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MARCH 2020 VOLUME 3, NUMBER 2

A locally owned, independent publication dedicated to higher standards of journalism

N$11.99

VEGA EW! COLU N RECIP E MN P G. 23


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2020

VOLUME 3 NUMBER 2 JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM

Buckets by Amy Barnes Under the category “You will laugh at this in the future,” are filed my years surviving gym class. The grown-ups in my life told me the lessons learned in gym would be helpful throughout my life. They were right, if they meant that I would know that I would never be able to save my life by climbing a rope or that I would never move fast enough to avoid a ball aimed with killer force at my body. In other words, I learned I would never be Indiana Jones. Not really a surprise. While the main lesson I learned from gym class was how to kill time in an outfield (the only position the others let me play because I could not catch), I like to think that a certain gym teacher learned a lesson from me. She was a new teacher at the school and was more drill sergeant than teacher. One day, she had all of us spread out across the gym, arm’s length apart. Yep, so far so good, I could accomplish that. It was her next words that I knew were going to cause trouble. “Feet together!” Uh, oh. I have always had knobby knees. Extremely knobby knees. I have NEVER been able to put my feet together because of my knees. Forget a thigh gap, I had an impressive calf gap. This was not going to go over well with the teacher. I looked around, hoping there was at least one other like me. No such luck, the other girls had feet together and were busy following the teacher’s barked orders. Sigh. I did as I always had, put my feet as close together as my knobby knees would allow, and followed the other girls in the exercises, hoping I would escape notice. It just was not my lucky day, I watched in dread as the teacher started patrolling the rows of girls and checking feet. Then she got to me. She stared in disbelief at my feet, a defiant

7 inches apart. “GET THOSE FEET TOGETHER!” she yelled, mortifying me and causing several of the braver girls to turn and look. I weakly tried explaining it was not something that was possible. “NO EXCUSES! GET THOSE FEET TOGETHER!” And so, I did as ordered. I put my feet together, which necessitated my partially bending my knees. I stood there, teetering, struggling to keep my balance. My gym shorts made it very easy to see what the problem was. The teacher’s face did a rapid change as the realization hit her that I was right, and worse yet, she was wrong. She slammed her lips together; her cheeks flushed; she muttered, “go back to the way you were doing it;” turned on her heel; and quickly walked away. I was mortified and vindicated at the same time. Such a big deal over a kid’s knobby knees! Looking back, what bothers me most is that the teacher treated me that way because my inability was not readily visible to her until I was humiliated and forced to demonstrate it. It brings to mind the stories of how someone with an unseen disability will get nasty looks or yelled at because he or she parked in a handicapped parking spot. They should not have to demonstrate or explain why they parked where they did. They have the placard; they already went through the process of proving their disability to the government and paying the extra fee for the placard. We each have a bucket of stuff we deal with. Sometimes it is obvious, sometimes it is hidden. It is worth taking an extra minute to think before reacting and, instead of glares, give kindness and understanding.

PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC EDITOR Amy Barnes ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller PHOTOGRAPHERS FlashBang Photography Ed Bacho Photography CARTOONIST Jerry King CONTRIBUTORS Bob Arnold Kelly Bailey Hunter Barnard Paul McHam Crystal Pirri Steve Rak Michelle Riley Robert Soroky Austin Steger Kent Von Der Vellen THE READING NOOK AUTHOR Kevin G. Oney MASCOT Rico Houdini ADVERTISING SALES AND OFFICE 330-461-0589 E-MAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com WEBSITE JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Learn more about the staff at Behind The Scenes, JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Open positions are listed on the website at Open Positions. JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256. It is distributed as an e-edition and in a print edition. Both editions can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Copyright 2018-2019 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2020

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JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

GRANGER BICENTENNIAL BASH It is Granger Township’s 200th birthday, and these words will be needed for the celebration.

DIG IT!

SPA FOR THE ROSES by Michelle Riley It is time to give rose bushes extra care in preparation for a summer full of memories.

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OF MIND AND BODY

WHEN DIET AND EXERCISE FAIL by Kelly Bailey There are other factors to consider when diet and exercise do not deliver a goal weight.

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HEALTHY TRAILS

E-BIKE EDUCATION by Robert Soroky How e-bikes work and whom they help the most

TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

TOXIC CULTURE by Paul McHam There is more than mold to be aware of when it comes to how our environment and the products we use affect our well-being.

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BUTTERSCOTCH OATMEAL COOKIES by Amy Barnes Flavors abound in this complex cookie.

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by Amy Barnes Can you catch how many good deeds were caused by the actions of one man?

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There was a lot of fun to be had while studying the science of snow.

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by Steve Rak

On the front and back covers: photos by Amy Barnes Bob Hummel, Granger Township Historical Society president, rode his trusty stick horse to re-enact delivery of the proclamation granting Granger township status at Travel Back 200. Helping were Roberta Gifford, left, and JoAnn Boruvka.

GEMS

EARS TO YOU by Kent Von Der Vellen While a cancer patient, Ruth Crane discovered a way to help others remember they are more than their treatments.

COLD-CALLING CHILL CURE Say “cold calling” and hear groans from a sales staff, yet it does not have to be painful.

by Austin Steger

by Jerry King

SINCERITY IS KEY THE IN BOX

REMOVING TECHNOLOGICAL BARRIERS

MIRTH AND JOY

THE NETWORKER Learn how sincerity can open doors.

FROM A TECHNICAL MIND Immersive technologies such as virtual reality and augmented reality are helping to make technology more enjoyable.

photos by FlashBang Photography

by Bob Arnold

by Hunter Barnard

THE MONEY TRAIL

LIFE AND RECOVERY OF AN AMERICAN JUNKIE by Kevin G. Oney

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PIGEON TICKLES REVIEWER

IN DEED

THE READING NOOK

OH, SNAP!

ROLL ’EM! Inventions, a cool car and pigeons. What more could a spy movie need?

Collect the letters, solve the riddle, and send your answer in!

A first-person, gritty account of becoming an addict and finding the strength and support to travel on the road of recovery.

by Crystal Pirri BITE ME!

by Amy Barnes

JOYFUL LETTER DETECTIVES

IRISH DROP SCONES It is the perfect time for Irish scones.

GRANGER GREATNESS It was 200 years ago that Granger Township became official, named after a man who was never there and with stories handed down for centuries.

NEW! VEGAN VITTLES

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LET’S DO IT! We found lots of things to do, visit our calendar and you can, too!


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2020

Granger Township almost was named Codding Township, after the Codding family, the first family to arrive before the township was formed. From left is Ellen Codding, the wife of Ken Codding, who is the son of Donald Codding, who also is the father of Diana Codding. Ellen married into the family, but the rest are direct descendants from the original Codding family.

Granger Greatness story and photos by Amy Barnes

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ou cannot get to be 200 years old without some stories being told about you, and so it is with Granger Township. The land that Granger Township now occupies was home to prehistoric Mound Builders first. They had built two mounds during their time in the area. According to local historian JoAnn Boruvka, one of the mounds was donut shaped and located on the south side of Granger Road. Part of the mound was removed to build the road. The second mound was oval shaped and located between Beachler Road and Longwood Drive. Frank Sylvester used it as a family burial ground in the

1800s until the bodies were moved to Spring Grove Cemetery in Medina, according to Boruvka. Several American Indian tribes are believed to have hunted and fished their way through the area, including the Ottawa, Seneca, Iroquois, and Wyandot, according to the township’s website. Granger Township’s path to existence began when Connecticut and the other Atlantic coast colonies were granted land deeds from England in the 1600s with no set western limit. That meant that since northern Ohio was at the same latitude as Connecticut, it was part of Connecticut’s holdings. By 1795, Connecticut wanted to raise money for its schools, according to Boruvka, so it sold the land to


Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2020

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was only an investment to profit from, said Boruvka. Henry Remsen bought 4,282 acres from Granger for almost $15,000. Granger then sold the remaining 10,847 acres of the future township to Anthony Low, Burt Codding, James Gaynard, and Elizur Hills for $44,800. Low, Codding, Gaynard, and Hills were all farmers from the Canandaigua Finger Lakes area of New York who were ready to farm the fertile Ohio soil. At that time, the land was abundant with wildlife, including wolverines, bears, wolves, otters, turkeys, foxes, beavers, and rabbits. It did not take long for word to spread of the rich farmland that was available and for people to arrive seeking a piece of good fortune, increasing the population and the need to become an official township. Among the names considered for Granger Township were Codding, after the Codding family, the first family to settle on the land that was to become the township; Berlin, after Berlin, New York; and Ontario, a New York county. Berlin and Ontario were JoAnn Boruvka holds open the township office door for Roberta Gifford. The two women are co-chairs of the Granger Township Bicentennial Committee. considered because many of the early settlers of the township had come the Connecticut Land Company, which was formed from that area. by 36 investors. Lots were drawn to determine Since Granger was chosen over Codding, a nearby ownership of sections of land. area was named Coddingville. While never a Judge Oliver Phelps became the owner of several township, it still bears the Codding name. townships, some city lots in Cleveland, and part “It’s just a bump on the map,” quipped Ken owner of the land that would become Granger Codding, a descendant of the original Codding Township. However, the land could not be opened to family. settlers because the American Indians first had to be “It was the consolation prize,” said a smiling Ellen removed and the land surveyed and parceled. Codding, Ken’s wife. In 1809, Phelps died deeply in debt, according to The township’s first officials allegedly were chosen Boruvka. To settle his almost $43,000 in debts, by drawing names from a hat, even though the 1803 Phelps’ daughter sold the land, which eventually Laws of Ohio outlined how officials were to be ended up in Gideon Granger’s hands in 1811. chosen involving a very specifically designed ballot Granger was a lawyer and was the postmaster box, according to Boruvka. general while Thomas Jefferson was president. He People continued moving into the township over never stepped foot in the township, because to him it continued, Page 6


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2020

funeral homes, she has seen a lot of changes in land the centuries, bringing the present day total to and people over the years. approximately 5,000 residents. Boruvka agrees that development has been the It was because of the rapid development and loss of most dramatic change the township has undergone. acres of farmland all over Medina County that the In addition to writing about Granger Township’s Medina County Parks District was formed to save as history, Boruvka is a retired schoolteacher for gifted much land from development as possible. students. She taught for 21 years at Cloverleaf High Granger Township has three of the parks in the School. She grew up in Parma, eventually moving to Medina County Parks District: Allardale Park, Carolyn Granger Township in 1979. Ludwig Mugrage Park and the newest park, the The two women are co-chairs of the Granger Granger Wetlands. Township Bicentennial Committee, which has raised Farms and open land being developed are the $18,000 toward the $20,000 goal to fund a three-day biggest change that one woman has seen in the 73 bicentennial celebration planned for June 26 years she has lived in the township. through 28 this year. The celebration is planned for Roberta Gifford’s eyes narrow slightly as she thinks later in the year because the cold, snowy weather in back to what it was like in the township when she February is not conducive to doing many activities was a youngster. In her position as the township’s outside, said Gifford. sexton, selling cemetery plots and coordinating with “February is February,” said Boruvka. continued from Page 5

From left, Shelley Tender, interpretive services manager, and Clair Bailey, naturalist, both with the Medina County Parks District, gave a presentation about Granger Township and the types of animals that were living there when it became a township. The district is planning historic hikes to coincide with the township's bicentennial celebration in June.


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Part of the June celebration will be the performance of a play, written by Boruvka, based on the 1938 Pulitzer Prize-winning play, “Our Town,” by Thornton Wilder. “Our Town: Granger Township” features a variety of local folklore stories including a tragedy that occurred during a barn raising, what was found in the fields, what happened in a church during a sermon by a less-than-loved preacher, a tree’s revenge, and more. The first part of the bicentennial celebration, Travel Back 200, was held in February. It was organized by the Medina County Parks District in observation of the 200th anniversary of the month Granger Township became an official township. Travel Back 200 featured a presentation by Shelley Tender, the parks district’s interpretive services manager, and Clair Bailey, a district naturalist. The two shared the natural history of the A bear pelt impressed many at the Travel Back 200 event hosted by the Medina County township, including displaying Parks District at The Lodge at Allardale. Some of the children made a very wide circle around it. pelts from the abundant wildlife that once lived in the area. because of heavy snowfall. Of course, that was when Also provided by the park district were games and Gifford decided it was time to be born. From her activities that would have been enjoyed by early grandfather’s farm, the closest hospital with a settlers, as well as a general store and a giant board birthing center was in Wadsworth. game based on historic facts. Her grandfather and aunt loaded Gifford’s mother The highlight of the event was the arrival of Bob into the car and started the long, slow drive through Hummel riding a stick horse. The Granger Township the snow to the hospital in Wadsworth. They had to Historical Society president was dressed in period take a shovel with them so Gifford’s grandfather garb to portray Andrew Deming, a then county could clear snow from the road where it was too commissioner, who had delivered the original deep for the car to travel along the way. All arrived document in 1820 proclaiming the formal foundation safely, but Gifford does not know if her father made it of the township. to the hospital in time for her arrival. It is not just the early settlers who have stories that Gifford’s grandfather’s farm was eventually cut into became the lore of Granger Township. smaller parcels and sold. Roberta Gifford has one of her own. Her father was “I’ve seen a lot of changes in Granger Township working the second shift in Akron, having just over the years,” Gifford said, with quiet acceptance. returned to work after being off for a few days continued, Page 8


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2020

continued from Page 7

Carol and Charles Leu, from Medina Township, examine the displayed pelts.

Travel Back 200 attendee Iyla Utter is being assisted with a pioneer craft by Vivian Gordon, a parks district volunteer. They are working on making a pouch.

A reproduction of the Granger Township charter was available at Travel Back 200 for attendees to sign.

See the Granger Township Bicentennial Weekend Time Line on Page 12!


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Gina, Jon, TJ, and Carter Stefanko enjoyed learning more about Granger Township at Travel Back 200. They live in Parma but own land in Granger Township and are planning to move there.

continued, Page 10


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2020

continued from Page 9

A set of turkey feathers the parks district brought to Travel Back 200.

Elise Simons, a parks district volunteer, was the general store proprietor at Travel Back 200. Visitors could see examples of what was available for purchase 200 years ago.

Puzzling over puzzles are, from left, Heather Friedrick of Medina, who is trying to solve a button-and-string puzzle, and Becky Leu of Medina, who solved the Conestoga Puzzle minutes later at Travel Back 200.


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Roberta Gifford in period costume for Travel Back 200. Behind her is the starting point for the Granger Trail game the park district made for the event. A pamphlet announcing an event for Granger Township's 175th birthday in 1995, note the picture of Gideon Granger.

JoAnn Boruvka shares historical stories with, from left, Chuck, Adam, Misty, and Allison Ricco at Travel Back 200.

continued on Page 12


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2020

continued from Page 11

Granger Township Bicentennial Weekend Time Line Friday, June 26: 6:30 – 7 p.m. – Musical entertainment by students in lobby outside Highland High School Auditorium (upper level entrance)

7 – 8 p. m. – Play production – “Our Town: Granger” at Highland High School Auditorium (upper level entrance) 8 – 9 p.m. – Birthday Cake Reception in lobby outside Highland High School Auditorium

Saturday, June 27: 9 –10:15 a.m. – Parade forms at South Parking Lot of Highland High School Stadium (4150 Ridge Rd.) (Participants in parade must pre-register) 9:00 a.m. – Check-in for Tricycle/Bicycle Parade for children under 12 (waivers to be signed to participate) 9:30 a.m. – Tricycle/Bicycle Parade around track at Highland High School Stadium (bring your own trike or bike) 9:45 – 10:15 a.m. – Opening Ceremonies – Highland High School Stadium 10:30 a.m. (or when all entries are in place)– 12 p.m.– Parade travels from Highland High School Stadium to Township Administration Bldg. (3717 Ridge Rd.)

All events below will take place at the Township Administration & Fire Department properties (3717 Ridge Rd) Guest parking at Highland Middle School with shuttle service to day’s events (Administration Building Parking Reserved for Handicapped Persons)

Noon – 3 p.m. – Purchase a food truck lunch on site: Firehouse Pizza, Swenson’s, Papa Bear’s Ice Cream & Treats, Savannah’s Kettle Corn Noon – 3 p.m. – Spinning/weaving demonstrations, Granger Historical Society display with Medina County Park, Quilt block signing Noon – 1 p.m. – Kids’ water polo (conducted by Fire Department), Roving Balloon Artist Noon – 4 p.m. – Inflatable obstacle course for kids 1 – 2 p.m. – Magician show Noon – 3 p.m. Corn Hole Tournament (pre-registration required - entry fee collected day of event) Noon – 3 p.m. – Historic Car Show (those displaying a vehicle must pre-register) 2 – 3 p.m. – Lock 4 – Barbershop Quartet & Roving Balloon Artist 1 – 3 p.m. – Softball game (co-ed) for adults (pre-registration encouraged)) 2 – 3 p.m. – Organized Kids’ games: sack race, water balloon toss, 3-legged race, wheel barrow race, etc. 3 – 6:30 p.m.– 3 on 3 Basketball Tournament -ages 14 and up (pre-registration required) 3 – 4 p.m. – Frametown - country western band performance 3 – 5 p.m. – Granger Historical Society Open House for guests (at 1261 Granger Rd.) 4 – 7 p.m. – DJ Tony Maroon – Sound Waves Entertainment 5 – 6:30 p.m.– Announcement of contests and results 4:30 – 7 p.m. – Steak Fry by Fire Department (need pre-sale ticket, available from Fire Dept. call 330-620-3377) 7 p.m.– 122nd Army Band outdoor concert (bring lawn chair if you wish) Approximately 9:45 p.m. – Fireworks (can be viewed from Highland Middle School parking lot)

Sunday, June 28: (All events at the Township Administration & Fire Dept. properties- 3717 Ridge Rd.) 10 –10:15 a.m. – Community Prayer around the flagpole at Township Administration Bldg. 10:15 a.m. – “Challenges & Choices” Inspirational Talk – Virgil Dominic, Former Cleveland TV newscaster 11:30 a.m. – Community Lunch - Free 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. – Photos taken for memory book, quilt block signing 12:30 p.m. – Closing Ceremonies – Results of Granger Quiz & Participation Challenge 12:30 p.m. on – Historical Society Open House for guests (at 1261 Granger Rd.)

See grangerhs.com for forms

or stop at Medina County District Library – Highland Branch


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Celebrate! Joy of Medina County Magazine thanks and celebrates these great companies who believe in community and make it possible for readers to enjoy this magazine for free. Please thank the following companies for bringing Joy to you!

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2377 Medina Road, Medina Contact: Andrea Reedy Phone: 330-239-4000 Website: https://www.yourplace4.com/

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Want to join these great companies in sponsoring the best publication in Medina County? Contact Amy Barnes, Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com, 330-461-0589.

photo by: Mike Enerio


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2020

Editor’s note: This is the very stark and rough true-life story of a man who became a drug addict and how he found his road to recovery, told in his own words. It may be a story that is difficult for some to read, but it needs telling because it is a story of our times. This is the second and final installment. To read the first installment, please go to https://bit.ly/2SesBnL

THE READING NOOK

Life and Recovery of an American Junkie by Kevin G. Oney

Chapter 3: Chasing Death

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wo short years after I divorced, I met wife number two, who was the complete opposite of wife one. She was younger, more outgoing, and loved to party. This woman would give me another son and would have a little girl with another man that I still consider to be my daughter. She was a different type of woman, but she was an excuse for me to do one thing: party! In my second wife, I met a woman who not only kept up with my drinking but also smoked weed and did the same pills I loved. Then, one fine day, she introduced me to the love of my life: heroin. We snorted, shot, and smoked it. We did favors for drug dealers, and our lives turned into all out chaos. Before I go too much into this, she also is clean today. The details of our marriage are mostly a blur, so I’m not going to go into many details because, honestly, I don’t remember a lot of them. What I do remember about this time, though, are the multiple arrests and the time I spent in jail, in a community-based correctional facility and in prison. My life was a mess, I did whatever it took to get my next fix, including criminal and degrading things. I stole from everyone and ruined relationships with everyone in my life. Some of those relationships, to this day, are still in shambles. Heroin was my life; it was all that mattered. My life had become be high or die.

Death was a thing I had faced many times having been clinically dead multiple times. I did not consider that if I died it would leave my children without a father and possibly cause my mother to have a mental breakdown. I didn’t consider how important my life was. I even survived multiple suicide attempts. Have you ever put a loaded pistol in your mouth and pulled the trigger? I have, a revolver, and I pulled the trigger multiple times, but I was so high I forgot to load the gun. That was my life. I didn’t want to live because I hated what I had become but couldn’t die and didn’t know why. I asked myself this question for a long time, I needed a reason to live and a family to cling to. My actual family and my kids weren’t enough. Heroin was the love of my life, and, for this, I threw away wife number two. Then I found them, a family and a reason. The “family” wore leather, rode metal monsters and called me brother. My “brothers” were the family I had always wanted; they were strong, confident and loyal. They loved to party as much as I did. Only problem was, I couldn’t do the one thing I loved the most. They wanted me to give up heroin. How? Easily enough. Although they didn’t allow me to do heroin anymore, they replaced it with crystal meth. That made breaking the first habit much easier, but it wasn’t long until I was hooked on another substance. Crystal meth was used to turn me into a mean, violent, fearless machine. Someone I never want


Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2020

to see again. I was a monster. I became a collector for them and would walk into a gunfight carrying multiple weapons. I felt untouchable. I always had what I wanted, and if I didn’t, I just took it. I didn’t steal anymore. To me, stealing was taking something from someone without their knowledge or consent. I took what I wanted, in front of people, making sure they saw it, and there was nothing they could do about it. My life was one of respect through fear. It was a life that ended up with me being tied to a chair and beaten for more than 13 hours. A life that could have ended it all, but still it wasn’t over. I don’t know why, but I made it through alive, however I was no longer fearless. Shortly after escaping that situation, I ran. I stole a vehicle from a local car dealership and fled, first stop Cleveland then, who knows?

Chapter 4: A New Start February 5, 2018. That is the date Kevin Gale Oney from little old Shiloh, Ohio, began his life at the age of 33. I had been arrested in Medina, and after a short jail sentence, I was blessed with Drug Court through the Medina County court system. I moved into a sober living house in Medina where I learned that being clean and sober was a great way of life and met the people who, to this day, still impact my life. Every day, I attended a 12-step meeting, worked my steps, made real friends, and learned what a man truly is. I still make mistakes, I have hurt people since being sober, but today I know when I’m wrong, apologize, and do whatever is necessary to make things right. Drug Court and the sober house have taught me so many great things, but the two most important things I’ve learned are that helping others is a way of life and that I don’t have to do this alone. Today, I have an amazing job with a lot of amazing people at The Recovery Center of Medina County, where I’m enrolled in a culinary arts program and learning everything in fine dining, including hospitality and the culinary arts.

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I’m working on earning my peer support specialist certificate so I can help others in recovery in multiple ways. I work closely with a friend and mentor who helps run the Recovery Center. He is my inspiration for continuing my peer support, and I love this man like a brother. My two bosses are like family, and they really care for me and all of the students. They are always there for us any time we may need them, and they have taught me what open mindedness and love truly are. I have a caseworker whom I am in regular contact with. I know she would do anything in her power to help me succeed. My family life today is amazing, I’m a son to my parents, a brother to my sisters, and most importantly, a father to my three amazing children. Today, I love my life. If you are out there, scared, addicted and not knowing how to make it through, we are here to help, there is hope. You can make it through. Addiction is an everyday battle, but you don’t have to go through it alone, reach out and ask for help, we are here. Alone, we lose the battle, but together, we can win the war. So please, keep your chin up, soldier, move forward, and live, you deserve it. My name is Kevin Oney, and I am an addict.

Kevin G. Oney wrote his true-life story and is sharing it in the hope that others will be helped. See his profile at https://bit.ly/2Qy88t6 Medina County Drug Court is a court-supervised program for addicts. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2SsYkjL For the story about The Recovery Center of Medina County, go to https://bit.ly/2ScCGRO If you would like to become the next The Reading Nook author and you are an unpublished author, please send your fiction or nonfiction story to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com for consideration.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2020

Lesley Hausz from Wadsworth recently shared her knowledge of Russian nesting dolls, also known as matryoshka or babushka dolls, with visitors at the Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth.

photos by FlashBang Photography Julie Tenney, the Wadsworth Library children's supervisor, explains the Science of Snow to some eager children and their parents.

Mom, Connie Pepke, intently watches as 4 1/2-year-old Anne Pepke makes snowmen fizz. Also enjoying the manufactured snow are Genniver Yaggi, in the pink sweater, and her son, 6-year-old Johnny Yaggi. Hidden by Johnny's arm is 2-year-old Milo Bailey, who is playing in the snow by the side of sister 4-year-old Mia Bailey, while their dad, Mitch Bailey, watches them from a safe distance. Along the back wall are 7-year-old Milania Contrufo on the left, Kelly Contrufo and 5-year-old Dante Contrufo.

Dad, Jeremy Grigsby, watches while 9-year-old Zane Grigsby throws snow in the air and 7-year-old Tzeitel Grigsby carefully cups snow in her hands.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2020

Two-year-old Dorothy Hunt

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Anne Pepke

Milo Bailey, 2 years old, is hard at work creating snowflake art at Science of Snow.

Milania Contrufo and Dante Contrufo get the attention of Johnny Yaggi with their fizzing mini snowmen.

While there was not much snow outside, parents and children showed up to enjoy the Science of Snow at the Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth.

Mia Bailey, 4 years old, concentrates on her drawings at Science of Snow.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2020

THE NETWORKER

Sincerity is Key

THE IN BOX

L

Cold-Calling Chill Cure

by Bob Arnold

by Steve Rak

I love to see people network! Not only do they look like they are enjoying getting to know someone new, but they are learning new things about their new friend. One main key that opens doors to making effective networking partners is sincerity. The Oxford Dictionary has a really neat definition for sincerity: “the quality of being free from pretense, deceit, or hypocrisy.” I think the neatest thing about sincerity is that it resides in your heart, and it flows out from there. It resides with truth as a cornerstone and does not harbor any pretenses. When this happens during a conversation, your new friend feels at ease and all your networking anxieties disappear. Your sincerity is where you will find your genuineness and when you do, you become authentic and people notice. Authenticity cannot be manufactured; it grows starting with sincerity. Authenticity will cement you as a genuine person in their mind. Is it scary being sincere? It can be. However, I have seen it produce way more good than bad. You have spent a lot of time establishing your beliefs, expanding your knowledge, and building your career, so why not talk about them with new people? Sincerity is a fantastic ice breaker. Ever seen someone standing alone with a scared face? Yep, they have a lot of anxiety going on inside. I usually go up to them and comment, “Pretty scary in here, don’t ya think?” They will usually laugh rather than answer directly and honestly. So, I follow up with, “Is there someone here I can introduce you to?” They usually laugh, look at me, and say, “Yeah, how about starting with you?” This just opened the door for a sincere relationship to start. If they do point out someone else, I follow up with, “I can introduce you, but I need to know who I’m talking with and a little about what you’re looking for, so I can introduce you properly.” This usually generates a good conversation that ends with an introduction. Next time you network, resolve to start with sincerity and watch where it gets you.

It is March and the weather is bouncing between warm and cold, so let us talk about cold calling and how to do it best. Cold calling is a method of sales that requires one to go from business to business and ask people to buy the service or product one is selling. If you are thinking that you would rather be dropped into a vat of boiling lava rather than go on cold calls, you are not alone. However, there are ways to alleviate the cold calling jitters before taking the plunge. Here are a few tips to make cold calling easier: 1. Be confident. This is not as hard as it seems. Since I have done my fair share of cold calling over the years, I have realized that the best approach is to walk into a facility with a lot of energy, smile and be as nice as possible. The best approach is to just own it, be sincere and move on. 2. Do not waste people’s time. Please, do not waste people’s time, they hate that. Get in, give them your card and information, and leave. If they seem like they are not annoyed that you interrupted their doughnut session, then ask them for the card of the person you are leaving the information for. Then get out, and move on. 3. Know your stuff. It would be a shame if you actually got to talk to the buyer and fumbled your way through a presentation. Sometimes, you actually get to talk to the person you are there to see. If you do, make sure you are well versed in what you are selling and can provide further information other than what is on the literature you are distributing. Be sure that you can speak their language, otherwise there is a circular bin just waiting for your literature to be thrown in before the door even closes behind you. Over the years, I have learned that cold calling is a good way to get new business if you can navigate the scary thoughts that go along with it. Give it a shot, it is really not that bad.

Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at https://amzn.to/2KSy3Xm More networking tips are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http://onwardnetworking.com/ or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com

Medina resident Steve Rak is an award-winning columnist and has spoken at numerous venues throughout the United States and Canada as the owner of Rak Consulting, http://www.rakconsultingllc.com/, and Southwest Landscape Management, http://www.sw-landscape.com/ E-mail questions or suggestions for future column topics to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “In Box” in the subject line.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2020

Joyful Word Search Granger Bicentennial Bash

BEARS GRANGER BALLOONS CONNECTICUT FARMING

LAND LOTTERY TOWNSHIP BICENTENNIAL BERLIN PARADE

WEAVING ARMY BAND FIREWORKS OUR TOWN QUILT BLOCK

A Answer Key for Last Month’s Search

A Walk In The Park

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2020

DIG IT!

Spa for the Roses photos and text by Michelle Riley My grandmother kept a beautiful, yet simple, floribunda rose garden. As a child, I regularly enjoyed playing in the lush green grass surrounding her prized roses. The roses themselves tickled my imagination with names such as Shirley Temple, Pinocchio, Peppermint, and Peace. Full of blooms throughout the summer, they filled the air with such sweet perfume that one could not help but draw near. I also recall every fall, after all of the leaves had fallen from the trees, my grandfather would carefully cut each rose bush back to 10 to 12 inches from the soil line and proceed to bury them deeply with leaves.

Remove and discard any remaining leaves so you can clearly see the plant structure. Next, remove any dead wood using bypass shears, not anvil shears, as the anvil shears may crush the stem.. When in doubt whether a stem is

Over the years, I have learned that if you want to forgo the burying of the roses, there is an alternative way to protect them. Around March 15, if the temperatures are above freezing, you can give your roses a spa treatment. Before starting, make sure to put on thick gloves and arm protection because most roses are inherently mean, and they will “bite� you if given the opportunity.

dead, try the thumbnail test and scrape a small piece of the stem to see if it is green (alive) or not. Remove any stems smaller than a pencil as they are weak and thin. Last, prune remaining stems 10 to 12 inches from the soil line at a 45-degree angle. Make sure to prune the stems a quarter inch above an outward facing bud or bud eye (small bump where the leaf will grow from the stem). This is called directional pruning and will encourage outward growth. Once trimming is finished, clean up and discard any debris and trimmings from around the roses. Give them a good feeding around April 1. Even though my grandparents are long gone, the fragrance steers my mind back to long summer days where life was endless as roses bloomed eternal. Michelle Riley is a local horticulturist, landscape designer, and consultant. She is founder of MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com and NeOhioGarden.com and is the president of All About You Signature Landscape Design, Inc. She can be contacted at Info@MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com or by calling 234-6788266.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2020

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OF MIND AND BODY

HEALTHY TRAILS

When Diet and Exercise Fail

E-Bike Education

by Kelly Bailey

by Robert Soroky

Weight loss is simple, right? Just eat less and exercise more! Fewer calories in than calories out! There is no doubt that diet and exercise play a role in weight loss and maintenance of a healthy weight. But more and more often, I see people do all the right things with diet and exercise and not get the results they want. So, what gives? There are three reasons for weight gain unrelated to diet and exercise. They are sleep deprivation, stress and toxins. A single night of poor sleep can cause the body to exhibit blood sugar swings near that of a Type 2 diabetic.(1) High insulin levels lead to excess fat deposition, especially around the midsection. Couple this with increased hunger hormones that result from poor sleep, and you have a situation that causes overeating and high insulin.(2) Stress can make people fat.(3) However, it is not entirely because of “stress eating.” Stress increases hunger hormones, making it more likely that you will overeat. Not a single one of us is choosing carrots over cupcakes while in a stress situation, but there is more to it. Research shows that chronic stress also causes the body to create more fat cells (https://on.today.com/39kJymd). Yikes! Then there are the toxins. Average humans are exposed to more than 700 toxins every day for their entire lives. Environmental toxins like BPA cause weight gain and an increased risk of Type 2 diabetes independent of caloric intake, according to Dr. Mark Hyman of the Cleveland Clinic (https://bit.ly/2Uuz6Eo). Toxins change our hormones, causing excess fat deposition while simultaneously disrupting the metabolic pathways that allow us to burn fat. That is a lose-lose for the waistline! In the next three columns, I will cover each of the above three reasons in greater detail and provide tips for mitigating the damage.

Over the last few months, I have shared the ins and outs of buying a new bicycle, from making sure it is the right style and fit to highlighting the most useful accessories. But, what if a regular bike does not work for you anymore? Maybe advanced age or a physical disability is limiting your overall strength and it is just too hard to keep up with friends or tackle hilly roads on a standard bicycle. No worries, as this is where the e-bike rolls in to save the day! Let us start by debunking some common e-bike myths. First, it is important to know that e-bikes are not mopeds. You do not just hop on and let the bike do all the work. Instead, e-bikes use pedal-assist technology, which means the rider has to be pedaling the bicycle in order for the motor to work. Riders can select different ride modes to control the motor assist level. For example, eco mode gives minimal assistance, while sport or turbo gives maximum assistance. Some models even have sensors that adjust the assist level based on how and where you ride. In a nutshell, e-bikes do not pedal for you, they pedal with you, making a once challenging ride easier and more pleasurable. Another misconception is that e-bikes are significantly faster and, therefore, too dangerous for use on bike paths. A fair concern, for sure, but design parameters which control speed, as well as a comprehensive classification system, help define e-bike types. Class 1 e-bikes have pedal-assist technology and a maximum assist speed of 20 mph. Class 2 have a pedal and throttle assist, but still top out at 20 mph. Class 3 have pedal assist and no throttle, but a maximum assist speed of 28 mph. Current laws state that on national park paths and trails, ebikes are permitted wherever regular bikes are allowed. However, each park can decide which classifications are allowed, based on safety concerns. For folks who are not quite ready to give up exploring the world on a bicycle, but feel hampered by age or physical limitations, e-bikes are just what the doctor ordered!

(1) “A Single Night of Partial Sleep Deprivation Induces Insulin Resistance in Multiple Metabolic Pathways in Healthy Subjects,” https://bit.ly/3bhaN2x (2) “A Single Night of Sleep Deprivation Increases Ghrelin Levels and Feelings of Hunger in Normal-Weight Healthy Men,” https://bit.ly/38hD2MA (3) “Predictors of Major Weight Gain in Adult Finns: Stress, Life Satisfaction and Personality Traits,” https://go.nature.com/2SmMMyF

Kelly Bailey is a certified personal trainer and certified holistic nutrition coach. She owns and operates Kelly Bailey Wellness. Read her blog and contact her at https://www.kellybailey.fit/

Robert Soroky is a lifelong cyclist regularly participating in long distance charity rides and manager of the Century

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Cycles Medina location. Contact Soroky at robert@centurycycles.com to suggest column topics, for further information or to chat about bikes.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2020

TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

Toxic Culture by Paul McHam

“Just pretend whatever you think you are thinking doesn’t exist.” –a grocery cashier explaining to a bagger how a customer wanted groceries bagged.

“I am never able to just be something.”— from an anxiety-filled teenager

From 104-year-old Marine Maj. Bill White, who lives in Stockton, California, on how to live a long life: “Keep breathing. I can give you all sorts of ideas and suggestions, but if you’re not breathing, they don’t mean anything.”

I recently heard someone say that they heard that this mold was worse than that mold, and that mold was better than that one. In all honesty, some molds are indeed better than others, I cannot deny it. There are, according to some scientists, nearly 300,000 molds, half of which we do not know anything about. The more we know, the more we realize we need to know. Even if you research mold on the internet, it does not mean you will have the right answer at the end. For that matter, most scientists would agree that some chemical contaminants have an even harsher effect on the human body than mold does. It is estimated that out of every 10 crystal-meth contaminated homes, only one is discovered. That means that nine of the 10 will remain on the market and be sold or rented. Even when you rent a hotel room, that room may have been used to get high. Just like in homes, the chemical residue left behind can attack the central nervous system. Living next to high power lines may increase exposure to electromagnetic frequencies, a potential cause of cancer. Follow the path of those power lines, and you will see thousands of homes built near them. Playing golf and biting on the tee between holes can contaminate your body with the pesticides and weed control agents used by the golf course. If you live downhill from a highly tended lawn or commercial establishment, the rainwater may carry the lawn maintenance chemicals downhill to your property. Become more aware of the toxins in your environment, look around and you will find many more examples, such as maintenance folks using an airborne sprayer to kill weeds close to homes. Keep in mind that outside air changes can cause changes to air within a home. If chemicals are airborne outside, they could very well end up inside. Paul McHam is a local expert on mold remediation. For more information, visit his website at http://myairxperts.com/ and his Facebook page Moldsporewars http://bit.ly/2E2Fj3y or call 330-658-2600. For a list of his certifications, go to https://bit.ly/2WH19Pt


Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2020

VEGAN VITTLES

BITE ME!

Irish Drop Scones

Butterscotch Oatmeal Cookies

by Crystal Pirri

by Amy Barnes

Traditional Irish scone recipes are laden with milk, butter and eggs. I was determined to have a delicious, satisfying scone without any animal products. In fact, I wanted to go out on a limb and have them be gluten free, sugar free and oil free, too. Fresh-ground oat flour is one of my favorite indulgences. If you have a high-speed blender, you can blend oats into oat flour in the time it takes you to gather the rest of the ingredients. A food processor or regular blender also will work, just be patient and use a spatula to scrape down the sides to ensure everything is well mixed. This recipe is not only guilt free but delicious, too. Split them in half and spread each side with your favorite jam for an authentic scone experience. • • • • •

3 cups old-fashioned oats (not instant) 1 teaspoon cinnamon 2 cups unsweetened applesauce 1 teaspoon vanilla 1/2 cup raisins or currants

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Blend oats in a high-speed blender. The finer the texture, the more authentic the scones will taste. In a mixing bowl, pour in the oat flour and whisk in cinnamon. Make a well in the center, add applesauce and vanilla, and mix together. Dough should be wet enough to be sticky and hold a drop-biscuit shape. If the dough is too dry and crumbly, add a bit more applesauce. Fold in raisins or currants. Drop in dollops the size of a small lemon onto a baking sheet that has been covered with a silicone baking mat or parchment. Bake at 425 degrees for 12 to 15 minutes or until just barely golden brown on the top peaks. These keep well for up to two days, and they will be softer if stored in a sealed container. I often keep them in an open bowl on the counter as everyone who walks through the kitchen wants to swipe one on their way. Yields 10 to 12 scones. Crystal Pirri is an author, coach and oil-free vegan. Her recipes can be found at https://bit.ly/2v6NQi5. Have a question or request? E-mail Crystal@CrystalsRecipes.com

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1 tablespoon vanilla (imitation or real) ½ teaspoon Fiori di Sicilia* 1 cup margarine ¾ cup sugar 1 generous, loose cup brown sugar 2 eggs 1 1/4 cup flour 1 teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon cinnamon 3 cups old fashioned oats 16 ounces butterscotch chips

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• ½ package coconut (optional) Set oven to 375 degrees. Use mixer to beat together vanilla, Fiori di Sicilia, margarine, sugars, and eggs. While that is beating, combine flour, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon in separate bowl using a fork or a balloon whisk. Gradually add combined dry ingredients to wet ingredients. Add slowly to avoid “flour poof.” When well mixed, add oats, butterscotch chips and coconut. Drop by tablespoon onto ungreased cookie sheets. Bake 9 minutes. *Can substitute ½ teaspoon dried orange peel soaked for about 10 minutes in 2 teaspoons vanilla Want to have your recipe featured in a future issue? Send it with your name, phone number (in case we have questions), the city you live in, and some information about you to: Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “recipe” in the subject line. Recipes MUST be your original recipe and by submitting a recipe you are guaranteeing it is one you have developed and used.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2020

ROLL ’EM!

IN DEED

Pigeon Tickles Reviewer

The Money Trail

by Hunter Barnard

by Amy Barnes

“Spies in Disguise” was really funny because it was about a guy who turns into a pigeon. There was another guy who was in the movie who was really funny and really cool because he thought of really funny things for the spy to use while he was still a person. He made all sorts of gadgets and inventions for the spy to use, like a glitter one that turned into a cat, and it was really cute. The movie was really good and had lots of funny parts. I really like that it was about a guy who turned into a pigeon. They did lots of funny things and he even made some friends who were pigeons, too. The pigeons were really funny and helped the spy. Even while he was a pigeon, not a person, he made a really good spy and did cool things. The movie was good for teaching people how to work together and how you should not try to do things by yourself. When the movie started, the spy did not have any friends and he tried to do everything by himself. I thought it was sad he did not have any friends. But when he turned into a pigeon, he needed help and he made friends who helped him. The spy had a really cool car that could even drive itself. One funny part was when the spy turned into a pigeon and tried to drive the car. I thought he would not be able to do it, but the car actually drove itself. I want a car like that. He got even cooler stuff once he decided to make friends, and the scientist made really cool stuff for him to use. The movie was really funny, and it was really good. I hope other people go see it, too, so they can see someone turn into a pigeon and all the funny things that I got to see.

The day before Thanksgiving was a day of cascading good deeds that started with a bagel run, became a lost-andfound, turned into a returned-to-owner, then morphed into a donation for the Salvation Army, and took almost three months to track down all of the details. On November 27, Brian Barberic, who is the office manager at Medina Vein and Vascular, was on a bagel run at Signature Square Plaza on state Route 18, Medina, when he found two envelopes of money in the middle of the parking lot. The bagel run was being sponsored by Barberic’s boss, Dr. Barry J. Zadeh, who regularly treats his staff. Hopeful he might find the owner of the envelopes, Barberic

Hunter Barnard is an energetic 6-year-old who attends Brunswick City Schools and likes to share his opinion. He is assisted in writing his column by his mom, Jessica Rapenchuk.

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posted on social media what he had found and stated that if someone recognized the envelopes and could tell him exactly how much was in each envelope, he would give them to that person. As chance would have it, someone did recognize the envelopes, knew whom they belonged to, and posted the information in order to connect the two. Meanwhile, Barberic had been busy going door to door to the businesses in the plaza, leaving his name and number in case the owner showed up looking for the envelopes. It did not take long for Barberic to reunite envelopes, money and owner, who happened to work at Salon Rootz in the plaza. He quickly edited his social media post, letting everyone know the mystery had been solved and celebrating a successful conclusion. The owner of the money was so thrilled to have the envelopes back, that she gave Barberic a big hug and thanked him when he delivered the envelopes to her. She later sent him a text message, once again thanking him and telling him that because of his good deed and honesty, she was going to turn around and donate the money to the Salvation Army, helping many others. It is never too late to reward a good deed, and so for his good deed and hard work attempting to locate the owner of the envelopes, Joy of Medina County Magazine awarded Barberic a gift certificate to a local business. Businesses that donate gift cards or certificates to be used as In Deed rewards will receive notice in the column when their donation is awarded. Interested businesses should call 330461-0589 or e-mail Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com


Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2020

FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

MIRTH AND JOY

Removing Technological Barriers

by Jerry King

by Austin Steger Technology often changes in fast and unpredictable ways. Innovations in technology have advanced exponentially. Over the last 20 years, things like processing power, storage space, battery life, and camera quality have drastically improved. However, it seems innovation is slowing down or at least becoming more predictable as these changes have an observable pattern. The biggest innovation for tech in the coming years likely will be within virtual reality and augmented reality technologies, which are immersive technologies designed to make the user experience visual and auditory simulations. VR is a type of digital environment, often generated by a computer or mobile device like a phone or tablet, and experienced by the user via a VR headset. AR is usually experienced on a phone screen or through a camera, where objects are superimposed onto the real world. There also is a mixed reality, a combination of AR and VR, where virtual objects are placed in a real-world environment and can be interacted with in ways that resemble real objects. The gaming and entertainment industries were some of the first to adopt these technologies in such applications as the game Pokemon Go and Snapchat. These technologies also are gaining popularity in many areas including, but not limited to, the military, engineering, construction, health care, education, and business industries. For example, some surgeons are training for difficult surgeries using VR to familiarize themselves with medical procedures without the risk of working on a live person. These innovations seem to have a clear goal in mind, which becomes increasingly apparent the more you use it: to make users forget they are interacting with technology in the first place. By fully immersing the users in the experience, they forget the technology is there at all. This removes a barrier that may have created confusion, frustration and apathy toward learning how to use a new device, program or skill. As these technologies improve and more devices adopt these innovations, it will become increasingly less obvious that you are interfacing through a computer, thereby creating a fully seamless, immersive and enjoyable experience with technology. Austin Steger is a local computer and mobile electronics technician and technical communicator. He can be contacted at repairs.riztech@gmail.com or by calling 330952-1225.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2020


Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2020

GEMS

Ears to You

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by Kent Von Der Vellen Ruth Crane had lost her hair and suffered an infection while receiving treatment for breast cancer. She was so focused on treatment that she had come to feel like nothing more than a cancer patient. While in the hospital, she asked her husband to bring her wig, makeup and earrings from home so she could feel better about herself. Just the simple act of putting on earrings made her feel better. Doctors and nurses emphasize it helps if someone has a more positive attitude about themselves while undergoing treatment. Crane’s friend Debbie Smith asked if she had considered doing something for other cancer patients. In June 2008, at Crane’s last chemo treatment, she brought 180 pairs of earrings and gave them to the nurses and social worker to distribute to cancer patients. Four hours later, stories of gratitude came back and the idea for Ears to You was launched. Today, Crane is the executive director of Ears to You. The nonprofit works with nearly all of the hospitals in northern Ohio, plus some out of state. Nurses and social workers distribute the donations from Ears to You to patients. Donated items have expanded beyond earrings, and patients can choose between hats, head scarves and books. Crane is hoping to add wigs to the list of items. Each patient also is given a copy of the book, “Why Bad Things Happen to Good People.” While undergoing cancer treatment, it is common for patients to lose their hair, as well as eyelashes and eyebrows. Skin also may change and become more sensitive. Because of this, the earrings have to be free of lead and nickel and hats and head scarves must be made from a gentle material. Ears to You accepts monetary donations, earrings, hats, wigs, and head scarves. The nonprofit’s goal is to bring hope and joy into cancer patients’ lives. The nonprofit will hold its eighth annual Green and Gold Gala on March 7 at Weymouth Country Club, 3946 Weymouth Road, Medina. Get tickets for the gala at https://bit.ly/2u1Ply1 . For more information about Ears to You, go to https://earstoyou.org/ or https://bit.ly/31nW9SS . Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by e-mailing von106@gmail.com or by calling 330421-0863. Learn what other area non-profits need by visiting Giving Hearts at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com .

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March 2020 Non-Profit Calendar Sunday, March 1 World Compliment Day https://bit.ly/2P0YWw9 and National Pig Day https://bit.ly/2wfF8P0 Do not let your pig know what happens on March 7, it will not think it is a compliment! Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Petco, 1052 Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth. Meet pets up for adoption. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2PbEuYS Monday, March 2 Old Stuff Day https://bit.ly/2OX4zvg American Red Cross Blood Drive, 8 a.m. to noon, Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. Monday Movie Matinee: “Yesterday” 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. A struggling musician wakes up to discover he is the only one on Earth who knows about the Beatles. Adults. Reservations by calling Soprema Senior Center, 330-335-1513. Empower Parent Workshop: Meltdowns, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Education Room, Summa Health Medical Building, 3780 Medina Road, Medina (enter in the Emergency Room doors). It is OK for a child to have a meltdown, tips on guiding a child through difficult situations. To register, contact Jennifer Gannon at jgannon@medinaesc.org or at 330-723-6393, Ext. 125 Beginning Cross Stitch Series, 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Three-part class. Register at https://bit.ly/3bHOO5d Tuesday, March 3 If Pets had Thumbs Day https://bit.ly/37uWXXu and I Want You to be Happy Day https://bit.ly/2Hr8UCQ AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick.

Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. Camp Wired, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-948-1885. Beginning Beekeeping, 6 p.m. to 8:15 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Fee $85 single, $100 family, includes book, more. Register at https://medinabeekeepers.com/ or call 330-723-6265. Cleveland Indians Baseball Preview, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Front office executive Hank Winters will recap off-season, raffle prizes and answer questions. Register at https://bit.ly/2SxdsOe Wednesday, March 4 National Marching Music Day https://bit.ly/2V3bWFc and Hug a GI Day https://bit.ly/39DKdPB What a great combination! AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Library Scavenger Hunt, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Complete the hunt, win a prize. Grades 6 to 12. Charming Tiny Weavings, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn handweaving and create a mini weaving with yarn. Learn different weaving techniques. Supplies provided. Adults. Register at https://bit.ly/2uQ2Dhl Recipe Showcase, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Thursday, March 5 Learn What Your Name Means Day https://bit.ly/2UVspvb AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2020 Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. Human Trafficking Education Night for Teens and Adults; 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. for middle-school aged children; 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. for parents; That Place for Teens; 1480 Pearl Road, Unit 9, Brunswick. Children’s program will focus on trafficking, internet warning signs and how to be safe online. Parents will learn about human trafficking awareness with an emphasis on social media. Sponsored by The Children’s Center of Medina County, the Medina County Coalition Against Human Trafficking, and That Place for Teens. Free. Perils of Petticoats, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Overview of women’s mid-19th century fashions and debunks myths about hoop skirts and corsets. Friday, March 6 National Frozen Food Day https://bit.ly/2UTom2B and Employee Appreciation Day https://bit.ly/2Hqj6eW We do not suggest lobbing a bag of frozen peas at your employees to show appreciation! American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina United Methodist Church, 4747 Foote Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

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Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional charge. Fish dinner through April 10, $8. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass/country bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. Wine and Canvas, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Bring wine, snacks, take your original painting home. Fee due to presenter at event, $15. Must be 21 or older to attend. Register at https://bit.ly/2Sz1unx Saturday, March 7 National Crown Roast of Pig Day https://bit.ly/2SvvQau A Healthy Dose of Nature: Hiking Series, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., Chippewa Rail Trail, Chippewa Road, east of Lake Road. Monthly vigorous 3- to 5-mile hike with naturalist. Dress for weather, wear appropriate shoes, bring water bottle. Ages 10 to adult. Hospice of the Western Reserve Volunteer Education Series, 9 a.m., Hospice of Medina County, 5075 Windfall Road, Medina. Training to be a Hospice volunteer. Must pre-register, call 216255-9090. Learn to Play Guitar, 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Ages 16


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2020

and up. Five-week session, $65. Pay at the door. Register at https://bit.ly/2UUQm5W Step Into a Story, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Mr. Puppet, puppet show, 10:15 a.m.; Mr. Science, 11:15 a.m.; Lindsey Bonilla, mystical folk tales, 12:15 p.m., Medina Weaving and Spinning Guild demonstrate spinning. Walk through three interactive story chapters, become royalty, learn to weave, survive obstacle course, try archery, try calligraphy, create book, more. Medina County Farm and Garden Show, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Medina County Community Center, Medina County Fairgrounds, 735 Lafayette Road, Medina. Board Gamers United, 5 p.m. to 10 p.m., Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Play board games after hours. Breaking Bread on Bourbon Street, 5:30 p.m., Galaxy Restaurant, 201 Park Center Drive, Wadsworth. Evening of jazz and art to benefit Feeding Medina County. Hors d’oeuvres, art auction, buffet dinner, live and silent auction. Tickets $60. For more information or for tickets, call 330-421-4816 or e-mail info@feedingmedinacounty.org. RESERVATIONS BY FEBRUARY 26. https://bit.ly/2tDj8g7 2020 Green and Gold Gala, 6 p.m. to 11 p.m., Weymouth Country Club, 3946 Weymouth Road, Medina. Benefits Ears to You, which raises funds to help cancer patients. Three cancer survivors will be celebrated. For tickets or to donate, go to https://bit.ly/2SYcOKD Sunday, March 8 Daylight Savings Time and Proofreading Day https://bit.ly/2u4yQBh Celebrate by proofreading your social media posts before posting, please!! Medina County Farm and Garden Show, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Medina County Community Center, Medina County Fairgrounds, 735 Lafayette Road, Medina. Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Petco, 1052 Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth. Meet pets up for adoption. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2PbEuYS Live at the Library: Latin-World Fusion, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Victor Samolot, Cleveland-based acoustic guitarist, plays original music blending Latin, jazz, world fusion. K-9 Kapers, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park, 4985 Windfall Road, Medina. Socialize dogs while hiking. Dogs must be on 8-foot non-retractable leash. Bring towel for muddy feet and water bowl for dog. All ages. Free. No registration. Natural Discoveries Program Hiking Series: Beneficial Buzzards, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Chippewa Inlet Trail North, state Route 42/Lafayette Road. Award-based hiking series. Ages 7 and

up. Free. No registration. Go to https://bit.ly/2HsFdBc for more details Monday, March 9 Panic Day https://bit.ly/37uJ4Z5 and Napping Day https://bit.ly/2SvxmJI You will need a nap after all of that panicking! AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Baby Car Seat Installations, 2 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., Medina Fire Station No. 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina. By appointment only, call 330-723-9688. Art in the Afternoon: Animal Stamping, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Stamp animal portraits either as pop art or natural looking. Ages 5 to 12. Murder Mystery Party, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Lord Heathcliff is throwing a party for his new bride until the unexpected happens. Be a detective and solve the mystery. Adults. Register at https://bit.ly/2HwRYeh Downsizing and Decluttering, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Rooms North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn how to decrease clutter. Monday Night Intrigue: American Predator, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Meeting Room B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Examination of Israel Keyes, a serial killer who struck across the U.S. Tuesday, March 10 R International Find a Pay Phone Booth Day https://bit.ly/2HrEArB AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. Creative Concoctions for Preschoolers, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. or 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Mysterious mixtures and marvelous messes. All supplies provided, come dressed for mess. Free. Ages 3 to 6. Register for 10 a.m. at https://bit.ly/2V39jDH and for 1 p.m. at https://bit.ly/2tZWcI2 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Camp Wired, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-948-1885.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2020 Tech Tuesdays: Laser Engraver, noon to 12:45 p.m., Makerspace, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Demonstration of how to use laser engraver. Mario Day, 3 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Activities and play Mario Kart. Grades 6 to 12. Gearheads: Paper Circuits, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina 1907 Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Use copper tape and LED lights to make lit works of art. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2UZknl4 Pour Painting, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Room South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Use pour paint technique to create art. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2UWVMx7 Who was…(Women’s Edition), 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Buckeye Library,6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Learn about famous women. Grades 3 to 5. Register at https://bit.ly/2wnEmzG Beginning Beekeeping, 6 p.m. to 8:15 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Fee $85 single, $100 family, includes book, more. Register at https://medinabeekeepers.com/ or call 330-723-6265. L Wednesday, March 11 Worship of Tools Day https://bit.ly/3bGt3CM AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. Cocoa Mania, 2:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Create own unique hot cocoa, vote on favorite flavors and toppings. Grades 6 to 12. Mediation and Mindfulness, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn how to obtain harmony and balance. Adults and teens. Meet a Civil War Soldier, 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m., Franklin Elementary School, 200 Takacs Drive, Wadsworth. Hosted by the Wadsworth Historical Society. Features a Civil War reenactor. Thursday, March 12 Plant a Flower Day https://bit.ly/2uGXWqf AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-7250588. Breastfeeding Basics Class, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Medina County Health Department, 4800 Ledgewood Drive, Medina. Free. For more information, call 330-723-9688, Option 4.

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Legal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served. Whatever the Weather, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Story Time Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Handson experiments about weather. Grades kindergarten to 2. Register at https://bit.ly/3bI6VIf Friday, March 13 Blame Someone Else Day https://bit.ly/3bHoAzR Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional charge. Fish dinner through April 10, $8. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass/country bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. Escape Room: Friday the 13th, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina 1907 room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Can you work with others to solve fiendish puzzles to escape the room? Must be in Teen Room prior to library’s closing for the day. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/38AvGEa Saturday, March 14 National Pi Day https://bit.ly/3bBns0u American Red Cross Blood Drive, 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., Brunswick Community Recreation and Fitness Center, 3637 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Calling All Princes and Princesses: Meet Elsa and Moana, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Elsa and Moana share what it is like to be a royal, play game, sing songs, hula dance. Photo opportunities. All ages, children must be accompanied by adult. Register at https://bit.ly/2SxWOy7 Silent Book Club, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Bring book and read for an uninterrupted hour, enjoy coffee and cookies. All ages. Tales and Tails, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Children read with therapy dogs. Living Library, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Sycamore Rooms North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Check out a “human” book, a live person will share life story for oneto-one 20-minute conversation. For list of topics and people, go to: https://bit.ly/2OUixhB Spring Scavenger Hunt, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Indoor-outdoor scavenger hunt, regardless of weather. All ages. Sit, Stay, Read, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Practice reading with Milo, a furry friend who loves to be read to. All ages. Register at https://bit.ly/2HwGuat


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Red, White and Blessed Sacred Heart Annual Reverse Raffle and Auction, 5:30 p.m. to 11 p.m., Sacred Heart School gymnasium, 260 Broad, Wadsworth. Games, food, silent and live auctions, more. For more information, contact Lindsay Mangan, 614-425-5818, or Whitney Murrell, 865-803-1898, or email Shsfundraiser20@gmail.com Sunday, March 15 Everything You Think is Wrong Day https://bit.ly/2vzqWQF Just wait for tomorrow! Spring Scavenger Hunt, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Indoor-outdoor scavenger hunt, regardless of weather. All ages. Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Petco, 1052 Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth. Meet pets up for adoption. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2PbEuYS Delve into the Dark: the Secret Lives of Vernal Pools, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. A photographic journey into vernal pools. See rarely seen creatures. Learn how to create and protect this natural habitat. Ages 10 and up. Free. Artrageous, 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., Medina Performing Arts Center, 851 Weymouth Road, Medina. Benefits the Medina City Schools Foundation. Arts create large paintings while music plays. Painting ends when music ends. Tickets $20 and $25 at A https://bit.ly/38t60ZG Monday, March 16 Everything You do is Right Day https://bit.ly/31XnPy8 AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Huntington Elementary School, 1931 Huntington Circle, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Tuesday, March 17 Tea for Two Tuesday https://bit.ly/38z7X7s AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick.

Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. Camp Wired, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-948-1885. Breastfeeding Basics Class, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Medina County Health Department, 4800 Ledgewood Drive, Medina. Free. For more information, call 330-723-9688, Option 4. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., The Chapel Wadsworth Campus, 1391 State Road, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Root Candles, 640 Liberty Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Beginning Beekeeping, 6 p.m. to 8:15 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Fee $85 single, $100 family, includes book, more. Register at https://medinabeekeepers.com/ or call 330-723-6265. Wednesday, March 18 Awkward Moments Day https://bit.ly/2OXOWnu AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. Natural Discoveries Program Hiking Series, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Lake Medina, state Route 18, Medina. Award-based hiking series. Ages 7 and up. Free. No registration. Go to https://bit.ly/2HsFdBc for more details. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Beginner Herb Garden, 2:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Choose seeds, decorate containers, take home. Grades 6 to 12. Teen Movie Afternoon: “Dunkirk,” 4 pm. to 6:30 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. WWII drama in which Allied soldiers are surrounded and evacuated. Rated PG-13. How Women Served in the Civil War, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Learn how women participated in battle and on the home front. All ages. Thursday, March 19 Let’s Laugh Day https://bit.ly/39Ddudi AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2020 Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. Beatles at Shea Stadium, 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Dave Schwensen takes attendees behind the scenes of a 1965 Beatles’ performance, including making and restoring video and audio recordings, details about a recording session, display of memorabilia. Book sale and signing follows. What is the Cloud? 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn what the cloud is, how it works, how to use it. Bring device, class is hands-on. Register at https://bit.ly/37rnPri Friday, March 20 Proposal Day https://bit.ly/2uELAil and Extraterrestrial Abductions Day https://bit.ly/2OZWvKc St. Baldrick’s Foundation Head Shaving Fundraiser, 2 p.m. to 6 p.m., Medina County Career Center, 1101 W. Liberty Street, Medina. Benefits childhood cancer research. Medina Councilwoman Jessica Hazeltine will be participating for her fourth year. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/36XHnnA American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional charge. Fish dinner through April 10, $8. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass/country bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. Painting Party, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Bring own refreshments, paint painting to take home. Bring $15 cash or check made payable to Artists Uncorkd. Alcohol-free event. Register at https://bit.ly/38Axop4 Saturday, March 21 Common Courtesy Day https://bit.ly/38z9jPA Fulton Farm Maple Valley Farm Maple Syrup Tour and Pancake Breakfast, 9 a.m. to noon, Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8708 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Wagon tours, pancake breakfast, warm refreshments. See syrup making from beginning to end. Dress for weather, boots recommended. Per person, $6. Register by March 10 at https://bit.ly/2P1j41b An e-mail confirmation will be sent by March 16, scheduled on first-come, first-served basis. Contact Shelley Tender for more information, stender@medinaco.org or 330-239-4814.

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A list of art shows in Medina County. To have a show listed, send the information to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late.

Aquarius Show Through March 1, 2020 Annual show of Medina County Art League members’ work. B. Smith Gallery, third floor, Medina Library 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina Medina Teen Juried Art Show March 6 through 29, 2020 Art displayed inside businesses in Historic District

Show reception: March 6, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Huntington Bank lobby 39 Public Square, Medina Pointillistic Art of Darrell Kent Through April 7, 2020 Kent uses colored marks to create works in pointillism. Marie’s Café 117 Public Square, Medina

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Books and Barks, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., Story Hour Activity Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Storytime with Griffin, the therapy dog. Marble Run Mania, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Experiment with mechanics basics, physics by building giant marble run. Grades 2 to 5. Register at https://bit.ly/2SzRTfW Spring Scavenger Hunt, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Indoor-outdoor scavenger hunt, regardless of weather. All ages. Wire-Wrapped Pendant, 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Sycamore Room South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Make bird’s nest pendant from wire and beads. Register at https://bit.ly/2UYGRmm STEM Saturday, 2 p.m. to 2:45 p.m., Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Create “firework” water and volcanoes. Grades 3 and up. Register at https://bit.ly/38BOWkW


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2020

Brass Band of the Western Reserve: An Evening at the Movies, 7 p.m., Performing Arts Center, 851 Weymouth Road, Medina. Tickets at the door, adults, $15; senior citizens, $12; and students, no charge. T Sunday, March 22 National Goof Off Day https://bit.ly/321Mt0I Spring Scavenger Hunt, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Indoor-outdoor scavenger hunt, regardless of weather. All ages. Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Petco, 1052 Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth. Meet pets up for adoption. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2PbEuYS Monday, March 23 Near Miss Day https://bit.ly/2vF6Ap0 AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville United Methodist Church, 74 W. Main Street, Seville. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Chip Challenge, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Taste variety of chips while blindfolded. Contests, prizes. Grades 4 to 12. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Trinity United Church of Christ, 215 High Street, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Scrapbooking, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Create four pages. Bring adhesive. Supply fee, $8, due to presenter at event. Register at https://bit.ly/2UWAwHZ Downsizing and Decluttering, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Learn how to decrease clutter. Tuesday, March 24 Chocolate-Covered Raisins Day https://bit.ly/2T2wfAn AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. Camp Wired, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-948-1885. Tech Tuesdays: VHS, Super 8, 8mm Conversion, Digital Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Demonstration of converting video to digital files. Otaku Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Teen Area, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Watch anime, cosplay, learn about Japanese culture, more. Grades 6 to 12.

Beginning Beekeeping, 6 p.m. to 8:15 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Fee $85 single, $100 family, includes book, more. Register at https://medinabeekeepers.com/ or call 330-723-6265. World War II Women Pilots, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Kathy Kraus presents. Hide and Seek, 7:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Conference Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Run, yell and play games in the library after hours. Grades 2 to 5. Register at https://bit.ly/2OZnwxg Wednesday, March 25 National Manatee Appreciation Day https://bit.ly/37x1E2P AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. Afternoon at the Cinema, 1 p.m. to 3:15 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Recent DVD releases, light refreshments. Call for titles, 330-273-4150. After-Work Wildflower Walk, 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Casual walk among spring flowers. Notebook, pencil, wildflower guide suggested. Free. Ages 10 and up. Battle for the Ballot, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn about the story behind the Cleveland women who advocated for suffrage and the birth of the League of Women Voters. Register at https://bit.ly/2uUcuTc Protect Your Peeps, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Build a boat to protect your marshmallow Peeps. Grades 3 to 5. Register at https://bit.ly/2wnN1SI Thursday, March 26 National Make Your Own Holiday Day https://bit.ly/38xN1hf AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-7250588. Narcan Training, 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., Meeting Room B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Presented by the Medina County Health Department. For more information, contact Jeannie Bunch, jbunch@medinahealth.org, 330-4412734. Legal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Conference Room 2A, second floor, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street,


Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2020 Medina. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served. Garden Chats With Master Gardeners: Planning a New Garden, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Learn how to select a location, determine garden size, what to plant, how much to plant. Wellness Yoga, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn soothing stretches in gentle yoga session. Friday, March 27 National Joe Day https://bit.ly/2OYLIjw American Red Cross Blood Drive, noon to 5 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional charge. Fish dinner through April 10, $8. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass/country bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. Saturday, March 28 Something on a Stick Day https://bit.ly/2OZVP7J Waterfowl Walk, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Chippewa Inlet Trail North, state Route 42, Lafayette Road, Medina. Bring binoculars, bird guide, to observe waterfowl traveling through Ohio to Canada. Dress for weather. All ages. Free. Rockin’ Tots, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Upbeat dance moves, songs with motions, dance games, more. Ages 1 to 3 with adult. Register at https://bit.ly/2uQFueI Wonder Woman Party, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., Story Time Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn what it takes to be a hero, meet Wonder Woman. All ages. Know Your Power Plus, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Presentation about women who have left their mark. Make a vision board. Grades 3 to 5. Register at https://bit.ly/2wlx5jL Sunday, March 29 Smoke and Mirrors Day https://bit.ly/39Q6Hx9 Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Petco, 1052 Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth. Meet pets up for adoption. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2PbEuYS Natural Discoveries Program Hiking Series: Frog Chorus, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 S. Medina Line Road, Sharon Center. Award-based hiking series. Ages 7 and up. Free. No registration. Go to https://bit.ly/327C0kk for more details ORMACO Party Bus to “Jesus Christ Superstar;” 5 p.m., Playhouse Square, Cleveland. Bus leaves from Buehler’s River Styx, 3616 Medina Road, Medina. Includes box lunch, wine,

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homemade cookies, chocolates, cheese, more. Tickets $75 for balcony, $105 for orchestra seating. www.ormaco.org , 330-7222541 Monday, March 30 I am in Control Day https://bit.ly/3bIHEO3 AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. Movie Monday, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Popcorn, pillows, newly released movie. Grades 6 to 12. Free. No registration. Beginning Web Design, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Design and create own web page. Grades 4 to 8. Register at https://bit.ly/2uQaGuB Tuesday, March 31 World Backup Day https://bit.ly/2HqDsET If you cannot remember the last time you backed up your computer, it has been too long! AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. Camp Wired, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-948-1885. Beginning Beekeeping, 6 p.m. to 8:15 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Fee $85 single, $100 family, includes book, more. Register at https://medinabeekeepers.com/ or call 330-723-6265.

I Submitting Calendar Events Listings in the calendar must be events, festivals or fairs hosted by or benefitting a nonprofit organization in Medina County. Send submissions to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com and put CALENDAR in the subject line. Information is not accepted by phone. The calendar also is available online at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com on the Events: Let’s Do It! tab at the top of the page or in the drop-down menu on mobile devices, where it is regularly updated.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine March 2020