Joy of Medina County Magazine February 2023

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MISSING

A small plane, an experienced pilot, and a mysterious disappearance

Pg. 12

BUSINESS TRIAGE

Planning for four of the most likely business emergencies

Pg. 17

PET COLUMN PREMIERES

Helping bearded dragons thrive, not just survive

Pg. 19

RESOLUTION RESCUE

Gave up on your resolutions?

Tips to rejuvenate them and succeed!

Pg. 22

One for the Books

The leader of Project: LEARN and its bookstores, Jennifer Brenner, and her husband, Jason Brenner, have a story romantic enough for any novel. PG. 4

FEBRUARY 2023 VOLUME 6, NUMBER 1
A locally owned, independent publication dedicated to higher standards of journalism

OneVoice

Please, Pat Me on the Head One More Time

Five years ago, in February 2018, I welcomed readers to the world of Joy. When it started, few understood what I was going to do, even fewer believed it could be done, and some even predicted the magazine would not last six months. I love being underestimated!

To the men who told me they would teach me how to run a business (I just smiled and nodded, little did they know that I actually knew more than they did!) and to the ones who made it clear they thought I was an uneducated woman with cute, impossible ideas, all I can say is: Go ahead, pat me on the head one more time, because the challenge just stokes my fire. This feisty magazine has grown from a thought in the middle of the night to 14,000 subscribers and a social media reach of more than 180,000, with print issues in every Medina County Library, including the Bookmobile. Go ahead, pat me on the head one more time!

Every month, Joy of Medina County Magazine proves how different it is, and it thrives. I stand tall with my “little spark of madness” (as Robin Williams used to say) and the magazine’s terrific staff. Being different, after all, is a celebration of possibilities.

THANK YOU to all of you who have been in our pages: the feature stories, the columns, the photos, the bylines. Every one of you is amazing, wonderful and an important contributor to the great story that is Medina County and that is proudly recorded for prosperity by Joy of Medina County Magazine, which is then stored in print the Medina County Library’s Historic Archives.

And THANK YOU to all of our wonderful, engaged, loyal readers!

I am so excited to see what amazing adventures and stories are ahead!

VOLUME 6 NUMBER 1

JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com

PUBLISHER

Blake House Publishing, LLC

EDITOR

Amy Barnes

LAYOUT DESIGN

Tyler Hatfield IT SUPPORT

Sara Barnes

Tyler Hatfield

PHOTOGRAPHERS

FlashBang Photography

CARTOONIST

Jerry King CONTRIBUTORS

Bob Arnold

Kelly Bailey

Katrina Barnes

D.J. Barnett

Paris Deeter

Tyler Hatfield

Bryan Lefelhoc

Mary Olson

Chris Pickens

Michelle Riley

Rachel Shepard

Robert Soroky

Kent Von Der Vellen

MASCOT

Rico Houdini

ADVERTISING SALES AND OFFICE

330-461-0589

EMAIL

Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com

WEBSITE

JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com

Learn more about the staff at Behind The Scenes

Open positions are listed on the website at Open Positions

JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256. It is distributed as an e-edition and in a print edition. Both editions can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com

Copyright 2023 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.

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2 Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2023

15 16 17 18 19

TURNING THE PAGE

Jennifer and Jason Brenner

share a love of books, a sense of humor, a dedication to helping others, and are always ready for the next chapter.

THE READING NOOK BEEN A LONG TIME

Finding love in later years

THE READING NOOK THE DISAPPEARANCE OF ERNIE

It has been around 46 years since he disappeared, but I still hope for answers.

BUSINESS

THE NETWORKER ONCE UPON A TIME

A fable with a lesson on sharing APPLAUSE!

Celebrating local new hires, promotions, certifications earned, and announcements.

FROM A TECHNICAL MIND BEING SMART WITH SMART HOMES

Being safe with technology that can control many aspects of your home INVENTION CONVENTION

Patents recently granted to Medina County residents.

RISE AND SHINE PLANNING FOR SUCCESS

Mapping a response path ahead of four likely business events makes a rapid response possible.

THE INBOX

BEHIND THE OVERNIGHT SUCCESS STORY

A company’s success is rooted in many failures first.

DOING BUSINESS

A calendar of area networking events

HOME AND GARDEN

BITE ME! ALLERGEN-FREE MEGA CHUNKS HOLD THEIR OWN

Reviewing an allergen-free alternative to chocolate chips

VEGAN VITTLES

ONE-POT PASTA

Try this easy, low-mess meal and you just might say, “Che buono!”

HEALTH

HEALTHY TRAILS SAFETY: THE RIDER

Bike riding safety starts with the person behind the handlebars.

OF MIND AND BODY RESOLUTIONS CAN BE SAVED

Even if you have given up, there are ways to resuscitate those goals.

COMMUNITY

GEMS STARTING A NONPROFIT

Following the regulations and making the required filings help create trust for nonprofits.

WATCHDOG PRESCRIPTION PROGRAM PENALIZED

FTC says GoodRX shared customers’ medical and other private information to advertising companies.

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

OFF THE SHELF

VICTIMS, VOICES AND JUSTICE

A New York Times reporter delves into the Sandy Hook shooting and reveals the backlash of conspiracy theories.

JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

BETWEEN THE COVERS

Jennifer and Jason Brenner share a love of books and each other.

MIRTH AND JOY

Our monthly cartoon GETTING REEL WATER BOGS DOWN, BUT STAY FOR ACTION

“The Way of Water” has slow spots but the action is worth the wait.

MOVIE TIME BOX

Tired of converting movie minutes to hours and minutes?

JOYFUL LETTER DETECTIVES

?

Read the clue, collect the magnifying glass letters, and solve the puzzle!

OH, SNAP!

photos by Amy Barnes and Patrick Lechene

DIG IT!

HEALING IN THE GARDEN

Design a sensory garden for healing and respite.

CRITTER CRAWL CARING FOR DRAGONS

Bearded dragons need much more than most pet stores advise.

Need a little taste of spring?

LET’S DO IT!

Spring mud is just around the corner, but find some clean fun in our calendar of events!

CELEBRATE!

A clickable directory of vetted businesses who bring you Joy!

On the front and back covers:

Contents 4 11
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Jennifer and Jason Brenner peek from the shelves of The BookShelf’s Wadsworth location. photos by Amy Barnes
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Turning the Page

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When Jason decided to propose to Jennifer, he had a small problem.

He had the ring, he had the diamond to be put into the ring, but he had underestimated how long it would take the jeweler to put the two together.

A job that he thought would take 30 minutes was actually going to take a week.

He had planned to propose on Sweetest Day, which was on a Saturday that year, but it was two days beforehand, and the ring was not ready.

Not wanting to change plans or delay the proposal, Jason did the only thing he could think of. He took the ring blank and hoped Jennifer would understand.

Well, Jennifer said, “Yes.”

Jason had to promptly take back the ring so he could get it to the jeweler’s on the following Monday for the stone to be set.

As with most trials and tribulations the couple has faced, they recall this one with laughter.

They must be doing something right, on February 2, they celebrated their 27th wedding anniversary.

Jason’s birthday is January 30, their wedding anniversary is February 2, and Jennifer’s birthday is February 5.

“So, if she forgets my birthday…no anniversary or birthday gifts (for her)!” Jason teased, chuckling, while Jennifer gave him a narrow-eyed look and laughed.

The couple began dating in eighth grade, having crossed paths a few times during their school years. They attended different elementary schools but the same junior and senior high schools.

They also attended the same church and shared their first communion together in second grade and their confirmation in eighth grade.

In school, she was a cheerleader, and he played a range of sports that included football, soccer,

wrestling, and tennis. In college, he played varsity tennis.

Never one to be shy, in seventh grade, Jennifer ran up to Jason and shouted out his name.

“I was the peppy, annoying person,” Jennifer says, laughing.

“You weren’t annoying,” Jason says gently, then groans and says their story is “a total cheese fest!”

Jason claims he had no idea who Jennifer was.

Jennifer firmly claims, with a side-eyed look at Jason, that he absolutely knew who she was.

“I’ve been on your radar since I was 7,” she says, with a big smile at him.

There must be something to Jennifer’s claim because Jason admits there could be no other.

“We married our best friends,” Jason says.

After high school, the two were separated because of attending different colleges.

Jennifer went to Kent State to major in theater.

In high school, Jason dreamed of being a park ranger, a game warden or a math teacher. His career assessment test said he should be an actor or a lawyer.

Jason went to Tri-State in Indiana for one year, then transferred to Cleveland State to earn a degree in civil engineering. Kent did not offer an engineering program so Jason could not join Jennifer at Kent and still get the degree he wanted.

Throughout college, the couple kept in touch and saw each other on weekends and breaks.

“When we got together,” Jason began, “it was like home,” finished Jennifer.

The BookShelf locations:

831 Pearl Road, Brunswick The BookShelf

105 W. Liberty Street, The BookShelf, Medina

130 Main Street, Wadsworth, The BookShelf

To learn more about The BookShelf sales, fundraisers, Project:LEARN and how to donate, go to https://projectlearnmedina.org/, or call 330-723-1314.

Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2023 5
continued, Page 6
Jennifer and Jason Brenner clown with the steel cage that is a remnant from the days when the Wadsworth
The BookShelf was a bank.
photo by Amy Barnes

continued from Page 5

What are the chances? While looking casually through books at Wadsworth’s The BookShelf, Jennifer Brenner came across a book that had her daughter Darby’s name on it. Since the handwriting looked familiar, Jennifer called her 23-year-old daughter, who confirmed it was indeed her book. photo by Amy Barnes

Jennifer said she was very busy in college.

“The theater people were kept very busy, we didn’t just sit in front of a book,” she quipped, glancing over at Jason, whose degree required a lot of sitting in front of books.

For her senior thesis, Jennifer produced a play at Kent titled, “I Stand Before You Naked,” which is a collection of monologues by an all-female cast. Jason was in the audience, lending his support and encouragement to Jennifer’s theater dreams.

“Having that college separation helped. We each

had our own lives,” said Jennifer.

“Being apart,” started Jason, and Jennifer finished, “strengthened our relationship.”

While Jennifer had considered moving to New York to pursue a career in theater, she quickly realized how expensive it would be.

“I don’t want to live poor,” she said.

Jason said there was no way he would move to New York.

“I’m not moving to New York,” he firmly says, even now.

After graduating college with a theater degree, Jennifer went to work at a pizza restaurant in Oberlin and worked her way up to manager.

Jason graduated from college and returned to Lorain to work as a civil engineer. Eventually, he would become part owner and vice president of engineering of Lewis Land Professionals, Inc.

Jennifer moved from making pizzas to helping teens find jobs through Jobs for Ohio Graduates in Wellington. When that program lost its funding, she became the business and community outreach manager for Tri-County Jobs for Ohio Graduates, which included Medina County.

When the executive director position with Project:LEARN of Medina County opened up, with Jennifer’s love of helping others and her love of reading, it was a natural career move that would utilize her skill set.

“I had a majority of the skills needed,” Jennifer said.

Project:LEARN is the adult literacy and education program in Medina County that provides literacy and high school graduate equivalency classes, tutoring, English as a second language services, and specialized test preparation.

As well as donations and fund-raising events, profits from the program’s three bookstores help fund the program. Books are donated to the bookstores and resold at a discount, helping those

6 Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2023
photo by Amy Barnes

who love books and those who are learning to read.

Almost 100 volunteers staff the bookstores and provide tutoring. Teachers, the office manager, the bookstore manager and the bookkeeper are the only paid positions, in addition to Jennifer.

Jason said it is important when joining a nonprofit to keep a focus on helping as many people as possible.

“It is easier to help 100 people one time than one person 100 times,” he said.

While Jennifer began immersing herself into her new job, Jason found himself in the role of furniture mover, heavy box hauler and general all-around support person, which is a role he relishes.

Talk to Jason and there is no doubt that he is a

cheerleader for Jennifer and her efforts.

Jason, who did not use to read much, now cannot go through any location of The BookShelf without collecting books like a magnet collecting iron filings.

The couple’s involvement with Project:LEARN dovetailed with their kids being grown and their desire to turn their focus onto the community around them.

“Now that the kids are grown up, we are focusing more on community,” Jennifer said.

The couple has two children. Darby Marie is 23 years old and an architect. Her interest in architecture came from the time she spent volunteering for Habitat for Humanity.

Their son, Ethan Patrick, is 25 years old. He is a mechanical engineer, having graduated from Mount Union.

Jennifer has three sisters: Amelia Woodward, an attorney who works for the National Education Association teacher’s union; Sarah Karpinski, who works for the City of Lorain, her husband works for Lorain County; and Emily Woodward who is in the Coast Guard, her wife is in the Air Force.

Jennifer’s parents are Sue and Joe Woodward who own the 1830 Hallauer House, a CivilWar theme bed-and-breakfast in Oberlin that has artifacts from the

Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2023 7
When books are donated, so are the messages and dedications that they carry. In this instance, the message was so powerful, volunteers typed it up so it would be easier to read.
continued, Page 8
photos by Amy Barnes

continued from Page 7

North and South.

Jason has a brother, Jarred, who lives in Vermillion with his wife, Beckie.

After Jennifer and Beckie became sisters-inlaw they discovered they had attended first grade together.

Jason said he learned a lot from his father, Denis, who died in 2020. His mother, Bonnie, still lives in the house that Jason and his brother grew up in.

Denis would take Jason and Jarred hunting and fishing and had them help build things.

“Now that he’s passed, I think back and think, ‘Oh, my God, it’s because of him’,” said Jason, appreciating all his father taught him.

Jennifer and Jason built a home in Spencer because it was the halfway point between their two jobs. They laughingly call their home Brenner’s Beagle Sanctuary because of their habit of giving beagles in need a home.

Two beagles they rescued were living in a box outside of shed, where they had a small run. They named the girl Lindy Marie and the boy Jacob Patrick. Gabby Marie is another female beagle they have, and the cast of many is topped off by Wheezer the cat.

The cat was named Wheezer because she was sick with a cold when she was rescued.

“She sounded like Darth Vader,” said Jennifer, referencing the villain from the “Star Wars” series.

Wheezer has a habit of barreling through the house and down the stairs, which is how she broke her leg and ended up in a cast.

Never lacking for adventure or new chapters, Jennifer and Jason are enjoying life and sharing their energy with those who need it most.

8 Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2023
The front doors of The BookShelf, Wadsworth photo by Amy Barnes A wish list from store customers. photo by Amy Barnes Wheezer in her cast, with her first autograph. photo provided

Upcoming Sales Events for The BookShelf

• March – Jimmy Buffet – March Madness –Sports, Music, Art Books BOGO

• April – Spring Fling –Gardening Books - BOGO

• May –Thursday May the 4th be with you

– All science Fiction BOGO Look at potential partnerships with Operation Fandom and Cool Beans.

• June – Summer Vacation – All travel books –BOGO - Kids day of Safety and play. Corn hole game, books tote bags, Set up starts about 8am.

• July – Happy Birthday America – All political and historical books BOGO

• August - Dog days of Summer – All Animal Gooks – BOGO

• September – Back to school month – All books in the teacher materials and reference sectionsBOGO

To learn more about The BookShelf sales, fundraisers, Project:LEARN and how to donate, go to https://projectlearnmedina.org/, or call 330-723-1314.

Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2023 9
The Brenner family: Jason, Darby, Jennifer, Ethan photo provided
continued, Page 10
The humidity control for the old bank vault at the converted bank, The BookShelf, Wadsworth. photo by Amy Barnes
10 Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2023 continued from
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Page
A rare moment: Jennifer Brenner sitting still. photo by Amy Barnes Lindy and Jacob photo provided Gabby and Wheezer photo provided Lindy photo provided Jennifer and Jason’s offspring: Darby and Ethan Brenner photo provided

Been a Long Time

Many years, we’ve been together. Been a long time since we first met. Yet clearly I still can remember, Did you think that I’d ever forget. We met when we were both older, It was clear we both had a past. Too late to be your first anything, I could only hope I’d be your last. It didn’t take long till we found, That we were meant for each other. Fit together like hand in a glove, Became my best friend and my lover

Don’t know where this love will take us, I’m sure as we travel life’s road. Whatever this world puts before us, Together we’ll shoulder the load. And when it’s all done and ended, I’m so glad that you were the one. To travel with me on this journey, Be beside me when it’s all done.

Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2023 11
Don Barnett lives in Hinckley with his wife, April; his son, Robert; and daughter, Skylar. He is 1975 graduate of Highland High School and recently retired from Century Cycle’s Medina location after being there for 20 years. He enjoys cycling and other outdoor activities.
THE READING
photo by Fadi Xd
NOOK

The Disappearance of Ernie

Iwas sworn to secrecy.

But like most secrets in my family, if they had been told long ago, it might have made a difference or brought the truth to light.

I don’t remember the date, I blocked that out long ago, the best I can remember is it was early February and the year was 1976 or 1977.

All I can remember of how it started was the phone ringing, some words came over the line, my mother’s muffled response, and then my mother’s anguished screams as she slid down the wall and sank to the floor, the wall phone receiver still clutched in her hand as she sobbed helplessly.

I had never seen my mother like that. She always was the aggressor, the abuser. But someone had said words on the phone that had crippled her and watching her collapse was like watching an elephant crumple into itself into a huge heap on the

dirty floor.

My aunt, ever the one to handle emergencies, grimly walked over and worked the phone receiver out of my mother’s hand and hung up the phone while my mother continued to sob.

We couldn’t understand her words at first, mangled by sobs as they were. She choked, and finally got out, “Ernie is missing.”

And my 12-year-old world came to a screeching halt. My beloved uncle was missing.

These were not words anyone was expecting. The Vietnam War was over, and my uncle had survived it.

Ernie was my mother’s younger brother, the only one of her siblings who also had been born in Czechoslovakia so they had a particular bond between them.

My Uncle Ernie had served in the US Army during the Vietnam War.

He had gotten a draft lottery number that indicated he would soon be drafted. After meeting with an Army recruiter, my uncle decided the safest bet for his survival in a war he did not agree with, rather than run to Canada as many did, was to go

12 Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2023 THE READING NOOK
photo by Drew Beamer

ahead and enlist ahead of being forcefully drafted and thus have some control over his destiny.

My mother told us how when he enlisted, she was terrified he would be killed in Vietnam. He reassured her that he had a foolproof plan that would ensure he would never leave the states. He had a buddy who had told him exactly what to do.

Once his basic training was completed, he had signed up for an extra training class. Once that class finished, he signed up for another and another and another. The Army was thrilled that he was so enthusiastic. He was carefully manipulating the system.

By the time the US pulled out of Vietnam, Ernie had taken so many classes and did so well in them that he had gained the rank of Green Beret and had become a pilot.

The family relaxed, believing the danger was over and he would return safely home.

Upon his return, he used his pilot’s license to get a job as a pilot for a company in New Jersey. Little did any of us know that he would soon be gone.

My mother was finally coaxed into a chair where the sobbing paused as she said half sentences that we were left to string together.

“It was my job….to protect him…he is my little brother…I was supposed….to….keep him safe, how could….how could…I…know….I have to go….I have to find him….I have to…find….my… my….little…brother,” she choked out.

We were firing questions at her, desperate to have the information that she knew, to know what had happened to my uncle. Who had been on the phone? How did something so crazy happen that

caused my beloved, strong uncle to disappear?

The questions only served to delay answers as her brain struggled to understand the words her ear had captured.

For our family, the world stopped.

Apparently, Ernie’s employer had purchased a new small plane and it was located in Georgia. Ernie and a buddy pilot of his flew down to Georgia to pick it up.

When they went to take off, Ernie proposed a race to his friend. His friend was to go by land, Ernie would go by sea and whoever made it back to the New Jersey air strip first would win a six-pack of beer.

That would be the last time Ernie was seen.

We were told the Coast Guard and others searched for three days along the eastern coast, concentrating on the New Jersey area.

No wreckage was ever found, no body. Not even an oil slick marked where my uncle went down into the ocean. No witnesses came forward having seen a plane crash or even one in trouble.

It was only a couple of months later that my grandparents went to Ernie’s apartment to clean it out.

They were in for a bit of a surprise.

It had been well known that in high school Ernie had competed in track and field. What no one knew was that he had kept winning trophies and ribbons. They found a closet in his apartment where he had stored all of them.

No one could figure out where he had hidden them while he was still living in my grandparents’ home. It was a heckuva secret he kept. While

continued, Page 14

Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2023 13

continued from Page 13 everyone made fun of him for being clumsy, he was winning trophy after trophy.

It wasn’t even a year later when he was declared dead. I guess a sort of funeral was held at some point. I was a kid in Oklahoma, so those details are fuzzy.

Three theories were floated regarding his disappearance, none of which could be proven.

One was that he had gotten involved in drug smuggling or had been kidnapped by smugglers who had slipped onto the plane and had taken control.

The second was that he hit air turbulence from a larger passing plane and his small plane had flipped and caused him to crash into the ocean.

The third was that he had simply taken the plane and flown to Canada for a wide variety of reasons that were proposed.

The theory pushed most by authorities was that he had crashed into the ocean.

Then, about a month after his disappearance, my grandparents went out to eat dinner. Having forgotten something at the house, they turned back unexpectedly to retrieve it.

As my grandfather went to walk in the door, it flew open and two men in dark suits hurriedly left the house.

My grandfather shouted at them, demanding to know who they were, why they were in the house and how had they gotten past the locked door.

They never answered, just rushed to a nearby dark sedan and left.

My grandparents were pretty shaken but no answers were offered by anyone.

We assumed it was FBI or CIA doing an illegal search, but could never get any information whatsoever.

Then, a year and a half later, as the tremendous sorrow over losing Ernie had began to become a longing ache something startling happened.

My mother was sitting, reading the Tulsa World newspaper one afternoon when she screamed. What the heck?

Well, it turned out that in the paper that day were the classes being offered at a Tulsa college.

One of the classes was Beginning Flying and it was being taught by one Ernest Shortridge, my uncle’s name. My uncle who was a highly trained pilot and a Green Beret, who knew (of course) that we lived in Oklahoma, just outside of Tulsa.

My mother became hysterical. She cried, she floated theories that this was his way of trying to make contact despite the danger since we figured we were all being watched after the men in suits had been at my grandparents’ house.

She jumped back and forth as to whether to reach out to the pilot. What if it were him and he was trying to make contact? What if it weren’t and it was just a really weird coincidence?

A few days later, it was no longer discussed. My mother’s entire attitude changed after that. She wouldn’t discuss Ernie or even the flying class. She said it was best we just accepted he was gone and swore us to secrecy.

Looking back, I am convinced she reached out to the pilot and I’m sure that if it had not been Ernie or connected to him in some way, she would have told us.

Years passed, my sister and I grew up and moved into new lives.

But something kept bothering me about Ernie’s disappearance. I kept feeling that I held a clue or knew something everyone had overlooked.

And then, one day, it hit me.

The bracelet.

Ernie had never given me and my sister a gift, ever. He just didn’t. Then, one Christmas, in the mail arrived two bracelets. One for me, one for my sister. We were thrilled and the next Christmas, we looked for a gift from him but there was nothing. It was two months later that he disappeared.

He knew what the family was like. He knew that if something happened to him, my sister and I (his only nieces and there were no nephews) would never inherit anything from him, that the other family members would go through his things like starved scavengers, which is exactly what happened.

Going back now, trying to find anything about Ernie’s disappearance, news clippings, any kind of official report, well, that all seems to have disappeared, too. Or perhaps I just haven’t found the right place to look.

But the more I have thought about that bracelet and the timing of such an unexpected gift, the more I have become convinced it was my uncle’s way of making sure my sister and I had something to remember him by and that he had planned his disappearance for reasons that I still hope one day to know and understand.

14 Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2023

NETWORKER Once Upon a Time

Networking does not have to be a lone sport. Too many of us have the idea that we must go it alone when networking.

Some people even feel it is unwise to share their connections. This is surprisingly true. I have been in conversations with several people lately who believe they own their connections.

This is a foolish attitude to have.

True networkers will make connections so they can share them. Those who think they own their connections put an unnecessary burden on the connection.

Every time I lead a networking talk or group, and ask them to express why they like networking, the answer is always a resounding 100 precent that they want to help people.

While it is expressed in a variety of ways, the overriding attitude is that connections made become a way of helping others become more successful in their endeavors.

So, why would someone feel possessive of a connection they have? It comes down to jealousy.

People become jealous that someone else might get more from a connection then they did.

For example, if two people meet at a networking event and Networker A sees there are ways the other person can help them with something that could increase their income, they will want to pursue that avenue with them further.

Then, Networker A introduces someone they know to this new person. Right before their eyes, they see that the two of them hit it off and the opportunity slips away, or so Networker A thinks. They start helping each other right away and Networker A knows it will take time before being helped by the person who originally was their new connection.

Networker A becomes jealous and regrets making the introduction.

Accountability is built into this situation, and if Networker A gets past the jealousy, the two whom Networker A connected will be trying harder to help Networker A than if it were only one of them. They may even put their collective heads together and come up with ways Networker A can grow that Networker A could have never thought of before.

Freely make connections and share them, opportunity will follow.

Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at https://amzn.to/2KSy3Xm. Learn more about Arnold at https://bit.ly/3VLzr1S Contact Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com

ApplAuse!

New hires, promotions, certifications earned, and announcements

Congratulations to Feeding Medina County and Medina County Park District and their teamwork that led to them winning the Award of Excellence for health and wellness programs and events at the Ohio Parks and Recreation Association’s Conference and Trade Show The two organizations won for teaming up to create additional food distribution sites throughout the county in Brunswick, Lodi and Wadsworth.

Has your business or an employee done something that should get applause or does your nonprofit have an announcement? E-mail the information to Joy@ BlakeHousePublishing.com and put “Applause” in the subject line.

Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2023 15
BUSINESS: THE

FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

Being Smart With Smart Homes

As we move toward a future of full automation, some may wonder what the trade-off will be.

With smart lights controllable by voice, thermostats that learn our habits, and kitchen appliances that can make shopping lists, what is the cost of a smart home?

As some early adopters know, smart devices are not always more convenient as they tend to have bugs or unexpected behaviors that normal “dumb” appliances do not. Such as reports of the incidences of a smart assistant device that started wildly laughing for no reason, startling those living with it.

When technology functions correctly, smart home automation can save time and add increase quality of life.

While “smart home” is a very broad term, the most common types of devices are connected to the internet via Wi-Fi. This means that things like smart light bulbs use an internet connection to report to a central server. When commands are issued to the light, such as to turn on, the command is sent through the server and then to the bulb. This type of system is

called a relay and means communication is never directly with the end device.

Relays are the most common approach and have several disadvantages including adding extra latency and exposing potential security risks.

Many smart home devices that connect over Wi-Fi do not offer proper security measures to keep the network safe.

This is an uncommon and difficult way for people to access information from a network, but it is possible.

No smart home system in use today is anywhere near perfect but new standards offer new and more secure ways of communicating with a smart home. Some standards also allow for local control, which means requests do not go to a server before reaching a smart home device and also avoids having those devices connect to the internet.

As smart homes and the accompanying technology become more common, it is important to choose carefully what is allowed to be a part of your private space.

Tyler Hatfield has a passion for technology and enjoys working on computers. To learn more about Hatfield, go to https://bit.ly/3Qr0LkH He can be contacted with questions and for recommendations at hatsmediagroup@gmail.com

Invention Convention

Patents recently granted to Medina County residents. Only county residents are included, although there may be additional people listed as patent grantees.

Patent for: Autolayering Blending System

To: Fred Mehlman

City of Residence: Brunswick

Patent for: High Sensitivity Movement Disorder Treatment Device or System

To: Joseph P. Giuffrida

City of Residence: Hinckley

Patent for: Lightweight Plastic Container and Preform

To: Richard C. Darr

City of Residence: Medina

Patent for: Insulative Rescue Cap Containing Emergency Response

Procedures

To: Paul Saluan

City of Residence: Hinckley

Patent for: Methods for Reducing Negative Flavor Attributes in Coffee and Compositions Therefrom

To: Yang Lu

City of Residence: Wadsworth

Patent for: Wireless Wall Console

To: Daniel Punchak

City of Residence: Wadsworth

Patent for: Sanitizer Composition With Probiotic/Prebiotic Active

Ingredient

To: Amanda Copeland

City of Residence: Seville

Patent for: Stud-Weldable Rebar

To: Timothy A. White

City of Residence: Medina

Patent for: Opportunistic Progressive Encoding

To: Mark Vanderaar

City of Residence: Medina

16 Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2023
BUSINESS:
photo by Pavel Neznanov

Planning for Success

The first piece of advice given when running a business is to plan well, and a business plan is a great place to start. Typically, a business plan includes a mission statement, a product or service description, a customer avatar and a financial plan.

Maybe you also will develop an annual plan with goals, targets and new services.

Things change, though, and the world will throw curveballs. While it is not possible to be prepared for every eventuality, anticipating and having a written plan for actions to take in response to some possibilities can be helpful in executing a rapid, concise response.

Some of the more common things that might come up are staffing issues, additional expenses, unexpected opportunities, and planning for more than minimal success.

Staffing issues: Even if not expecting employees in the beginning, there needs to be a plan in case you are unavailable to work. What if there were a family emergency? What if business takes off faster than expected?

It is important to know where to find staff members when they are needed.

Additional expenses: Have taxes been planned for? What software is needed to make things better for customers and easier for you? There may be some surprises, and it is a good idea to have a fund set up for some of those eventualities.

Unexpected opportunities: What if there is a service that was not planned to be offered but it is the one your best customers want? Be ready to pivot and seize the potential that comes.

Saying no: Alternatively, when should “no” be said? Customers will want things that are good for them but are not a part of your dream plan. To stay in control of the business, be ready to deliver the bad news. It is OK to say no.

Plan for success: Many businesses plan for the minimum. Be sure to plan for success, too. What is the most business that can be handled? What is the most that can be delivered? What will that success do to your model? It is a great problem to have, as long as you are prepared to capitalize. These things are usually not part of a traditional business plan, but they should be. Brainstorm how to handle these situations and work to identify and plan for a few more that may impact your business in its marketplace.

A business plan is a great idea, until the plan changes. You can be both flexible and rigid, as long as you are prepared.

Bryan Lefelhoc is founder and president of Bryan Media Strategies LLC, a boutique “company of one” marketing firm. Learn more about Lefelhoc and his expertise at https://bit.ly/3FqMBfl Email Lefelhoc at bryan@bryanmediastrategies.com

Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2023 17 BUSINESS: RISE AND SHINE

Doing Business

Local business networking events, not category restricted

Greater Medina Chamber of Commerce Chamber membership requirement after two events.

Tuesday, February 7

Monthly Luncheon, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Williams on the Lake, 787 Lafayette Road, Medina. Register at https://bit. ly/3x2oU7X

Thursday, February 9

Get to Know the Chamber, 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m., Buffalo Wild Wings, 5050 Eastpointe Drive, Medina. Network and learn about chamber benefits. https://bit.ly/3JJ45pQ

Wednesday, February 15

Networking WOW! 8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m., Williams on the Lake, 787 Lafayette Road, Medina. No walk-ins. $12 member attendance charge, $15 non-member attendance charge. Register at https://bit.ly/3HX3UpH

Thursday, February 16

Medina County Young Professionals Association: Biggest Barriers in Business Communication, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Biz Hive Wadsworth, 130 Main Street, Wadsworth. Register at https://bit.ly/3wUAHoX

Friday, February 24

Chamber Chat, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m., Medina Chamber, 211 S. Court Street, Medina. Coffee and networking. https://bit. ly/3YbqwbO

Northern Medina County Chamber Alliance Chamber membership requirement after two events.

Wednesday, February 1

Chamber Chomps, 7 a.m. to 2 p.m., The Cracked Egg, 1480 Pearl Road, Brunswick

Thursday, February 2

NMCCA Membership Benefits Informational Social, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., 9’er’s Diner, 63 Pearl Road, Brunswick. Network and learn about chamber benefits. For more information, call 330-225-8411.

Wednesday, February 15

Monthly Luncheon: Speed Networking, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Scene 75 Entertainment Center, 3688 Center Road, Brunswick. Members $25, non-members $30. Register at https://bit.ly/3VC80qD

Wadsworth Area Chamber of Commerce Chamber membership requirement after two events.

Monday, February 6

Women in Leadership, noon to 1 p.m., Community Room, Soprema Senior Center, 617 School Drive, Wadsworth. Register at https://bit.ly/40xiX0D

Tuesday, February 21

Member Coffee, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m., Wadsworth Chamber, 132A Main Street, Wadsworth. Free. Register at https://bit. ly/3JJ3fcG

Wednesday, February 22

Luncheon: State of the City, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., The Galaxy Restaurant Banquet Center, 201 Park Centre Drive, Wadsworth. $20 Register at https://bit.ly/3VEivdf

Thursday, February 23

Mochas and Mentors, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m., Community Room, Soprema Senior Center, 617 School Drive, Wadsworth. Register at https://bit.ly/3HXdM2u

Friday, February 24

2023 Wadsworth Chamber Euchre Tournament, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Wadsworth Eagles Club, Aerie #2117, 9953 Rittman Road, Wadsworth. Mexican dinner served 6 p.m., tournament starts 7 p.m. Fee is $40 per person, includes dinner. Register at https://bit.ly/3RvGafx

Seville Area Chamber of Commerce

Thursday, April 13

Quarterly Luncheon, 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m., Hawthorne Suites, 5025 Park Avenue West, Seville. $8 donation, pay at the door.

BUSINESS: THE INBOX

Behind the Overnight Success Story

Overnight success stories in business tend to be dramatized, and that success usually came about as a result of years of hard work and frustrations.

There is no doubt that some companies become successful quicker than others.

However, in most cases, what appears to be an overnight success is often the result of many years of hard work, trials and pivots.

Behind the scenes and long before becoming overnight successes, business owners often put in countless hours and deal with numerous setbacks along the way.

Successful companies solve problems; they seek to understand what the customer wants, which often leads them to pivot when necessary. This is evident in many famous success stories.

For example, YouTube started as a video dating site in 2005. The original idea did not gain traction, but the cofounders quickly realized that its users preferred to share videos of other topics.

The company was acquired by Google in 2006 for around $1.65 billion in stock.

Kevin Systrom was the cofounder of a check-in app called Burbn.

It was used for a combination of photo-sharing, checkingin to locations and gaming. Kevin paid attention to user engagement and quickly realized that most users posted pictures.

The app was streamlined to focus on photography with the ability to like and comment. When it was officially “relaunched” as Instagram, it was a huge success. It was acquired by Facebook for $1 billion in 2012.

When Melanie Perkins’ Canva was discovered by tech investors and the media, it sounded like an overnight success story. When her story hit the magazine Fast Company, she had just launched Canva about a year prior in August 2013.

Asked how she was able to build an incredible start-up in a couple of years, she laughed and said, “Yeah, right. We’re a regular 7-year overnight success story.”

It had been her previous start-up Fusion Books which lead to the insight and expertise needed to create Canva.

In other words, overnight success represents the sum of all learned experiences and in-the-trenches education. Very few succeed at the first attempt.

Business success comes through hard work and persistence. Business owners often put in countless hours, learning and growing through trial and error.

Success doesn’t come overnight. Success comes over time. Enjoy the journey!

Rachel Shepard is the founder of LonaRock, LLC, and a Medina County resident. She specializes in helping businesses understand financials and access capital. Learn more about Shepard at https://bit.ly/3h0LFEY Shepard can be reached by email at rshepard@lonarock.com

18 Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2023

HOME AND GARDEN: DIG IT! Healing in the Garden

Healing can be a very broad term, teetering on the spectrum of perspective.

What may be perceived as therapeutic can also cause intense feeling related to past trauma.

The best healing gardens interject sensory stimulation specifically designed to instigate deep emotional interactions, subtly nudging the psyche to presence.

A healing garden’s masterpiece is in personal invitation. A shadowed paradigm of observer and participant.

As the observer, interaction within the healing garden space may appear social.

The underlying secret, the participant has become involved, emotional contact is inevitable as a personal relationship with the space evolves.

A healing garden mirrors that of a sensory garden in that the design usually incorporates the five senses: sight, sound, smell, taste, touch.

A large red perennial hibiscus Sultry Kiss to catch the eye. The large ornamental grass Miscanthus sinensis strictus wrestling with the wind. Honeysuckle Major Wheeler, touched by the heat, spreading sweet fragrance abroad. Tasting a fresh native blueberry right from the shrub or a winter check berry (Gaultheria procumbens) and feeling the soft warmth of lamb’s ear.

These, while all stimulating even the smallest sense of emotion, becomes the surface of the garden.

In the true heart of a healing garden there grows a story. Purpose, a synonymous acknowledgement of loss as presence is found.

Healing gardens are created for physical as well as emotional healing. Creating a healing garden can be as simple as placing a favorite perennial such as Buddleia Miss Molly (butterfly bush) close to a memorial bench or as extravagant as winding paths leading to raised beds, water features and quiet places to linger.

Regardless the size, it must be personal. Aesthetics become a byproduct of creating a garden with purpose. Every aspect of the garden is created with specific function for individual need.

Who will benefit from the garden, why will they benefit from it, and what design will achieve these results. Creating a space to slowly reintegrate back into the world, ground with nature, remember or forget. A space to quietly find how to belong once again. Seeing, smelling, feeling, tasting, touching, healing.

Michelle Riley is a local horticulturist, landscape designer, and consultant. She is the founder of the gardening subscription service, https://theplantmall.com; https:// michellerileyhorticulturist.com; and https://neohiogarden. com. She also is the president of All About You Signature Landscape Design, Inc. Learn more about Riley at https://bit.ly/3BavKLk Riley can be contacted at Info@ MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com or by calling 234-678-8266.

HOME AND GARDEN: CRITTER CRAWL!

Caring for Dragons

Bearded dragons are one of the most popular and loved reptiles in the world, but did you know that most of them do not have proper care?

Contrary to what most pet stores will tell you, these animals need huge enclosures, live insects, greens every day, and are expensive.

You will need:

• A large enclosure, at least 4 feet by 2 feet by 2 feet in size

While a dragon can survive in a smaller enclosure, they cannot thrive in one. Always strive to ensure pets are thriving. Remember that these are solitary animals. Often they will stack on top of each other to fight for warmth, injure each other, or even kill each other.

• Live insects

They need to be live. Live insects contain certain nutrients that cannot be found in dead ones. Feed dragons bugs that are low in chitin, like Dubia roaches. Baby dragons younger than 3 months should be offered insects three to five times a day. Offer only as much as they can eat in 15 minutes. Adults continued, Page 20

Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2023 19
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need bugs three times a week. All food should be dusted with calcium or multivitamin powder.

• Vegetables

The best option is collard greens or dandelion greens. Do not feed kale, as it is a calcium binder! Greens should be offered at least once a day.

• Hides

Hides offer a sense of security to an animal and should always be offered, no matter what species.

• Heating

Heat during the day should be provided by using a basking bulb on a thermostat. At night, typically, heat is not needed unless the temperature drops below 65° F. Do not use any belly heat or colored bulbs, as bearded dragons often get injured by them. Also, use digital probes to monitor temperatures in the enclosure.

• Lighting

Bearded dragons need a source of UVB. The coil UVB bulbs are not safe, as they produce very uneven levels of UVB. Instead, use a linear UVB. A T5 7-percent version works well. The light source should cover two-thirds of the enclosure. It also provides an excellent source of light.

• Substrate

Bearded dragons can either be housed on a safe loose substrate, paper towels, tile, or non-adhesive shelf liner. The best mixture of substrate is a 50/50 mix of washed children’s play sand and organic topsoil.

Do not use calcium sand, coconut fiber or wood chips as these are very dangerous for bearded dragons. While bearded dragons can be a time-consuming and expensive pet, they are super fun.

Sources:

https://tinyurl.com/2u3htphe

https://tinyurl.com/y6wjujbj

Paris Deeter lives in Brunswick and has raised a wide variety of critters from spiders to rats. She welcomes questions and column suggestions, which can be sent to Joy@ BlakeHousePublishing.com with “Critter Crawl” in the subject line.

HOME AND GARDEN: BITE ME! Allergen-Free Mega Chunks Hold Their Own

Rating (out of 5 possible):

For those with food allergies and sensitivities it is a rocky road of challenge trying to find foods free of allergens, and a mistake or overlooked ingredient can be life threatening. Finding “like” ingredients to replace those with allergens can be very difficult and sometunes .

As more factories multi-produce products, even those that would not normally cause an allergic reaction get cross contaminated by contact with the same machines that have been in contact with foods or ingredients that have allergens. One of my specialties is chocolate chip cookies but with my daughter now dating a guy with nut allergies, we have been challenged to find chocolate chips that are safe for him to eat. Most chocolate chips on the market are cross contamination with other ingredients.

Enter Enjoy Life’s Mega Chunks semi-sweet large chocolate chips that state on the package that they are free from 14 allergens.

I was hesitant to try them and especially at the high price of more than $6 for a 10-ounce bag (compare to $3 for a 12-ounce bag of regular chocolate chips), especially since I put at least a pound of chocolate into each batch of cookies. After sampling one right out of the bag, I was not impressed. It seemed extra hard and rather bland.

However, I was to be very pleasantly surprised with the quality of the Mega Chunks once they had a trip to the oven. They lacked the waxiness of many chips I have used in the past and had a full, rich chocolate taste once baked into cookies.

The chunks were best when the cookies were fresh from the oven. They were wonderfully melty and rich with flavor. However, do not let them sit too long after baking.

After a couple of days, they were still soft, but a week after baking, while the cookies were still fresh, the chunks were hard and did not seem as tasty.

The kids, however, were delighted to finally have homemade cookies that were safe for all to eat!

20 Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2023
Order print copies at: JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com continued from Page 19
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photo by Amy Barnes

HOME AND GARDEN: VEGAN VITTLES

One-Pot Pasta

Appreciate having fewer dishes and yet want to serve a homemade, nutritious and delicious dinner? Then this is the dish for you. Here is the one-pot pasta!!

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 small, sweet onion, chopped

4 cloves garlic, minced

15 ounce can diced tomatoes

3 cups vegetable broth

1 tablespoon Italian seasoning

1/3 cup sun-dried tomatoes, chopped small

1 tablespoon tomato paste

12 ounces small pasta

2-3 cups spinach

1/2 cup vegan cream cheese

1/2 cup vegan Parmesan cheese, shredded salt and pepper to taste

Heat olive oil over medium heat. Sauté onions 3 to 4 minutes. Add garlic and sauté another minute. Add all tomatoes, vegetable broth, Italian seasoning, tomato paste, and pasta. Bring everything to a boil. Add spinach. Simmer for 6 to 8 minutes, until pasta is tender. Add cream cheese, Parmesan, and salt and pepper.

Chris Pickens, a vegan since 2016, is a certified holistic nutrition coach, a health and wellness coach, a holistic health practitioner, and a holistic health coach. To learn more about Pickens, go to https://bit.ly/3FqhEId Email her at momof4chris@gmail.com, with “The Joy of Medina Attn: Chris” in the subject line.

Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2023 21
photo by Chris Pickens
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HEALTH: HEALTHY TRAILS Safety: The Rider

Although Mother Nature may have other plans, according to the calendar, spring is just around the corner.

If you love riding a bike like I do, you are probably anxious to get outside after a long winter.

Even though it might not be a great time to hit the trails and city streets just yet, it is a great time to start prepping for the upcoming season.

One of the most important areas to consider is safety. On that topic, the first thing to cover is the rider. Obviously, one of the best and most effective safety items is a helmet. Protecting that noggin is priority one, and with modern helmets being super lightweight, comfortable and providing multiple safety features, there is no excuse to not wear one.

Another way to be safe on a bike is to be visible! Wearing bright clothing with eye-catching colors can really help a bike rider stand out, especially if riding on the road. If the weather starts to go south, being seen by motorists is extremely critical.

Besides bright clothing, the use of bike lights is another great way to be seen. Much like with a car, headlights and taillights are available for bikes.

Look for lights that have high lumen numbers as this is an indicator of brightness.

While riding on the road, I tend to have my lights flashing during the day to ensure they draw additional attention (remember, the lights are competing with the sun).

At night I keep them at a steady brightness in order to better see the road ahead and not freak out approaching motorists. Even if biking on paved or towpath-type trails instead of roads is preferred, visibility is still important as many of these trails have sections that venture into wooded areas, reducing the amount of natural light and making it harder to be seen by other cyclists.

A final, if less obvious, influence on safety is nutrition. Keeping hydrated and snacking on foods that replace electrolytes, vitamins and other elements the human body needs will help keep the mind alert, the body fresh and reaction times at their peak.

Now that we have made the rider safer, next month’s column will be about making the bike safer.

HEALTH: OF MIND AND BODY Resolutions Can be Saved

Still on top of your New Year’s resolution to get fit? If not, you are in good company.

The average American quits by the end of January, and only about 9 percent of all people who make a New Year’s resolution actually achieve their goal.

The biggest reasons people fail is that the goal is too lofty, they do not track and review progress, and they do not plan.

For a resolution to succeed, behaviors and habits must change. No easy feat for busy humans who thrive on routine!

The following four actions are research-backed ways to increase the chances of success.

Track what you eat. The majority of people who report successful weight loss are tracking food. Even if tracking for only a week or two, it is amazing what you discover about yourself and how it naturally encourages behavior change. Take a vitamin, drink a big glass of water in the morning, go for a 5-minute walk after meals, do 10 squats at noon every day. What do these things have in common? They are microhabits: little actions that are easy to do, that snowball into big results over time.

Write goals down. Do not just think it. Write it on a real piece of paper with a real pen. What do you want? How will you get there? What do you need to achieve this goal? What will you do when things get tough?

Finally, if you still cannot get back on track, it may be time to hire a trainer or coach. Most people lack accountability unless they have skin in the game. Paying hard-earned money and knowing someone is waiting for you to show up makes it harder to excuse falling back into bad habits.

A certified personal trainer and certified holistic nutrition coach, Kelly Bailey owns and operates Kelly Bailey Wellness. Find her blog, visit the Food Freedom page, and contact her at https://www.kellybailey.fit/ Learn more about Bailey at https://bit.ly/3B9HkGm Following any recommendations are solely at your discretion and responsibility. Consult your medical professional prior to undertaking any suggested diet, lifestyle or exercise change or routine.

Robert Soroky is a lifelong cyclist who regularly participates in long-distance charity rides and is the manager of the Century Cycles Medina location. To learn more about Soroky, go to https://bit.ly/3Vof7DX Contact Soroky at robert@ centurycycles.com to suggest column topics, for further information or to chat about bikes.

22 Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2023
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Starting a Nonprofit

When starting to raise funds or giveaway money or gifts, it is important to be aware of the laws and taxes governing such activities.

Laws have been put in place to protect all involved, from the donor to the recipient and the organization itself.

Nonprofits are required to state their objectives, set operating standards, and name a board to oversee its operations.

A 501c3 status allows the organization to raise, spend and gift funds without paying taxes as long as it maintains IRS requirements. If the IRS rules an entity is not operating properly, the entity will be required to change its status and potentially pay taxes.

As a donor, gifts to organizations with 501c3 status are eligible for a tax deduction.

Many businesses and foundations require their donations go only to 501c3 nonprofits to ensure the businesses are eligible for the tax benefits and as a way to ensure legitimacy.

The IRS has a long, detailed form utilizing tax language that can be difficult to complete if one lacks the expertise of a tax accountant.

The form has to be completed and mailed to the IRS. The organization then waits for a letter giving approval from the IRS that grants them nonprofit status and assigns them a 501c3 tax identification number.

The IRS may ask for clarifying information before approval and could deny the application if requirements have not been met.

The state of Ohio requires a nonprofit to file articles of incorporation with the secretary of state detailing the organization’s structure and how it will function.

There is an expectation by the IRS and the state of Ohio

that there will be a board that will regularly meet and keep records of these meetings. Ohio requires nonprofits to file a statement of continuing existence form with the secretary of state every five years.

After the nonprofit is established, regular filings with the IRS and Ohio attorney general must be made.

The amount of money an organization raises over the course of the year determines which form to file with the IRS.

In Ohio, nonprofits are required to make an annual charitable filing with the attorney general’s office.

The Ohio attorney general’s website is available to everyone who wants review the annual charitable filings for an organization at https://bit.ly/3XKUFgW

Available information includes the legal name of the organization, the tax identification number, address, date of formation, its purpose, names of board members, financial information, and if the registration is current.

The nonprofit has the ultimate responsibility to make sure these filings are made to the IRS and attorney general. Many nonprofits have an accountant and/or attorney to help with these forms.

State charitable filings will be checked as well to ensure the nonprofit is still functioning and performing its legal filings.

It shows a level of trust and legitimacy when a nonprofit takes the time to ensure these forms are filed correctly and in a timely manner.

Kent Von Der Vellen has lived in Medina for more than 20 years and is cofounder of the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Learn more about Von Der Vellen at https://bit.ly/3Fg6PqQ Email him at Gems@ BlakeHousePublishing.com or call 330-421-0863. Learn about other area nonprofits at Giving Hearts

Critical Needs Continue

WE CONTINUE TO SERVE

1450 number of people with disabilities we provide, find, fund and coordinate services for each month

Medina County board of developmental disabilities

From the time a child is born with a developmental disability until the end of their life, the MCBDD is there to help them through life’s challenges. We help with everything from early intervention and education for children to employment and community inclusive living for adults.

Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2023 23 COMMUNITY: GEMS
330-725-7751 • www.mcbdd.org
347number of children (ages 0-3) we help in our Early Intervention program and work with their families to support their needs.
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COMMUNITY: WATCHDOG Prescription Program Penalized

Ever since GoodRx started offering consumers its low-cost prescription program without charging the consumers any fees, the question was: How were they making a profit?

To the consumer, it may have raised some red flags, but between GoodRx’s advertising program and the dramatic difference in prices for prescriptions, the program was hard for millions of people resist.

According to the FTC, GoodRx Holdings Inc. was disclosing consumer health data for advertising purposes to companies such as Facebook, Google and advertising companies without the prior consent from consumers.

In fact, GoodRx shared the information even though it made privacy promises to consumers that it would not do exactly that, according to the FTC.

GoodRx even went so far, the FTC reported, as to put a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (commonly called HIPPA) compliance seal at the bottom of its website home page.

While consumers took advantage of the telehealth and discounted drug program, their information was being mined and gathered to be used by GoodRx, the FTC claims.

It is a serious enough offense that, if approved in federal court, the company will be forced to pay $1.5 million in civil penalties for failing to report what it was doing with its customers’ data.

In addition, the company has been ordered to tell the thirdparty companies they shared information with to delete the data that was shared.

Good Rx also must inform consumers about the information breech as well as the FTC’s action against the company.

Since January 2017, more than 55 million consumers have utilized the company’s service, according to the FTC.

Charges were filed for the FTC by the Department of Justice under the Health Breach Notification Rule.

To learn more about the case, go to https://bit.ly/3JG3DbO

24 Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2023
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Victims, Voices and Justice

Book: Sandy Hook: An American Tragedy and the Search for Truth”

Rating (out of 5 possible):

This is an incredibly important book, heartbreaking and infuriating and inspiring all at once.

Elizabeth Williamson, feature writer for The New York Times, digs deep into the events at Sandy Hook Elementary School on and after December 14, 2012, when a heavily armed shooter entered the school and killed 20 first graders and six teachers.

Less well known than the events of that day are the years of repercussions the shooting had on the victims’ families.

The parents and families of those killed at Sandy Hook became targets of a feverish group of conspiracy theorists and “truthers” who claimed the victims were either actors performing on behalf of a corrupt, overreaching government or that the children never existed in the first place.

Giving voice and airtime to conspiracies ranging from laughable to cruelly dangerous, was Alex Jones, the ringleader of the truthers.

The InfoWars host made millions of dollars in advertising and product sales during broadcasts focusing on Sandy Hook.

Journalist Williamson worked to gain the trust of many Sandy Hook parents.

Three of the parents gave her access to the details of the personal attacks, invasions of privacy, threats, and malicious slander they endured.

With the help of one parent, who was a former conspiracy theorist himself, the author interviewed some of the truthers in an attempt to understand what motivates someone to hypothesize so irrationally about a tragedy that took 26 lives.

This book is not just about a school shooting and its aftermath. It also is about the internet and the way ideas permeate certain subsets of society. It is about victims, voices and justice.

Sandy Hook families recently won victories in civil court against Jones, with juries awarding millions of dollars to them.

Insight into the legal battle is provided by Williamson who includes an accessible discussion of First Amendment rights.

This book brings up very uncomfortable feelings, and the scenes described can be distressing.

Yet, in this age of abundant information and social media, the book is a vitally important read for anyone interested in current events, the legal system, victims’ rights, and free speech.

Mary Olson is the readers’ advisory librarian at the Medina County District Library. To learn more about her, go to https:// bit.ly/3gZ1mg1

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2023 25 ENTERTAINMENT:
THE SHELF
OFF

“The ad says this is real underwear. I don’t understand, is there fake underwear?”

“If someone made a movie about my life and it was that boring, I’d be insulted.” -A 22-year-old unwillingly watching a Hallmark movie.

26 Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2023
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TOWNSHIPS OF MEDINA COUNTY Y M R S H A R O N R D M Z S L A E W R R G W E L N T L K O H G L E L G C D E N L Z X O T N M B S N U T B I E D M P A A W O E T T I H L L V W R H R M P N E F K L E B A R E C G S R Y T C I I F D B H V J J L A W I V F E S O I K I R M F Y W S H I W L N R M L W A O S I C R O L C D E D B L R N R T V R E K L D N R B K U R I N T Q L M I E M G G R A L R H R E B N O K R R B H B D Y L Y R A T J H Y R M
Joyful Word Search

Water Bogs Down, But Stay for Action

Movie: “Avatar: The Way of Water”

Seen: movie theater

Rating (out of 5 possible):

While it is not absolutely necessary to have seen the first “Avatar” movie, it is necessary to at least know the premise and a few of the main points of the first movie before seeing the second.

As with the first movie, there is a strong emphasis on family and the connectedness between all living things.

The sinister development in this movie was a little hard to follow. Colonel Quaritch, who was determined to destroy the Na’vi, the blue-skinned inhabitants of Pandora, a moon lush with jungle flora and fauna, in the first movie is brought back in this sequel.

Quaritch died in the first movie at the hands of Jake Sully and Neytiri.

In “The Way of Water,” Quaritch comes back as something called a recombinant which is created by using a combination of his memories, feelings, and DNA that was bottled and stored prior to his death. It is then used to grow a kind of cloned Avatar Na’vi.

It would have been helpful if more time in the movie were spent explaining how recombinants were being made rather than so much footage showing how Avatars can swim underwater.

How we are moved from the forest into the ocean has to do with Jake Sully’s desire to keep his family and the other Na’vi safe by moving his family to live with the Metkayina, who live mostly in the ocean.

His reasoning is that if Quaritch and the others cannot find him, they will leave everyone alone. A little strange that this would be his thinking when he understands so well how the attacking humans/recombinants think.

Accepting that Sully so severely underestimates the

determination of Quaritch and the others and why he thinks they will give up before succeeding at their mission (killing Sully), takes a bit of a leap. As expected, the invaders torture their way to eventually finding Sully and his family.

However, the decision to have a forest-dwelling Na’vi family move into a settlement of Metkayina, who are mostly ocean dwelling gives the opportunity for an interesting undercommentary on refugees and accepting those who are different and offering grace and education.

While parts of “The Way of Water” drag, such as when Sully’s family learns to swim, rest assured there is plenty of action and drama to come.

An interesting side note is that it took a tank of 90,000 gallons of water to film “The Way of Water” as compared to “Titanic’s” 17-million gallons. Word is that there is going to be a third movie in the series. Let us hope the acting is more fluid and believable.

MOVIE TIME BOX

How long is the movie?

93 minutes = 1 hour, 33 minutes

102 minutes = 1 hour, 42 minutes

106 minutes = 1 hour, 46 minutes

111 minutes = 1 hour, 51 minutes

126 minutes = 2 hours, 6 minutes

135 minutes = 2 hours, 9 minutes

Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2023 27 ENTERTAINMENT: GETTING REEL
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photo by Christian Wiediger

Oh, Snap!

Tired of winter? Here is a little reminder of the green and wonder of spring, courtesy of the camera of local resident Patrick Lechene.

A sweet proposal on the message board at Dolce at the Strand, 123 Broad, Suite H, Wadsworth. photo by Amy Barnes

Let's do it!

All Month

Suicide Prevention Poster Contest, January 1 to March 3. For students grades 6 to 8. Create a poster to educate people on the warning signs and ways to get help. Find contest rules at https://bit.ly/3PZ5UQK

Suicide Prevention Sticker Contest, January 1 to March 3. For students grades 9 to 12. Create a sticker to educate people on the warning signs and ways to get help. Find contest rules at https://bit.ly/3jmc9BG

Wednesday, February 1

National Freedom Day https://bit.ly/3khHk1F

Natural Discoveries, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Schleman Nature Preserve, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. An easy walk to explore and observe the unfolding of nature all year long.

Lodi Railroad Museum, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Learn about the history of the railroad’s effect on the Village of Lodi and Harrisville Township. Register at https://bit.ly/3iSntWz

Read to Teddy, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Cuddle up and practice reading a story to Teddy, a mini golden doodle.

Thursday, February 2

National Play Your Ukulele Day

Camp Wired, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina. Learn how to manage files and folders. Board Game Bonanza, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina. Play a variety of board games. For students grades K through 8.

Tween Thursday: Watercolor Newspaper Flowers, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. For children ages 9-14.

Friday, February 3

National Carrot Cake Day

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Medina Hospital, 100 East Washington Street, Medina. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg

Moon Hike, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Learn about the moon, nocturnal animals, and night vision.

Saturday, February 4

National Eat Ice Cream For Breakfast Day

A Healthy Dose of Nature: Hiking Series, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., Carolyn Mugrage Park, 4985 Windfall Road, Medina. Vigorous 3- to 5-mile hike with naturalist, dress for weather, wear appropriate footwear, bring own water. Ages 10 and up. No registration, free.

Do It Yourself: Crochet Slippers, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Make cozy, crochet slippers. Register at https://bit.ly/3XF3r0B

Creating a Book Journal, 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Hand craft a book journal. Register at https://bit.ly/3wvINEr

Sunday, February 5

National Fondue Day

Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Winter Birds, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park, 4985 Windfall Road, Medina. An easy walk to explore and observe the unfolding of nature all year long.

Monday, February 6

National Frozen Yogurt Day

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Trinity United Church of Christ, 215 High Street, Wadsworth. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg

Monday Movie Matinee: “Marry Me”, 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Meeting Room A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth.

Idiatrod: The Last Great Race, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Lodi Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Learn about idiatrod dog sledding. Maple Sugaring, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Highland Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Learn how maple syrup is made. Register at https://bit.ly/3XLBvb6

Sign Language Level 2, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina. For those who attended

February 2023

Nonprofit Calendar

the beginning sign language classes or has a basic knowledge of American Sign Language and deaf culture. Register at https://bit.ly/3DiwTBx

Wire Wrapped Crystal Necklace, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Make a wire wrapped crystal necklace. Register at https://bit. ly/40aql1x

History of the Cleveland Browns, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Learn the history of the Cleveland Browns football team.

Tuesday, February 7

National Periodic Table Day

Knitting and Crochet Circle, 10 a.m. to noon, Brunswick Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations.

Naturebrary, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina. Explore, discover, and connect with indoor and outdoor activities. Register at https://bit.ly/3HeYh4D

Create!: Self-Care Creations, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Register at https://bit.ly/3wT7b32

Truth Seeker: America’s First Ladies, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Learn the history of America’s first ladies.

Wednesday, February 8

National Kite Flying Day

Puzzle Palooza, 12:15 p.m. to 1:30 p.m., Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Relax with friends while piecing together fun jigsaw puzzles.

Paint Pouring, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Register at https://bit. ly/3JoaZkl

Candy Sushi, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Create candy sushi. Register at https://bit.ly/3JfFsAL

Kindergarten Readiness Night, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. To help children prepare for kindergarten. Register at https://bit.ly/3wBL40R

Fencing, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Highland Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. An introduction to fencing event. Register at https://bit.ly/3kO0Va0

Read to Teddy, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Cuddle up and practice reading a story to Teddy, a mini golden doodle.

Thursday, February 9

National Pizza Day

Camp Wired, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina. Learn advanced internet skills. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m., Saint Ambrose Church, 929 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg

Tween Thursday: Watcha’ Reading?, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Art History Craft Time, 5 p.m. to 6 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Creat a painting inspired by Vincent Van Gogh. Register at https://bit. ly/3Di3uY6 Idiatrod: The Last Great Race, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3629 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn about idiatrod dog sledding. Podcast 101, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Highland Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Learn how to create a podcast. Register at https://bit.ly/3Rc6zP3

Local Author: Brandon Massullo, “Haunted Medina County”, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth.

Friday, February 10

National Umbrella Day

Snow Bug Stroll, 6 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 South Medina Line Road, Sharon Center.Every day until February 28. Learn about how bugs stay active during the winter.

30 Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2023
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Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2023 31

Saturday, February 11

National Make a Friend Day

Snow Bug Stroll, 6 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 South Medina Line Road, Sharon Center.Every day until February 28. Learn about how bugs stay active during the winter.

Adapted Storytime, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., Story Time Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Storytime in a supportive environment for children with autism and sensory integration challenges. Register at https://bit.ly/3Di7vfl

Winter Orienteering, 10:30 a.m., The Lodge at Allerdale, 141 Remsen Road, Medina. Bring your own compass and whistle, and dress for the weather to enjoy this navigation course.

Cookie Mix Valentine’s Day Craft, 11 a.m. to noon, Highland Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Register at https://bit. ly/3DkZy8W

Weekend Woodpeckers, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. February 11, 12, 18, and 19. Enjoy educational activities about woodpeckers and a bird-viewing area.

Snowflake Salt Art, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Make watercolor snowflake art. Register at https://bit.ly/3WDqnvX

Sunday, February 12

National Darwin Day https://bit.ly/3X7X8T4

Snow Bug Stroll, 6 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 South Medina Line Road, Sharon Center.Every day until February 28. Learn about how bugs stay active during the winter.

Weekend Woodpeckers, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. February 12, 18, and 19. Enjoy educational activities about woodpeckers and a bird-viewing area.

ORMACO Presents: Live At the Library: Stephan Haluska, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Enjoy a live harp performance. Register at https://bit.ly/3QVMeh5

Monday, February 13

World Radio Day

Snow Bug Stroll, 6 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 South Medina Line Road, Sharon Center.Every day until February 28. Learn about how bugs stay active during the winter.

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Medina Fire Station 1,

300 West Reagan Parkway, Medina. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg

Makerspace Monday: VHS & Camcorder Transfer, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina. Register at https://bit. ly/3JjPHUU

Make Your Own Chocolates, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Highland Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Register at https://bit. ly/3wyG4de

Art in the Afternoon: Snowflake Collage, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Use colored tissue paper to make a snowflake collage.

Sign Language Level 2, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina. For those who attended the beginning sign language classes or has a basic knowledge of American Sign Language and deaf culture. Register at https://bit.ly/3XWSFmR

Monday Night Intrigue: “The Doomsday Mother” by John Glatt, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Register at https://bit.ly/3HV7rF4

Tuesday, February 14

National Library Lovers Day

Snow Bug Stroll, 6 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 South Medina Line Road, Sharon Center.Every day until February 28. Learn about how bugs stay active during the winter. For the Love of Scat, 2 p.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Take a hike to look for and identify common animal droppings. Explorastory: The Secret Life of Squirrels, 6:30 p.m. to 7:15 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Register at https://bit.ly/3HV7OPY

Wednesday, February 15

National Gumdrop Day

Snow Bug Stroll, 6 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 South Medina Line Road, Sharon Center.Every day until February 28. Learn about how bugs stay active during the winter.

American Red Cross Blood Drive, noon to 5 p.m., Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg

Fork Painting Party!, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina.

Tween Trivia Night, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina. Register at https://bit. ly/408pe2A

Options for Word Processing, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina. Learn about different word processing programs that are available. Register at https://bit. ly/3JliTLi

Read to Teddy, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Cuddle up and practice reading a story to Teddy, a mini golden doodle.

Using Ancestry Library Edition for Family History Research, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina. Register at https://bit.ly/3WJaJ22

Thursday, February 16

A list of art shows in Medina County

To have a show listed, send the information to joy@ blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late.

19th Annual Aquarius Exhibition Through March 5

Medina County Art League members exhibit two works each.

B. Smith Gallery

Third Floor, Medina Library

210 S. Broadway Street, Medina

Teen Juried Art Competitions and Scholarship Show

March 13 through April 9

Reception: March 15, 6 p.m.

B. Smith Gallery

Third Floor, Medina Library

210 S. Broadway Street, Medina

National Almond Day

Snow Bug Stroll, 6 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 South Medina Line Road, Sharon Center.Every day until February 28. Learn about how bugs stay active during the winter.

Camp Wired, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina. Discover Facebook and the differences between unfriending, unfollowing, and snoozing.

Bad Art Night, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Aim to create the worst art in the room. Register at https://bit.ly/3WDu7xv

Book Nook, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina. Create a literary diorama. Register at https://bit.ly/3j25AVn

Local Author: Don Ake, “Turkey Terror at My Door - Misadventures of a Middle Aged Man”, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth.

Friday, February 17

National Random Act of Kindness Day

Snow Bug Stroll, 6 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 South Medina Line Road, Sharon Center.Every day until February 28. Learn about how bugs stay active during the winter.

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., St Mark Church, 1330 North Carpenter Street, Brunswick. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg Music and Movement, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Children will enjoy music, dancing, and playing musical instruments.

The 29th Annual Medina Ice Festival, 5 p.m. to 11 p.m., Medina Historic Square, Public Square, Medina. View over 100 ice carvings around the square.

Saturday, February 18

National Battery Day

Art In Action, All Day, Medina Community Room A and B, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina.

32 Joy of Medina County Magazine | February
2023
T

This Prime Real Estate For Sale

To stake your claim, call (330) 461-0589

Smaller parcels are available. Limited availability, call now for choice of best locations.

Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2023 33

Snow Bug Stroll, 6 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 South Medina Line Road, Sharon Center.Every day until February 28. Learn about how bugs stay active during the winter.

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Hinkley Fire Old Station, 1410 Ridge Road, Hinkley. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg

Winter Bird Walk, 10 a.m., River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. February 18 and 25. Take a walk to look for and observe winter birds around the park.

Weekend Woodpeckers, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. February 18, and 19. Enjoy educational activities about woodpeckers and a bird-viewing area.

Sunday, February 19

National Chocolate Mint Day

Snow Bug Stroll, 6 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 South Medina Line Road, Sharon Center.Every day until February 28. Learn about how bugs stay active during the winter.

ORMACO Presents: Hadestown, 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Beuhler’s River Styx, 3626 Medina Road, Medina. Bus ride to Playhouse Square to see Hadestown the musical. Party bus and orchestra seat is $140, party bus and balcony seat $100, orchestra seat only $90, and balcony seat only $50. Purchase tickets at https://bit.ly/3XROA2P

Weekend Woodpeckers, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Enjoy educational activities about woodpeckers and a bird-viewing area.

Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Skunks, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Holmesbrook Park, 660 College Street, Wadsworth. An easy walk to explore and observe the unfolding of nature all year long.

Monday, February 20

National Love Your Pet Day

Wadsworth Library Closed

Snow Bug Stroll, 6 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 South Medina Line Road, Sharon Center.Every day until February 28. Learn about how bugs stay active during the winter.

Music & Movement Jr., 10:30 a.m. to 11:15 a.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Led by a boardcertified music therapist. Register at https://bit.ly/3wA8mEa

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., First Congregational Church, 114 Church Street, Lodi. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg

Arctic Animal Science, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road. Learn about arctic animals and do a camouflage experiment. Register at https://bit.ly/3JeKBJv

Make It Monday: Inspirational Pencils, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina. Engrave a set of 10 pencils with a laser engraver. Register at https://bit.ly/3jfZlwZ

No Sew Sock Owl, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Lodi Story Hour/Activity Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Road, Lodi. Register at https://bit.ly/3DiEuQz

Tuesday, February 21

National Sticky Bun Day

Snow Bug Stroll, 6 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 South Medina Line Road, Sharon Center.Every day until February 28. Learn about how bugs stay active during the winter.

Knitting and Crochet Circle, 10 a.m. to noon, Brunswick Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations.

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., The Chapel Wadsworth Campus, 1391 State Road, Wadsworth. https://rcblood. org/32i1sbg

Food Habits for a Healthy Heart, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Register at https://bit.ly/3Y3HNmr

Wednesday, February 22

National Be Humble Day

Snow Bug Stroll, 6 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 South Medina Line Road, Sharon Center.Every day until February 28. Learn about how bugs stay active during the winter.

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Root Candles, 640 West Liberty Street, Medina. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg

Snowman Storytime and Craft, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina. Register at https://bit. ly/3DeMIZN

Marshmallow Architect, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Build with marshmallows and toothpicks. Register at https://bit.ly/3WPpHny

Book Art, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina Community Room A and B, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina. Register at https://bit. ly/3DmEEGz

Read to Teddy, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Cuddle up and practice reading a story to Teddy, a mini golden doodle.

Ceramic Paint and Take Craft, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Paint a spring-inspired flower pot.

Thursday, February 23

National Banana Bread Day

Snow Bug Stroll, 6 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 South Medina Line Road, Sharon Center.Every day until February 28. Learn about how bugs stay active during the winter.

Camp Wired, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina.

Therapy Dog Day, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Visit with a therapy dog at the library.

American Red Cross Blood Drive, noon to 6 p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg

Meet the Animals, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Learn about the nature center’s animals including their habits, care, and life histories.

Tween Thursday: Draw in 3D, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth.

The Life of Frederick Douglass, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn about the life, career, and accomplishments of Frederick Douglass. Register at https://bit.ly/3wETVP7

Wadsworth History: Stories, Landmarks, and Traditions, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Learn the history of Wadsworth. Register at https://bit.ly/3JCiOTm

Alphabet Adventure: L is for Love, 6:30 p.m. to 7:15 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Register at https://bit.ly/40ofmSn

Introduction to Online Job Searching, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Register at https://bit.ly/3layRgU

Friday, February 24

National Tortilla Chip Day

Snow Bug Stroll, 6 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 South Medina Line Road, Sharon Center.Every day until February 28. Learn about how bugs stay active during the winter.

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg

Wine and Canvas, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Bring wine and snacks to enjoy while painting. Adults 21 and over only. $20 fee due at time of event. Register at https://bit.ly/3Rchit9

Saturday, February 25

National Chocolate Covered Nut Day

Snow Bug Stroll, 6 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 South Medina Line Road, Sharon Center.Every day until February 28. Learn about how bugs stay active during the winter.

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., St Mark Church, 1330 North Carpenter Street, Brunswick. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg

Winter Bird Walk, 10 a.m., River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. February 18 and 25. Take a walk to look for and observe winter birds around the park.

Backyard Birds, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Lodi Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Road, Lodi. Learn about the birds found in backyards during the winter. Register at https://bit.ly/3HzwDk0

Sunday, February 26

National Pistachio Day

Snow Bug Stroll, 6 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 South Medina Line Road, Sharon Center.Every day until February 28. Learn about how bugs stay active during the winter.

Monday, February 27

International Polar Bear Day

Snow Bug Stroll, 6 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 South Medina Line Road, Sharon Center.Every day until February 28. Learn about how bugs stay active during the winter.

Music and Movement, 10:30 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Participate in instrument playing, singing, and dancing with activities led by a board certified music therapist. Register for the 10:30 a.m. session at https://bit.ly/3R8yi3o Register for the 11:30 a.m. session at https:// bit.ly/409Dicb

Dog Man Party, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Celebrate the crime-fighting canine with crafts and activities. Register at https://bit.ly/3HCIOgd

Tuesday, February 28

National Tooth Fairy Day

Snow Bug Stroll, 6 a.m. to 7 p.m., Green Leaf Park, 1674 South Medina Line Road, Sharon Center. Learn about how bugs stay active during the winter. Last day. Hibernation Station, 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Take a hike to learn about animals’ hibernation. Art Attack, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Turn a thrift store painting into a masterpiece. Register at https://bit.ly/3XIKVV8

Otaku Tuesdays, Otaku Tuesdays, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina 1907 Room, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina. A discussion of all things anime, for Grades 6 through 12. Do geekcrafts, learn about Japanese culture, cosplay welcome! Register at https://bit.ly/3HJV7Yd, and a slide. Register at https://bit.ly/3VB3okG

34 Joy of
Medina County Magazine | February 2023
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Celebrate!

Joy of Medina County Magazine thanks and celebrates these great companies who believe in community and make it possible for readers to enjoy this magazine for free.

Please thank the following companies for bringing Joy to you!

Cable, Internet, Phone Armstrong

1141 Lafayette Road, Medina

Contact: Sam Pietrangelo

Community Marketing Manager

Phone: 330-722-3141

Website: ArmstrongOneWire.com

Community Resources

Medina County Board of Developmental Disabilities

4691 Windfall Road, Medina

Contact: Patti Hetkey

330-725-7751

Dentist

Landry Family Dentistry

5076 Park Avenue West, Seville

Contact: Dr. Joseph G. Landry II

Phone: 330-769-4470

Website: LandryFamilyDentistry.com

Fireplaces, Hot Tubs, Grills The Place 2377 Medina Road, Medina

Contact: Andrea Reedy

Phone: 330-239-4000

Website: YourPlace4.com

Insurance

Thomas Muntean Agency/ American Family Insurance

451 W. Liberty Street, Medina

Contact: Thomas Muntean

Phone: 330-721-7716

Website: Bit.ly/39kwVN7

Photographer

FlashBang Photography/ Videography

Phone: 440-263-4502

Website: FlashBangFoto.com

Simulated Shooting Range

Engage Virtual Range

Locations in Medina and Avon Lake

Visit EVR website for information and to book appointments.

Website: EngageVirtualRange.com/r/b9aSrM

Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2023 35
to
these great companies in
the best
Medina County?
Amy Barnes, Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com, 330-461-0589. The Col. H.G. Blake House photo by Amy Barnes
Want
join
sponsoring
publication in
Contact

Joy of Medina County Magazine

1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256

E-mail: Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com

Website: JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com

Phone: 330-461-0589

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