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AUGUST 2020 VOLUME 3, NUMBER 7

$11.99

WHEN MERCY CAME TO AMERICA Her career path was set, but a cousin’s guidance and a whisper from a childhood dream changed everything. PG. 4 A locally owned, independent publication dedicated to higher standards of journalism


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2020

VOLUME 3 NUMBER 7 JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM

Pearls by Amy Barnes On her fourth birthday, my daughter Sara

slaughter day. I could not stand so much

handed me one of her pearls of wisdom to

death and the stench of it. My dismay on

hold.

those days was only somewhat alleviated by

“Snack time,” she solemnly informed me, “is when you eat your favorite cookie.” For Sara it was simple. I am sure she would have been deeply puzzled as to why

knowing our animals had had better lives than the ones packaged for sale in the grocery store. My aunt must have understood the unease

someone would not have their favorite

of us kids, because one slaughter day, she

cookie. Why deny oneself the joy of doing

called us to the kitchen sink where she was

something truly enjoyable?

gutting chickens. We were so reluctant to

Sometimes we lose track of those small things, the little joys in life. It is too easy to tell a child to behave and

approach that sink as my aunt deftly wielded the knife. “Look,” she said, pointing to one of the

yet forget to enjoy the boundless joy of

prettiest things I have ever seen. There was a

childhood hugs and kisses. It is too easy to

bluish rainbow, shining and colorful and

forget when you return home at the end of

beautiful. We could not help but edge closer

the day, there is someone else who had a

with “ooohs” and “ahhhs.”

tough day, too, and a quiet hug can renew

“Was that inside the chicken?” we asked.

each other’s strengths.

“Yep, that’s the inside of the gizzard,” she

One summer, I decided to show the children that there is beauty in the simple

said. Deep in thought, I stayed beside her at the

pleasures, such as blowing bubbles on

sink long after my younger sister had

Public Square or in sharing our chalk with

wandered off, and wondered at the beauty in

others who happen by.

the middle of the mess in the sink. Why

It was important for them to see that sometimes, even though they are late for bed, there are fireflies in dire need of a good game of catch-and-release. How much they remember of those times is

would there be beauty in a place where it was unlikely to ever be seen? I walked away that day with a new piece of understanding and wonderment. It is that ability to find beauty and wonder,

not as important as whether their hearts and even in the most unlikely of places, that I minds learned how to discover joy wherever they are, to find the beauty even when

hope my children inherit. With that ability firmly in place, they never

others might never see it, and that

will need to turn to artificial

sometimes beauty hides in very odd places.

stimulants to find a thrill in living.

When I was a kid on the farm, I hated

PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC EDITOR Amy Barnes ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller PHOTOGRAPHERS FlashBang Photography Ed Bacho Photography CARTOONIST Jerry King CONTRIBUTORS Bob Arnold Kelly Bailey Hunter Barnard Paul McHam Crystal Pirri Michelle Riley Robert Soroky Austin Steger Kent Von Der Vellen THE READING NOOK AUTHOR Christopher Barnes MASCOT Rico Houdini ADVERTISING SALES AND OFFICE 330-461-0589 E-MAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com WEBSITE JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Learn more about the staff at Behind The Scenes, JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Open positions are listed on the website at Open Positions. JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256. It is distributed as an e-edition and in a print edition. Both editions can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Copyright 2020 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2020

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HOME AND GARDEN

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DIG IT!

HOW WET TO GET by Michelle Riley Put your watering worries to rest, we have the answers.

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BITE ME!

TUNA CASSEROLE by Jennifer Knapp This recipe is a hit in Jennifer Knapp’s home, give it a try in yours!

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VEGAN VITTLES

EASY VEGAN HUMMUS by Crystal Pirri Add an extra dimension and zing to meals with homemade hummus, augmented with your own selection of extra spices.

HEALTH

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by Robert Soroky

STEPPING OUT

She arrived from Kenya to pursue a career in international relations, but she found she had something else to give.

by Kelly Bailey Get out of the house and enjoy an outdoor workout.

THE READING NOOK

WHAT GRIEF EATS: THE UNINTENDED LESSON

COMMUNITY

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GEMS

GLOWING WITH PURPOSE by Kent Von Der Vellen He lost his life to cancer, but he left a winning legacy.

OH, SNAP!

ENTERTAINMENT

Temperatures were in the 90s, but nothing was stopping the fishing, picnicking, sliding, and more.

BUSINESS

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JOYFUL LETTER DETECTIVES CLUE BOX

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MIRTH AND JOY

FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

TECHNOLOGY STRESS REDUCTION by Austin Steger Browser customization can make all the difference.

by Hunter Barnard

by Bob Arnold

You never know who or what will be your friend next!

Virtual meetings create new challenges.

INFORMED CONSENT by Amy Barnes

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JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

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LET’S DO IT!

Considering boosting your income by selling for an MLM? Read this guide first. On the front and back covers: photos by Amy Barnes Mercy Muchemi takes a rare break on Medina Public Square.

by Jerry King

FRIENDS COME IN ALL SIZES

LOOK ME IN THE EYES THE IN BOX

Find the magnifying glass letters and use the clue to solve the puzzle.

ROLL ’EM!

THE NETWORKER

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TRAILS OF MEDINA COUNTY

OF MIND AND BODY

by Amy Barnes

A short story about how one teacher taught far more than he intended. Also, check out our contest! You could win more than $300 in prizes!

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HEALTHY TRAILS Bike trails wind throughout the county, sharing history and scenic views.

GIVING MERCY

by Amy Barnes

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WORDS OF MERCY Words that are inspiring Mercy Muchemi in her pursuit of a career of caring.

Self-guided tours, virtual performances and more prove that where there is a will, there is a way!


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2020

by Amy Barnes

I

f there is one thing that Medina resident Mercy Muchemi knows, it is how to survive adversity with a ready smile, her chin up and quiet patience. Born in Busia, in the western part of Kenya, Muchemi attended school in Nairobi, and arrived in the U.S. in 2013 with a bachelor’s degree in international relations from the United States International University in Kenya. International relations focuses on politics and laws, Muchemi said. She landed in California and moved in with her cousin Naomi Thiru. When Thiru looked at the earning potential of a career in international relations, she had a different idea for Muchemi to pursue. She convinced Muchemi to switch to a career in nursing. Thiru pointed out to Muchemi that a much better salary could be had in the nursing field than in international studies, where Mercy Muchemi in front of the 1969 Medina County Courthouse. photo by Amy Barnes Muchemi was expecting to work as a clerk as she had when interning in the African Union another cousin in Indiana and immediately begin Department with Kenya’s minister of foreign affairs. attending medical school there. Muchemi said she is very grateful to her cousin, “for She decided to make the move to Indiana. While believing in me and encouraging me and steering me attending school, she worked the night shift in home health care for the elderly and for the in the right direction.” developmentally disabled. The career change was a return to Muchemi’s Muchemi said that the night shift was perfect for childhood dream of being a nurse and helping people, which was inspired by watching her father’s her because after a client went to sleep, she was able health struggles and those who helped care for him. to study for her classes. The decision to change her career to nursing meant Muchemi was on track to graduate with a nursing another decision had to be made. She could wait to degree when the unexpected happened. For a maternity class term paper, she had paraphrased start school in California or she could stay with


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exam. They just tell you to read the whole book,” Muchemi said, laughing and rolling her eyes. The final set of exams students take in high school determines whether a student will attend college, go to technical college or go into general labor. Students take mock exams to practice for the finals. “There is lots of pressure to do well on the exams,” Muchemi said, “A lot of pressure.” English is taught in the schools as the official language of Kenya because of having been colonized by the English, Muchemi said. The native language is included in the national exams, but most students do not do well on that part of the test, Muchemi said. Muchemi proudly wears a colorful necklace from Kenya. When she is facing tough circumstances, photo by Amy Barnes she is encouraged by her mother’s words and some of the material. Previously, she had been she keeps her father’s never-give-up attitude in mind. taught it was acceptable to paraphrase as long as the One of her mother’s quotes in particular keeps information had attribution, which her paper did. Mercy going when things are at their toughest. Words Unfortunately, the class instructor did not feel that remind her that bad times do not last forever. paraphrasing was appropriate and Muchemi found “Everything that has a beginning has an end,” herself ordered to leave the school for one year. Muchemi said, quoting her mother, Winny Juma. Muchemi continued working the home health care Juma came from a poor beginning and did not night shift but did not want to wait to continue finish high school, but she went on to run a hotel in school. She found Fortis College in Cuyahoga Falls Kenya. There have been several deaths in the family, would accept her and allow her to continue her work and as relatives died, leaving children who needed to toward an associate degree of nursing. be cared for, Juma would take them in. She moved to Medina where she continues to work “I don’t have the words to explain how much my night shifts for home health care while attending mother has helped” the family, said Muchemi. college. Muchemi’s father, Juma Muchemi, also came from a Hard work is not foreign to Muchemi. While in poor family and worked his way up to become an school in Kenya, she learned to work hard for what alcohol distributor and home goods seller, eventually she wanted. becoming a businessman who dealt in real estate. In Kenya, national exams determine each student’s When Mercy Muchemi learned her father’s health path. The first set of national exams determines was declining, she was in the U.S. and unable to which high school a student will attend based on a return home. His health issues began with kidney point system. failure when Mercy Muchemi was 12. One of her In order to attend the best high school, a score of brothers donated a kidney to save their father. That 400 was needed. Muchemi got a score of 399, only was when Mercy Muchemi first dreamed of being a one point short. nurse. “I always get a point less, it has happened all of my For 16 years after the transplant, Juma Muchemi life,” Muchemi says, with a rueful chuckle. carefully watched his diet and took care of his health, She said that schools in the U.S. are much easier Mercy Muchemi said. than the schools in Kenya. “He would be down, but he would keep fighting,” “In Kenya, you don’t know what’s coming in the continued, Page 6


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2020

continued from Page 5

she can get into a nurse practitioner doctorate program there. Her long-term goal is to become a certified registered nurse anesthesiologist. While the program is available here, she finds it difficult to remain in Medina because she does not have family support here, like she does with her cousin in Indiana. Family support has become more important to Mercy, who became a single mother with the birth of her daughter, Ava, in 2019. Muchemi has found financial support here, however, in the form of scholarships. She recently was awarded the Non-Traditional $1,000 Student Scholarship from MC Chamber Charities, Inc., and a $1,500 scholarship from the local chapter of the American Association of University Women. Although the road has been long, Muchemi fiercely holds onto her dream of one day bringing her mother to the U.S. She knows tough times do not last; obstacles can be overcome. After all, everything that has a beginning has an ending.

While she does not have much time for relaxing, Mercy Muchemi enjoyed Medina Public Square on a recent Saturday. photo by Amy Barnes

Muchemi said. “He was a fighter.� Muchemi would not see her father again. The inspiration for her dream of becoming a nurse, Juma Muchemi died in 2018 at the age of 81. Mercy Muchemi will be graduating with her degree in nine months and said it is possible she will return to Indiana, but that will be determined by whether

Ava, Mercy Muchemi’s daughter, was born last year. photo provided


Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2020

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2020

THE READING NOOK

What Grief Eats: The Unintended Lesson

by Amy Barnes

M

r. Albert Thiesen was the kind of math teacher you wished for; he was hard but he was accepting of effort. If he knew you were trying your best to understand and do the work, he did all he could to help. He had a way of making math fun to learn, while at the same time he taught us to accept we were human and would make mistakes. He was known for cracking a sporadic series of jokes throughout the class period and had a way of making each student feel cared about. In an era when few had divorced parents, he was the closest thing I had to a father figure. Seeing how timid and withdrawn I was, he would joke with me, bringing me into the class instead of leaving me living on the fringe as most teachers had. I learned it was OK to make smart aleck responses to his jokes, and as long as they were smart retorts, he would gleefully chuckle and grin ear to ear. He also taught me to never allow grief to defeat me, but that lesson was accidental and was not one he ever meant to teach. As a kid, it’s hard to believe that such a lively, energetic, happy man could have ongoing tremendous heartbreak. So, I was shocked, one night at dinner, when I was talking about how he was my favorite teacher, and my mother told me of the heartbreak he silently carried. She said that he had two young daughters who were dying from a genetic disease and that they most likely would never live long enough to grow up. My heart cringed with sorrow for Mr. Thiesen. I never did understand what the disease was, and my mother was unable or unwilling to explain. Other grown-ups didn’t want to talk about it and whenever it was talked of, it was only in hushed tones, like those used in libraries or at funerals. The only understanding I managed to get of the disease is that there was no cure, there was only the

wait for death as he and his wife struggled to enjoy every last moment they could with their beautiful daughters. My mother said the girls were breathtaking and heartbreaking in their beauty, and that they looked so much like angels it was a constant reminder of what their destiny was. I was no longer in his math classes when his first daughter died. I saw him in the school and it was very apparent how he had changed. He was like a boxer, hit but coming back up off the floor to fight some more. Staggering slightly, shaking his head as if to clear it, if you looked closely you could see there was a little less of a twinkle to his eye as he struggled to hide and deny his grief. It was after Mr. Thiesen’s second daughter was taken that he no longer tried to hide the changes. It was as if the years of effort, of being cheerful through the torment, had slammed into him all at once and his kind and gentle spirit had been knocked out of his body. We all watched as grief ate Mr. Thiesen. Each day seemed more and more of a struggle for him, he became angry and unaccepting. Suddenly, our kind and caring teacher had been replaced by a stranger and it broke my heart. He no longer greeted me in the hall or would throw a playful verbal jab to see if I was quick enough to return it. He snapped and yelled at students in his rage against what had been taken from him. There was nothing any of us could do. He would not accept support or sympathy. He made it clear that no one could understand his grief, and he refused to share it with anyone. I could not talk to him after that. His yelling frightened me and I could not bear the look in his eyes, the pain there seemed to stab outward in revenge at those around him who were still alive. I became convinced that he hated me so I avoided him. continued on Page 10


Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2020

Here’s our contest! In the short story that finished running last month, what was the title that Jake finally gave Kyle’s book? It’s up to you to decide!

Submit the winning title for Kyle Hodge’s novel and win more than $300 in gift cards! Be sure to familiarize yourself with the story (previous chapters can be read in past issues of the magazine) to create the winning title.

The Rules

1. Contest is open to Medina County residents 18 years old and older. Joy of Medina County Magazine staff members and their families cannot submit entries. 2. Please ensure that all entry information is typed or clearly printed. 3. Send: Kyle’s book title Your name Age Mailing address Phone number Note: Mailing address and phone number are only to contact you if your entry is the winner. Personal data will be destroyed once the prize is awarded. 4. Submissions without all of the required information will be eliminated. 5. Entries will be judged by magazine staff members. 6. The winning title becomes the property of Blake House Publishing, LLC. 7. By submitting a contest entry, you are giving permission for the publication of your name in the magazine and on social media should you win the contest. 8. Entries must be received by August 10, 2020.* Winner will be announced in the September 2020 issue of Joy of Medina County Magazine. Send submissions: By e-mail, with “title contest” in the subject line to: Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com By mail to: Joy of Medina County Magazine, Title Contest, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256 *We are not responsible for lost or re-directed mail. Submissions must be received by the August 10, 2020, deadline. Any entries received after that date will not be considered. No entries will be accepted by phone.

Prizes donated by: Baskets Galore 1434 Town Center Boulevard, Unit C50, Brunswick https://basketsgaloregifts.com/ 330-220-0088

$25 Baskets Galore gift card Infinity Counseling, LLC 1839 Pearl Road, Suite 101, Brunswick http://infinitycounselingohio.com/ 330-220-9679

$50 Barnes and Noble gift card $25 Regal Movie gift card $25 Scene 75 gift card Joy of Medina County Magazine https://bit.ly/3euDtWc 330-461-0589

$25 Scene 75 gift card $25 Target gift card

MDG Flooring 3812 Pearl Road, Suite C, Medina https://www.mdgflooringamerica.com/ 330-725-5252

$25 Sully’s gift card Scene 75 Entertainment Center 3688 Center Road, Brunswick https://bit.ly/2ZwRdvH 234-803-1100 Open Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Sunday 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.

$25 Scene 75 gift card Susan Russell, Personal Trainer www.russellstrong.com 330-840-9385

$80 Health Assessments and Personal Training Sessions

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2020

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The pain of losing him and watching him selfdestruct was too sharp for me to bear. His entire being seemed consumed, and his rage became directed at those who could not answer the questions that mattered to him most. Every day the grief ate of Mr. Thiesen. Then he was gone; moved I was told. I guess he couldn’t take being around all of us who Knew. Over the years, I have thought often of Mr. Thiesen, of how he reached out to a dorky kid and tried so hard to teach her math, of his humor. To this day, I still tell some of his jokes and it makes me smile, more for remembering the man as he was than for the actual humor of the joke. His jokes were never funny on their own, it was the way he had of delivering them with that twinkle and chuckle. I can’t count how many times I tried to repeat his jokes at the dinner table only to be looked at in awkward silence as if I had just announced I was going to be a nun. For what was far too short a time, those around him had seen the wonderful father his daughters had been blessed with. So it was that the most important lesson I learned

from Mr. Thiesen had nothing to do with math. It was about handling grief over senseless loss. I saw how noble he was in the beginning, when his girls were diagnosed, and the price paid by all of those around him as he descended into his grief and was lost to us just as much as his daughters were lost to him, causing the grief to compound over and over again. After I was grown and finding my way in the world, I discovered there was one more lesson I had learned. I came to realize that I had developed a habit of looking for the person who is not included in a group and working to include them and ensure they felt valued, in the same way that Mr. Thiesen had done for me. I had accidentally become a part of his legacy.

Have you written a fiction or nonfiction story (short or chapter) that you would like to share with Joy’s readers? Go to https://bit.ly/2Zmc98z for details on how to submit it.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2020

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Celebrate!

Joy of Medina County Magazine thanks and celebrates these great companies who believe in community and make it possible for readers to enjoy this magazine for free. Please thank the following companies for bringing Joy to you!

Cable, Internet, Phone

Armstrong

1141 Lafayette Road, Medina Contact: Sam Pietrangelo Community Marketing Manager Phone: 330-722-3141 Website: https://armstrongonewire.com/

Dentist

Landry Family Dentistry

5076 Park Avenue West, Seville Contact: Dr. Joseph G. Landry II Phone: 330-769-4470 Website: www.LandryFamilyDentistry.com

Fireplaces, Hot Tubs, Grills

The Place

2377 Medina Road, Medina Contact: Andrea Reedy Phone: 330-239-4000 Website: https://www.yourplace4.com/ Want to join these great companies in sponsoring the best publication in Medina County? Contact Amy Barnes, Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com, 330-461-0589.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2020

Getting ready for customers at the Medina Police Department bake sale are, from left, Claire Martucci, Eliza Fields and Nick Martucci. photo by FlashBang Photography

Sharing a table for lunch at Brunswick Lake were, from left, Chris Frenz, Dharmik Pamdya, Jim Roberts, and Steve Livengood, coworkers at Electric Power Systems. photo by Amy Barnes

From the look on Jason Waltman’s face, the treats he picked up at the Medina Police Department bake sale will not last long! photo by FlashBang Photography

Despite temperatures in the 90s, Mary and Joe Zagaria were enjoying each other’s company on a walk around Brunswick Lake. photo by Amy Barnes


Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2020

While visiting from Oceanside, California, Jody O’Brien found the fish were biting in Brunswick Lake while his wife, Leandra O’Brien made sure to stay in the shade. photo by Amy Barnes

Liam Carney took a break from fishing with his uncle, Jody O’Brien, at Brunswick Lake. Carney is the son of Stephanie and Zack Carney of Brunswick and was a micro preemie when he was born at 23-weeks old. His aunt, Leandra O’Brien, chronicles his story at https://bit.ly/3fpxIub photo by Leandra O’Brien

Two-year-old Bronson Nagel was glad that his mom, Bree ShockleyNagel, took him out for fun on the Garfield School playground slides in Medina. photo by Amy Barnes

Vince Apanovitch enjoyed lighting sparklers in Medina to observe the Fourth of July. With firework shows cancelled this year, sparklers were one of the few legal alternatives. photo by Amy Barnes

Susan Steinle found a walk around Brunswick Lake in the blazing sun and 90-degree weather a relaxing break from her job at the Cleveland Clinic - Brunswick Family Health Center. photo by Amy Barnes

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2020

Join Our Team! Want to… • set your own hours • earn a high monthly commission • fit the work to your family’s and your schedule • know that you make a difference • be part of a team with high ethical standards • be able to take pride in the end product • work for the very BEST publication in the county

...and one of the best in the country

Then it is time to join us! Send your resume to: By e-mail: Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com Please put “job” in the subject line By mail: Joy of Medina County Magazine 1114 N. Court Street, #144 Medina, Ohio 44256


Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2020

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BUSINESS: FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

BUSINESS: THE NETWORKER

Technology Stress Reduction

Look Me in the Eyes

by Austin Steger

by Bob Arnold

Technology has made our lives easier. However, it is not without flaws. Sometimes, it may seem like the stress caused by devices outweighs their advantages. How often do you get frustrated trying to remember a password? Do pop-ups and ads plague your web browser, making it difficult to get tasks done or threaten your PC with malware? Do you often print web pages and wish those pesky ads were removed? Fortunately, there are several browser extensions that can help. A browser extension is a software tool that can be downloaded and added to a web browser. The most popular browsers have thousands of extensions available that enable a variety of customization options. Some work in the background, while others require direct user action. Extensions can make minor changes to the user interface, such as colors, fonts and animations, or they can make drastic changes with ad-blocking and password management features. You are not alone if you have ever been frustrated when trying to remember a password. There are several useful browser extensions that manage and remember passwords. They require you to remember a single password to sign into it. The extension then remembers your passwords and can even randomize them for added security. Several wellknown and professional companies provide this service. Advertisements and pop-ups can be a frequent annoyance, and an ad-blocking extension will solve the issue. A wide range of ad-blockers can be added to a web browser to prevent harmful and intrusive ads from appearing and can prevent viruses and malware from infecting the device. If you like to print whole web pages, you may have noticed that much of the web page’s content, such as ads, toolbars and links, are completely unnecessary and are a waste of ink. There are browser extensions for this as well, typically listed under “PDF print” or similar titles. These extensions remove the unnecessary information so only the relevant information prints, saving paper and ink. Browser extensions solve several common problems experienced when using devices and can tailor browser functionality and behavior to meet individual needs or preferences. Check your browser’s web store to see what extensions are available, or you can contact me for suggestions.

I have noticed for most of us during a virtual networking event that our eyes have become a barrier to successful networking. We have lost the importance of looking other people in the eye as we talk with them. With virtual meeting platforms, we enjoy the luxury of seeing participants on our screen, however, a problem comes along with that convenience. We look down in order to see everyone. This prevents us from looking people in the eye. In fact, when we are talking with someone on the screen, our camera is recording the tops of our heads. Eyes are still our primary tool for intentional connections.

Austin Steger is a local computer and mobile electronics technician and technical communicator. He can be contacted at repairs.riztech@gmail.com or by calling 330952-1225.

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Our eyes gather more information from another person then we can imagine. This information is very important for us in determining good networking partners. It does not feel natural to look at the camera when we are talking with someone; however, what they see is what is most important. I know you want to make the best impression possible with a new person online, so it is necessary for you to take some time to practice looking at the camera. Try recording yourself talking to someone on your screen, and then record yourself talking to your camera. You will see a huge difference. However, if we stare at the camera, we are going to create another problem if we are not careful. I suggest you move your eyes a bit and use some body language (hands, eye expressions, props, or a glance away, but do not make it obvious. Staring into the camera can make you look boring. Find a style that complements your style and practice it. The reverse is also true. When you are listening to another person, it is necessary to continue looking at the camera. The basics have not changed. When networking face-toface, we look at each other in the eye, so we must use technology to our best advantage. That means you must master the eye connection with the camera. Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at https:// amzn.to/2KSy3Xm More networking tips are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http://onwardnetworking.com/ or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2020

BUSINESS: THE IN BOX

Informed Consent by Amy Barnes As the business world shifts and changes to survive shutdowns and ever-changing regulations, many people are re-evaluating available income options. An option that may appear to be very attractive is becoming a representative for a multi-level marketing company or MLM. The way an MLM functions is that it continuously creates tiers of salespeople. Once it has one tier of salespeople in place, it has the first tier recruit the next tier, and so on. Each tier profits from sales made by the tiers below it. So the uppermost tier, those who were first to sign up, make the most and the bottommost tier, the most recent recruits, make the least. As products are sold, each tier gets a bite out of the profit, with the founder, of course, getting the biggest bite. The bites become smaller and smaller the farther down the tier the profits trickle. Salespeople are given a variety of titles including consultant, partner, ambassador, director, home consultant, life or health coach, and so forth. No matter the title, it all comes down to the same thing: a salesperson who is expected to recruit other salespeople in order to increase profits. We have all heard stories of those who joined an MLM and made a lot of money, but often it is only the founder and top tier who see large profits. Before getting dollar signs in your eyes and enthusiastically throwing yourself into hours of labor, use these guidelines to help protect yourself and your bank account from a very rude awakening. 1. Ask questions, a lot of questions. Do not take anyone’s word for the answer, no matter how good a friend they are. Ask for proof, ask for copies of the paperwork that backs up what you are told. Keep it all in a file. Look at yourself as an investor, would a smart investor skip the research and just hand over cash or invest their time and hope it netted a profit? No. 2. Get everything, every thing, in writing. That way, you have it to refer to in the future if something needs clarifying. It also will be your only protection and proof should something go wrong. 3. Make sure to read every word of every contract and agreement and that you understand exactly what you are agreeing to.

4. How much of an investment do you have to make? How much is the starter kit, the samples, whatever it is the company requires you to have? 5. Does the company pay out cash? Do not accept payment in product that you would then sell. That means you have to work and sell even more to get your cash. You cannot pay bills or buy groceries with product. How often is the payout? Is there a dollar amount you have to reach to get paid? Is there a time limit, i.e. if you are given 90 days to sell x amount, if you do not reach that goal, does what you have sold roll over into the next 90 days or do you lose that income? 6. How much of the product are you expected or required to buy? 7. What is the quota? Is the quota weekly, quarterly, or annually? What happens if you do not meet the quota? Do not accept, “Oh, that won’t happen to you, you’re going to be so great at this you don’t have to worry about it.” You need a clear, concrete answer. 8. What is the name of the parent company? What other MLMs do they own? 9. Are there studies proving the effectiveness of the product? Who funded the studies? Were the studies funded by a parent company that goes by a different name that the MLM is a subdivision of? Were the studies conducted by a government entity? 10. Get a copy of the studies. What were the parameters of the studies? Are the studies legitimate or were they skewed to give the company the answers it wanted? This is more common than you would probably think. Are you being told that in 30 days people felt a change but the study was only conducted for 24 hours? Were there only a few people studied? An article by the National Institutes of Health, which can be found at https://bit.ly/3e0ePww provides guidance on what study parameters should be used. 11. Get a copy of the official income disclosure statement. The statement will show how much representatives on all levels make, but it will not deduct expenses. So, while they may show you a statement that says a new representative will make $1,000 the first year, it does not subtract the expenses that were incurred to get there or how many hours of work it took. Be sure to read the fine print, that is where the disclosures usually are. 12. Does the company encourage you to make false or misleading social media posts? i.e. Posting someone’s before-and-after photos with the words: “Wow! Look at this weight loss! Buy Product X to get weight loss like this!” even


Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2020 though the person in the photo never used Product X. 13. Will you be charged if the customer returns the product or refuses delivery? 14. What will your income be if you do not recruit any other sellers? Is the income mostly based on the number of people you recruit or on sales of the product itself? 15. Compare the product with other products available. Look up reviews of the product, both good and bad. Look up the company and reviews on it as well as how it treats representatives. 16. Finally, use common sense. If you are being told something that is not logical or does not seem possible, it most likely is not the product you want to put your name and reputation in front of, you do not want to sell a relative a defective product. After doing thorough and complete research, you will be better educated as to whether this is a solid business investment for you. Keep in mind, if you decide to make this venture, you are starting a business. Be sure to treat it like a business from minute one. It will be important to keep records on how much it costs to get started, all expenses, mileage, and a log of the exact hours you work on the business (this will help you decide in the future if you are earning a satisfying per-hour wage). Having records in hand to give to your tax preparer is much better than sitting there with a dumbfounded look when asked for them. Interested in writing this column? Contact Amy Barnes at Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com Be sure to include information about your business experience and a sample column of no more than 350 words.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2020

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2020

HOME AND GARDEN: DIG IT!

How Wet to Get column and photo by Michelle Riley Water. A two-syllable word, made up of two elements, yet holds gardens at its mercy. Gardeners are held in a constant state of questioning: Have I watered enough? Have I watered too much? How do I know when to water? Do I water after a rain? Once a plant has been planted correctly, water becomes crucial to proper establishment. Here is a simple water schedule to follow when planting something new: Container plants, grown in nursery medium: Water deeply every three days for three weeks. Ball-and-burlap plant: Water deeply once a week for three weeks Continue to water deeply once a week during drought conditions, until rain returns, for both container and ball-andburlap. Rain saturates the soil, with a typical rainfall reaching 1 to 2 inches. Think about how deep the root ball of the plant is. The plant would prefer a deep watering, which means watering when it rains. This will allow the water to percolate much deeper into the soil more quickly. Stay on the watering schedule and be sure to water deeply each time. Watering deeply, but less often, creates a deeper and healthier root system. A deep root system benefits the plant by granting it better drought tolerance, as well as access to nutrients. Thus answering the question: How much? Deeply enough that the water percolates past the bottom of the root ball. On the other side, too much water may suffocate a plant. Plants breathe oxygen through their root systems and release carbon dioxide. Most plants do not want to sit in consistently wet soil unless they are bald cypress trees. These trees have nodes that reach above the waterline to help them breathe. If your soil tends to hold water, let it dry out between waterings. Red Japanese maples tend to lose their red flare in the heat of the summer because of a lack of water. In scarcity, one suffers. In abundance, one thrives.

Michelle Riley is a local horticulturist, landscape designer, and consultant. She is the founder of the gardening subscription service, https://theplantmall.com/; MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com; and NeOhioGarden.com. She also is the president of All About You Signature Landscape Design, Inc. Riley can be contacted at info@MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com or by calling 234-678-8266.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2020

HOME AND GARDEN: BITE ME!

Tuna Casserole recipe by Jennifer Knapp

“I want the life back that I used to b…h (complain) about!”

“It’s my birthday, and I don’t need to be healthy.”

“One time, I saw a pencil in a parking lot and got really excited!” — former Medina resident, now an inner-city school teacher in need of supplies for lowincome students.

Let me preface this recipe with the fact that I am not a great cook. However, my kids love and request my tuna casserole often. It is adaptable to add your own flair and to match what you have on hand. My boyfriend, Riz, and I own RizTech Computer Sales, Repair and More on Medina Public Square. For more information about that, go to www.riztechmedina.com/ or https://bit.ly/3fhZ0mt Riz is a remarkable cook. No leftovers when he cooks, seriously! I am a very proud mom to Max and Millie, and Riz has given me four incredible bonus daughters. We are expecting our first grandchild this fall, and we could not be more excited! • • • • • • • • • • •

12 ounce bag Kluski noodles 1/3 cup chopped Vidalia onion A 1/3 cup frozen peas 1/3 cup chopped celery 1/3 cup shredded carrots 2 cans each of chunk and albacore canned tuna in water 2 cans cream of celery soup 2/3 cup milk ½ cup mayonnaise 8 ounces shredded cheddar cheese ½ cup dried french fried onions

Cook noodles to al dente (cooked but still firm), rinse with water, set aside. Add vegetables and strained cans of tuna to noodles. Give tuna juice to pet of choice. Combine soup, milk and mayonnaise in pot and simmer on low heat until well blended. Slowly add cheese, stirring until completely melted and blended. Pour over noodle mixture. Mix well. Pour into buttered or greased 9 x 13 pan. Tent with foil and bake at 425 degrees for 30 minutes. Remove foil and sprinkle top with more cheese and dried onions. Bake 5 to 10 minutes, until perfectly cooked. Let sit for 15 minutes. Serve over fresh baby spinach. Can garnish with more dried onions or crushed potato chips. Note: If mixture looks dry, add more cans of soup with 1/3 cup milk per additional can of soup. Miracle Whip can be substituted for mayonnaise. Cheese can be mild or sharp cheddar or Colby Jack. Additional vegetables can be added, if desired. Want to have your recipe featured in a future issue? Send it with your name, phone number (in case we have questions), the city you live in, and some information about you to: Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “recipe” in the subject line. Recipes MUST be your original recipe and by submitting a recipe you are guaranteeing it is one you have developed or modified and used.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2020

HOME AND GARDEN: VEGAN VITTLES

Easy Vegan Hummus by Crystal Pirri Hummus is one of my favorite kitchen staples. It adds an extra dimension to almost every meal: salads, sandwiches, wraps, rice dishes, and, of course, it is perfect all on its own as a savory dip. Use with a veggie platter full of carrots, celery, colorful peppers, cucumbers, cauliflower, broccoli, and even pickles. They all serve as a great way to get a scoop of this creamy hummus. Add extra spices to hummus to give it an extra zing or color: paprika, crushed red pepper, cayenne pepper powder, turmeric, hot sauce, even a dash of salt and pepper for triedand-true flavor. It looks beautiful with a garnish of parsley or a swirl of roasted red pepper sauce. This version, my favorite, is oil- and tahini-free, making it not only easy to make in the barest kitchen, but extra good for you, too. Do not skimp on the lemon, that is what truly makes hummus work. You can go the extra mile and cook the beans from scratch instead of using canned. Start by soaking the dry garbanzo beans in water and a tablespoon of vinegar overnight in a covered container. The next day, drain and rinse the beans, place in a pot, cover with fresh water, and bring to a boil. Simmer one to two hours until the beans are soft and mash easily. Alternatively, after soaking, cook the beans in a pressure cooker, according to manufacturer’s directions. In both cases, do not add any salt before the beans are fully cooked or it will make them tough. • • • • • •

30 ounces (2 15-ounce cans) garbanzo beans, drained 2 teaspoons garlic powder 2 teaspoons onion powder 1/2 teaspoon salt juice of 1 lemon 1/4 cup of water to mix (add more if too dry)

Put all of the ingredients into a high-speed blender. Secure and blend on high until creamy and no lumps remain. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for three to four days to keep it fresh, though ours never lasts that long! Crystal Pirri is an author, coach and oil-free vegan. Her recipes can be found at https://bit.ly/2v6NQi5. Have a question or request? E-mail Crystal@CrystalsRecipes.com

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2020

HEALTH: HEALTHY TRAILS

HEALTH: OF MIND AND BODY

Trails of Medina County

Stepping Out

by Robert Soroky

by Kelly Bailey

It is always fun to take a day and explore the community you live in. It is even more fun to explore it on a bicycle! Back in June, I highlighted a few of the bike paths in and around Medina (see the column here: https://bit.ly/3eu7kPA ). This month, the other bike paths across Medina County are being showcased, starting with the two short trails in the heart of Brunswick. The first is a casual, mile-long paved trail off of Center Road and Brunswick Lake Parkway that encircles Brunswick Lake. The trail boasts a couple of wooden boardwalk-style bridges that offer some great scenic views. The second trail, located off of Grafton Road between North Carpenter and Haddock roads, encircles a small lake at North Park. Although primarily paved, there is a little hidden gem of an off-road trail tucked away behind the lake. This simple dirt trail meanders easily through the woods across several short bridges but also has a few quick branchoffs to challenge the more skilled riders. In Wadsworth, there is the Interurban Trail. This 2-mile long paved trail starts near Central Intermediate School in downtown Wadsworth and continues to Silvercreek Road. Some of the points of interest along the trail include the Wadsworth gazebo, built in 1976; the Miller baseball fields; and Trolley Line Park. In Seville, there is a nice paved trail that starts at the Seville Historical Society off of West Main Street, runs along Chippewa Creek, and finishes back at West Main Street just south of Leohr Park, which was named after the Leohr family, who founded Leohr Motors, Inc., in Chippewa in 1911. While biking through Leohr Park, be sure to stop at the boardwalk along the lake and watch a relaxing sunset! For a great resource listing all bike trails and paths around Medina County, pick up a copy of the Bike Map of Medina County, developed by the Northeast Ohio Areawide Coordinating Agency. This free map can be found at any local area bike shop, library, tourist center, or online at https://bit.ly/3hXVbEq NOACA also has developed bike maps for Lorain, Cuyahoga, Lake, and Geauga counties as well, so get out there and explore!

I am a gym rat. I love heavy lifting. But, when summer rolls around, I am ready to be outside and my body usually needs a break from heavy work. That is why I typically switch to a cardio-focused workout that can be done outdoors. It breaks up the monotony of my training and gives me a great dose of Vitamin D and fresh air. I wanted this month’s column to be a little different, so I am sharing my favorite outdoor workout. Find a park with a loop trail that has benches interspersed along the path, and bring a stopwatch or timer. My favorite local parks that are great for this workout are Chippewa Inlet Trail, Buckeye Woods Park, Hinckley Lake, Letha House Park, and Lake Medina, go to https://bit.ly/3gN4aqO for addresses and more information about these parks. The Workout* Warm up: Brisk walk or slow jog five to 10 minutes Speed-burst intervals: Using the timer, walk at a normal pace for 40 seconds, then increase speed for 20 seconds. (Depending on your fitness level, you may increase the speed of walking or, if you are more advanced, you may choose to sprint.) Continue the sprint intervals until you come to the first bench on the path and then do the following circuit: 10 squats 10 push-ups (hands on the bench) 10 step-ups per leg 10 sit-ups (on the bench) Follow the circuit with sprint intervals until you come to the next bench, complete the circuit again, and so on. Do this until you come to the end of the trail loop. If you have any questions on any of the exercises listed, please contact me for guidance. *Disclaimer: This workout is for entertainment purposes only. It is strongly recommended that you consult with your physician before beginning any exercise program. When participating in any exercise or exercise program, there is the possibility of physical injury. If you engage in any of the exercises or in this exercise program, you agree that you do so at your own risk, you are voluntarily participating in these activities, and you assume all risk of injury.

Robert Soroky is a lifelong cyclist regularly participating in long distance charity rides and manager of the Century Cycles Medina location. Contact Soroky at robert@centurycycles.com to suggest column topics, for further information or to chat about bikes.

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Kelly Bailey is a certified personal trainer and certified holistic nutrition coach. She owns and operates Kelly Bailey Wellness. Read her blog and contact her at https://www.kellybailey.fit/


Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2020

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COMMUNITY: GEMS

G l o w i n g W i t h Pu r p o s e by Kent Von der Vellen It was during Christmas break 2014 when three childhood buddies, Collin Kiousis, Harrison Fayette and Ben West spent the weekend snowboarding and staying up late, goofing around. The trip was an opportunity for Kiousis to escape his cancer and chemo treatments and momentarily be a teenager hanging out with friends. Awaiting Kiousis’ return was what his mom, Elizabeth Kiousis, still calls “the big surgery” they hoped would start the road to recovery. Collin told his mom and dad, Thomas Kiousis, that he thought everyone fighting cancer should have the same opportunity to get away and have fun. They agreed. That was the beginning of the Collin Cares Cure Cancer Foundation. It was by chance that Collin’s cancer was discovered. An active teen, Kiousis played on the Medina High School lacrosse and soccer teams and was involved backstage at school performances. During a sports physical for his senior year, it was noticed that the appendectomy scar from his sophomore year was raised. An abdominal scan lead to the diagnosis of a rare form of cancer, pseudomyxoma peritonei. His aunt, Connie Gardner, wanted to help and quickly organized a 5K fundraiser run in fall 2014, in which Collin participated. That first run was followed by the foundation’s first 5k run in October 2015. Despite undergoing surgery in January 2015, Collin Editor’s note: Information is from Reporting Start the nonprofit’s most recent filings Date: 1/1/2019 with the Ohio attorney general. Reporting End Date: 12/31/2019 COLLIN CARES CURE Total Revenue: $57,276.00 CANCER CORP. Total Expenses: $44,689.00 1035 Larkens Way Total Program Medina, 44256 330-416-7502 Expenses: $44,689.00 https://collincares.net/ Percent of Total Date of Expenses: 100% formation: 07/24/2015 Total Assets: $12,828.00 Organization type: 501(c)(3) Director or Board Member Description of List (6): Organization’s Patricia Stout Purpose: Cancer research Hayden Cory and patient assistance Erin Cory Is the organization's Connie Gardner registration status Thomas Kiousis current? Yes Elizabeth Kiousis Reporting Year: 2019

photo by nikitOS

participated in the October run, which benefited Medina area families battling cancer. Collin graduated high school and attended the University of Akron while continuing to fight cancer. The second run was fall 2016. On January 5, 2017, 20-year-old Collin died. The foundation has continued the mission Collin started. Its main fundraiser is the annual fall 5k Glow Run. Runners wear glow sticks while running a decorated path, complete with a disco ball hanging from a tree. Collin’s high school sweetheart, Hayden Cory, makes sure the races are instilled with fun. She emphasized that is what Collin wanted and who he was. So far, the foundation has helped 98 families with an average donation of $994. Recipients are chosen based on recommendations, with most not knowing they have been chosen until they receive a check from the foundation. This year’s run will be virtual, August 1 through 14, with a goal of raising more than $100,000. Information and registration forms are available at https://bit.ly/2Z8puRJ or https://bit.ly/ 321dB1w Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions Club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by emailing Gems@BlakeHousePublishing.com or by calling 330-4210863. Learn what other area nonprofits need by visiting Giving Hearts at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2020


Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2020

Please patronize our advertisers, when you see them in “Joy,” you know they believe in community!

Want more Joy? Subscribe to our e-edition and get Joy no matter where you go! Use this link https://bit.ly/30duSlB to start your subscription. Want to read Joy in print? Visit Medina County libraries where you can find Joy of Medina County Magazine as an official, cataloged publication in the Periodicals section of the library. Joy also can be found in the Medina Library’s Historic Archives! For more information about Joy of Medina County Magazine, visit our website: https://bit.ly/38WotiH

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2020

MIRTH AND JOY

ENTERTAINMENT: ROLL ’EM!

by Jerry King

Friends Come in All Sizes

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by Hunter Barnard This month, I watched “Dolittle.” It was a really good movie. I would give it 1,000 percent! Dolittle is a very smart guy who helps animals. He helps them take their medicine, and he does a better job than other people because he can talk to them. He can help people, but he does not like people very much. There is a boy who gets caught in a trap at Dolittle’s house at the beginning of the movie, and I thought that was the funniest part. Even though Dolittle does not like people, he lets the boy, Stubbins, stay because he can help him. Stubbins wants to learn about animals. Dolittle and Stubbins have to go on an adventure to help the queen. They need to get to an island that has a special fruit that can help the queen get better. But first, they have to find a special journal. The trip there is really dangerous. There is a bad guy who really wants the journal for himself so he tries to beat Dolittle there, and he is not very nice. But Dolittle brings some of his animals with him so they are able to keep each other safe. There is a polar bear, a parrot, a duck, and a gorilla. The polar bear was my favorite animal, he was really funny and seemed very nice. Dolittle was really scared to make new friends, but at the end, we found out new friends can be a good thing. The end of their adventure was really cool, they met a really big animal and learned a lot. They are all able to help each other, and Dolittle does not seem so sad anymore. One really cool part was when they got the big animal at the end to feel better, they were really nice to her. There were a lot of cool animals in the movie, like a tiger. He seems really mean, but I think he was just hungry. Eventually, everyone is friends. “Dolittle” was a very good movie and I think lots of other people should watch it, too. Hunter Barnard is an energetic 7-year-old who attends Berea City Schools and likes to share his opinion. He is assisted in writing his column by his mother, Jessica Rapenchuk.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2020

Joyful Word Search Words of Mercy

NIGHT SHIFT KENYA NURSING LAW CALIFORNIA ENCOURAGEMENT AVA SCHOLARSHIP

BUSIA SCHOOL INTERNATIONAL FAMILY EXAMS NAIROBI SCHOOL

O

Answer Key for Last Month’s Search

Acting Like Janine

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Joseph G. Landry II, D.D.S., M.A.G.D., F.I.C.O.I Master of the Academy of General Dentistry

5076 Park Avenue West • Seville, OH 44273

330-769-4470 www.LandryFamilyDentistry.com OVER 200 POSITIVE GOOGLE REVIEWS WITH A 5 STAR AVERAGE

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August 2020 Nonprofit Calendar Saturday, August 1 National Girlfriend Day https://bit.ly/3j3ankz American Red Cross Blood Drive, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp ORMACO Jazz Under the Stars: Ryun Louie Jazz Ensemble, 7 p.m., live-stream concert. Log in at https://bit.ly/3cAp1Mx The concert is free, but donations are needed. Donations can be made by calling 330722-2541 or at https://bit.ly/3buoBWF Sunday, August 2 Friendship Day https://bit.ly/2WeXLwC Medina Cars and Coffee Cruise-In, 7 a.m. lineup begins, 8 a.m. to 11 a.m., Broadway Street, Medina Public Square. Antique, classic and collectible cars. Monday, August 3 Grab Some Nuts Day https://bit.ly/2OkUpDX 175th Medina County Fair begins, ends August 9. More information at https://www.medinaohiofair.com/ Demo Derby, 7 p.m., Medina County Fairgrounds, 720 W. Smith Road, Medina. More information at https://www.medinaohiofair.com/ Tuesday, August 4 National Chocolate Chip Cookie Day https://bit.ly/305vtWy Medina County Fair, more information at https://www.medinaohiofair.com/ Paddle the Parks: Lake Lore, 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m., Chippewa Lake boat launch ramp. Join a naturalist on the water and share tales of Chippewa Lake. Register by August 2 at https://bit.ly/322GUAQ Cycling Makes Sense Fitness Ride, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Lake Medina, 3749 Medina Road, Medina. Learn bike fitness tips. Six to 10-mile ride. Helmets required; masks encouraged. Ages 16 and up. Free, no registration Travelin’ Man Band, 8 p.m., Medina County Fairgrounds, 720 W. Smith, Medina. Performing at the pavilion. Free. Wednesday, August 5 Work Like a Dog Day https://bit.ly/2ASNdvL Medina County Fair, more information at https://www.medinaohiofair.com/ Lawn Reduction Workshop, 10 a.m. to noon, Green Leaf Park, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Learn how to use plantings to decrease mowing. Free. Register at https://bit.ly/3efTSxy American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Root Candles, 640 Liberty Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Chippewa Lake Water Ski Show Team, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Emerald Lake, 3196 Clark Mill Road, Norton. Everyone is welcome. Donations welcomed. Thursday, August 6

Wiggle Your Toes Day https://bit.ly/2Ofdc3A Medina County Fair, more information at https://www.medinaohiofair.com/ Foster Care Open House, 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Medina County Job and Family Services, 232 Northland Drive, Medina. Social distancing rules followed, meetings by appointment. Limited video conference call appointments available. Call 330-635-9165, for more information and to schedule. County Line Performance, 8 p.m., Medina County Fairgrounds, 710 W. Smith Road, Medina. Free with paid fair admission. Friday, August 7 National Lighthouse Day https://bit.ly/327yOal Medina County Fair, more information at https://www.medinaohiofair.com/ American Red Cross Blood Drive, 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Medina Hospital, 1000 E. Washington Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Art in the Afternoon: Homemade Paint, 10 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., virtual with Wadsworth Library. Learn how to make homemade paint using kitchen ingredients. Go to https://bit.ly/3iQ6eAh for more information. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 12:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Hard Day’s Night Performance, Beatle’s tribute band, 8 p.m., Medina County Fairgrounds, 710 W. Smith Road, Medina. Free with paid fair admission. Saturday, August 8 Sneak Some Zucchini Onto Your Neighbor’s Porch Day https://bit.ly/3foa0yE Medina County Fair, more information at https://www.medinaohiofair.com/ Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series, through August 16, Chippewa Inlet Trail South, Chippewa Road, west of Lake Road. Signs along nature trail will mark points of interest, with one having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form.Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3efEDoH American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Hinckley Fire Department, 1616 Ridge Road, Hinckley. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Antique Treasures Appraisal, 2 p.m. to 5 p.m., Building 22, Medina County Fairgrounds, 710 W. Smith Road, Medina. Experts will identify treasures and estimate their current value. Maximum of three items per person. Free with adult paid fair admission. Sunday, August 9 Book Lover’s Day https://bit.ly/2OfdA22 Medina County Fair, final day, fireworks at 10 p.m., more information at https://www.medinaohiofair.com/ Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series, through August 16,


Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2020 Chippewa Inlet Trail South, Chippewa Road, west of Lake Road. Signs along nature trail will mark points of interest, with one having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form.Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3efEDoH ORMACO Miki Saito: Music of Japan, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Free. Reservations recommended, 330-722-2541 or tsigel@ormaco.org. If library is closed due to COVID-19, it will live stream at https://bit.ly/3dFp5ub The concert is free, but donations are needed. Donations can be made by calling 330-722-2541 or at https://bit.ly/3buoBWF Monday, August 10 National S’mores Day https://bit.ly/3emsONi Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series, through August 16, Chippewa Inlet Trail South, Chippewa Road, west of Lake Road. Signs along nature trail will mark points of interest, with one having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form.Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3efEDoH 10th Annual Lego Competition Exhibit Voting, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m., virtual with Wadsworth Library. Go to https://bit.ly/2C23xLa to view and vote. Most votes wins People’s Choice award. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Cleveland Clinic Family Health Center Brunswick, 3574 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Fire Station 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Baby Car Seat Installations, 2 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., Medina County Health Department, 4800 Ledgewood Drive, Medina. By appointment only, call 330-723-9688. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Trinity United Church of Christ, 215 High Street, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Tuesday, August 11 Presidential Joke Day https://bit.ly/2ASavlz Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series, through August 16, Chippewa Inlet Trail South, Chippewa Road, west of Lake Road. Signs along nature trail will mark points of interest, with one having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form.Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3efEDoH 10th Annual Lego Competition Exhibit Voting, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m., virtual with Wadsworth Library. Go to https://bit.ly/2C23xLa to view and vote. Most votes wins People’s Choice award. Wednesday, August 12 Middle Child Day https://bit.ly/2ARyXn0 Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series, through August 16, Chippewa Inlet Trail South, Chippewa Road, west of Lake Road. Signs along nature trail will mark points of interest, with one having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form.Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3efEDoH 10th Annual Lego Competition Exhibit Voting, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m., virtual with Wadsworth Library. Go to https://bit.ly/2C23xLa to view and vote. Most votes wins People’s Choice award. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Chippewa Lake Water Ski Show Team, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Emerald Lake, 3196 Clark Mill Road, Norton. Everyone is welcome. Donations welcomed. Thursday, August 13 Left Hander’s Day https://bit.ly/2Oh3YUm

Brunswick 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sundays, June 14 through October 4, 2020 Heritage Farm, 4613 Laurel Road, Brunswick Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2I4I5DV Medina 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays, June 6 through October 17 Medina Public Square Main Street Medina 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays, May 23 through October 31 Medina VFW Post 5137 3916 Pearl Road, Medina Parking next door: 3950 Pearl Road, Medina

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Seville 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, May 23 through September 26 Gazebo at Maria Stanhope Park, 73 W. Main Street, Seville Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2r4Hmvk Wadsworth 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, June 13 through September 26 Central Intermediate School, 151 Main Street, Wadsworth Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2JykOKc

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Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series, through August 16, Chippewa Inlet Trail South, Chippewa Road, west of Lake Road. Signs along nature trail will mark points of interest, with one having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form.Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3efEDoH 10th Annual Lego Competition Exhibit Voting, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m., virtual with Wadsworth Library. Go to https://bit.ly/2C23xLa to view and vote. Most votes wins People’s Choice award. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m., St. Ambrose Church, 929 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Virtual Soap Carving, 4 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., with Wadsworth Library. No special tools required. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2ZmZ0vW Friday, August 14 Creamsicle Day https://bit.ly/2BU3UHT Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series, through August 16, Chippewa Inlet Trail South, Chippewa Road, west of Lake Road. Signs along nature trail will mark points of interest, with one having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form.Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3efEDoH Saturday, August 15 National Honey Bee Day https://bit.ly/2Wb9cpl Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series, through August 16,


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2020

Chippewa Lake Water Ski Show Team, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Emerald Lake, 3196 Clark Mill Road, Norton. Everyone is welcome. Donations welcomed. B Thursday, August 20 National Radio Day https://bit.ly/302ZVk3 Cycling Makes Sense Fitness Ride, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Buckeye A list of runs and walks that benefit area non-profit Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Meet in ballfield parking organizations. lot. Learn bike fitness tips. Six to 10-mile ride. Helmets required; masks To have your run listed, send the information to encouraged. Ages 16 and up. Free, no registration joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. Friday, August 21 There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late. Spumoni Day https://bit.ly/38PNMD0 Medina Runs Down Cancer Until Sunday, American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina United Collin Cares: August 30 Methodist Church, 4747 Foote Road, Medina. Virtual Glow With the Flow 5k No More Abuse Virtual Walk Run your own course. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Take photo or video (print race bib here: https://bit.ly/3i8hU0X For fees and registration, go to Paddle the Parks: Sunset Cruise, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Killbuck Lakes, https://bit.ly/2BMS8yR ), share on social media and 7996 White Road, Burbank. Join a naturalist on the water and enjoy the include why you are walking, sunset. Register by August 19 at https://bit.ly/3ehrgnP Saturday, August 29 challenge friends to do the ZERO the End of Prostate same, and donate to a Medina Saturday, August 22 Cancer Run/Walk County organization that Be an Angel Day https://bit.ly/2AWacWW Team Tutu for Steve works with abuse survivors. Brunswick Lake, Parschen Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: A Water Wander, Boulevard, Brunswick through August 30, Letha House Park East, 5745 Richman Road, Saturday, August 1 For more information: Spencer. Learn about habitats and aquatic creatures. Signs along through Thursday, https://bit.ly/3ftALlq nature trail will mark points of interest, with one having a code word to August 14 list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries Chippewa Inlet Trail South, Chippewa Road, west of Lake Road. Signs award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU along nature trail will mark points of interest, with one having a code ORMACO Jazz Under the Stars: Ryun Louie Jazz Ensemble, 7 p.m. to word to list on Natural Discoveries form.Counts toward Natural 9 p.m., live-stream concert. Log in at https://bit.ly/3cAp1Mx The Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3efEDoH concert is free, but donations are needed. Donations can be made by Sunday, August 16 calling 330-722-2541 or at https://bit.ly/3buoBWF National Tell a Joke Day https://bit.ly/2ZmE1cH Sunday, August 23 Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series, last day, Chippewa Ride Like the Wind Day https://bit.ly/3gRkOpb Inlet Trail South, Chippewa Road, west of Lake Road. Signs along Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: A Water Wander, nature trail will mark points of interest, with one having a code word to through August 30, Letha House Park East, 5745 Richman Road, list on Natural Discoveries form.Counts toward Natural Discoveries Spencer. Learn about habitats and aquatic creatures. Signs along award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3efEDoH nature trail will mark points of interest, with one having a code word to Monday, August 17 list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries National Thrift Shop Day https://bit.ly/300Cqs5 award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU Tuesday, August 18 ORMACO Bus Trip to Toledo Museum of Art and Tony Packo’s, 9:30 Bad Poetry Day https://bit.ly/327zOv7 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., Beuhler’s River Styx, 3626 Medina Road, Medina. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Northside Christian Arrive in Toledo, 11:30 a.m. for lunch at Tony Packos, then to the Church, 7615 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp museum for tour and free time. Board bus at 4:30 p.m. and enjoy Wednesday, August 19 cheese trays, drinks, chocolates on the return trip. Cost is $95. Reserve National Potato Day https://bit.ly/307GkPI space by calling 330-722-2541 or by going to https://bit.ly/2yDBxvZ American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Root Candles, 640 Monday, August 24 Liberty Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Pluto Demoted Day https://bit.ly/3iVs1Gy Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: A Water Wander, through August 30, Letha House Park East, 5745 Richman Road, Spencer. Learn about habitats and aquatic creatures. Signs along nature trail will mark points of interest, with one having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., First Congregational Church, 114 Church Street, Lodi. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Virtual Sensory Friendly Story Time, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Stories, songs, rhymes, play time for children on the autism spectrum, those with sensory integration challenges, their families and


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2020

caregivers. More information at https://bit.ly/3fpA1NX Tuesday, August 25 Kiss and Make Up Day https://bit.ly/3foPxcS Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: A Water Wander, through August 30, Letha House Park East, 5745 Richman Road, Spencer. Learn about habitats and aquatic creatures. Signs along nature trail will mark points of interest, with one having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU

Submitting Calendar Events Listings in the calendar must be events, festivals or fairs hosted by or benefitting a nonprofit organization in Medina County. Send submissions to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com and put CALENDAR in the subject line. Information is not accepted by phone. The calendar also is available online at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com on the Events: Let’s Do It! tab at the top of the page or in the drop-down menu on mobile devices, where it is regularly updated.

A list of golf outings that benefit area non-profit organizations. To have your golf outing listed, send the information to joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late. Contact the hosting golf course for pricing, registration and sponsorships.

Address Guide: Bunker Hill Golf Course 3060 Pearl Road, Medina 330-722-4174 or 216-469-9241 Rawiga Golf and Swim Club 10353 Rawiga Road, Seville 330-336-8809 Monday, August 10 2020 Wadsworth Area Chamber of Commerce 18-Hole Scramble Golf Outing 9 a.m. registration, 10 a.m. shotgun scramble start

Benefits Wadsworth Chamber Rawiga Golf Club Thursday, August 20 Northern Medina County Chamber Alliance: Staycation Golf Outing and Beach Party 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Benefits Northern Medina County Chamber Alliance Bunker Hill Golf Course

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., The Chapel Wadsworth Campus, 1391 State Road, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Wednesday, August 26 Dog Appreciation Day https://bit.ly/2C3uEWk Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: A Water Wander, through August 30, Letha House Park East, 5745 Richman Road, Spencer. Learn about habitats and aquatic creatures. Signs along nature trail will mark points of interest, with one having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU Chippewa Lake Water Ski Show Team, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Emerald Lake, 3196 Clark Mill Road, Norton. Everyone is welcome. Donations welcomed. E Thursday, August 27 Just Because Day https://bit.ly/2CtaJzU Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: A Water Wander, through August 30, Letha House Park East, 5745 Richman Road, Spencer. Learn about habitats and aquatic creatures. Signs along nature trail will mark points of interest, with one having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU Friday, August 28 Race Your Mouse Day https://bit.ly/2C7t7OS But what kind of mouse? Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: A Water Wander, through August 30, Letha House Park East, 5745 Richman Road, Spencer. Learn about habitats and aquatic creatures. Signs along nature trail will mark points of interest, with one having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Saint Mark Lutheran Church, 1330 N. Carpenter Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Saturday, August 29 International Bacon Day https://bit.ly/3eoDrz4 and More Herbs, Less Salt Day https://bit.ly/3enr2LY Does anyone else see a conflict here? We are voting for bacon! Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: A Water Wander, through August 30, Letha House Park East, 5745 Richman Road, Spencer. Learn about habitats and aquatic creatures. Signs along nature trail will mark points of interest, with one having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU Sunday, August 30 Frankenstein Day https://bit.ly/3iYUwmI Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: A Water Wander, last day, Letha House Park East, 5745 Richman Road, Spencer. Learn about habitats and aquatic creatures. Signs along nature trail will mark points of interest, with one having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU Monday, August 31 National Eat Outside Day https://bit.ly/2WfipwR and National Trail Mix Day https://bit.ly/3gVABn9 Well, these two seem well suited for each other!


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Joy of Medina County Magazine August 2020  

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