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MAY 2020 VOLUME 3, NUMBER 4

$11.99

LEAN ON ME PG. 14

Building a supportive team

WHEN SPRING ARRIVED PG. 16

Flowers around the county

COMMUNITY SPIRIT PG. 23 Businesses that stepped up when times were down. EXCLUSIVE!

ARTISTICALLY YOURS PG. 24

Meet the top children artists.

More photos, columns, stories, puzzles and an updated format wait for you inside!

IN THE BEGINNING Updates to the first four stories we shared with readers: Learn what happened next to Nessa the three-legged dog, Graham Fitzgerald, Elizabeth Mikita, and Sharon and Tony Gordon. Pg. 4 A locally owned, independent publication dedicated to higher standards of journalism


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020

VOLUME 3 NUMBER 4 JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM

Setting the Tone by Amy Barnes On June 8, 1974, a tornado hit our small family farm. The roof was torn off over our heads and rain came down like a huge endless bucket of water from the sky as horrendous sounds filled the air. When it seemed the tornado had gone on her way, my mother and aunt gathered the family dogs and us two kids, and we rushed out into the blackest night I have ever seen to a car we were not even sure was still there. It was a terrifying night. We would learn later that a momma tornado and her two daughters had hit our small town that night, flying across the open fields, destroying farms and homes. One of the things I remember most about that night was the moment we came out of the farmhouse to try to make it to the car. In that deep darkness, we bumped into and tripped on monstrous shapes of things we could no longer identify while my mother was crying hysterically and screaming over and over, “It’s all gone! Everything is gone!” and finally my aunt yelling at her to shut up, so forcefully that it startled her into silence. I heard it all through the deafening roar of rain and wind. All I knew was that it felt like monsters had attacked us, and my mother, who almost never cried, had lost her mind. Another thing I remember about that night was the steadiness of my aunt as she firmly herded us into the car. She drove over washed-out roads to a nearby vacant house that was still intact and got us safely inside. Then she went back to the farmhouse, alone. We waited in tearful silence for her return, jumping at every burst of wind, not knowing

if the tornado would circle back or if there was another one tearing toward us. What seemed like months later, she was at the door with what necessities she could find in the rain and dark. She had brought a full-sized foam mattress, complete with bedding, that she had somehow managed to shove into the backseat of our Ford Galaxy 500 and had even managed to grab my sister’s and my favorite dolls. The funniest thing she brought back was a can opener. What cans were we going to open in the middle of the night? It was the only indicator of the panic she was feeling. She somehow thought that as long as we had a can opener, all would be OK. During that terrifying night and the rough days that followed, I learned a lot about my mother and aunt. I also learned a lot about reacting to a crisis. My aunt knew that little eyes were watching and learning, and that one day, when these two little girls would grow up and face a crisis, they needed to know how to do it. They would need to know what to do when the world was not as expected. I did not know I had learned so much until, many years later, when I was grown and a major crisis hit. My first reaction was to react as my mother had, and my scared children followed suit, crying, fighting and sinking into despair. That was when I realized that I was now the leader, and little ones were watching and learning. It was now my turn to set the tone and show by example how to handle a crisis. It is not ever, after all, if you feel brave. It is if you seem brave to those around you.

PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC EDITOR Amy Barnes ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller PHOTOGRAPHERS FlashBang Photography Ed Bacho Photography CARTOONIST Jerry King CONTRIBUTORS Bob Arnold Kelly Bailey Hunter Barnard Paul McHam Crystal Pirri Steve Rak Michelle Riley Robert Soroky Austin Steger Kent Von Der Vellen THE READING NOOK AUTHOR Christopher Barnes MASCOT Rico Houdini ADVERTISING SALES AND OFFICE 330-461-0589 E-MAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com WEBSITE JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Learn more about the staff at Behind The Scenes, JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Open positions are listed on the website at Open Positions. JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256. It is distributed as an e-edition and in a print edition. Both editions can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Copyright 2018-2019 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020

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HOME AND GARDEN

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DIG IT!

START YOUR TROWEL by Michelle Riley A little twist on choosing annual plants for container gardening.

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BLOOMS OF SPRING

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VEGAN VITTLES

photos by Amy Barnes and FlashBang Photography Across Medina County, spring flowers pushed from the soil to raise their faces to the sun.

EGG-FREE BREAKFAST BOWL by Crystal Pirri Start the day with an anti-inflammatory boost.

BITE ME!

BLACK BEAN FALAFEL recipe by Elizabeth Orley Our guest in the kitchen this month is sharing her vegan version of falafel with a homemade cashew cream sauce.

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4 Sharon, Emmi and Tony Gordon photo by Colleen Gordon

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OF MIND AND BODY

MANAGING STRESS AND WEIGHT by Kelly Bailey Having trouble sleeping, always hungry and gaining weight? Read this!

Revisiting our first four issues with updates about what has changed for those featured.

HEALTHY TRAILS

THE READING NOOK

by Robert Soroky

ROLLING ALONG

ONE WEEK WITH KYLE HODGE

Freedom can be found on two wheels.

by Christopher Barnes

OH, SNAP!

COMMUNITY

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TIP OF THE HAT

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DRAWN TO PETS

photos by FlashBang Photography Before and during the shutdown, county residents were busy making zentangles, flying through the air and being taken out by their dogs.

FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

TECHNOLOGY STEPS UP by Austin Steger While utilizing technological solutions, it is important to remember how they can affect your career and loved ones.

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by Paul McHam

HEALTH

by Amy Barnes

BUSINESS

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INVADER CAN BE COSTLY Mold endangers more than your family’s health.

WHERE THEY ARE NOW

With a rocky start, a friendship begins and a search leads to Kyle’s past.

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TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

THE NETWORKER

KEEPING CONTACT WITHOUT CONTACT

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On the front and back covers: photos by Amy Barnes Daffodils nod their bright heads in their annual welcome to spring, which has included dramatic temperature swings, snow flurries and a tornado for Medina County.

IN DEED

LOVING CUP by Amy Barnes

ROLL ’EM!

IMAGINE THAT by Hunter Barnard Imagination and humor defeat The Darkness in 2019 movie.

MIRTH AND JOY

THE IN BOX A solid network of colleagues, friends and trade groups can provide invaluable support.

See the top three entries in a countywide pet portrait contest.

ENTERTAINMENT

Meeting the new challenge to successful networking

by Steve Rak

When Medina County residents needed help, these companies reached out.

The family is not sure how grandma got her original cup, but they are very grateful for how she got her second.

by Bob Arnold

WITH FRIENDS LIKE THESE

PROVING COMMUNITY SPIRIT

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by Jerry King JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

THE SEARCH FOR ING Find our 15 wonderful words that end in “ing.”

JOYFUL LETTER DETECTIVES CLUE BOX Collect and unscramble the letters, send in your answer. New puzzle monthly!

LET’S DO IT! A calendar of events that might be happening.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020

by Amy Barnes

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oy of Medina County Magazine reached out to the subjects of the feature stories in the first four issues of the magazine to find out what has changed in their lives and what was the next chapter in their stories. In some cases, the next chapter was one of sorrow and, in other cases, it was a change in direction. If you are not familiar with the original stories, they can be read at https://bit.ly/2REqYPn or, if you are seeing this as a digital copy, click on the cover for the feature you would like to read.

“The Nobility of Nessa” Nessa was a talented three-legged dog who had been working at Wadsworth Point, a nursing home and rehabilitation center, for eight years. She was an inspiration to those struggling to overcome the challenges of rehabilitation and gave comfort and companionship to longterm residents. The story also revealed a few clever tricks she had learned on her own. A year after the story published, Nessa retired. She lived the last year of her life on a large farm owned by the home’s former activities director who had originally brought Nesssa into the nursing home. So far, there has not been another dog to step into Nessa’s paw prints. Dutchess, Nessa’s devoted friend who was part of the story, has a new friend named Annie, a German shepherd. Dutchess and Annie visit the nursing home on a regular basis under the loving care of Susan McCune, who once gave Nessa so much devoted care.


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“When Two Grateful People Cross Paths” Graham Fitzgerald was featured because of a social media post by police officer Ryan Nagy, who had posted how touched and impressed he was by Fitzgerald, whom he met at Dunkin’ Donuts. At the time, Fitzgerald was attending Cuyahoga Community College in his first steps to get a teaching degree while working at the donut shop. Fitzgerald earned his associates degree but then decided teaching was not the profession for him. He attempted to sign up for military service but was turned down because excessive nerve damage in his hands makes it very difficult for him to fire a weapon. The nerve damage was caused by years of participating in karate matches when he was younger.

Not one to give up, Fitzgerald continues to work at Dunkin’ (formerly Dunkin’ Donuts) on Pearl Road in Medina while he works to become a heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning technician and carpenter. Shortly after the article published, Nagy retired from the Middleburg Heights police department and took a job as a Medina Municipal Court bailiff. He still goes to Dunkin’ daily. Nagy and his family are currently living with his parents in Brunswick while they wait for their new Medina home to be finished being built, which has been delayed by the COVID-19 shutdown. continued, Page 6


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020

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“A Place to Be” When the story about Hungarian immigrant Elizabeth Mikita and her mission to help veterans was published, she was working 90hour work weeks and measured her success by whether she wanted to get up in the morning. She still does both. Since the story published, the Lodi American Legion began supporting Mikita’s efforts and soon 55 other local posts joined in the mission to provide homes for military veterans and the mentally ill at Newbridge Veterans Place, Newbridge Place and the Dome Home. The COVID-19 shutdown added challenges with residents restricted to the property, supplies being less available in stores, and the suspension of physical goods donations and volunteer recruitment. Two veterans are waiting to move in once the shutdown has ended, adding to the 20 veterans already in residence. Monetary donations still are needed to care for the residents. A low-income resident may be able to contribute as much as $1,100 a month, but the total care cost is $2,000 a month. There also is a capital funds campaign for needed vehicles and building improvements such as new

furnaces, floors, carpets, and a whole-house generator. The campaign goal is $25,000. Donations can be made by sending a check to Newbridge Place, 645 Wooster Street, Lodi, Oh. 44254 or by going to https://bit.ly/2yVE1W1 Those interested in being added to the list of volunteers to be contacted at the end of the shutdown can call Elizabeth Mikita at 330-948-8000.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020

“Becoming a Flea Market Treasure” Sharon and Tony Gordon had been sitting a booth at the Medina Flea Market since 1977. A few months after their story published, they were forced to give up their reign as the unofficial queen and king of the flea market due to a cascade of physical ailments and accidents they both suffered. When Tony was asked if he had broken his hip, he denied it and said, “It’s the way I walk and sing.”

However, his daughter Colleen Gordon confirmed that he had, indeed, broken his hip. Tony was still overseeing his barbershop called Tony Gordon’s Barbershop in Brunswick until further ailments made it impossible. The couple lives with Colleen and her husband in Strongsville.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020

THE READING NOOK

One Week With Kyle Hodge by Christopher Barnes Catch up on previous installments of our story in the Joy of Medina County Magazine e-edition! Go to JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com for past issues.

Chapter 3

Chapter 4

he next morning, I was far too tired to function, and I knew I needed caffeine to help me wake up. So, I grudgingly made my way to that same café and ordered a vanilla latte. I could’ve just left, went on with my life and never glanced at Kyle Hodge ever again, but I couldn’t bring myself to do so. I couldn’t just drop it, not with him sitting there again, just like always, typing away. I sat down across from him and stared at him. He made no acknowledgement of my presence. No glance up at me, no tiny smile, not even a hello or how do you do? “It’s Kyle, right?” I asked him, shattering the tense silence. “Mhm, and you are?” I was surprised that he responded, but glad. “Jake,” I answered. “Well, Jake, would you kindly find a different table to sit at?” “What? I mean - what?” He finally looked up at me, but only for a second and without speaking. “Fine. Whatever. Waste your life away while your daughter grows up without her father, but remember how I told you you’d regret it.” I stood and grabbed my latte, hoping for him to change his mind, offer me a seat, and welcome my questions like he had before. He didn’t. I left the café in a horrible mood and hardly got any work done at all that day. Kyle Hodge was negatively affecting my life without even being a part of it. This was the first time I lost sleep over Kyle Hodge.

He was there again the following day, just as I knew he would be, and I confidently sat down with him after ordering my vanilla latte. This time, I wanted things to be different. I didn’t want him to shoo me away, and I didn’t want to argue with him. I wanted to know why he was abandoning his daughter and wife, but I needed him to trust me before I’d get any answers. So, I didn’t speak. I sat there silently, sipping my latte, looking at him periodically, and just waiting for him to give in. I kept an eye on the clock and watched as the time I was supposed to clock in at work came and went. Being late one day didn’t matter to me, as long as I got something out of it from Kyle. But I got nothing. After about half an hour of my sitting there, he packed up his laptop and left without as much as a glance in my direction. Stunned, I slowly got up and threw away my drink. I didn’t go to work that day. I didn’t go anywhere, actually. I stayed in the café the whole day, ordered lunch there, ate there, and just sat there, wasting time away until I finally gave in and went home. It was after five, and I needed dinner, but all I could think about was Kyle Hodge. This man, this nobody whom I shouldn’t be the slightest bit concerned with, had worked his way into my mind and set up camp there. And it was all because he sat in a café typing every morning? I understood it as little as I liked it. I just wanted answers. So, I researched Kyle on the

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020

internet and finally found the answers I was seeking. “Kyle Hodge,” I read aloud to my empty apartment, “the only survivor of the Skyway airlines crash in 2006. Among the deceased passengers were Hodge’s wife and daughter. Hodge has since written a novel titled “Going Down” that is about the crash and the aftermath. Currently residing in Philadelphia.” That was the first time I understood Kyle Hodge.

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Our story continues next month! Christopher Barnes is a graduate of Medina High School/Medina County Career Center and The Ohio State University. Find his stories of realistic fiction and magical realism at cbthesurvivor.com

Celebrate! Joy of Medina County Magazine thanks and celebrates these great companies who believe in community and make it possible for readers to enjoy this magazine for free. Please thank the following companies for bringing Joy to you!

Cable, Internet, Phone

Dentist

Armstrong

Landry Family Dentistry

1141 Lafayette Road, Medina Contact: Sam Pietrangelo Community Marketing Manager Phone: 330-722-3141 Website: https://armstrongonewire.com/

5076 Park Avenue West, Seville Contact: Dr. Joseph G. Landry II Phone: 330-769-4470 Website: www.LandryFamilyDentistry.com

Fireplaces, Hot Tubs, Grills

Mold Remediation

The Place

AirXperts

2377 Medina Road, Medina Contact: Andrea Reedy Phone: 330-239-4000 Website: https://www.yourplace4.com/

Contact: Paul McHam Office phone: 330-658-2600 Cell phone: 330-280-3777 Website: http://myairxperts.com/

Want to join these great companies in sponsoring the best publication in Medina County? Contact Amy Barnes, Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com, 330-461-0589.

photo by: Mike Enerio


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020

It was a great day to burn some energy at the Wadsworth Skate Park in Valley View Park, 616 West Street, Wadsworth. The park was designed with the help of local skaters and is free to use. For more information about the park, go to https://bit.ly/3e7ncrk

photos by FlashBang Photography


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020

Caramel, a Basenji and retired show dog, gives our photographer a wary eye while taking owner Derwood Shankleton for a walk on High Street in Wadsworth recently. Basenjis originated in Africa, are easily bored and were bred to hunt reed rats.

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"Whatcha doin'?"

Carmen Reynolds, left, enjoys the interaction between her pit bull, Lily, and Michelle Sviatko in Wadsworth.

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Alyssa Musser, left, and Sophia Musser use suggested patterns and shapes to create zentangles at Wadsworth Library.

Zane Grigsby, 9 years old, watches as Eli Shore, 10 years old, creates a zentangle at Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth.

Three-year-old Hava Grigsby concentrates on creating a zentangle at Wadsworth Library.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020

BUSINESS: FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

Technology Steps Up by Austin Steger If anyone doubted it previously, it has become obvious in recent weeks how much humans crave social interaction and how valuable technology is for maintaining contact. Posting regular updates, videos and pictures on social media can not only help your inner circle keep updated, but it also shows potential customers or employers your human side. As always, it is important to be aware that anything you post can influence your career. Try to keep your social media posts upbeat and positive. There are several ways, in addition to social media posts, to use technology to communicate. Many online platforms offer messaging services that allow for instant communication. There is rarely much setup involved, and most are easy and intuitive to use. In addition, there are free online services available for making video calls, which are much more personal than a phone call. However, it is important to remember that you can be seen and to dress accordingly, especially for workrelated calls. Many companies have had to implement emergency workfrom-home programs to avoid exposure to COVID-19 but still keep their businesses open. Some companies may provide a company device, like a laptop, and others may allow you to use your own device. If you are using a company device, keep in mind that the safest route is to use it for work purposes only. If you are using a private device for work, check with your company to ensure that it has your company’s approval and follows their safety protocols Time once spent commuting to work can be used to explore online classes and gain skills you previously wished you had time to acquire. If you know someone who needs help locating an open public Wi-Fi connection, the state has established a site to help at https://bit.ly/3aM880m These solutions are ultimately only as helpful as our desire to use them. Now, more than ever, we need to be united, helpful and aware of the needs of others, including their technology needs. Austin Steger is a local computer and mobile electronics technician and technical communicator. He can be contacted at repairs.riztech@gmail.com or by calling 330952-1225.

EARLY AND LATE HOURS FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE. Check www.landryfamilydentistry.com for current hours.

Joseph G. Landry II, D.D.S., M.A.G.D., F.I.C.O.I Master of the Academy of General Dentistry

5076 Park Avenue West • Seville, OH 44273

330-769-4470 www.LandryFamilyDentistry.com OVER 200 POSITIVE GOOGLE REVIEWS WITH A 5 STAR AVERAGE

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BUSINESS: THE NETWORKER

BUSINESS: THE IN BOX

Keeping Contact Without Contact

With Friends Like These

by Bob Arnold

One thing I learned a long time ago about being an entrepreneur and business owner is that you cannot do it alone. As I write this, my business is shut down, like many others. Also, like many other business owners with employees, the shutdown has caused me to have to make some gutwrenching decisions. It has not been easy. I am lucky that I have a solid network, including business colleagues, friends and trade associations to support me and my company. It is in times like these that these relationships are critical. I have been in constant contact with fellow business owners, sharing strategies and procedures to help our businesses survive this difficult time. We are all learning as we go, but at least we have each other to lean on. Calling a fellow business owner and talking candidly about situations like this helps me immensely. Another thing that is helpful are the social media pages set up by trade associations to share relevant information from the federal and local government levels. Checking trade sites daily will keep you up to date on the changing rules and guidelines. If you have not already joined your local trade association or a group that pertains to your business, now is the time to do so. Also, while it may not be the easiest time to try to make friends within in your industry, it is worth a try. Reach out to someone whom you think can help, or you can e-mail me at steveii@me.com. We will get through this.

All of a sudden, we were asked to stay to ourselves, to stay home as if we did not live among other people in our community, and to practice social or, more accurately, physical distancing. So much time off, isolation, and the closing of businesses and schools can cause a rise in anxiety for many. How do we deal with this in a society that depends on social interaction in its work and play? First, we have to restructure priorities around what is best for our families and our neighbors. This means we have made saving lives a top priority. The highly contagious nature of COVID-19 makes it necessary to take steps to stay away from each other, or we could see our circle of family and friends diminishing. At the same time that we must limit contact with each other, we also have to ensure our families have the provisions they need for health and sanity and then ensuring our neighbors do, too. Second, we need to remember that, despite the challenges, we still need to find ways to maintain our connections with the people in our businesses, neighborhoods and communities. Networking is an essential activity that we, as humans, require. To overcome the challenges presented by living and working in isolation, I suggest moving your networking and social groups to online platforms. These platforms have experienced a surge in popularity with many who have utilized them for meetings and networking. By using these platforms, you can maintain contact and connections with people in your network and maintain a degree of certainty. Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at https:// amzn.to/2KSy3Xm More networking tips are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http://onwardnetworking.com/ or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com

by Steve Rak

Medina resident Steve Rak is an award-winning columnist and has spoken at numerous venues throughout the United States and Canada as the owner of Rak Consulting, http://www.rakconsultingllc.com/, and Southwest Landscape Management, http://www.sw-landscape.com/ E-mail questions or suggestions for future column topics to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “In Box” in the subject line.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020

HOME AND GARDEN: DIG IT!

Start Your Trowel photos and text by Michelle Riley Ready to plant annuals? Gardeners wait in eager anticipation for more sun-filled hours, signaling the advent of spring as we begin filling our lives with blossoms. Everyone has favorite blooms and an opinion on the proper way to display them. Many of us have heard the annual planting mantra using the thriller, filler and spiller style of placement, which refers to a style of grouping of annuals combined into one annual pot. The thriller represents the center annual. Growing tall and standing above the rest, the thriller should be the star of the show. Fillers are the grouping of plants placed around the thriller. These plants are intended to stay upright and full, though not so large that they overwhelm the thriller. Spillers are the plants that will be placed at the edge of the pot, and they may trail down the sides. There are many annuals for the task. It depends on the size of the pot, the plants chosen and the spacing needed for proper root growth. I encourage you to take a different perspective when planting your annual pots this year. In place of the thriller, try picking an annual that represents love. After all, love should be the brightest star in our lives. Instead of having a filler, pick the best annual to represent life. Choose something that will grow strong and robust, filling all of the empty spaces with grace and beauty, never forgetting love is the center of its being. Finally, replace the spiller with laughter. Choosing the perfect annual for the job, let your laughter overflow the edges of the pot. You are the artist. Annuals are your paint. The pot is your canvas. Plant love and surround it with a vibrant, full life, overflowing with laughter. May you find joy in every bloom.

Michelle Riley is a local horticulturist, landscape designer, and consultant. She is founder of MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com and NeOhioGarden.com and is the president of All About You Signature Landscape Design, Inc. She can be contacted at Info@MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com or by calling 234-678-8266.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020

HOME AND GARDEN

Blooms of Spring Across the county, flowers made cheery spots of color, a signal that spring was forcing its way past winter.

photo by Amy Barnes

photo by Amy Barnes


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020

photo by Amy Barnes

photo by Amy Barnes

photo by FlashBang Photography

photo by Amy Barnes

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photo by FlashBang Photography

photo by FlashBang Photography


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020

photo by FlashBang Photography

photo by FlashBang Photography

photo by FlashBang Photography

photo by FlashBang Photography

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020

HOME AND GARDEN: VEGAN VITTLES

HOME AND GARDEN: BITE ME!

Egg-Free Breakfast Bowl

Black Bean Falafel

by Crystal Pirri

recipe by Elizabeth Orley

Chronic stress creates chronic inflammation, which one study shows is a component of chronic diseases (https:// bit.ly/3aFT0l3). We need to manage our minds and emotions to reduce stress, and certain foods can support this journey. Green leafy vegetables are my first choice for fighting inflammation (https://bit.ly/2UH9dRk), and this antiinflammatory breakfast bowl is a close second. Turmeric, the magic ingredient, is known for being an antioxidant and reducing inflammation, when paired with black pepper (https://bit.ly/3dTwqHP). While this breakfast bowl is a great way to start your day, I also love to add this dynamic dish to any soup or salad I am

Elizabeth Orley now lives in Ohio, but grew up in Arizona. She has degrees in history, political science and Middle Eastern studies. While in college, she worked at promotional marketing events and traveled the country. She spent almost five years honing her skills before opening her own company, Elizabeth Ink, a digital marketing agency based in Medina. This is her vegan version of falafel.

enjoying when I feel the need for anti-inflammatory support. The oats can be substituted with steel-cut oats, though cooking time will increase from five minutes to 30. To cook steel-cut oats, simply turn down the heat, and keep them stirred, adding more milk if they start to get too dry. Steelcut oats also can be made ahead of time. I like to put them in a slow cooker the night before with a dash of salt and cinnamon (save the other spices until the morning or they will seem too strong.) Note: Do not omit the black pepper! It is essential for helping the turmeric do its job.

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• 1 cup old-fashioned oats • 2 cups unsweetened soy milk • 1 tablespoon chia seeds (for omega-3) • ½ teaspoon turmeric • ½ teaspoon ground black pepper • ½ teaspoon cinnamon, cloves, ginger, or another spice (I prefer cinnamon) • 1/2 cup frozen or fresh berries of choice (for sweetness, add raisins or a bit of maple syrup) Combine oats with milk, chia and spices in a small saucepan over medium heat. Cook, stirring frequently, until oats are cooked and soft, about five minutes. Add berries or raisins, and serve hot. Crystal Pirri is an author, coach and oil-free vegan. Her recipes can be found at https://bit.ly/2v6NQi5. Have a question or request? E-mail Crystal@CrystalsRecipes.com

• • • • • • • • • • • •

1 12-ounce can organic black beans, rinsed and dried ¼ cup flour of your choice (I used quinoa flour) 2 cloves garlic 1 shallot 1 teaspoon cumin 1 teaspoon sea salt 1 teaspoon smoked paprika 2 teaspoons olive oil 4 teaspoons fresh parsley, chopped 3 teaspoons fresh red pepper, chopped corn oil or peanut oil bibb lettuce

In a medium saucepan, heat 2 inches of corn or peanut oil over medium heat and preheat for at least five minutes. While oil is preheating, put black beans, garlic and shallot in a food processor and pulse until it begins to make a paste. Add olive oil, sea salt, cumin, and smoked paprika and pulse for an additional 30 seconds. Remove the mixture from the bowl and shape into 1-inch balls. If dough is sticky, sprinkle your hands with flour to help form the balls. If the mixture is still too wet to form balls, add additional flour as needed. Fry over medium heat for about three minutes and remove. Sprinkle with sea salt and set aside. Cashew Cream • 1 cup whole cashews • ½ cup boiling water • 1 teaspoon sea salt • 2 teaspoons hot sauce • ½ teaspoon black pepper • diced parsley and red peppers for topping Place whole cashews in a food processor, pour boiling water over the cashews and allow to sit for 5 minutes. Pulse until creamy. Add hot sauce and sea salt. Serve by separating bibb lettuce leaves and place one or two black bean falafel on top. Add one small spoon of cashew cream, and drizzle with additional olive oil. Top with diced parsley and red peppers. Serve hot. Note: The cashew cream can be made ahead of time and stored in the refrigerator for up to three days prior to use. Want to have your recipe featured in a future issue? Send it with your name, phone number (in case we have questions), the city you live in, and some information about you to: Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “recipe” in the subject line. Recipes MUST be your original recipe and by submitting a recipe you are guaranteeing it is one you have developed or modified and used.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020

HOME AND GARDEN: TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

Invader Can Be Costly by Paul McHam While everyone talks about mold and its affect on people’s health, they are missing another important aspect of mold. There is little doubt that the wrong mold, in excessive amounts, can make you sick. Some molds (very, very few) can even result in death, however, most people will show little immediate reaction to mold exposure. What is not discussed as much is that mold also causes damage to the biggest investment people typically make: their homes. The first thing mold does is dramatically decrease the value of a home. Most banks will not finance a home that has mold until the mold has been cleared. The fact that a home can easily lose a third of its value or more is significant. In addition, most folks will not consider purchasing a home with mold until it is remediated and has received clearance testing by a professional. When it comes to mold, you have your health, the health of your family, and the value of your home to consider. The damage caused by water and mold can cause a roof to collapse, walls to rot, floors to warp, and an entire library of other destruction. Particle board or oriented strand board (OSB) will delaminate and fall apart. Any untreated wood that is touching a concrete or cement floor will begin to rot and collapse. Before you know it, Mother Nature will reclaim your home or create huge projects with extremely high repair bills. You can prevent it all by watching for water, water vapor, and the things that allow for mold growth and the resulting deterioration of your home. If you are not confident in your own skills, contact a home inspector. A good home inspector can identify any existing or impending problems with a thorough inspection. Paul McHam is a local expert on mold remediation. For more information, visit his website at http://myairxperts.com/ and his Facebook page Moldsporewars http://bit.ly/2E2Fj3y or call 330-658-2600. For a list of his certifications, go to https://bit.ly/2WH19Pt

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“I’m around my family, I don’t need to be attractive.”

“Just because you have a good reason to do something doesn’t mean you’re immune to being laughed at.”

“Dealing with angry people wasn’t in my job description, but I did it anyway.”

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020

HEALTH: OF MIND AND BODY

HEALTH: HEALTHY TRAILS

Managing Stress and Weight

Rolling Along

by Kelly Bailey

by Robert Soroky

Stress, no matter the cause, is well known for amping up hunger hormones, disturbing sleep, spiking cortisol, and causing increased deposits of belly fat. Yikes! While you can thank your little friend, stress, for increased hunger, there are ways to manage stress and, thus, have more control over weight gain. The following three tips can help in reducing stress, and, bonus, they are completely free! First, move your body, preferably outdoors. Very few things relieve stress like increasing activity levels. Even if it is for only 10 minutes, it can make a difference. Get outside, and take a walk. Second, practice deep breathing. The power of breath work is sorely underrated. For one minute each day, that is only one single minute out of the 1440 minutes in a day, practice deep diaphragmatic or belly breathing. To practice diaphragmatic breathing, place a hand on your upper chest and a hand on your abdomen. Breathe in through your nose, deep enough that it makes your stomach push against your hand. Throughout the breath, the hand on the upper chest should not move. Exhale slowly. For a video on practicing diaphragmatic breathing while lying down, go to https://bit.ly/2UIZY3i The next video shows diaphragmatic breathing in a sitting position. Third, work on your mindset. Too often we focus on the negative, for instance, on what we cannot do or what we are not allowed to do. Creating a stress-resilient mindset is as simple as focusing on what you can do. For example, you may not be able to go to your favorite gym, but you can use one of thousands of free workouts available on video-sharing or streaming platforms to get in a stress-reducing sweat session! Keep in mind that stress affects everyone and learning to manage it is an integral part of weight loss.

With all of the concerns surrounding public interaction and the closing of gyms, fitness centers and other places people gather to exercise, it is important now, more than ever, to find ways to still be able to live a healthy lifestyle. Bicycles provide a wonderful, low-impact way to get solid exercise for folks of all ages. You can ride solo or with family and friends, easily maintaining a 6-foot distance. There are many days when I just want to escape the pressures of life, and a long ride in the Cleveland Metroparks or on the Medina trails does wonders for my body and mind. Such rides can be the perfect way to escape crowds and achieve a little exercise along the way. Looking ahead to when businesses reopen, the same bike that got you outside enjoying nature can also be used to tackle your errands and work commute. Biking to work not only decreases your carbondioxide footprint, but, depending on where you travel, it also can cut out the stress of crazy rush-hour drivers. A huge win, win! Obviously, depending on where you work, commuting by bike might not be practical, but if you can swing it, give it a try. It does not have to end with work. A bike ride to a favorite location or to a local market is a great way to explore your town from a whole new perspective. When unable to leave home, it is the perfect opportunity to turn an outdoor bike into an awesome indoor cycling machine by connecting it to an indoor trainer. There are apps that can be downloaded to make riders feel as if they are pedaling through incredible virtual locations. Many apps are designed to replicate the climbs and descents that would be experienced in the real world. Indoors or out, riding a bike can be a great way to stay fit and healthy!

Kelly Bailey is a certified personal trainer and certified holistic nutrition coach. She owns and operates Kelly Bailey Wellness. Read her blog and contact her at https://www.kellybailey.fit/

Robert Soroky is a lifelong cyclist regularly participating in long distance charity rides and manager of the Century Cycles Medina location. Contact Soroky at robert@centurycycles.com to suggest column topics, for further information or to chat about bikes.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020

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COMMUNITY: TIP OF THE HAT

Proving Community Spirit The sudden shutdown of schools and businesses to slow the spread of COVID-19 caused a crisis of need for many in Medina County. Joy of Medina County Magazine is recognizing those companies that stepped up. Thank you, and a tip of the publisher’s hat to the following companies who showed their commitment to community and reached out to help.

Armstrong, 1141 Lafayette Road, Medina, took steps to enable easier working and schooling from home and increased entertainment options. The company relaxed its data allowance policy, opened all Zoom Wi-Fi hot spots, increased download speeds, and added a free preview of 14 cable channels for the month of April.

The Place, 2377 Medina Road, Medina, is hosting a pickup and drop off point for making face masks. At press time, volunteers were busy sorting donated fabric from Mission of Love for the face masks in response to the Million Mask Challenge created by the Ohio-based Pins and Needles Sewing Shop. Instructions are available for a simple face mask and for one appropriate for health care workers, which CR Multi-Service Company, Medina, and MDG was designed by Pins and Needles with the help of a Flooring America, 3812 Pearl Road, Medina, local hospital. Volunteers are needed for making the sponsored a visit from the Easter bunny, Santa Claus masks. Material and instructions can be picked up and a dinosaur with candy-filled eggs to nine homes and completed masks dropped off in bins at The in Lodi, Medina, Sebring, Wadsworth, and Wooster. Place or at any Pins and Needles location. To volunteer, text Linda Baddely at 330-990-1451. Grande Café and Roastery, 4080 Creative Living Way, Medina, is providing meals and baked goods to Williams on the Lake, 787 Lafayette Road, Medina, Creative Housing residents who have lost their jobs. with the help of the Medina Lions Club and a faithbased organization, is donating hundreds of meals of Proximity Marketing, 2947 Interstate Parkway, pork loin, cabbage rolls, barbecue, and more to Cups Brunswick, donated support to the United Way of Café and Love Dash. Medina County COVID-19 Relief Fund.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020

COMMUNITY:

Drawn to Pets In April, Mike Kovack, Medina County auditor, held a drawing contest of pets by county-area children. There was a total of 23 entries. The winner received a $15 prize at a local business.

Third Place: Basil Vlcek Jackett, age 6, Medina, family cat Mallie.

Winner: Carmen Donze, age 11, Medina, family dog Maggie

Second Place: Caleb Howard, age 9, Spencer, family’s three cats


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020

COMMUNITY: IN DEED

Loving Cup

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by Amy Barnes

At 96 years old, it often is the small things that hold the most importance, and so it was with Evelyn Nanashe and her mug. Nanashe had a beloved mug from Park West Surgical Center that her family called her “security mug.” When the mug was accidentally dropped and broken, the family began an urgent search to replace it. For three months, the family searched, while Nanashe kept asking everyone to check the car for her mug, convinced that was where it must be. Elaine Cota, Nanashe’s granddaughter, said that while searching for the mug, she discovered that Park West was an ophthalmologist practice purchased by the Cleveland Clinic several years ago. Nanashe claimed she was the first patient at Park West and that the doctors had made a “big deal” about giving the mug to her. However, as far as family members are aware, Nanashe has never seen an ophthalmologist. In a final effort to locate a similar mug, a desperate Cota reached out on social media. That was when Jaime Polt entered the picture. It just so happens that Polt works for the Cleveland Clinic Foundation and at Park West and one of her close

friends worked at Park West for several years. It also just so happened that Polt’s friend had a very similar Park West mug. Polt got the mug, then made arrangements to deliver it to a relieved Cota. While Nanashe noticed the replacement cup was different from her first one, she was very happy to have her “new, same one” mug. Thank you, Jaime Polt, for taking the time to help bring happiness to a family who needed a cup of kindness! For her good deed, Polt was excited to receive a gift certificate to The Book Shelf, which has locations in Brunswick, Medina and Wadsworth. The Book Shelf’s book sales benefit nonprofit Project Learn. You can learn more about The Book Shelf at https://bit.ly/3aQrfpW Businesses that donate gift cards or certificates to be used as In Deed rewards will receive notice in the column when their donation is awarded. Interested businesses should call 330-461-0589 or e-mail joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020

MIRTH AND JOY

ENTERTAINMENT: ROLL ’EM!

by Jerry King

Imagine That by Hunter Barnard Editor’s Note: With so many people currently streaming movies, our movie reviewer decided to review “Wonder Park,” which was released in 2019.

A

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The movie “Wonder Park” was a happy and a sad movie. It was happy because there was a really cool fair in it, but it was sad because The Darkness made the fair yucky. June is the main character in the movie. She is really cool because she likes to make things just like I do. She could make a whole roller coaster track in her house, and it looked like it was hard to make. June is really smart and good at figuring things out. June has a favorite stuffed animal named Peanut who helps her build Wonder Park. He is a really good guy. All of the animals talk in this movie because June has a really big imagination. The park starts off looking really cool and fun, but then things happen that make June sad and The Darkness starts to take over Wonder Park. She has to go find it and fix it so Peanut can help her make things again. She has to go really far in her imagination to fix it. There are other animals who live in the park, too, Boomer is my favorite. He is a big blue bear who falls asleep when he gets scared, and he was really funny. He got to ride one of the roller coasters even though he did not like them very much. He was in all of my favorite parts of the movie. They were my favorite parts because Boomer made me laugh a lot. The movie taught me that sometimes you are sad even when you do not want to be, but that is OK because you can always learn how to have fun again. June made lots of nice new friends that helped her save Wonder Park from The Darkness, and they were all able to have fun again. All of the animals in Wonder Park were stuffed animals that June has, so even after they had their adventure, she was still able to see them. The end of the movie was really happy, and I liked that a lot, it made me happy, too. Hunter Barnard is an energetic 6-year-old who attends Brunswick City Schools and likes to share his opinion. He is assisted in writing his column by his mom, Jessica Rapenchuk.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020

Joyful Word Search The Search for Ing

HOPING AMAZING HEALING SURVIVING BELIEVING

LOVING CONNECTING GIVING HELPING CURING

OVERCOMING REOPENING FINDING SMILING CELEBRATING

Answer Key for Last Month’s Search

Smiling in the Kitchen

G

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020

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May 2020 Nonprofit Calendar Editor’s Note: Please be aware that many events are being

encourage kids to ride their bikes to school. Prizes will be awarded.

cancelled due to concerns about COVID-19. Check before going to

Sponsored by Century Cycles.

ensure events you plan to attend are still being held.

Monday Movie Matinee: “Downton Abbey,” 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Adults. Reservations by calling Soprema Senior Center, 330-335-1513.

Friday, May 1

May the 4th Be With You: “Star Wars” Through the Years, 7 p.m. to

No Pants Day https://bit.ly/2XxnlyA and Batman Day

9:10 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street,

https://bit.ly/2XBDsen

Wadsworth. Presentation on how culture, more are represented by

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina United

“Star Wars.”

Methodist Church, 4747 Foote Road, Medina.

Tuesday, May 5

https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

National Cartoonists Day https://bit.ly/2K3VP3O Enjoy, Jerry King,

Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United

“Mirth and Joy”!

Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30

Beginning Computer Class, 10 a.m. to noon, Sycamore Rooms North

p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn charge. Bluegrass/country bands welcome, arrive early to be

computer basics. Register at https://bit.ly/2XAsDJz

scheduled.

Camp Wired, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library,

Saturday, May 2

635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55

World Naked Gardening Day https://bit.ly/2XyKSyY Observance not

plus. Call for topics, 330-948-1885.

suggested for community gardens!

Create! Washi Tape Coasters, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A,

Paper Shredding, 9 a.m. to noon, American Legion Post 202, 620 N.

Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Register at

Broadway Street, Medina. Donations requested.

https://bit.ly/2V6LvOO

Woodland Healthy: Day of Service, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Hubbard Valley

Gearheads: Shrinky Plastic Art, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina 1907

Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Help pull aggressive weed

Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Register at

from sensitive habitat. Bring work gloves, dress for outdoors. Ages 9

https://bit.ly/2RF9J0j

and up.

Wednesday, May 6

Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Highland Library,

International No Diet Day https://bit.ly/2XyaKeg and National Bike

4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up

to School Day https://bit.ly/2Vg4rv4

Medina County donations.

Is Seeing Really Believing? 2:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m., Buckeye Library,

th

7 Annual Children’s Cup: A Night at the Races, 5:30 p.m., Weymouth 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Examine optical illusions, make own. Grades Country Club, 3946 Weymouth Road, Medina. Benefits The Children’s

6 to 12.

Center of Medina County. Bet on the horses like you were at the

Lifesize Clue, 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., Community Rooms A and B,

Kentucky Derby. Silent auction, hat contest, raffle. Tickets $60 at

Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Grades 3 to 5. Register

https://bit.ly/3bXQasF

at https://bit.ly/2RCXAJn

Sunday, May 3

Empower Parent Workshop: Preparing for Summer!, 6 p.m. to 8

Lumpy Rug Day https://bit.ly/3b9QhAs

p.m., Education Room, Summa Health Medical Building, 3780 Medina

Monday, May 4

Road, Medina (enter in the Emergency Room doors). Tips on pro-active

Star Wars Day https://bit.ly/2wFRlxc

schedules, routines and other tools to help summer go smoothly. To

2020 Bike to School Challenge, Medina, through May 8 and May 11

register, contact Jennifer Gannon at jgannon@medinaesc.org or at

through May 15. All nine Medina schools will be participating to

330-723-6393, Ext. 125


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020

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Diversity and Inclusion Series: Understanding What it Means to be

National Clean Up Your Room Day Very appropriate for Mother’s

LGBTQ, 7 pm. to 8:30 p.m., Community Rooms A and B, Medina.

Day!

Understand terms and challenges.

Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Petco, 1052

Thursday, May 7

Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth. Meet pets up for adoption.

National Barrier Awareness Day https://bit.ly/2RD10vM

For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2PbEuYS

Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Room, Medina Library,

ORMACO Presents John Caracillo: Blues and Original Tunes, 2 p.m.

210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills.

to 3 p.m., Wadsworth Public Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth.

Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588.

Performance of blues and original music. Learn about the blues and its

Legal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center

influences. Q-and-A session. Free but because of space, reservations

Street, Seville. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not

are recommended. Call 330-722-2541.

represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served.

Monday, May 11

Saving Money With Little Effort, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Community Room,

National Foam Rolling Day

Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Discover cash-back apps,

2020 Bike to School Challenge, Medina (second week), through May

grocery pickup, using cash, more.

15. All nine Medina schools will be participating to encourage kids to

Mother’s Day DIY Gift, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center

ride their bikes to school. Prizes will be awarded. Sponsored by

Street, Seville. Children of all ages invited to make a gift. Register at

Century Cycles.

https://bit.ly/2VuUYOU

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick United

Navigating the Medicare Maze, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Meeting Room A,

Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick.

Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Learn about

https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

different parts of Medicare.

Baby Car Seat Installations, 2 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., Medina County

Medical Issues of Presidents, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room,

Health Department, 4800 Ledgewood Drive, Medina. By appointment

Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. How medical issues

only, call 330-723-9688.

impacted history from Washington to Trump. Register at

Self-Portrait Collage, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Community Room, Highland

https://bit.ly/2VwiqLo

Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Use creativity, magazines to create

Friday, May 8

self-portrait. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2REvRIi

National Coconut Cream Pie Day

Indian Cooking, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Sycamore Rooms North and South,

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina

Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn about

Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina.

commonly used Indian spices and how they can heal. Register at

https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

https://bit.ly/2V9ZhjA

Bluegrass Jam and Special Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette

Tuesday, May 12

United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens

International Nurses Day https://bit.ly/2JZ0Bzx and National

at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is

Limerick Day https://bit.ly/2xqEWxp

additional charge. Fish dinner through April 10, $8. Bring favorite

Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Hickory Room,

dessert to share. Bluegrass/country bands welcome, arrive early to be

Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome.

scheduled.

Making Warm Up Medina County donations.

Saturday, May 9

Camp Wired, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library,

Lost Sock Memorial Day https://bit.ly/2VnCMGM

635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55

Search Engine Showdown, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Computer Lab, Medina plus. Call for topics, 330-948-1885. Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Put your search engine up against others and see which is best. Register at https://bit.ly/2V7f1E3 Tales and Tails, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Children read with therapy dogs. Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. Tabletop RPG Day, noon to 3 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Bring Magic: The Gathering, Dungeons and Dragons or new game to play. Sunday, May 10


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020

Tech Tuesdays: Large Format Printer, noon to 12:45 p.m.,

Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission

Makerspace, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina.

$3, dinner is additional charge. Fish dinner through April 10, $8. Bring

Demonstration of how to use large-format printer.

favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass/country bands welcome, arrive

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Root Candles, 640

early to be scheduled.

Liberty Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Wine and Canvas, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Rooms A and B,

South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., Habitat for Humanity parking

Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Bring wine, snacks,

lot, 233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Open to all antique, classic or

take your original painting home. Fee due to presenter at event, $15.

collectible cars. Weather permitting. Free.

Must be 21 or older to attend. Register at https://bit.ly/3adbZlU

Native Perennials, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Buckeye

Benefit Dinner for Emma Pfouts, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., Galaxy Banquet

Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Learn about native perennials, care,

Center, 201 Park Center Drive, Wadsworth. Includes pasta dinner, cash

selection, benefits.

bar, auctions, wine pull, DJ and dancing. Tickets range from $50 to $60

Road Scholar, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Sycamore Rooms North and South,

at https://bit.ly/2T5bnt9

Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Traveling, education

Saturday, May 16

opportunities. Register at https://bit.ly/2K72qug

National Do Something Good for Your Neighbor Day

Wednesday, May 13

Plein Air Art Event, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Granger Historical

Frog Jumping Day https://bit.ly/2xrblE6

Museum, 1261 Granger Road, Medina. Bring own art supplies and chair.

Candy Grab, 2:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road,

Create art highlighting the Granger bicentennial and area barns. Artists

Medina. Roll dice, grab candy. Grades 6 to 12.

are invited to display work at the Bicentennial Art Show. Drop off

Scrapbooking, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South,

completed works of art at the Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road,

Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Create four pages.

Medina, June 22, noon to 4 p.m. Go to https://bit.ly/3ddGR8D for more

Bring adhesive. Supply fee, $8, due to presenter at event. Register at

information.

https://bit.ly/2V9YU8U

Bookin 5k, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth

Plotting Your Story With “Save the Cat,” 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.,

Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. No registration.

Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina.

ACT Practice Test, 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Sycamore Rooms North and

Learn how to plot story, build character arcs, eliminate plot holes with

South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Full-length

Disney artist David Schwartz. Register at https://bit.ly/2VsiADL

practice test. Bring own graphing calculator. Test and pencil provided.

Wadsworth Area Historical Society: The History of Automobile

Register at https://bit.ly/34AgEgs

Dealerships in Wadsworth, 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and

2020 Medina Spring Avant-Garde Art and Craft Show, 10 a.m. to 5

B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth.

p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road,

Thursday, May 14

Medina. Benefits Hope Through Sports. Admission $3 at the door.

Dance Like a Chicken Day https://bit.ly/2Vt1yVR

Mouse and Keyboard 101, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Computer Lab, Medina

Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Computer Lab, Medina

Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Improve mastery of mouse

Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer

and learn about buttons on keyboard. Adults. Register at

skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588.

https://bit.ly/2V6vJ6m

Breastfeeding Basics Class, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Medina County Health

Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Highland Library,

Department, 4800 Ledgewood Drive, Medina. Free. For more

4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up

information, call 330-723-9688, Option 4.

Medina County donations.

Tween Scene: Amazing Miniatures, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s

Unicorns and Rainbows, 11 a.m. to noon, Community Room, Highland

Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Use

Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Explorastory story time with

food to create tiny edibles and clay to make fun-sized items. Register at mythical creatures and rainbows. Grades 1 to 3. Register at https://bit.ly/2XCQRDc

https://bit.ly/2VzVTh8

Preschool Dance Party, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Rooms North STEM Saturday, 2 p.m. to 2:45 p.m., Story Time Room, Medina Library, and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Ages 3

210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Construct marshmallow structures.

and up. Register at https://bit.ly/3esr2f5

Grades 3 and up. Register at https://bit.ly/34C1C9Z

Friday, May 15

Brass Band of the Western Reserve: Slides Rule!, 7 p.m., Performing

Bike to Work Day https://bit.ly/3cgoX3U and National Pizza Party

Arts Center, 851 Weymouth Road, Medina. Featuring Brett Baker,

Day

trombone soloist. Tickets at the door, adults, $15; senior citizens, $12;

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Holy Martyrs

and students, no charge.

Church, 3100 S. Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Sunday, May 17

Bluegrass Jam and Baked Potato Bar Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.,

Pack Rat Day https://bit.ly/2RyZLxC and Take Your Parents to the

Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina.

Playground Day


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020

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ORMACO Party Bus to “My Fair Lady,” 11:30 a.m., Playhouse Square, Cleveland. Bus leaves from Buehler’s River Styx, 3616 Medina Road, Medina. Includes box lunch, wine, homemade cookies, chocolates, cheese, trivia quiz, more. Tickets are $45 for balcony only; with party bus: $75 for balcony, $105 for orchestra seating. www.ormaco.org , 330-722-2541 Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Petco, 1052 Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth. Meet pets up for adoption. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2PbEuYS K-9 Kapers, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Hidden Hollow Camp Day Use, 8672 Richman Road, Lodi. Socialize dogs while hiking. Dogs must be on 8foot non-retractable leash. Bring towel for muddy feet and water bowl for dog. All ages. Free. No registration. Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: The Ants go Marching In, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Learn about ants, how they live, fight, communicate. All ages. No registration. Free. Monday, May 18 No Dirty Dishes Day https://bit.ly/2RzxiaJ and Visit Your Relatives Day https://bit.ly/2RzCvQ1 We suspect you may not have any dirty dishes because you visited your relatives! Movie Monday, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Popcorn, pillows, newly released movie. Grades 6 to 12. Free. No registration. Sensory Friendly Story Time, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Stories, songs, rhymes, play time for children on the autism spectrum, those with sensory integration challenges, their families and caregivers.

Brunswick 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sundays, June 7 through ?? Heritage Farm, 4613 Laurel Road, Brunswick Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2I4I5DV Medina 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays, May 2 through October 12 Medina Public Square Seville POSTPONED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, May 23 through September 26

Gazebo at Maria Stanhope Park, 73 W. Main Street, Seville Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2r4Hmvk Wadsworth POSTPONED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, June 13 through September 26 Central Intermediate School, 151 Main Street, Wadsworth Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2JykOKc

Register at https://bit.ly/2VrWP78 Donauschwaben Kindergruppe Performance, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.,

Garden Club Planting Day, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Children’s Activity

Sycamore Rooms North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center

Room and library courtyard, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street,

Road, Brunswick. Children’s dance group of boys and girls aged 4 to 11. Wadsworth. Plant flowers, herbs and vegetables in the courtyard. Register at https://bit.ly/2K74DG4

Register at https://bit.ly/3cmbwj0

Tuesday, May 19

Wednesday, May 20

World Plant a Vegetable Garden Day https://bit.ly/2yfd6UJ

Be a Millionaire Day https://bit.ly/2RzDbVz

Camp Wired, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library,

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville United

635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55

Methodist Church, 74 W. Main Street, Seville.

plus. Call for topics, 330-948-1885.

https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Breastfeeding Basics Class, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Medina County Health

Take Me Out to the Ball Game. 2:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m., Buckeye Library,

Department, 4800 Ledgewood Drive, Medina. Free. For more

6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Baseball, cornhole, hot dogs, popcorn.

information, call 330-723-9688, Option 4.

Grades 6 to 12.

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., The Chapel

Teen Movie Afternoon: “The Social Network,” 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.,

Wadsworth Campus, 1391 State Road, Wadsworth.

Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth.

https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Story of the creation of Facebook.

Escape from Mr. Lemoncello’s Library, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s

eMedia 101, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Highland

Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Work

Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Learn how to use eMedia through

as a group to untangle puzzles, clues and ciphers before time runs out.

hands-on, interactive class. Bring devices to download media. Register

Register at https://bit.ly/2K2P1Dh

at https://bit.ly/2K5SRM6

South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., Habitat for Humanity parking

Thursday, May 21

lot, 233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Open to all antique, classic or

Talk Like Yoda Day https://bit.ly/3a8ekyo

collectible cars. Weather permitting. Free.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020 Mystery Mayhem Escape Room, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., Activity Room, Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. A horrible crime has been committed, almost no clues were left, and you have 20 minutes to retrieve the evidence and solve the crime. Permission slip required for after-hours event. Grades 4 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2yU3FKO A list of golf outings that benefit area non-profit organizations.

Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United

To have your golf outing listed, send the information to joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late. Contact the hosting golf course for pricing, registration and sponsorships.

Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional charge. Fish dinner through April 10, $8. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass/country bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. Saturday, May 23

Bunker Hill Golf Course 3060 Pearl Road, Medina 330-722-4174 or 216-469-9241 Friday, May 15 Synergy Networking Fundraiser Golf Outing 8 a.m. registration and putting contest 1:30 p.m. dinner-only guests Benefits Feeding Medina County Bunker Hill Golf Course

Lucky Penny Day https://bit.ly/3cdTG1f Migratory Bird Banding, 9 a.m. to noon, Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Dependent on weather. All ages. Learn about bird banding. Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. Memorial Day Weekend Family Fishing, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 ridge Road, Wadsworth. Fishing is

Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Room, Medina Library,

permitted in this park only during this program. No experience

210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills.

necessary, help will be available. Limited number of rods, reels, and

Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588.

bait available, suggest bringing your own. Children must be

Can You Escape? The Color Scheme, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room

accompanied by adult. All ages. Free. Register at https://bit.ly/2wIeuiw

A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Apply color

Sunday, May 24

knowledge to solve the puzzles to unlock paints needed for the next

Scavenger Hunt Day https://bit.ly/2V3Cjuy

project. Register at https://bit.ly/3a88zky

Monday, May 25

Exporastory: “Frog and Toad,” 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Children’s

Tap Dance Day https://bit.ly/2V36DVY and Sing Out Day

Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth.

https://bit.ly/2V3sCMx

Discover “hopposites,” make crafts. Register at https://bit.ly/2K3Ki4e

Tuesday, May 26

Legal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Conference Room 2A,

World Lindy Hop Day https://bit.ly/3ekW4W7

second floor, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina.

Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Hickory Room,

Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a

Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome.

lawyer in family court. First come, first served.

Making Warm Up Medina County donations.

Herbert Hoover, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi

Camp Wired, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library,

Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. The man, myths, misunderstandings

635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55

st

E

of 31 U.S. president.

plus. Call for topics, 330-948-1885.

Friday, May 22

Daring Girls Club: Build a Coaster, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A,

Buy a Musical Instrument Day https://bit.ly/2Vup6dj

Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Build a model roller coaster from variety of materials. Register at https://bit.ly/3epqLJx South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., Habitat for Humanity parking lot, 233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Open to all antique, classic or collectible cars. Weather permitting. Free. Otaku Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Teen Area, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Watch anime, cosplay, learn about Japanese culture, more. Grades 6 to 12. Wednesday, May 27 National Grape Popsicle Day https://bit.ly/2V3962O Afternoon at the Cinema, 1 p.m. to 3:15 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Recent DVD releases, light refreshments. Call for titles, 330-273-4150.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2020

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End of School Celebration, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Grab a snack and chill with friends. Grades 6

P

to 12. Daring Boys Club: Build a Coaster, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Build a model roller coaster from variety of materials. Register at https://bit.ly/3a8GlGh Thursday, May 28 National Hamburger Day https://bit.ly/3eiOOd4 Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. Narcan Training, 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., Meeting Room B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Presented by the Medina County Health Department. For more information, contact Jeannie Bunch, jbunch@medinahealth.org , 330-441-2734. Movie Matinee: Sing-along, 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Sing-along with icy sisters and friends. Popcorn provided. Children of all ages. Instant Pot Tips and Tricks, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Learn what the buttons mean, how the pot works. Garden Chats with Master Gardeners: Composting, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Learn all about composting. Gratitude Practice, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Sycamore Rooms North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. How to live with gratitude.

A list of runs and walks that benefit area non-profit organizations. To have your run listed, send the information to joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late. Until May 3 Run Over Rona Virtual 5K, any place, any time. Benefits free fitness programs at Running2bWell to support those struggling with mental health and substance abuse issues and to raise awareness for child abuse. Run or walk at the time and location of your choice while maintaining COVID-19 safety guidelines. Results will be announced May 4. For fees and registration information, go to https://bit.ly/2UYfubm Friday, May 29

2020 Medina Runs Down Cancer: Medina Half Marathon, Relay and 5k Expo; 3 p.m. to 7 p.m., Summa Health Medina Medical Center, 3780 Medina Road, Medina. Information at https://bit.ly/38IIXe5 Saturday, May 30 Medina Runs Down Cancer Summa Health Medina Half Marathon and 5k, 6:45 a.m. to 10:45 a.m., Public Square, Medina. Benefits Mary Grace Memorial Foundation. For fees and registration, go to https://bit.ly/2VeJDDS

Pages for Change, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Stories to encourage empathetic

ACT Practice Test, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth

worldly children. Introduces concepts to help children understand

Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Simulated ACT practice test.

issues. Grades kindergarten to 5. Register at https://bit.ly/2RAjUTJ

Register at https://bit.ly/2V6lezY

Friday, May 29

Will it Waffle? 1 p.m. to 3 p.m, Community Room, Lodi Library, 635

Put a Pillow on Your Fridge Day https://bit.ly/3a5kfEs

Wooster Street, Lodi. Find out if brownie batter or biscuit dough will

SRC Kick-Off, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Sycamore Rooms North and South,

waffle. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/3chekxG

Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Summer reading

How to Use Your Own Telescope! 8 p.m. to 11 p.m., Letha House

program starts with face painting, crafts, balloon art. All ages.

Lodge, 5800 Richman Road, Chatham Township. Cuyahoga

Fairy Tale Foundation Characters, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Meeting Rooms A

Astronomical Association will teach telescope basics. Free.

and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Drop-in

Sunday, May 31

program. Sing, dance with favorite character, do crafts. All ages.

Macaroon Day https://bit.ly/34EMWaf

Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United

Toad Lore, 2 p.m., Plum Creek Park South, 2500 Plum Creek Parkway,

Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30

Brunswick Hills. Learn abilities, mythologies, facts and folklore about

p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional toads. Free. charge. Fish dinner through April 10, $8. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass/country bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. Saturday, May 30 My Bucket’s Got a Hole Day https://bit.ly/34wt8Wq Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations.

Submitting Calendar Events Listings in the calendar must be events, festivals or fairs hosted by or benefitting a nonprofit organization in Medina County. Send submissions to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com and put CALENDAR in the subject line. Information is not accepted by phone. The calendar also is available online at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com on the Events: Let’s Do It! tab at the top of the page or in the drop-down menu on mobile devices, where it is regularly updated.


Joy of Medina County Magazine 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256 E-mail: joy@blakehousepublishing.com Website: JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Phone: 330-461-0589

Profile for Joy of Medina County

Joy of Medina County Magazine May 2020