, no registration. Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: No Bones, 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., through May 23, Schleman Nature Preserve, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Yellow nature trail teach about animals that do not have bones; one sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh Monthly Makers: Snails, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday, last day. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view snails created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more information.

Tween Scene: Rainbow Fun, 3:30 p.m. to 4 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Wadsworth Library. Learn how to make a magic rainbow appear using markers, a paper towel and water. Ages 9 to 14. View program at https://bit.ly/3nWWoPC Virtual Can You Escape? Glorious Glacier Park Camp, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., virtual with Wadsworth Library. You arrive for a week-long camp at the park, but everything is locked. Clues were left to solve how to get into the camp. No download or special software needed. See tutorial at https://bit.ly/345sWiL Register at https://bit.ly/3b2jNu4 OSU Master Gardeners Workshop: Certify Your Backyard With National Wildlife Foundation, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Learn how to certify your backyard. Meeting link sent following registration at https://bit.ly/2PO33iH Explorastory: Robots, Robots Everywhere, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., virtual. Sponsored by Wadsworth Library. Stories, songs, games about robots. Make a robot you can balance on your nose. Materials pickup available May 13 through 27 at the library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth, with registration at https://bit.ly/3xXjTNw View program at https://bit.ly/ Sunday, May 23 3nWWoPC

World Turtle Day Be a Bird! 6 a.m., through May 31, Allardale West parking lot, 401 Friday, May 21 Remsen Road, Medina. Follow signs along paved trail (teal rectangle) to Talk Like Yoda Day or maybe we should say: Yoda Talk Like You Will Day enjoy play features creating an interactive adventure into being a bird. All ages, no registration.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2021

Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: No Bones, 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., last day, Schleman Nature Preserve, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Yellow nature trail teach about animals that do not have bones; one sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh

enjoy play features creating an interactive adventure into being a bird. All ages, no registration. Virtual Nature Break: Migration Madness, 3:30 p.m. to 4:15 p.m., virtual. Explore migratory journeys of birds that travel to and through Medina County. For more information and to register, go to https:// bit.ly/3b2dSVH

Monday, May 24 Scavenger Hunt Day Be a Bird! 6 a.m., through May 31, Allardale West parking lot, 401 Remsen Road, Medina. Follow signs along paved trail (teal rectangle) to enjoy play features creating an interactive adventure into being a bird. All ages, no registration. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Virtual Sensory Friendly Story Time, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., with Wadsworth Library. Designed for children on the autism spectrum or

Friday, May 28 National Brisket Day https://bit.ly/3h2jSSc Be a Bird! 6 a.m., through May 31, Allardale West parking lot, 401 Remsen Road, Medina. Follow signs along paved trail (teal rectangle) to enjoy play features creating an interactive adventure into being a bird. All ages, no registration. Saturday, May 29 Put a Pillow on Your Fridge Day https://bit.ly/3eVAmJm Be a Bird! 6 a.m., through May 31, Allardale West parking lot, 401 Remsen Road, Medina. Follow signs along paved trail (teal rectangle) to

sensory integration challenges and their families and caregivers. View at enjoy play features creating an interactive adventure into being a bird. https://bit.ly/3rd9kBe All ages, no registration. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., St. Mark Lutheran Tuesday, May 25 Church, 1330 N. Carpenter Street, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/ Sing Out Day https://bit.ly/3nLSU2J 2ybO4Rp Be a Bird! 6 a.m., through May 31, Allardale West parking lot, 401 Remsen Road, Medina. Follow signs along paved trail (teal rectangle) to Sunday, May 30 enjoy play features creating an interactive adventure into being a bird. National Water a Flower Day which is made even easier when All ages, no registration. observed with National Hole in My Bucket Day https://bit.ly/3nOgLi9 Virtual Nature Break: Migration Madness, 3:30 p.m. to 4:15 p.m., Be a Bird! 6 a.m., through May 31, Allardale West parking lot, 401 virtual. Explore migratory journeys of birds that travel to and through Remsen Road, Medina. Follow signs along paved trail (teal rectangle) to Medina County. For more information and to register, go to https:// enjoy play features creating an interactive adventure into being a bird. bit.ly/2SmmvUB All ages, no registration. Virtual Otaku Tuesdays, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. A discussion of all things anime, for Grades 6 through 12. Register for required meeting link at Monday, May 31 https://bit.ly/3uoiZYe Macaroon Day Be a Bird! 6 a.m., last day, Allardale West parking lot, 401 Remsen Road, Wednesday, May 26 Medina. Follow signs along paved trail (teal rectangle) to enjoy play World Otter Day features creating an interactive adventure into being a bird. All ages, no Be a Bird! 6 a.m., through May 31, Allardale West parking lot, 401 registration. Remsen Road, Medina. Follow signs along paved trail (teal rectangle) to enjoy play features creating an interactive adventure into being a bird. All ages, no registration. H American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville United Methodist Church, 74 W. Main Street, Seville. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., Habitat for Humanity parking lot, 233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Open to all antique, classic or collectible cars. Weather permitting. Free. Thursday, May 27 Sunscreen Day https://bit.ly/3b3VfRn Be a Bird! 6 a.m., through May 31, Allardale West parking lot, 401 Remsen Road, Medina. Follow signs along paved trail (teal rectangle) to


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2021

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Celebrate! Joy of Medina County Magazine thanks and celebrates these great companies who believe in community and make it possible for readers to enjoy this magazine for free. Please thank the following companies for bringing Joy to you! Cable, Internet, Phone

Medical Massage

1141 Lafayette Road, Medina Contact: Sam Pietrangelo Community Marketing Manager Phone: 330-722-3141 Website: https://armstrongonewire.com/

238 S. Elmwood Avenue, Medina (Inside GotMilt Health and Fitness) Contact: Rachael Hall Phone: 330-461-0769 Website: www.KnotYourself.com

Dentist

Photographer

Armstrong

Knot Yourself

Landry Family Dentistry

Allison Waltz Photography

5076 Park Avenue West, Seville Contact: Dr. Joseph G. Landry II Phone: 330-769-4470 Website: www.LandryFamilyDentistry.com

Phone: 567-203-2287 Website: https://www.allisonwaltz.com/

Fireplaces, Hot Tubs, Grills

Phone: 440-263-4502 Website: https://www.flashbangfoto.com/

The Place

2377 Medina Road, Medina Contact: Andrea Reedy Phone: 330-239-4000 Website: https://www.yourplace4.com/

Furniture

Wallace Home Furnishings

FlashBang Photography/ Videography

Renovations

North Shore Renovations Contact: Tony Ciero Phone: 216-676-4700 Renovations and 24-hour emergency service Website: https://nsr911.com/

883 N. Court Street, Medina Contact: David and Richard Wallace Owners

Phone: 330-723-3006

Want to join these great companies in sponsoring the best publication in Medina County? Contact Amy Barnes, Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com, 330-461-0589.

photo by: Mike Enerio


Click on “follow” below so you don’t miss a single edition of Joy of Medina County Magazine! Joy of Medina County Magazine 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256 E-mail: joy@blakehousepublishing.com Website: JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Phone: 330-461-0589

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Joy of Medina County Magazine May 2021  

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