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UPDATE OVERLOAD PG. 24 Tired of those pesky update notifications? You might want to pay attention.

PING VS. PEOPLE PG. 24 Which you prioritize says a lot.

TALKING WITH TULIPS PG. 28 Find out what each color signifies.

Legacy in the Woods

With a strong work ethic and a deep belief in family, the Fultons prove every day that a family business can thrive for more than 115 years. Pg. 4 A locally owned, independent publication dedicated to higher standards of journalism


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

VOLUME 4 NUMBER 3 JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM

What Lives in the Basement by Amy Barnes Years ago, when winter refused to release a large crawfish. Barely more believable to its grasp and spring was particularly wet and cold, making outside play more mud

me than a baby lobster! After all, where in the world had it come

than play, the kids had taken to playing in

from to end up in the middle of our

our very unfinished basement.

basement floor?

At least, they did until the day that they

The children were confused and deeply

all came running, screaming and yelling

disappointed by the word, “crawfish.” They

out of the basement.

really were convinced it was a baby lobster.

Never fails, just when you think the day will be uneventful. Amid all of the clatter and noise, I tried to

Then there was the cascade of questions as to what a crawfish was. When I explained to them that in some

figure out who needed rushing to the

areas of the country, the critters known as

hospital.

crawfish, crawdads or crayfish are a popular

Words that I finally could make out was that there was a baby lobster in the basement.

dish. I got the expected response to that. “Ewwwwwwwwwwwww!” the kids exclaimed, rolling their eyes and making

A what?

weird faces. Then they wanted reassurances

“A baby lobster!” they all yelled.

that I was not planning to serve their find

Now, living in a historic home, it is true

for dinner.

that just about anything can happen and

To this day, I do not know what is more

does, but a baby lobster truly was blowing

surprising, that there was a crawfish in the

my mind, at the same time that I could not

middle of the floor or that there never has

help but think about melted butter.

been another one.

So, into the depths of the basement I

What I do know, is that whenever

descended. Not knowing if I needed a

someone says something is impossible, I

weapon, a net or a pot of boiling water,

think of that mysterious crawfish, and ever

with kids following closely behind. They

since, I turn on the light before going into

would absolutely be in the way if it became the basement. I have total faith that there is necessary for me to turn and run. There, lying quite motionless and quite dead in the middle of the cement floor, was

no knowing what impossible thing may be down there next!

PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC EDITOR Amy Barnes ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller PHOTOGRAPHERS Allison Waltz-Boebel FlashBang Photography CARTOONIST Jerry King CONTRIBUTORS Bob Arnold Kelly Bailey Hunter Barnard Tyler Hatfield Michelle Riley Robert Soroky Kent Von Der Vellen MASCOT Rico Houdini ADVERTISING SALES AND OFFICE 330-461-0589 E-MAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com WEBSITE JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Learn more about the staff at Behind The Scenes, JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Open positions are listed on the website at Open Positions.

JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256. It is distributed as an e-edition and in a print edition. Both editions can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Copyright 2020 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

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HOME AND GARDEN

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DIG IT!

A TOUCH OF TULIP LOVE by Michelle Riley Our gardening columnist takes a look at the legendary history of tulips and the wonderful meaning behind each tulip color.

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BITE ME!

SALMON PATTIES WITH LEMON DILL SAUCE recipe by Seth Carmen Guest chef Seth Carmen of Brookdale Camelot Medina steps into the kitchen this month to share one of his popular recipes.

HEALTH

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OF MIND AND BODY

WAYS TO THRIVE THROUGH THE YEARS by Kelly Bailey There is more than just numbers when surviving to an old age, it also is about the quality of life through the years.

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HEALTHY TRAILS

IMPROVING RIDE WITH COST-EFFECTIVE CHANGES by Robert Soroky

STICKING TOGETHER

Changing out select parts of a bicycle can improve the ride, but it is not always the most cost-effective route.

by Amy Barnes Their farm’s story began in 1903 with a man named Isaac Fulton, and it has grown into a 118-year-old legacy of maple syrup and cattle.

OH, SNAP! photos by FlashBang Photography

COMMUNITY

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Fish were frying, and people were flying.

GEMS

FOOD, SUPPORT FOR ALL AGES by Kent von der Vellen The Lodi Family Center has come a long way over the years, and has grown to offer numerous programs to help the community.

BUSINESS

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

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FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

IMPORTANT UPDATE PENDING by Tyler Hatfield While all updates seem designed to interrupt us at the worst moments, learn the important reasons to allow them and about the different kinds of updates.

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JOYFUL LETTER DETECTIVES CLUE BOX

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ROLL ’EM!

Read the clue, then gather and unscramble the magnifying glass letters to solve the puzzle.

JAPANESE FANTASY HAS GIRL VERSUS DEMON by Hunter Barnard Reviewer enjoys the twists and turns of a story about what happens when a girl joins the home of a witch and a controlling demon.

THE NETWORKER

PEOPLE BEFORE PINGS by Bob Arnold How important do you feel when the person you are talking to takes a call or responds to a notification?

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THE IN BOX

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MIRTH AND JOY

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LET’S DO IT!

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CELEBRATE!

DO YOU COPY? by Amy Barnes Copy challenges got you down? There are some simple ways to decrease your pain.

On the front and back covers: photos by Amy Barnes Steve Fulton and Hadley Ratliff represent the fourth and sixth generations of the Fulton family.

by Jerry King JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

GETTING STICKY See if finding these words keeps you as busy as the Fulton family has been turning sap into syrup this spring. Adventures await you in our most egg-cellent calendar of things to do! Our clickable directory of vetted businesses who bring you Joy!


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

In back, from left: Michael Ratliff, Steve and Beth Fulton’s son-in-law; Hadley Ratliff, 2; Andrew Fulton; Cory Fulton; Herb and Grace Erhmann; Steve and Beth Fulton. In front, from left: Clayton Fulton, 9, and Cody Fulton, 6 photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel

by Amy Barnes

woods, with buckets hanging on the trees to collect the sap, and vats over fires to boil the sap down into n some ways, time has stood still at Maple syrup, said Grace Fulton Erhmann. Valley Farm in Seville, also known as Fulton Farm. Grace, whose family, the Kreiders, had a farm next Calves call in the background and steam billows to the Fulton Farm, joined the Fulton family in 1955, from the closely watched vats of maple sap, while when she married Gene Fulton. After Gene’s death in more sap is gathered and brought in for processing, 2008, Grace married Herb Erhmann. as it has since 1903 when Isaac Fulton signed the first Gene and Grace are the parents of the fourth deed for the founding of what was to become his generation of Fultons: Cheryl Bock, Brenda Bartlett, legacy. Kelly Manley, and Steve Fulton. In other ways, time has marched on, and while the Steve said the sap buckets were replaced in 1989 by products produced have remained the same, the tubing that snakes its way around the trees and into farm’s name and the manner of production have partially buried tanks. seen changes over the farm’s 118 years. The sap is then pumped from the holding tanks into It was in 1978 that the farm became known as smaller tanks pulled by tractors to the sugar camp. Maple Valley Farm. The sugar camp is where the sap is put into a Maple syrup used to be produced completely in the reverse-osmosis machine to remove water from the

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

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Pancakes need some syrup? Call ahead to arrange a visit or look for the Maple Valley Farm stand at the Farmers Market of Medina County starting May 1 at the Medina VFW Post 5137, 3916 Pearl Road, Medina. Maple Valley Farm/Fulton Farm 8701 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville 330-769-2936

sap. Next, the concentrated sap is boiled to finally become syrup. While the taps are removed at the end of each season, the tubing remains in place year round. The acres of tubing must be inspected each year for squirrel nibbles and deer chomps on the lines to ensure the sap will flow uninterrupted. The first tubing the farm used lasted 15 years, the current tubing already has surpassed that and will last much longer, Steve said. Besides making sap collection much more efficient, another advantage to the tubing over the sap buckets is that it increases the production life of a tree. Sap taps are inserted anew into the trees each year, but must be at least 2 inches away from any previous tap. Each tap causes the tree to develop a kind of scar, similar to a knothole, called brown wood. Since buckets are hung about waist high to a human, that means that once the taps have been placed all the way around the tree, the tree can no longer be used. The tubing system allows for taps to be placed in a

photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel

wider area on the tree’s trunk. As long as a new tap can be placed at least 2 inches away from any old tap spots, the tree can still be tapped, said Steve. “You can’t kill a tree unless you put a crazy amount of taps on it,” he said. A combination of gravity and a gas-powered vacuum helps to pull the sap down the lines into the holding tanks from this year’s approximate 1,600 taps. In the 1970s, the family had 3,500 bucket taps. That has dropped to a top capacity of 2,500 taps now, but, even with the help of Steve and Beth’s sons, 34-yearold Andrew and 26-year-old Cory, there is a shortage of labor to place the taps and check the lines. Steve and Beth’s daughters are busy with careers off the farm. Rebecca Ratliff, 33, is a vet technician in Medina, and Kimberly Fulton, 31, is a milk tester with the Dairy Farmers of America. For syrup production, a good sap flow is considered 180 gallons an hour. Steve said it takes 40 to 50 gallons to make 1 gallon of syrup. The family watches the weather to determine when to start sap continued, Page 6


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

continued from Page 5

collection. During early spring, when it still freezes at night, the trees take up more water from the ground, which increases the amount of sap available to tap. He said that a shorter tree, one with a lot of branches, is the best for syrup production. The Fultons watch the colors of the fall leaves to get an idea of how high the sugar content will be in the following spring’s sap. More reds and oranges in the fall mean a better sugar content, Steve said, however, as with everything else to do with farming, there are no guarantees. “Until you start making it (syrup), you don’t know what you’re going to get,” said Steve. 1961 was the only year since 1903 that syrup was not made on the farm, Steve and Grace said. That was because Steve’s father, Gene, was injured in a farm accident. A more recent blow to the farm’s income was the event shutdowns caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. The Fultons depend heavily on local events, such as

photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel

farmers markets, to sell their syrup. Unlike other businesses that found online selling was a way to still reach their customers, there is no Fulton Farm or Maple Valley Farm website or social media presence. It comes down to a matter of time, Steve said. Producing the syrup, milking the cows, raising beef cattle, and growing corn and hay to feed the cows is very time consuming, leaving little time or energy for much else. “We’re not on social media like we should be,” Steve said. “We’re kind of isolated.” Even though selling syrup at events also is time consuming and a lot of work, Steve said it is worth it. “It’s a lot of work but yet, you do make sales,” said Steve. Visitors to the farm tend to be a high percentage of hobby syrup producers instead of paying customers, said Steve, shrugging. He is well aware that it is all part of the business. On the other side of the farmyard are the milk and beef production.


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Cody Fulton, 6, practices balancing while his father, Andrew, herds cattle into a trailer to move them to a different barn. Cows are separated depending on age and if they are producing milk. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel

The farm’s dairy herd once was 40 cows. Today, approximately 150 cows make up the dairy herd and produce 1,200 gallons a day. Steve said that although they once used the rbST growth hormone in an effort to increase milk production, they no longer do. He said that if cows are taken care of and fed properly, milk production is the same as it would be using rbST. As members of the Dairy Farmers of America, the Fultons sell their milk to the co-op, which acquired a substantial part of Dean Foods, once the country’s largest milk processor, in May 2020. Cows are milked at 9 a.m. and 9 p.m. each day, and the milk is picked up daily. The milking is done in the milking parlor that was built in approximately 1979, Steve said. He added that they used to milk the cows three times a day but decreased it to two times a day. They can milk 12 cows at a time, 48 cows an hour. The entire milking is completed in four-and-a-half hours. Steve said that they have a girl who comes in

three times a week to do the milking, which can be done by one person, although he admits it is easier with two to help with moving the cows around. The milk tank has a capacity of 18,000 pounds or approximately 2,000 gallons of milk, so they are at the mercy of when the milk truck can come pick up the milk as to when they milk the cows. The milk tank has to be washed out every other day. “All of us like riding the tractors, but none of us like milking,” Steve said. Because of that, they have been examining the option of installing robotic milkers, which come with the hefty price tag of $250,000, but have only a 12year lifespan. There are 144 stalls in the dairy barn. The stalls are elevated off of the barn floor, and each stall has a waterbed to keep the cows from lying directly on the concrete. Waste from the cows is pumped into a storage tank with a 960,000-gallon capacity. The liquid manure is then spread on fields as fertilizer for continued, Page 8


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

go down,” said Steve, adding that the cow then the feed crops for the cows. cannot be slaughtered to sell for human Steve said that while there are currently more cows consumption. than stalls for them lay in, he keeps the percentages A cow can collapse from such things as milk fever, of cows to stalls close because otherwise milk which is when a cow is low in phosphorus or calcium production decreases. after calving; infection; or injury. According to He said happy cows make more milk and that for Farmers Weekly, if a cow fails to rise within 24 hours, the highest amount of milk production, the cows muscle and nerve damage can result. should be either lying down or eating. He said dairy Adding to the cost of dairy and beef production is farming can be tough. the cost of raising the calves. It costs $2,000 to raise “It ain’t fun, you never know when a cow is going to one calf to full grown, Steve said. Currently, there are continued from Page 7

Steve Fulton and his grandson Cody Fulton take a breather from farm chores. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel


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photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel

Steve Fulton in the calf barn. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel continued, Page 10


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

Jars of maple syrup ready for sale. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel continued from Page 9

approximately 350 cows on the farm, including calves and beef cattle. Steve said it has been suggested to him a few times to pay other farmers to raise his calves as a costcutting measure, but it is not an option he is comfortable with. There is no guarantee that he would get back the exact calves he sent out. Plus, he wants to know with certainty what the calves are fed. The farm is a combination of owned acres and rented acres, coming to a total of approximately 700, down from 1,000 acres. “Eventually, there won’t be enough land,” Steve said. Various parts and parcels have been added to the farm’s actual acreage so much over the years that Steve has a doctor’s bag full of deeds that he found stashed in the farmhouse. By 1928, 25 years after Isaac signed the first deed establishing the farm, 700 acres had been added to

the farm. Another 50 acres were added in the 1960s when I-76 went through Seville, and it split the Fultons’ neighbor’s property in half. The Fultons purchased the section of property that was on their side of the highway. The current farmhouse, built in 1919, is actually the second on the property. Steve said there are no pictures of the first farmhouse. The big red barn on the property is older than the farmhouse, it was built in 1917. In the 1970s, gas wells flourished in the Seville area and gas began being provided to the farmhouse for free. More recently, the controversial Nexxus pipeline crossed through the property, but Steve said he has only profited from the pipeline and has not seen any ill effects from its presence. “We don’t even notice it there,” Steve said.


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photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel

On the steps of the farmhouse that was built in 1919, from left: Michael Ratliff, Andrew Fulton, Clayton Fulton, Cory Fulton, Herb Ehrmann, Hadley Ratliff, Grace Erhmann, Beth Fulton, Cody Fulton, and Steve Fulton. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel continued, Page 12


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Medina County Magazine | April 2021

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Cory Fulton reverses the tractor and trailer of cattle with his nephews Cody, who can be seen through the window, and Clayton riding along. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel

A page from an early accounts ledger for Fulton Farm photo by Amy Barnes Andrew Fulton opens the trailer to release the cattle. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel


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Cattle being unloaded by Andrew and Clayton Fulton. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel

Dairy cows eating hay, a short walk behind them are individual stalls they can lie down in. Cows that are fertile and ready for artificial insemination are marked with a pink stripe. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel continued, Page 14


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continued from Page 13

The trail used to get to and from the sap holding tanks

photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel

photo by Amy Barnes


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

Medina Fiber

Blazing fast internet! Our pure fiber to the home network delivers unparalleled performance, symmetrical download and upload speeds, and game changing low latency. Sign up for service or take our survey today by pointing your phone camera at the QR code in the corner of this ad.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

photos by FlashBang Photography

Jackson Gamsby looks like he is riding on the lap of a ghost as he flies above his sled instead of on it!

Not even a pandemic could stop the enjoyment of sledding at Green Leaf Park, 1674 S. Medina Line Road, Sharon Center.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

Anderson Schuster flies over the snow.

Grant Schuster adds his own flair to his downhill journey.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

Lexi Ingersoll and Henry Crumbaker

Teresa Contraseier helps her granddaughter, Brooklynn Contraseier, pause for a photo.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

It was a day out with dad for sledding! From left, back row: Daniel and dad Eric Swart; front row, McKenna and Tyler Swart.

Blythe McDermott was having a flipping good time!

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

Customers for the fish fry waited for their names to be called to pick up their take-home meals.

Fish frys are popular community pre-Easter fundraisers for several organizations, including the Wadsworth Knights of Columbus. All proceeds went to charity. The fish fry crew, from left: Kirk Gegick, grand knight of Wadsworth Council 3213; Alan Beery; Bill Bees; Tony Spitaleri, council warden; Vincent Vetter; Cecelia Bees, a loyal supporter; Francis Vetter, chief in charge of fish frys; Paul Slota; James Kiel, the Knights of Columbus hall manager; Killian Mendel; and Roger Petrey, the fish fryer.

Volunteer Bill Bees brings out more food to pack in the dinners.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

Tony Spitaleri worked as cashier while Vincent Vetter and Cecelia Bees helped distribute dinners in the background.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

BUSINESS: FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

BUSINESS: THE NETWORKER

Important Update Pending

People Before Pings

by Tyler Hatfield

by Bob Arnold

In the world of computers, phones, tablets, and even smart watches, it may seem like something is updating every day. While this may feel excessive, it happens for a good reason. Every day, the engineers and coders behind every piece of technology are hunting for issues and potential security holes that could put devices and information at risk. When they find these types of problems, they design coding patches to cover those holes or stop specific bugs from occurring. Because the updates are designed to ensure safety, it is important to install them as soon as they are released. These are not the only kind of updates, though. While patches and bug fixes are the most common updates, there are also new features or large amounts of changes that a company might want to release for a device, making full software updates necessary. In that case, the updates can be much larger and take longer to complete. Full software updates are intended to offer new functionalities or refreshed visuals and typically are not as important as patches. While keeping up with software updates is important, they can be temporarily paused if the timing is not good or if it would disrupt work. In some rare cases, there might be something called a firmware update. Firmware updates are not aimed at the software but, instead, are fixing issues or adding features to the hardware code. These updates are not common, but should be handled as soon as possible as they may be intended to fix larger issues or security holes that the software cannot handle alone. Also, these updates are communicating with the hardware more directly so it is important to be careful not to turn the device off while they are running, or it could cause damage to the device. While the timing can be inconvenient, in the end, updates are intended to improve and protect devices and should be done as promptly as possible.

One fallacy of networking is the misunderstanding that it is instantaneous. One of the most notable enablers of this misunderstanding is the 'ping' on our devices, especially the cell phone. A friend commented recently on a call with me that his phone kept pinging over the last few hours as messages came in. To his credit, he said he had not looked at them yet. You are probably thinking, "What do you mean 'to his credit?’” Let us set something straight, we are human beings and science has found that we can focus on only one thing at a time. We, falsely, think differently. https://cle.clinic/3lhy4H7 The ping (technically, a notification) is an interruption, meant to let us know someone would like our attention. It is usually noted in our brain as, “Drop everything and answer me!” In reality, a very small percentage of these pings are urgent, I would say fewer than 2 percent, unless your situation depends on instant communication. What this tells us is that we are putting more importance on our availability then we should. This hurts our networking and relationships. We are telegraphing to the person we are talking with that someone else is more important than they are. Take notice of how you feel when someone does this to you. So, how to change this? 1. Completely silence your notifications. (Yes, even on vibrate, it is intrusive), 2. Turn off the notification option for some of the apps, such as Facebook and Twitter. 3. If you are expecting an important call, let the person you are talking with know you may have to take a call, and set up an automatic message for the caller that you are unable to answer right now. Then, enjoy your new friend. People love talking with people, it is important to respect that. Those actions will work wonders in your relationships and networking. By the way, my friend was at a trade show, meeting new people, and did not distract himself with the pinging phone. I told him, “Good for you!” He said, “Bob, I was networking, having conversations.” I smiled.

Tyler Hatfield has a passion for technology that he would like to someday turn into his own business. He runs a small media group, hatsmediagroup.com, and works on computers on the side. He can be contacted with questions and for recommendations at hatsmediagroup@gmail.com

S

Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at zMore networking tips are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http://onwardnetworking.com/ or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

BUSINESS: THE IN BOX

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R

Do You Copy? by Amy Barnes With the increase of people working from home, there also has been a huge influx of people who suddenly found themselves

Third, know if the original document is in color or black-andwhite and which one you want it printed as. There can be a

without access to their company copier or the support staff they huge price difference between the two options. were used to having. Previously, when presentation materials were needed, many were to be able to tell an assistant or the company’s marketing department to create materials and to have copies ready by morning. The COVID shutdown changed all of that for many employees.

Fourth, get a blank flash drive. One that is fresh, new and has absolutely nothing else on it. The simplest way to transport a file from office to copy shop is to load what is needed on a flash drive. One advantage to using a blank flash drive is that there is no chance of the wrong file being printed.

Suddenly, employees found they still needed certain marketing materials, signs, multiple copies of documents, and

Part II with more important tips, including flash drive best

manuals but now they were expected to find a way to produce

practices, next month!

them and, in some cases, even create them. This has presented several new challenges, including successfully transporting

Have small business pointers you would like to share as a columnist? Contact Amy Barnes at Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com Be sure to digital files from computer to off-site printing services. include information about your business experience and a sample There are some easy tips to follow to ease the pain until offices column of no more than 350 words.

reopen and assistants are available or will help should the business decide to remain virtual. First, know what you want before you walk out the door. Do you want a laminated, mounted sign? Postcards? Posters? Fliers? Single sided or double sided? To help decide, think about how the end product will be used, what is the event or meeting? Size is influenced by whether the occasion is in person or virtual and if this is something that will be displayed or mailed. Second, consider what will be done with the item once the occasion has ended. If it is large, like a poster, will it hang on an office wall or in a hallway? Is it something smaller that could be taken on the road for sales calls? Is it worth a slight redesign, such as removing the date, in order for it to have a secondary use? If it is something smaller, such as postcards or brochures, how will the leftovers be used? Is it worth paying a small upcharge to get twice the number of copies to use as a follow-up, as a leave behind, or for another event?


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

Free Seed Share at all Medina County District Library locations. Bring in homegrown, dried seeds saved from last year, put in provided custom seed packets, label and add notes for the next gardener. Take a few to try. Seed Share bins at all locations beginning March 1. photo provided

Looking for help and can’t find it? Click Help is Here


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HOME AND GARDEN: BITE ME!

Salmon Patties With Lemon Dill Sauce recipe by Seth Carmen Seth Carmen’s passion for cooking began by spending time in the kitchen with his grandfather, preparing Sunday dinners. His love of cooking never faded, and he grew up to graduate from the Institute of Culinary Arts. In 2003, Carmen became the executive chef at Brookdale Camelot Medina, an assisted living facility at 49-A Leisure Lane, Medina. In addition to his own recipes, Carmen gets further inspiration from Brookdale residents who share their own recipes with him. Carmen wants to make each dining experience memorable for all. “I hope you enjoy this exciting way to enjoy salmon!,” said Carmen. photo by Ramille Soares

Salmon Patties • 1 tablespoon olive oil or butter • ¼ yellow onion, finely chopped • ¼ red bell pepper, finely chopped • 2 cloves of garlic, minced. • ½ cup butter • ½ cup flour • 2 cups milk • 2 tablespoons mayonnaise • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard • paprika • salt • pepper • 4 6-ounce salmon fillets, cooked • cornflake crumbs (to increase firmness) Breading • cornflake crumbs combined with paprika • dusting of flour • egg wash Lemon Dill Sauce • 1 stick of butter • 2 tablespoons finely chopped shallots • ½ cup heavy cream • 2 lemons • 1 tablespoon fresh, chopped dill • salt • pepper Preheat pot over medium/high heat. Heat a tablespoon of olive oil or butter in the pot. Sauté onion and red pepper for one minute before adding garlic. Cook an additional minute. Next, add the ½ cup butter and heat until completely melted. Add ½ cup flour and stir frequently for 5 to 10 minutes until the roux starts to brown. Add milk and remove from heat. Add mayonnaise, Worcestershire, Dijon mustard, paprika, salt, and

pepper. Stir as it cools. Add salmon. Mix and mash as much as possible. The mix needs to be firm enough to make patties. Add cornflake crumbs, if needed. Once the mix has cooled and is the correct consistency, shape into patties. Place patties in refrigerator for about an hour to make the breading process easier. Lemon Sauce Melt butter in a pot over medium/high heat. Add shallots and cook for one to two minutes. Lower heat, add heavy cream, and stir frequently as it comes to a boil. Lowering heat will reduce the chance of cream bubbling over the pot. Cook for 20 to 30 minutes, then remove from heat. Cut lemons and squeeze juice into the cream mix. Add fresh dill, and season with salt and pepper. Final Steps Bread the patties by dusting the patties with flour, dipping in egg wash, and finally dipping into cornflake-paprika blend. Heat cooking oil in pan over medium/high heat. Once cooking oil is hot, add prepared salmon patties. Cook until golden brown, then flip over and repeat. Larger patties can be finished off by baking in a 350-degree oven. Drizzle lemon sauce to taste over cooked patties, and enjoy!

Want to have your recipe featured in a future issue? Send it with your name, phone number (in case we have questions), the city you live in, and some information about you to: Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “recipe” in the subject line. Recipes MUST be your original recipe or one you have highly modified and thus made it your own. By submitting a recipe, you are guaranteeing it is one you have developed or modified and used. This is open to anyone who would like to submit a recipe.


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HEALTH: OF MIND AND BODY

HEALTH: HEALTHY TRAILS

Ways to Thrive Through the Years

Improving Ride With Cost-Effective Changes

by Kelly Bailey Humans are living longer than ever, and that is great. But we do not want to just survive to an older age. We want to thrive! The following tips can help increase the length, health and happiness of your life. 1. Walk briskly for at least 20 minutes every day. As little as 20 minutes is shown to improve heart health and increase lifespan. https://bit.ly/38FKovH 2. Practice intermittent fasting. Fasting gives digestive organs a break from processing food and is shown to improve biomarkers such as blood pressure and blood glucose. https://bit.ly/30Ini3b 3. Install a blue light filter on your phone. Blue light can inhibit the hormones that help you get a good night's sleep. These filters dim the phone screen after dark, which can help reset the circadian clock. https://cle.clinic/3vjLRBP 4. Lift weights twice per week. A simple routine of squats, step ups, push-ups, rows, and overhead presses can improve strength, balance, coordination, joint stability, and bone strength. https://bit.ly/3leWLnu 5. Take five deep breaths in the middle of your most stressful hours of the day. Breathing is one way to bring the body back into parasympathetic dominance. Breath in through your nose for a slow count of five and out through your nose for a slow count of five, repeat at least five times. https://bit.ly/3ctQgJC 6. Drink at least 60 ounces of water every day, preferably filtered water. The body is more than 60 percent water. Even mild dehydration can cause headaches, joint pain, and digestive distress. Drink up! https://bit.ly/38FlhJp 7. Eat five servings of deeply colored vegetables and fruits every day. Foods such as spinach, broccoli, bell peppers, beets, and blueberries are rich in antioxidants, phytonutrients and filling fiber. 8. Cook at home. If you control the ingredients that go onto your plate, you can control your health. People who eat at home also tend to practice better portion control. 9. Hug a friend or loved one. Hugging someone for just seven seconds is shown to reduce stress hormones and increase happiness. https://bit.ly/3vmcoyd 10. Laugh, smile, play, and have fun. Find a hobby or do something that fills your cup and makes you happy every day. A certified personal trainer and certified holistic nutrition coach, Kelly Baily owns and operates Kelly Bailey Wellness. Find her blog, visit the Food Freedom page, and contact her at https://www.kellybailey.fit/ Following any recommendations are solely at your discretion and responsibility. Consult your medical professional prior to undertaking any suggested diet, lifestyle or exercise change or routine.

by Robert Soroky Last month, I wrote about upgrading the rider (https:// bit.ly/38EfS5j) as part of making bicycle upgrades and how to make your current ride better, stronger and faster than it was before. This month, the focus is on the bike itself. For some, the goal might be making the bike lighter. Most of a bike’s weight is in the frame, so changing out the frame would seem to make the most sense, right? Well, there is a catch. For instance, perhaps you want to upgrade from an aluminum frame to a much lighter and stronger carbon frame on your road bike. Unfortunately, it may not be as simple as swapping over parts from the old frame to the new because, for some bike types, a complete switch in materials might also mean a different style of road bike altogether. In these cases, not only would the geometry of the carbon frame be different, but it might also accept only proprietary parts that vastly differ from what is on the current bike. Suddenly, a simple frame swap has turned into additional purchases of a new seat post, handlebar and cabling. There are more sensible and less labor-intensive ways to upgrade. Probably the best place to improve both weight and performance (outside of the frame) is to change out wheel sets. Higher-end wheels tend to be stronger, more stable, take more abuse, and are considerably lighter. Even the tires themselves can make a difference. If you own a mountain bike, but primarily ride on paved paths or sidewalks, then replacing those big, knobby treads with thinner, smoother tires will decrease weight and road resistance. Air suspension forks on mountain bikes are lighter and more capable off-road than standard metal-coil springsuspension forks. On road bikes, changing out an aluminum fork for carbon saves weight and reduces road vibration. Keep in mind that with any change made, there is always a pocketbook consideration. The lighter and better performing you want the bike to be, the higher the associated cost. A piecemeal approach can get expensive, which is why, when looking for dramatic weight and performance changes, the most cost-effective solution can be upgrading to a completely new bike that best fits the cycling goals.

Robert Soroky is a lifelong cyclist regularly participating in long distance charity rides and manager of the Century Cycles Medina location. Contact Soroky at robert@centurycycles.com to suggest column topics, for further information or to chat about bikes.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

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COMMUNITY: GEMS

Food, Support for All Ages by Kent Von der Vellen The nonprofit Lodi Family Center offers a wide range of programs that touch almost every segment of the population. LFC has toddler, youth and after-school programs; activities for senior citizens; parenting support; a food pantry; and free facility use to other nonprofits that provide free services for families. Executive Director Rebecca Rak has been involved with LFC since 2001, before it was known as LFC, and it was operated as a nonprofit youth center. She was there in 2004, when the food pantry was added and the organization functioned under Safe Haven and Family First Resource Center. The organization continued to grow, and, in 2012, became its own 501C-3 registered nonprofit. By 2014, it gained its own building when It moved into the old Lodi Elementary School at 301 Mill Street. Free programs are offered for senior citizens Monday through Wednesday until 2 p.m. Senior citizens can visit each other, catch a movie, play cards or bingo, and have lunch. When school lets out, the LFC welcomes students ages 5 to 18 and is a regular stop for the Cloverleaf School District buses. Student programs include assistance with schoolwork and tutoring, leadership, self-esteem, 4-H, and STEM clubs. Rak gets excited when talking about the success students have with STEM clubs, which are clubs that focus on science, technology, engineering, and math. In 2014, her ninth-grade son and several of his classmates complained of being bored with board games. Rack encouraged them to start a robotics program. The robotics program grew to include clubs and activities for ages 5 to 18. Through the program, students learn about computers, robots, and the math and science that are involved. LFC also provides a food pantry serving the Lodi area. Most of the food they offer comes through the Akron Food Bank. It also is a participant of the MyPlate program. Through the MyPlate program, participants receive food and recipes for meals with the items picked up at the pantry in an effort to teach nutrition and healthy lifestyles. In 2019, the food pantry distributed 149,000 pounds of food. That increased to 350,396 pounds in 2020 due to extra demand caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. For more information about the programs offered, to donate or to become a volunteer, go to https://lodifamilycenter.org/ or https://bit.ly/3lMIK0D

Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions Club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by emailing Gems@BlakeHousePublishing.com or by calling 330-4210863. Learn what other area nonprofits need by visiting Giving Hearts at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com.

Lodi Family Center, Inc. 301 Mill Street Lodi, Oh. 44254 330-302-4182 Date of formation: 08/21/2012 Organization type: 501(c)(3) Description of Organization’s Purpose: Facilitate programs that meet the needs of families through pantry services, youth programs and parenting activities Is the organization's registration status current? Yes Reporting Year: 2019 Reporting Start Date: 7/1/2018 Reporting End Date: 6/30/2019 Total Revenue: $39,364.80 Total Expenses: $41,221.35 Total Program Expenses: $37,836.21 Percent of Total Expenses: 92% Total Assets: $76,000.00 Director or Board member List (6): Judy Reed Rebecca Rak Kelli Sanders Shawna Brasty I Jeff Vogel David Spieth


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

Want more Joy? Subscribe to our e-edition and get Joy no matter where you go! Use this link https://bit.ly/30duSlB to start your subscription. Want to read Joy in print? Visit Medina County libraries where you can find Joy of Medina County Magazine as an official, cataloged publication in the Periodicals section of the library. Joy also can be found in the Medina Library’s Historic Archives! For more information about Joy of Medina County Magazine, visit our website: https://bit.ly/38WotiH


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT: ROLL ’EM!

Japanese Fantasy has Girl Versus Demon by Hunter Barnard For this month’s review, I watched a cool new movie called “Earwig and the Witch.” It has lots of cool characters in it, and I liked it very much. The story is about a little girl named Earwig who gets left at an orphanage because her mom is a witch being chased by other witches. Some nice people at the orphanage take care of her with lots of other kids. She does not want to leave because it is where her friends are, but a very tall man and a lady with blue hair come to adopt her, even though she does not want to go. When Earwig arrives in her new home, she finds out the lady who adopted her is a witch, and the man she lives with is a demon. The only two rules are to never make the demon mad and to always do what the witch says. But the witch is very mean and does not teach Earwig anything helpful to become a witch but instead has her do chores. Earwig is a really cool character because she always had good ideas and was always helpful. My favorite character was the witch though, because she made really cool spells and was good at lots of different things. Even if she was a little mean at first, she was really nice at the end. I really liked this movie because it had a very nice ending. I like it when everyone gets along. Earwig found a nice place to live, and the witch started to be a little nicer. Even the demon was pretty nice, too, even though he was mad a lot. There was a lot of cool music in the movie, and there was one song I liked very much. It turned out that the witch knew how to play the drums, and that was one of the reasons I liked her so much. She was very good at it and made it look very easy. The demon’s name was Mandrake, and he knew how to play the piano. They made really good music together, and Earwig liked it a lot, too. I think this movie was very fun and very good, it had lots of cool things in it and it made me laugh a lot. I think everyone should watch it if they want to see a really good movie!

Hunter Barnard is an energetic 7-year-old who attends Berea City Schools and likes to share his opinion. He is assisted in writing his column by his mother, Jessica Rapenchuk.

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“Unfortunately, being stupid is not criminal.”

“Every time I remember you exist, I’ll miss you.”

“Cavemen did not garnish their chicken before eating it.”

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

MIRTH AND JOY by Jerry King


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

Joyful Word Search Getting Sticky

LEGACY MAPLE TREES MILK SAP FARMING HAY BOILING CATTLE

SUGAR CAMP GENERATIONS FULTONS SYRUP CORN TAPS GENERATOR ACREAGE

Answer Key for Last Month’s Search

Through the Lens

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

April 2021 Nonprofit Calendar All Month: Seedling Sales, through April 2, sponsored by the Medina County Soil and Water Conservation District, 6090 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Sold in packets of 10 tree seedlings, $12. For ordering form and more information, go to: https://bit.ly/39wfQNP or call 330-722-9322.

Monday, April 5 National Dandelion Day https://bit.ly/3f3vFPg Wild About Eggs, 6 a.m. to close, Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Self-guided walk along the Nature Trail to look for hidden signs depicting eggs from native wildlife. All ages, free.

Thursday, April 1 National Burrito Day https://bit.ly/3cYfm3s Do not eat too many, might have some apologizing to do later for the “end” result! Storytime with Koda, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., virtual. Virtual meet-and-greet and story time with K-9 officer Koda with the Brunswick Police Department. All ages welcome. Link will be emailed to those registered before event. Register at https://bit.ly/3svEepK

Tuesday, April 6 Plan Your Epitaph Day https://bit.ly/2NBMOUQ No one is better suited to sum up your life than you and get all of the facts right! Have fun with it, after all, it is your last chance to share all of the bad jokes you know! Wild About Eggs, 6 a.m. to close, Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Self-guided walk along the Nature Trail to look for hidden signs depicting eggs from native wildlife. All ages, free. Earth Day Nature Walk, 10 a.m. and 1 p.m., Plum Creek Park North Open, 2390 Plum Creek Parkway, Brunswick Hills. Naturalist leads casual walk to explore seasonal happenings. For 10 a.m. walk, register at https://bit.ly/3rd1Eid For 1 p.m. walk, register at https://bit.ly/3tFjj3W American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Our Saviour Lutheran Church, 1605 Center Road, Hinckley. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Northside Christian Church, 7615 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Friday, April 2 Reconciliation Day https://bit.ly/3lDC70s Great day to apologize for the results of yesterday being National Burrito Day! American Red Cross Blood Drive, 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Medina Hospital, 1000 E. Washington Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Saturday, April 3 International Drop a Rock Day https://bit.ly/3f3mez9 Wild About Eggs, 6 a.m. to close, Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Self-guided walk along the Nature Trail to look for hidden signs depicting eggs from native Wednesday, April 7 wildlife. All ages, free. International Beaver Day https://bit.ly/3savYvd Dedicate the day to appreciating beavers and, if you have a beaver, let it know Sunday, April 4 it is loved! Celebrate by reading “Brenda’s Beaver Needs a National Walk Around Things Day https://bit.ly/3sayjX0 Barber,” or listen to a reading of it at https://bit.ly/3s861wB Wild About Eggs, 6 a.m. to close, Susan Hambley Nature Center, Wild About Eggs, 6 a.m. to close, Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Self-guided walk along the 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Self-guided walk along the Nature Trail to look for hidden signs depicting eggs from native Nature Trail to look for hidden signs depicting eggs from native wildlife. All ages, free. wildlife. All ages, free.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021 Monthly Makers: Birds, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday through Saturday, April 10. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. This month is birds. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. For more information and to register, go to https://bit.ly/3s94Xsn Woodland Health Day of Service, noon to 3 p.m., Allardale West Parking Lot, 401 Remsen Road, Medina. Volunteers needed to pull garlic mustard, an aggressive weed, from sensitive habitat. Ages 7 and up. Dress for weather. For more information and to register, go to https://bit.ly/3965VOy Create! Resist Art, 4 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Wadsworth Library. Resist art uses layers to define a design in negative space. View at https://bit.ly/2P7mF0R Managing Your Passwords, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. Learn how to manage passwords so accounts are safe but still accessed with ease. Meeting link sent by e-mail once registered at https://bit.ly/3d6J1Ye Thursday, April 8 National Zoo Lovers Day https://bit.ly/3f9G1gm Wild About Eggs, 6 a.m. to close, Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Self-guided walk along the Nature Trail to look for hidden signs depicting eggs from native wildlife. All ages, free. Monthly Makers: Birds, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday through Saturday, April 10. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. This month is birds. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. For more information and to register, go to https://bit.ly/3s94Xsn American Red Cross Blood Drive, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m., St. Ambrose Church, 929 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Author Visit: Eliese Colette Goldbach, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. Goldback was a steelworker at ArcelorMittal Cleveland and now works at John Carroll University. Her writing has appeared in numerous publications and has won writing awards. Meeting link sent by e-mail once registered at https://bit.ly/3fbv6Tu Writers Series: Jump Start Your Creativity, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. Open the door to creative energy through explorative writing. Meeting link sent by e-mail once registered at https://bit.ly/3cekwt3 Friday, April 9 National Unicorn Day

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Brunswick 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sundays, June 13 through October 2, 2021 Produce, consumables and crafts Heritage Farm, 4613 Laurel Road, Brunswick Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2I4I5DV Medina 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays, May 1 through October 30 Produce, consumables, crafts, and knife sharpening Front parking lot, May 1 through 22 Main Market behind VFW Post, May 30 through October 30 Medina VFW Post 5137 3916 Pearl Road, Medina 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays, May 15 through October 16 Produce and consumables

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Medina Public Square Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/3vLZY2W Seville 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, May 29 through September 25 Produce, consumables and crafts Gazebo at Maria Stanhope Park, 73 W. Main Street, Seville Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/3r1v9ni Wadsworth 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, June 12 through September 25 Produce, consumables and crafts Central Intermediate School, 151 Main Street, Wadsworth Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/3r8trRd

Wild About Eggs, 6 a.m. to close, Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Self-guided walk along the Nature Trail to look for hidden signs depicting eggs from native wildlife. All ages, free. Monthly Makers: Birds, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday through Saturday, April 10. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. This month is birds. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. For more information and to register, go to https://bit.ly/3s94Xsn Woodland Health Day of Service, 10 a.m. to noon, Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Volunteers


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

needed to pull garlic mustard, an aggressive weed, from Brunswick Library Adult Reference Department, 3649 Center sensitive habitat. Ages 7 and up. Dress for weather. For more Road, Brunswick, during open hours. Call 330-273-4150, Ext. information and to register, go to https://bit.ly/3965VOy 2131, for hours. Register at https://bit.ly/399zXRe Wild About Eggs, 6 a.m. to close, Susan Hambley Nature Center, Saturday, April 10 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Self-guided walk along the National Siblings Day Nature Trail to look for hidden signs depicting eggs from native Wild About Eggs, 6 a.m. to close, Susan Hambley Nature Center, wildlife. All ages, free. 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Self-guided walk along the Natural Discoveries Self-Guided Hiking Series: Spring is in Nature Trail to look for hidden signs depicting eggs from native Full Swing!, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., through April 25, Bluebell Valley, wildlife. All ages, free. 8504 Richman Road, Lodi. Discover wonders of spring while Natural Discoveries Self-Guided Hiking Series: Spring is in hiking. Signs along the nature trail with one sign having a code Full Swing!, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., through April 25, Bluebell Valley, word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural 8504 Richman Road, Lodi. Discover wonders of spring while Discoveries award. For more information, go to hiking. Signs along the nature trail with one sign having a code https://bit.ly/3cTqzT9 word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick Discoveries award. For more information, go to United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://bit.ly/3cTqzT9 https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Monthly Makers: Birds, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wolf Creek American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Trinity United Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Registered Church of Christ, 215 High Street, Wadsworth. households are provided outdoor space each month to set up https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp displays according to that month’s theme. This month is birds. Art in the Afternoon: Three Dimensional Faces, 4 p.m. to 4:15 Portable restroom is available in parking lot. For more p.m., virtual. Hosted by Wadsworth Library. Learn how to bend, information and to register, go to https://bit.ly/3s94Xsn fold, curve paper to create three-dimensional face. View American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., St. Mark program at https://bit.ly/3nWWoPC Lutheran Church, 1330 N. Carpenter Street, Brunswick. Monday Night Intrigue: “If You Tell,” 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., virtual. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Sponsored by Wadsworth Library. Focus is on true story of murder and three survivors of child abuse and their escape. Sunday, April 11 Register for link at https://bit.ly/3fbP2FO National Eight-Track Tape Day https://bit.ly/3c5qZ9K O Wild About Eggs, 6 a.m. to close, Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Self-guided walk along the Tuesday, April 13 Nature Trail to look for hidden signs depicting eggs from native International Plant Appreciation Day https://bit.ly/3c9CRYp wildlife. All ages, free. Korean Bookmark, all day. Sign up and get first name written in Natural Discoveries Self-Guided Hiking Series: Spring is in Korean on a bookmark. Bookmarks can be picked up at Full Swing!, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., through April 25, Bluebell Valley, Brunswick Library Adult Reference Department, 3649 Center 8504 Richman Road, Lodi. Discover wonders of spring while Road, Brunswick, during open hours. Call 330-273-4150, Ext. hiking. Signs along the nature trail with one sign having a code 2131, for hours. Register at https://bit.ly/3sdPib7 word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Wild About Eggs, 6 a.m. to close, Susan Hambley Nature Center, Discoveries award. For more information, go to 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Self-guided walk along the https://bit.ly/3cTqzT9 Nature Trail to look for hidden signs depicting eggs from native American Red Cross Blood Drive, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Litchfield wildlife. All ages, free. Township Fire Station, 9487 Norwalk Road, Litchfield. Natural Discoveries Self-Guided Hiking Series: Spring is in https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Full Swing!, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., through April 25, Bluebell Valley, 8504 Richman Road, Lodi. Discover wonders of spring while Monday, April 12 hiking. Signs along the nature trail with one sign having a code Walk on Your Wild Side Day https://bit.ly/31430kW word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Korean Bookmark, all day. Sign up and get first name written in Discoveries award. For more information, go to Korean on a bookmark. Bookmarks can be picked up at https://bit.ly/3cTqzT9


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021 Monthly Makers: Birds, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday through Saturday, through April 24. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view birds created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. Woodland Health Day of Service, 9:30 a.m. to noon, Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Volunteers needed to pull garlic mustard, an aggressive weed, from sensitive habitat. Ages 7 and up. Dress for weather. For more information and to register, go to https://bit.ly/3f9YlWG African Community Dance and Drum, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Join Djapo Cultural Arts Institute in virtual workshop. Meeting link sent by e-mail once registered at https://bit.ly/3lNn8kH Alphabet Adventure: E is for Egg, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Wadsworth Library. Stories, do the Bunny Boogie, make an egg suncatcher and the letter “e” hatching from an egg. Materials pickup available at library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth, April 6 through 20. Register at https://bit.ly/3vUuwQ0 View program at https://bit.ly/3nWWoPC Wednesday, April 14 National Reach as High as You Can Day https://bit.ly/2Pi9REw Korean Bookmark, all day. Sign up and get first name written in Korean on a bookmark. Bookmarks can be picked up at Brunswick Library Adult Reference Department, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick, during open hours. Call 330-273-4150, Ext. 2131, for hours. Register at https://bit.ly/2PpZChP Wild About Eggs, 6 a.m. to close, Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Self-guided walk along the Nature Trail to look for hidden signs depicting eggs from native wildlife. All ages, free. Natural Discoveries Self-Guided Hiking Series: Spring is in Full Swing!, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., through April 25, Bluebell Valley, 8504 Richman Road, Lodi. Discover wonders of spring while hiking. Signs along the nature trail with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3cTqzT9 Monthly Makers: Birds, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday through Saturday, through April 24. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view birds created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according

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to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Seasonal Discoveries, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Lake Medina, 3733 Granger Road, Medina. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award, naturalist will initial form at end of hike. Register at https://bit.ly/3vNsgdm For more information about the Natural Discoveries program, go to https://bit.ly/3pD5P71 REGISTRATION IS FULL. Making Dough Fundraiser, noon to 8 p.m., Courthouse Pizzeria, 2 Public Square, Medina. Benefits Kids First Medina. Bring in flyer or image on phone, mention fundraiser when placing order. 25 percent of pre-tax totazl donated. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3c4K1Nk Kids First Media promotes Medina City School programs. Woodland Health Day of Service, noon to 3 p.m., River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Volunteers needed to pull garlic mustard, an aggressive weed, from sensitive habitat. Ages 7 and up. Dress for weather. For more information and to register, go to https://bit.ly/39kIocTv American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Medicare 1010: Navigating the Medicare Maze, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., virtual. Learn about all of the plan tiers and what the benefits are. Register at https://bit.ly/3fa9neI


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

A list of runs and walks that benefit area non-profit organizations. To have your run listed, send the information to joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late.

Friday, May 7, 2021 Run 4 Fun, first run starts at 7 p.m., Medina High School. Runs include half-mile Fun Run, 1-mile run, 5k run. Benefits Medina City Schools Foundation. For fees and registration, go to https://bit.ly/3132Eef Saturday, May 22, 2021 Wooster Golden Gloves 5k, 8:30 a.m., McConnell Field, Wooster High School, 625 Oldman Road, Wooster. Benefits Golden Gloves 15u traveling baseball team. Get T-shirt, water bottles during race, post-race refreshments, awards. For fees and registration, go to https://bit.ly/311lu5p Registration ends May 21, 2021. Saturday, May 29 2021 Medina Runs Down Cancer: Medina Half Marathon and 5k Expo, 6:30 a.m., Medina Square. Expo is 3 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Summa Health Medina Medical Center, 3780 Medina Road, Medina. Benefits Mary Grace Memorial Foundation, Collins Cares and Medina County Road Runners Memorial Scholarship Fund. Further information and registration at https://bit.ly/3c9tesJ

Thursday, April 15 National High Five Day https://bit.ly/3lAYMux Korean Bookmark, all day. Sign up and get first name written in Korean on a bookmark. Bookmarks can be picked up at Brunswick Library Adult Reference Department, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick, during open hours. Call 330-273-4150, Ext. 2131, for hours. Register at https://bit.ly/3vUKMjT Wild About Eggs, 6 a.m. to close, Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Self-guided walk along the Nature Trail to look for hidden signs depicting eggs from native wildlife. All ages, free. Natural Discoveries Self-Guided Hiking Series: Spring is in Full Swing!, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., through April 25, Bluebell Valley, 8504 Richman Road, Lodi. Discover wonders of spring while hiking. Signs along the nature trail with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3cTqzT9 Monthly Makers: Birds, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday through Saturday, through April 24. Wolf Creek Environmental Center,

6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view birds created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. Tween Scene: Self-Watering Planter, 4 p.m. to 4:20 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Wadsworth Library. Learn how to make a selfwatering planter with only a few easy supplies.. Ages 9 to 14. View program at https://bit.ly/3nWWoPC Gods and Heroes of India, 5:30 p.m. to 6:15 p.m., virtual. Cleveland Art Museum leads virtual tour of Hindu and Buddhist art from the museum collection. Meeting link sent by e-mail once registered at https://bit.ly/3lOxKQE Explorastory: LMNO Peas, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. Sponsored by Wadsworth Library. Fun stories and songs about peas and other green things. Play a word-building game, sort peas, make finger-painting pea craft and peas in a pod. Materials pickup available April 8 through 22 at the library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth, with registration at https://bit.ly/3lOVZxL View program at https://bit.ly/3nWWoPC Friday, April 16 National Reveal the Genius Within Day https://bit.ly/3f1iwpT Korean Bookmark, all day. Sign up and get first name written in Korean on a bookmark. Bookmarks can be picked up at Brunswick Library Adult Reference Department, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick, during open hours. Call 330-273-4150, Ext. 2131, for hours. Register at https://bit.ly/3sjLB3I Wild About Eggs, 6 a.m. to close, Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Self-guided walk along the Nature Trail to look for hidden signs depicting eggs from native wildlife. All ages, free. Natural Discoveries Self-Guided Hiking Series: Spring is in Full Swing!, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., through April 25, Bluebell Valley, 8504 Richman Road, Lodi. Discover wonders of spring while hiking. Signs along the nature trail with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3cTqzT9 Monthly Makers: Birds, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday through Saturday, through April 24. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view birds created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more information.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Earth Day Nature Walk, 10 a.m. and 1 p.m., Plum Creek Park North Open, 2390 Plum Creek Parkway, Brunswick Hills. Naturalist leads casual walk to explore seasonal happenings. For 10 a.m. walk, register at https://bit.ly/3c5mifY For 1 p.m. walk, register at https://bit.ly/3c5Jr1O Saturday, April 17 Record Store Day https://bit.ly/3vHsaUF Korean Bookmark, all day. Sign up and get first name written in Korean on a bookmark. Bookmarks can be picked up at Brunswick Library Adult Reference Department, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick, during open hours. Call 330-273-4150, Ext. 2131, for hours. Register at https://bit.ly/3tKdUbM Wild About Eggs, 6 a.m. to close, Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Self-guided walk along the Nature Trail to look for hidden signs depicting eggs from native wildlife. All ages, free. Natural Discoveries Self-Guided Hiking Series: Spring is in Full Swing!, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., through April 25, Bluebell Valley, 8504 Richman Road, Lodi. Discover wonders of spring while hiking. Signs along the nature trail with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3cTqzT9 Monthly Makers: Birds, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday through Saturday, through April 24. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view birds created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. Woodland Health Day of Service, 9:30 a.m. to noon, Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Volunteers needed to pull garlic mustard, an aggressive weed, from sensitive habitat. Ages 7 and up. Dress for weather. For more information and to register, go to https://bit.ly/2PhOJhH Movie Discussion: “The Farewell,” 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., virtual. Watch the movie (available on Kanopy, free through the library website), then join discussion. Register at https://bit.ly/3rhLwfD

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Wild About Eggs, 6 a.m. to close, Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Self-guided walk along the Nature Trail to look for hidden signs depicting eggs from native wildlife. All ages, free. Natural Discoveries Self-Guided Hiking Series: Spring is in Full Swing!, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., through April 25, Bluebell Valley, 8504 Richman Road, Lodi. Discover wonders of spring while hiking. Signs along the nature trail with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3cTqzT9 Sister-to-Sister Conference, noon to 2 p.m., virtual. Theme is “How to be Resilient.” Pick up craft kit April 12 through 17 at Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway St., Medina. Hosted by American Association of University Women and Medina County Junior Leadership. Open to girls, ages 11 to 14. For more information, contact Cindy McQuown, 330-722-4166, Ext. 205. Admission $25. Register at https://bit.ly/392kanq Monday, April 19 National Hanging Out Day, National Garlic Day and National Amaretto Day What a combination! Natural Discoveries Self-Guided Hiking Series: Spring is in Full Swing!, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., through April 25, Bluebell Valley, 8504 Richman Road, Lodi. Discover wonders of spring while hiking. Signs along the nature trail with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3cTqzT9 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Fire Station 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., First Congregational Church, 114 Church Street, Lodi. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Let’s Explore: Science of Rabbits, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Wadsworth Library. Learn the differences between wild and pet rabbits, learn the life cycle of a rabbit, how to care for a rabbit, and make a craft. Pick up materials packet April 12 through 26 at the library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Register for packet at https://bit.ly/3cXJ34Q

Tuesday, April 20 Look Alike Day https://bit.ly/390W5gA Natural Discoveries Self-Guided Hiking Series: Spring is in Sunday, April 18 Full Swing!, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., through April 25, Bluebell Valley, National Columnists’ Day A tip of the hat to all of the wonderful 8504 Richman Road, Lodi. Discover wonders of spring while Joy columnists today! hiking. Signs along the nature trail with one sign having a code


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3cTqzT9 Monthly Makers: Birds, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday through Saturday, through April 24. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view birds created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., The Chapel Wadsworth Campus, 1391 State Road, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Virtual Nature Break: Egg-cellent Explorations, 3:30 p.m. to 4:15 p.m., virtual. Explore eggs of native wildlife. For more information and to register, go to https://bit.ly/3vXP22m Wednesday, April 21 National Library Workers Day Natural Discoveries Self-Guided Hiking Series: Spring is in Full Swing!, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., through April 25, Bluebell Valley, 8504 Richman Road, Lodi. Discover wonders of spring while hiking. Signs along the nature trail with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3cTqzT9 Monthly Makers: Birds, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday through Saturday, through April 24. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view birds created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. Woodland Health Day of Service, 9:30 a.m. to noon, Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Volunteers needed to pull garlic mustard, an aggressive weed, from sensitive habitat. Ages 7 and up. Dress for weather. For more information and to register, go to https://bit.ly/3r80rJk American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Root Candles, 640 Liberty Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp A Tale of Two Torpedoes, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. Examining the twists and turns of the nine-day chase, the two torpedoes, and more involved in the sinking of German battleship Bismarck. Meeting link sent by e-mail once registered at https://bit.ly/3rkdNSy

Thursday, April 22 International Mother Earth Day Natural Discoveries Self-Guided Hiking Series: Spring is in Full Swing!, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., through April 25, Bluebell Valley, 8504 Richman Road, Lodi. Discover wonders of spring while hiking. Signs along the nature trail with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3cTqzT9 Monthly Makers: Birds, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday through Saturday, through April 24. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view birds created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. Nature Break: Egg-cellent Explorations, 3:30 p.m. to 4:15 p.m., virtual. Explore eggs of native wildlife. For more information and to register, go to https://bit.ly/3f2SXF6 Virtual Escape Room: Atom Blaster, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., virtual with Wadsworth Library. Library-themed breakout. No download or special software needed. See tutorial at https://bit.ly/345sWiL Register at https://bit.ly/3ciixnN How to Market Yourself in a Job Search, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., virtual. Topis covered include creating an elevator speech (30second commercial) and giving excellent answers to tough interview questions. OhioMeansJobs and MCDL presenting. Must have Zoom to participate. Meeting link sent by e-mail once registered at https://bit.ly/3d1pSXY

C Friday, April 23 Take a Chance Day https://bit.ly/3rhbmR3 Natural Discoveries Self-Guided Hiking Series: Spring is in Full Swing!, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., through April 25, Bluebell Valley, 8504 Richman Road, Lodi. Discover wonders of spring while hiking. Signs along the nature trail with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3cTqzT9 Monthly Makers: Birds, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday through Saturday, through April 24. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view birds created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more information.


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American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., St. Mark spectrum or sensory integration challenges and their families Lutheran Church, 1330 N. Carpenter Street, Brunswick. and caregivers. View at https://bit.ly/3rd9kBe https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Tuesday, April 27 Saturday, April 24 Tell a Story Day National Kiss of Hope Day https://bit.ly/2P9nDcJ Virtual Otaku Tuesdays, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. A discussion of all Natural Discoveries Self-Guided Hiking Series: Spring is in things anime, for Grades 6 through 12. Register for required Full Swing!, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., through April 25, Bluebell Valley, meeting link at https://bit.ly/3lKr2en 8504 Richman Road, Lodi. Discover wonders of spring while Author Visit: Robin Ha, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. Ha was hiking. Signs along the nature trail with one sign having a code born in Seoul, Korea, and moved to the U.S. when 14. Had a word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural career in the fashion industry. She wrote “Almost American Girl,” Discoveries award. For more information, go to a graphic novel about how art can save a life, immigration, and https://bit.ly/3cTqzT9 belonging. Meeting link sent by e-mail once registered at Monthly Makers: Birds, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday through https://bit.ly/31eNDpU Saturday, through April 24. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, Cinderella Around the World, 6:30 p.m., virtual. Hosted by 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to Wadsworth Library. Make a crown, a gem-encrusted slipper, a view birds created by local families. Get inspired and consider butterfly fairy wand, and paper dolls. Learn about versions of becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are story of Cinderella from around the world and hear from one provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according from the Ojibwa people. Supplies packet pickup April 20 through to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking May 4, at the library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Register for lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. supplies at https://bit.ly/3vSGARQ View program at American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Hinckley https://bit.ly/3nWWoPC Fire Old Station, 1410 Ridge Road, Hinckley. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Wednesday, April 28 Genealogy Slam, 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., virtual. Caring for Your Kiss Your Mate Day and National Great Poetry Reading Day Treasures presented at 1 p.m., learn how to protect heirlooms. Could be a perfect combination! Applying to Lineage Societies presented at 2:15 p.m., learn how to preserve family history by joining a lineage society. Can attend Thursday, April 29 one or both sessions, registration covers both. Meeting link sent International Dance Day Celebrate with an impromptu dance by e-mail once registered at https://bit.ly/3tKj0EW party! American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick Sunday, April 25 United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. National Hug a Plumber Day https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Natural Discoveries Self-Guided Hiking Series: Spring is in Full Swing!, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., last day, Bluebell Valley, 8504 Friday, April 30 Richman Road, Lodi. Discover wonders of spring while hiking. National Honesty Day Signs along the nature trail with one sign having a code word to American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural United Methodist Church, 4747 Foote Road, Medina. Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp https://bit.ly/3cTqzT9

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Monday, April 26 National Pretzel Day American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Cleveland Clinic Family Health Center Brunswick, 3574 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Virtual Sensory Friendly Story Time, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., with Wadsworth Library. Designed for children on the autism

Submitting Calendar Events Listings in the calendar must be events, festivals or fairs hosted by or benefitting a nonprofit organization in Medina County. Send submissions to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com and put CALENDAR in the subject line. Information is not accepted by phone. The calendar also is available online at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com on the Events: Let’s Do It! tab at the top of the page or in the drop-down menu on mobile devices, where it is regularly updated.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021

Joy of Medina County Magazine

Looking for Novels, Poems, and Short Stories We're looking for writers! Do you know someone who has written a book but never got it published? Someone who is frustrated with trying to enter the publishing world and finding they have to be published before they can be be published? Someone who has written a terrific short story or poem? Joy of Medina County Magazine is currently accepting submissions to be the next featured Reading Nook book and for poems and short stories! Writers of all ages are welcome. For details and the official submission form, please go to: https://bit.ly/39wSAyQ


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Celebrate! Joy of Medina County Magazine thanks and celebrates these great companies who believe in community and make it possible for readers to enjoy this magazine for free. Please thank the following companies for bringing Joy to you! Cable, Internet, Phone

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photo by: Mike Enerio


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2021