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My work is black/sociopolitical from the point of conception. - Juan Logan


Cover Passed Down, 2010, mixed media, 72” x 96”

Digital publication jointly produced by Logan Studios and CuratorLove, (2016). All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be produced, stored or transmitted in any shape, way or form by any means without written permission by the producers.  This catalog is not intended to be used for authentication purposes.


Contents About Juan Logan 10 11

Contact Bio

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What do you See? By Erika Hirugami, BA

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Sweetmare By John W. Love Jr.

Curriculum Vitae 37 39 42 48

Public Art Commissions Solo Exhibits - Museums Solo Exhibits - Institutions Solo Exhibits - Galleries

76 79 86 91

Awards Collections Lectures Residencies

Bibliography 92 Books and Catalogues 101 Articles and Periodicals Art

53 59 69 71

Group Shows - Museums Group Shows - Institutions Group Shows - Art Fairs Group Shows - Galleries

125 127

List of Works Video


Juan Logan 305 Henry Chapel Road., Belmont, NC 28012 (919) 260-4492 | juanlogan@gmail.com www.juanlogan.com


Bio Juan Logan was born in Nashville, Tennessee. He received his MFA from the Maryland Institute College of Art, Mount Royal School in Baltimore focusing on painting and mixed-media sculpture. He currently lives and works out of Belmont, North Carolina. Logan’s artworks address the American experience. Simultaneously abstract and representational, his paintings, drawings, sculptures, installations, and videos address the convergences of race, place, and power. Making the hierarchical relations and social stereotypes visible and how they shape individuals, institutions, and the material and mental landscapes of contemporary life. Juan Logan is currently the Conservation Manager at the Vollis Simpson Whirligig Project, which is actively restoring thirty-one large-scale sculptures created by artist Vollis Simpson for the city of Wilson, NC.

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“What do you see?” - Juan Logan

“There is no art without intoxication. But I mean a mad intoxication! Let reason teeter! Delirium! The highest degree of delirium! Plunged in burning dementia! Art is the most enrapturing orgy within man’s reach. Art must make you laugh a little and make you a little afraid.” - Jean Dubuffet

Aesthetically seductive, yet socio politically charged; confrontational yet inviting, captivating and provocative are the artworks by Juan Logan. In a recent art journey, I came across his body of work at Logan Studios and became quickly intoxicated. Unlike encountering them in a museum space, an institution or a gallery; here I found myself entranced in a different type of aesthetic journey; one that would lead me to 15


experience an understanding which I had not encountered before. Juan Logan’s body of work is fascinating; enchanting and challenging all at once, unapologetic and strong with hints of sarcasm and irony that serve to challenge the viewer into engaging with the heavy issues he addresses with every piece he produces. I visited Logan studios with my colleagues at the time; several curators in one room and a different type of aesthetic experience is bound to happen. I had recently become involved in curatorial research for the first ever African American exhibition in a museum in South Carolina. As a Kress Foundation scholar it was my task to deeply delve into the Kress foundation works in the permanent collection of the museum. Because of my involvement in this project, I was asked to accompany my colleagues to visit Logan Studios. Meeting Juan was one of those experiences nothing could have prepared me for. Upon venturing into Logan Studios I became fascinated by what I encountered on the walls before me. Every inch of that massive warehouse type structure was filled with canvas amongst canvas, sculptures, ready made found objects, puzzle pieces, catalogues, photographs, stampers, you name it, the aesthetic journey of a single man throughout time was unraveling before my eyes. What happened inside this space was an experience far beyond the depths of my imagination. As soon as I came into this space I was incredibly captivated by the history that surrounded the place. Juan had “about 40 years of work� within his studio (as he so gracefully put it). I recall coming into the space with no expectations, but I immediately felt a desire to submerse myself within this art space and the experience I was privileged to witness gave more so than just that. I happily followed him around as he showed me work, after work. He answered every possible question I could come up with, and the more I learned the more I felt compelled by what I saw.

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Juan Logan began his artistic career circa 1969, and as of today has been a part of over two hundred and fifty exhibitions that range from art fairs to art galleries, and from Intuitions to Museums around the world. His artwork is a part of multimilliondollar corporate collections, world renown private collections and museums; Logan has also been commissioned by various cities to produce public art works. Logan is one of those rare artists that transcend media by challenging the viewers to discuss the relevant concerns of modern society by engaging with his artworks.

A singular symbol emerged time and time again from within the various compositions at Logan’s studio, the shape of a head; an abstract head broken down to its bare essentials aesthetically standing for a myriad of possibilities, that of a person, that of a race, that of Logan himself, that of myself even. The simply rendered shape took various different positions and levels of importance in the myriad of artworks he has produced, for some it was the all-encompassing shape of the artwork that hosted the composition, some works made of paper other of iron. In other instances, this shape repeated throughout the composition in various sizes and media. For some works, the head is a singular shape, in other instances its covered in puzzle pieces, some are glitter based, others are rusted pieces of medal or even stamped on top of wallpaper disguised as background.

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Parallel to the concepts being questioned by Sol LeWitt, Carl Andre and Frank Stella, Juan Logan uses modular form in his aesthetic vocabulary to confront his own concerns within his practice. To explore modulation as an aesthetically driven grammatical device, Logan uses the afore mentioned head shape through various of his compositions and thus is granted a larger freedom to explore certain aspects and concerns. However, in making use of this vocabulary Logan stays away from creating conceptual art and infuses his own very unique perspective within his compositions to make a more tangible argument that is more easily accessible to his audience. With this single shape, Logan allows the viewer to take part of the conversation, Logan places himself into the dialogue and even speaks of a multitude of individuals at once that within a single instance become a cohesive community of people involved in articulating one particular query. Similar to his pop-art contemporaries such as Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein and Richard Hamilton to name a few, Juan Logan has condensed the information he carefully selected to be a part of his compositions, and rendered simple to digest figures that are easily recognizable within the cannon of aesthetic appreciation. Which is not to say that Juan is a pop-artist himself, because 18


to state so would fall short of cohesively understanding his trajectory of art and how his aesthetic style has evolved over time. Yet his choice to create complex compositions with easy to recognize forms and symbols allows the viewer to experience a deeper understanding and to have an intimate conversation with Logan’s artwork. As Mark Sloan, Director of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art in Charleston articulates; “Seduced by the beauty of the work we are then drawn into the complexities of the content.” Thus Logan’s artworks entice the viewer to have a deep and meaningful reaction to the subject matter he pushes to the forefront of the dialog. Logan’s artwork is analogous to Neo-Dadaist Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg’s own aesthetic practices. Like his colleagues, the meaning of Logan’s work does not necessarily lie within the object of aesthetic appreciation set forth before us, but instead a greater understanding comes from the interaction between the viewer and the subject matter being challenged by Logan himself. Thus the core idea that Logan places in the conversation has an innumerable amount of meanings and possibilities. As the artist articulates himself about his series of artwork entitled Reliquaries, “It is the love of the material as a tool… whatever my original feelings and intent, as time passes the particular shape or form or color that may have one meaning to me may become different from what I originally intended. In the process the whole story is never on the surface.” Therefore, a new language emerges from within the canvas, from within the restructure and composition of the ready found objects that take shape into sculptures produced by Logan. The countless other aesthetic articulations go far beyond media to transcend their own connotations and articulate tangible concerns that he challenges within his aesthetic discourse. In a sense Logan’s found-object artworks exist in the rift between art and life, with innovative practices 19


and rare materials Logan sets forth a new kind of aesthetic challenge, a seductive yet compelling dialogue that emerges from within the core of his artworks. Such is the case of Sugar House (shown in page 1819), a magnificent 6 x 16 foot canvas whose sheer existence commanded attention during my visit to Logan Studios. I was immediately drawn to it because of the texture, the color even its size seduced me toward coming closer. As I made my way through the space, every step I took lead me in its direction. I came within feet from it and found myself entranced in its seductive beauty, every inch of this outstanding artwork made me yearn to feel it, to comprehend it, to discuss it, to articulate what it was trying to convey. Upon seeing my initial reaction Logan began to explain the various intricate messages he inlaid within this work. For instance, with it he is referencing the mistreatment that slaves phased historically as they were being tortured in houses of correction; yet he also alludes to illnesses, behavior and a myriad of other concerns both historical and contemporary. As I visually explored the various artworks immediately visible surrounding me at Logan Studios, Juan Logan was incredibly generous in answering my concerns and pushing my ever present inquisitive nature toward places I had yet to concern myself

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with. I got a rare glimpse into his series Ghost, it demanded my attention placed over a table; one by one all six artworks that make up the entire series laid bare in front of me demanding my attention. This series of etchings are dark in nature, each of the six square shaped prints shows a single form, a semi visible, almost distant shape that appeared to disappear before my eyes; each showing a different type of ghost. Similar to Lázsló Moholy-Nagy’s photographs by which he incorporated the optical eloquence of light into his compositions to transcend the limitations of his medium at the time. Logan’s etchings thus conveys a potent concern in a very subdued way. As I was presented with this series of prints, Logan asked me “Well… what do you see?” I looked and looked but could not make out any single clue that could give me a hint about the images I was looking at. To me they where fluid; these dark squares in front of me each showed me a form, a form I had not seen, something that was unfamiliar, something new, something strange, something that intrigued me but at this point I was unaware as to why. I stepped back, I took a moment, I was unable to ascertain the answer after a couple of minutes. Logan thus began to place foreign objects in front of me that were being obscured by an adjacent box. He pulled from within that box, leg irons, shackles, and finally an iron neck ring. Amongst the various concerns that inform Logan’s aesthetic practice is a heavy influence by the historical past of the African American 23


people in this country. Logan has been collecting these objects as a way of research for his ongoing practices, similar to Betye Saar’s aesthetic queries by which a series of found objects become witness to her aesthetic process, so too thus Logan’s work begins with a concept he challenges himself; a concept often witnessed by a historical object that Logan later articulates aesthetically and presents to his audience aesthetically. As Lyneise Williams points out “Casting a critical eye, he broadly delineates the territory of American history and culture to include all of its complicated interactions regarding power, economics and race.” Thus inquisitively and aesthetically exploring the relations between power and race both historically and contemporarily, are some of the many concerns palpable within Logan’s artworks. Because Juan Logan grew up in the South during the end of segregation and the Civil Rights Movement, he intimately understood African – Americans’ desire to define themselves on their own terms. Logan expresses himself aesthetically through his artwork while also allowing it to serve as a vessel for larger questions, concerns, and dialogues personal and general alike. As he articulates about his upcoming work entitled The Waiting Project by which he challenges contemporary police brutality: We must all use our skills and passions to create a broader forum for conversation and action. This project is important, relevant, and means so much to millions of Americans who care about the outcome of police violence against African-Americans, and Americans as a whole. 24


Bringing forth a unique dialogue as represented by his artwork and calling for other individuals to get involved in the same queries allows Logan’s work to be at the forefront of aesthetic praxis and thus transcend its own connotations of medium, geography or even temporality. Similar to Mark Bradford aesthetic repertoire, Juan Logan employs his own process to converse about larger concerns and supplies his viewers

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with messages that they can easily digest toward becoming involved with a larger conversation that seeks to bring about a change within the way contemporary society behaves. By defying categorization and cultural expectations, Logan’s aesthetic practice places his artwork at the trenches of an exchange that he demands from his audience with every single artwork he produces. Yet Logan manages to deliver this message with a hint of satire and a bit of poignant sarcasm. Such is the case of Keeping America Strong in which Logan places easily recognizable imagery, such as that of an American flag, a phallus and a capirote which together challenge the preconceived notions of African American masculinity as understood by the general populous today. In showing such easily accessible symbolism Logan simplifies the dense subject matter that he is provoking. Similar to Robert Mapplethorpe’s Man in a Polyester Suit, or Fahamu Pecou’s Fra-Gee-Lay. It is clear that Logan understands the ravaging delirium that one bares witness to upon coming across his masterpieces, therefore he infuses each one of them with a deeper meaning; a conversation, a concern to be had and the necessity to delve deep with every encounter. Be it a painting at a museum, a sculpture at a gallery, a monumental work at an institution, a work of public art made of stone or in the intimacy provided by Logan Studios. What I saw that day filled me with a sense of desperation for acknowledging how little I knew about the subjects he was confronting. Since leaving this space I dug a little deeper, called him a couple of times and kept his aesthetic practice mindfully ever present. 26


Logan’s seductive artistic practice now follows me everywhere I go, be it at the High Museum, The Harvey B. Gantt Center’s public façade or even his online presence. Every so sporadically I am privileged to recall the experience of coming across Juan Logan and his work, and how that has changed the way I experience aesthetic conversations presented at me ever since. His work transcends standards of beautyby having a compelling conversation with the viewer and allowing for an alternative engagement that goes deeper that the work placed in front of him. It could be that his years of experience and outstanding trajectory make it so that his work is persuasive. It could be the simplicity of his aesthetic cannon and how easily relatable his language is to comprehend. It could be that like his contemporaries, Logan has presented via aesthetic processes every concern that has tug at his heart strings, it can also be that his work is inviting, intriguing, bewildering and mystifying. It can be the history that he conveys within his renderings, it can be the challenge he provokes within his viewers. It can be that way in which he represents his concerns, it can also be that the man is a genius. Regardless of reason or in spite the need for one as Picasso mentioned once, “we all know that Art is not truth. Art is a lie that makes us realize the truth, at least the truth that is given to us to understand.” If Logan’s work is a lie that will gain us closer to a truth about our ourselves, about our times, about our society, about the way we interact with one another because of reasons such as race or power; then it is of upmost importance that we take a moment to pause, and ask ourselves as Juan Logan once asked me himself “What do you see?”

By Erika Hirugami, MA Founder & Chief Executive Officer at CuratorLove Getty Foundation Curatorial Researcher & Kress Foundation Scholar 27


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SWEETMARE is a literary response by John W. Love, Jr. to “I’ll Save You Tomorrow”, Juan Logan’s exhibition of visual works.

SWEETMARE© Something minuscule could no longer bear its own weight. This was just the beginning. i SELF STUFFED Hiding in plain sight and slipping inside selective moments of catatonia was not some cloying, candy-assed bit of child’s play. It was a carefully bound parcel of survival...and all the packages were prone to bruising. • They were stacked like beautifully boxed shoes; spaced, de-papered, and squeezed like naked little chocolates. Not even the missing babies hidden and voluntarily self-stuffed in the corners could make the un-so, so.

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Nothing could make this a place of delicacies. There was nothing sweet about The Sugar House. Nothing. • Not a goddamned thing. ii THINNED Their offspring’s skin would become known for brushing off like dust and rust and metal filings; for deriving too much pleasure in slipping across unsuspecting flesh and drawing the tiniest bits of blood. Their kisses would initially taste like vacation, and vanilla bean, and a burnt pepper; taste like a promise and then vault into the full on disappointment of a lie. Bearing no weight and leaving no mark, these babies’ kisses would only leave the indelible stain of a voiceless gasp. When kisses run around like tasteless molasses that gesture is actually too cruel to be innocent. • Dissipation can be an intoxicatingly dark art. There is a skill to diluting horror to the point of overlay, to a wash of filmy residue worn as an anemic glamour. So what is the secret to The Art of Dissipation? 30


Discourage your mythic behemoths and wayward whales from finding their elusive oceans. Encourage your ghosts to beach themselves across their own bloodlines - up your nose, down your throat, and over your psyche. Never root yourself in your now. Always make it about what mama and ‘nem’s people used to do. • Standing on a pile of salt the sweet voiced Daddy said it all very clearly, “Surviving the survival...now that’s a stealth train without a whistle. Don’t be the fool to get caught up in my reflection on the tracks. Choo-muthafuckin’-chooo.” Like the first and tiniest of hairline fractures in a glacier, something small cracked in the distance. iii STAIN AND SMEAR Teeny-tiny. Raised like Braille. Internal scars are real but scarification en utero? Well that shit was legendary. 31


Teeny-tiny. Raised like Braille. It was said those second, third, fourth, fifth…line of babies were born with an endless parade of ellipses as birthmarks. It turns out they weren’t ellipses at all. • The room smelled of bleach, crisp dingy linens, and a tenacious strain of piss. She was always calm in the beginning, “I never aspired to be a Sphinx. Somebody please read me correctly. The constancy of the clumsy ones getting it wrong is an unbearable bit of tedium.” She was calm until things took their customary flight into the blades of her screams. The fingers of the old ones were repeatedly sliced and singed as they tried to coax, tease a little meaning out of her flesh, “All I ever inherited from my muthafuckin’ daddy was a goddamned muthafuckin’ keloid! And for the first eternity of unbearable days that shit wept more than I did! Yeaaah, teeny-tiny, raised like Braille, muthafuckas! What ‘chall readin’?” They weren’t ellipses at all. They were shimmering bits of flesh casting shadows of brass rings and floating hoops worn as haloes, shadows of puzzled personages and lost lottery tickets...golden tickets fading into paper thin dreams inked with the right numbers in all the wrong colors. Seven generations later and a certain insidious dust still hadn’t worked itself up, out, or through any of the babies’ skin. She had sweetmares.

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She was the first to actually admit that she had sweetmares, and she had them…all…the…time. When a new baby gurgles in tune with a lonely implosion far away it is a breathtaking confirmation that they have been born with perfect pitch. He was such a new baby. iii DIM HUNTERS The welcome mat to hell has always been a scream. The color of the travesty was the color of dirty butter. That’s why you need salt to cleanse things. • No entity that is to be taken seriously hunts with a dull blade. • They thought she was dead. The first self-stuffed baby girl, they thought she was dead.

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Their hubris ate up their instincts and their ignorance was a blessing. They knew she was missing but were too dim to smell the high hanging fruit of a not yet bleeding girl hiding in plain sight. They didn’t think she could get very far. Little did they know it was her formidable three week missing, pretty-eyed, nappy headed little girl-ness that made the decision not to go anywhere. They thought she was dead because they believed their own myths of her worthlessness as they called her ‘a twisted backed bitch who didn’t even have berries yet’…as if that were a weakness. Mean and dirty words are dirty magic and dirty magic makes people filthy in stupidity. That’s why you need salt to cleanse things. I mean where else did these fools think the other missing babies had gone? The rafters were full. vi HOISTING THE OILY Spoken sweetly, Daddy’s words were salty. • Hoisted.

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There were big people parts tied, hooked, hung like meat walking through a perpetual purgatory that didn’t have the decency to lead to death. The misery had run its course. It was time to walk and actually get somewhere. • “Baby girl, Daddy needs you to make a decision. Soon the bitterest one will be here alone. In the thickest swathe of the velvet darkness I need you to either slit his throat or slit mine. The treadmill must stop. It’s time to walk and actually get somewhere.” There was nothing sweet about The Sugar House. Nothing. Not a goddamned thing. v 13 generations down the line, born with the same face and same scars, a 7 year old boy of blue- black skin and silver-white hair was awakened from a particularly fitful sleep. “Wake up, baby boy! Wake up! You were having a sweetmare!”

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“Huh?”, he chirped. “Wake-up...sweetmare...for real?! Haha! Don’t ch’all know don’t nobody ever wake up from a sweetmare? Hahaaaaa! This time Salt Daddy and I discussed how he wants me to fly into transcendence as opposed to fucking with the train. He said because nobody has a blissful sense of the absurd or gazes at their destinies with the same affection they gaze at their asses nobody ever languishes in the magic of it all. They never laugh when he says, Surviving the survival...now that’s a stealth train without a whistle. Don’t be the fool to get caught up in my reflection on the tracks. Choo-muthafuckin’-chooo. Haha! For some reason I’m crying but I still think it’s funny. I still think Salt Daddy is funny.” It was at this point that a tiny delusion shattered along with a minuscule crystal from the chandelier. Then without warning, a symphonic shattering of crystals and delusions became the soundtrack to his little life...forever. He asked his mama for some sugah and she gave him all he could handle. As she kissed his thick and delicately lined feet, she noticed that within this moment they carried a new and salty little message of their own, Save your breath, if you must wait until tomorrow, don’t save me at all. It was pitched perfectly for a symphony still to be written.

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Public Art Commissions 2010 | Grounded Here | Warnersville/Ashe Street Project |Action Greensboro, NC. 2009 | Horizon Lines | Raleigh Arts Commission, City Plaza | Raleigh, NC. 2008-2009 | Intersections | Gantt Center for African American Arts and Culture | Charlotte, NC. 2006-2017 | North Carolina Freedom Monument | Raleigh, NC. 2001 | Elements of Time | Hillside Park | City of Durham, NC. 1998 | Choose Your Destiny | Green Fair Manor Housing Program | Lubbock, TX. 1998 | Home | Gaston County Courthouse | Gastonia, NC. 1997 | The Seed | Biomedical/Biotechnology Center, North Carolina Central University | NC. 1996 | The Journey | Charlotte Chamber of Commerce | Charlotte, NC. 1996 | Roads Home | Charlotte Transportation Center | Charlotte, NC. 1995 | The Message | City of Belmont, NC. 1995 | Pillar of Enlightenment | Gaston County Public Library | Gastonia, NC. 1994 | I’ve Known Rivers | Charlotte Convention Center | Charlotte, NC. 1993 | Freedom’s Footbridge | Happy Hill Garden Mart | Winston-Salem, NC.

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Solo Exhibitions - Museum

2014 | Juan Logan: I’ll Save You Tomorrow | The Ogden Museum of Southern Art New Orleans, LA. 2012 | Juan Logan: Without Stopping | Weatherspoon Art Museum Greensboro, NC. 2009 | Juan Logan: Leisure Space | Gantt Center for African American Arts and Culture |, Charlotte, NC. 2006 | Juan Logan: The Third Place, Paintings, Drawings and Sculptures Museum of Art Duluth, MN. 2005 | Juan Logan: Full Disclosure | Greenville County Museum of Art Greenville, SC. 2002 | Juan Logan: Whose Song Shall I Sing? | Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art | Boulder, CO.

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Solo Exhibitions - Museum (cont)

1997 | Juan Logan: not separate and apart from | St. Johns Museum of Art Wilmington, NC. 1997 | Effective Sight: The Paintings of Juan Logan | Asheville Art Museum Asheville, NC. 1994 | Effective Sight: The Paintings of Juan Logan | St. John’s Museum of Art Wilmington, NC. 1994 | ART Currents 15: Juan Logan / Tucker’s Grove | Mint Museum of Art Charlotte, NC. 1992 | Juan Logan: Observations | Tubman African American Museum Macon, GA. 1986 | Juan Logan: Paintings and Drawings | Gaston County Museum of Art and History | Dallas, NC. 1973 | Juan Logan: Reconstruction Period | Mint Museum of Art Charlotte, NC.

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Solo Exhibitions - Institutions 2012 | Juan Logan: Pleasure and Power | Barton Art Galleries, Barton College Wilson, NC. 2009 | Juan Logan – Notes and Observations | African American Atelier Greensboro, NC. 2007 | Juan Logan: Notes and Observations | Rocky Mount Arts Center at the Imperial Centre | Rocky Mount, NC. 2006 | Juan Logan: Caught Off Guard, Selected Works from 1965-2005 Sturgis Gallery of Art, Kennesaw State University | Kennesaw , GA. 2000 | Juan Logan: Black and Blue | John and June Allcott Gallery, University of North Carolina | Chapel Hill, NC. 2000 | Juan Logan: Other Considerations | Trahern Gallery, Austin Peay State University | Clarksville, TN. 2000 | Juan Logan: Unconscious Bias | Gallery of Art and Design, North Carolina State University | Raleigh, NC. 2000 | Juan Logan: Prints | Rockefeller Model Center, Elon University Elon, NC.

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2000 | Juan Logan: Reliquaries, | The World Bank Washington, D.C. 2000 | Juan Logan: A Selection of Prints From The 90s’ | The Print Center Philadelphia, PA. 1998 | Juan Logan: Ginned: An Installation | Wellington B. Gray Gallery, East Carolina University | Greenville, SC. 1994 | Juan Logan: not separate and apart from | Knight Gallery, Spirit Square Center for Arts and Education | Charlotte, NC. 1993 | Juan Logan: Recent Paintings | Fine Arts Center, School District of Greenville County | Greenville, SC. 1992 | Juan Logan: Private Traps | Cleveland Community College Shelby, NC. 1992 | Juan Logan: Private Traps | Carolina Mills Gallery, Lincoln Cultural Center Lincolnton, NC. 1992 | Juan Logan: The Art of Juan Logan | The Arts and Science Center Statesville, NC. 1990 | Juan Logan: Soldiers For Common and Uncommon Wars Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University |, Blacksburg, VA. 1990 | Juan Logan: Selected Works | North Carolina State University, School of Design Gallery | Raleigh, NC. 1987 | Juan Logan: The Artist and His Collection | Green Hill Center for North Carolina Art |, Greensboro, NC.

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1986 | Juan Logan: Paintings and Drawings | Afro-American Cultural Center Charlotte, NC. 1985 | Juan Logan: Recent Paintings and Drawings | Gaston College, Dallas, NC. 1985 | Juan Logan: Early and Current Works, 1970 - 1984 | North Carolina Central University | Durham, NC. 1983 | Juan Logan: Recent Work | Rowe Gallery, University of North Carolina Charlotte, NC. 1980 | Juan Logan: Sculpture | Frederick Douglas Institute Washington, DC. 1979 | Juan Logan: Paintings | Winston-Salem State University Winston-Salem, NC. 1976 | Juan Logan: Sculpture | South Carolina State University Orangeburg, SC. 1974 | Juan Logan: Constructional Forms | Winthrop Gallery, Winthrop College Rock Hill, SC. 1973 | Juan Logan: Paintings and Sculpture | North Carolina A & T State University Greensboro, NC. 1973 | Juan Logan: Drawings and Sculpture | Davidson College Davidson, NC. 1972 | Juan Logan: Sculpture | Barber-Scotia College Concord, NC.

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1971 | Juan Logan: Recent Work, 1969 -1971 | Sacred Heart College Belmont, NC. 1994 | Juan Logan: Instincts | Jerald Melberg Gallery Charlotte, NC. 1993 | Effective Sight: The Paintings of Juan Logan | Roland Gibson Gallery, Potsdam College of the State University of New York | New York, NY. 1993 | Juan Logan: Postcards From Home | Wilmer Jennings Gallery at Kenkeleba | New York, NY. 1993 | Juan Logan: Paintings | Isobel Neal Gallery Chicago, IL. 1993 | Juan Logan: New Paintings | The McIntosh Gallery Atlanta, GA. 1992 | Juan Logan: New Small Scale Paintings | Jerald Melberg Gallery Charlotte, NC. 1991 | Juan Logan: Talisman, Shaman and Soothsayer | Isobel Neal Gallery Chicago, IL. 1990 | Juan Logan: Sacred Symbols | Jerald Melberg Gallery Charlotte, NC. 1990 | Juan Logan: Paintings | Marita Gilliam Gallery | Raleigh, NC. 1989 | Juan Logan: A Ten Year Retrospective | The Theatre Arts Galleries High Point, NC.

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1988 | Juan Logan: The Past Five Years | The McIntosh Gallery Atlanta, GA. 1987 | Juan Logan: Paintings and Drawings | Lucien Crump Gallery Philadelphia, PA. 1987 | Juan Logan: Drawings and Paintings | Gallery Two Nine One Atlanta, GA. 1985 | Juan Logan: Paintings | Deborah Peverall Gallery Charlotte, NC. 1985 | Juan Logan: Recent Paintings | Somerhill Gallery Durham, NC. 1974 | Juan Logan: Paintings | Queens College Art Gallery Charlotte, NC. 1969 | Juan Logan: Paintings | Jefferson Gallery Denver, CO.

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Solo Exhibitions - Galleries 2013 | Juan Logan: The Other City | N’Namdi Contemporary Miami, FL. 2005 | Juan Logan: Close Inspection | Sumter Gallery of Art Sumter, SC. 2005 | Juan Logan: Thirty Years of Painting | Elder Art Gallery Charlotte, NC. 2003 | Juan Logan: Whose Song Shall I Sing? | City Gallery at Waterfront Park Charleston, SC. 2002 | Juan Logan: Whose Song Shall I Sing? | Michigan Avenue Galleries, Chicago Cultural Center | Chicago, IL. 1999 | Juan Logan: Sculpture & Prints | Gomez Gallery Baltimore, MD. 1998 | Juan Logan: Standard Practices: Reliquaries for America Hodges Taylor Gallery | Charlotte, NC.

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1998 | Juan Logan: Paintings | Gomez Gallery Baltimore, MD. 1998 | Juan Logan: Standard Practices: Reliquaries for America Landmark Gallery, Department of Art, Texas Tech University | Lubbock, TX. 1997 | Juan Logan: My America | Morris Gallery Columbia, SC. 1996 | Juan Logan: Paintings | June Kelly Gallery New York, NY. 1995 | Juan Logan: not separate and apart from | Diggs Gallery, Winston-Salem State University | Winston-Sale, NC. 1995 | Juan Logan: Recent Linocuts | Isobel Neal Gallery Chicago, IL.

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Group Exhibitions - Museums

2013 | Civil Rights: Then, Now and When | IP Stanback Museum Orangeburg, SC. 2012 | Recent Acquisitions | Weatherspoon Art Museum Greensboro, NC. 2010 | On the Mark: Contemporary Works on Paper | Baltimore Museum of Art |Baltimore, MD. 2009 | Kaleidoscope: Changing Views of the Permanent Collection Cameron Art Museum | Wilmington, NC. 2009 | Selections from the Permanent Collection | Tweed Museum of Art Duluth, MN. 2009 | Prop Master: An Installation by Juan Logan with Susan Harbage Page Gibbes Museum of Art, Charleston, SC. 2008 | Scene In America: A Contemporary Look at the Black Male Image Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte, NC. 2008 | Landscape of Slavery: The Plantation In American Art | Morris Museum of Art | Augusta, GA. 55


2008 | Living African American Artists of North Carolina | Greenville Museum of Art | Greenville, NC. 2008 | Black & White | Cameron Art Museum Wilmington, NC. 2008 | Art and Social Conscience: The Holocaust | Louise Wells Cameron Art Museum | Wilmington, NC. 2007 | Practicing Contemporaries | Ackland Art Museum Chapel Hill, NC. 2005 | University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Faculty Artists Biennial Ackland Art Museum | Chapel Hill, NC. 2004 | A History of Color | Greenville County Museum of Art Greenville, SC. 2004 | Prevalence of Ritual | African American Museum of Nassau County Hempstead, NY. 2004 | The Nature of Craft and the Penland Experience | Mint Museum of Art Charlotte, NC. 2004 | Art in the South: The Charleston Perspective | Gibbes Museum of Art Charleston, SC. 2004 | Sum Parts: From The Permanent Collection | Memphis Brooks Museum of Art | Memphis, TN. 2003 | The Felt Moment | Columbia Museum of Art Columbia, SC. 2003 | Passing | Mint Museum of Art Charlote, NC. 56


2003 | New South, Old South, Somewhere in Between | Levine Museum of the New South | Charlotte, NC. 2003 | Contemporary Western North Carolina: Works On Paper | Asheville Museum of Art | Asheville, NC. 2003 | University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Faculty Artists Biennial Ackland Art Museum | Chapel NC. 2002 | Celebrating the Legacy of Romare Bearden: A Juried Exhibition Mint Museum of Art, Dickson Gallery | Charlotte, NC. 2002 | Coming of Age | Mint Museum of Craft and Design Charlotte, NC. 2002 | Art of the United States: Selections from the Permanent Collection Mint Museum of Art | Charlotte, NC. 2001 | Absence of Color | Philadelphia Museum of Art Philadelphia, PA. 2001 | Journey Towards Sunrise | Asheville Art Museum Asheville, NC. 2001 | Subjectivity: i-den’-ti-ty | The Chapel Hill Museum Ackland, NC. 2000 | Biennial Faculty Exhibition, Ackland Art Museum Chapel Hill, NC. 2000 | Carolina Contemporary | Hickory Museum of Art Hickory, NC. 2000 | An Inaugural Gift | Mint Museum of Craft and Design Charlotte, NC. 57


2000 | Coping With Reality, James E. Lewis Museum of Art, Morgan State University | Baltimore, MD. 2000 | An Exuberant Bounty: Prints and Drawings by African Americans Philadelphia Museum of Art | Philadelphia , PA. 2000 | Reliquaries for America | San Francisco Craft and Folk Art Museum San Francisco, CA. 1998 | Recent Acquisitions To The Permanent Collection | St. John’s Museum of Art Wilmington, NC. 1997 | Charles Fambro and Juan Logan - Paintings, Prints and Collages Waterloo Museum of Art | Waterloo, IA. 1997 | Think Dinky International Invitational | Modern Museum Durham, NC. 1995 | Civil Rights Now | Parrish Art Museum Southhampton, NY. 1994 | 1994 Montgomery Biennial: Chiaroscuro - A Contemporary Study of Light and Dark |Montgomery Museum of Art | Montgomery, AL. 1993 | 20th Annual Exhibition | Asheville Art Museum Asheville, NC. 1992 | Artists for North Carolina Art | St. John’s Museum of Art Wilmington, NC. 1992 | Inside Visions | Asheville Art Museum Asheville, NC. 1991 | Premier 91 | Greenville Museum of Art Greenville, NC. 58


1988 | Dare to Dream | Hezekiah Alexander History Museum Charlotte, NC. 1987 | Charlotte Collects | Mint Museum of Art Charlotte, NC. 1986 | North Carolina Artists Invitational | Hickory Museum of Art Hickory, NC. 1986 | Choosing: An Exhibit of Changing Perspectives in Modern Art and Art Criticism by Black Americans, 1925 -1985 | Museum of Science and Industry Chicago, IL. 1986 | Selections from North Carolina National Bank’s Corporate Collection Gaston County Museum of Art and History | Dallas, NC. 1980 | Afro-American Artists: North Carolina USA | North Carolina Museum of Art | Raleigh, NC. 1976 | Leo Twiggs - Juan Logan | Fayetteville Museum of Art vFayetteville, NC. 1974 | Directions In Afro-American Art | Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art Cornell University | Ithaca, NY. 1972 | National Exhibition / Black Artists | New Jersey State Museum Trenton, NJ 1971 | North Carolina Artists Annual | North Carolina Museum of Art Raleigh, NC.

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Group Exhibitions - Institutions

2014 | arts/INDUSTRY: Collaboration and Revelation | John Michael Kohler Arts Center | Sheboygan, WI. 2013 | Dieu Donne Annual Benefit Exhibition | Dieu Donne | New York, NY. 2012 | Manifesting Memory – Plantation Legacies of the South | Art institute of Charleston, SC. 2012 | PULLED: Evidence of a Print Community | Case[werks] | Baltimore, MD. 2011 | Brian Garner: Collaborations From Litho Shop | Davidson College, Smith Gallery | Davidson, NC. 2009 | Collected | McColl Center for Visual Arts | Charlotte, NC. 2008 | Performing Gender | Winthrop University Galleries | Rock Hill, SC. 2008 | National Black Fine Arts Exhibition | Puck Building | New York, NY. 2008 | Unintended Relations | Clinton Junior College | Rock Hill, SC. 2007 | Dashangzi Art Festival | HuanTie International Arts Center | Beijing, China. 2007 | First 50: An Arts Center’s 50th Anniversary Exhibition | Rocky Mount Arts Center, Imperial Centre for the Arts and Sciences | Rocky Mount, NC. 61


2006 | Unstitched, Unbound; Imprints for Change | Nathan Cummings Foundation New York, NY. 2006 | Blurring Racial Barriers | Diggs Gallery, Winston-Salem State University Winston-Salem, NC. 2005 | Shared Spaces, Curated by Joe Ford, Director of City Without Walls Seton Hall University, Law School | South Orange, NJ. 2005 | Ascension: Works by African American Artists of North Carolina Diggs Gallery, Winston Salem State University | Winston-Salem, NC. 2005 | Noah’s Ark | TsingHua University Art Gallery | Beijing, China. 2005 | Homegrown: Southeast | Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art Winston-Salem, NC. 2005 | First Beijing International Art Camp Open Exhibition | Suojiacun Art Center Beijing, China. 2005 | Road in Sight | Duke University | Durham, NC. 2005 | Preserving the Legacy | Della Brown Taylor Art Gallery West Virginia State University, Institute | Charleston, WV. 2004 | Sculpture Retold | Green Hill Center for North Carolina Art Greensboro, NC. 2004 | Rituals | Breathe Art Space |Davidson, NC. 2004 | NC Arts Council’s 2004 Film and Visual Artist Fellowship Recipients Exhibition | McColl Center for Visual Arts |, Charlotte, NC. 2004 | Ascension: Works By African American Artists of North Carolina | Diggs Gallery, Winston-Salem State University | Winston-Salem NC. 62


2004 | Selections from the Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Darrell Walker Weston Art Gallery, Cincinnati Art Association, Aronoff Center for the Arts Weston, OH. 2003 | Off The Wall | Elon University Center for the Arts | Elon, NC. 2003 | Raleigh Outdoor Sculpture Expo | City of Raleigh Arts Commission Raleigh, NC. 2003 | Celebrating the Legacy of Romare Bearden | Mint Museum of Art and McColl Center for Visual Art | Charlotte, NC. 2003 | The Perfect Picture |Duke University Law School | Durham, NC. 2002 | Regional Perspectives | Museum of Art North Carolina Central University Durham, NC. 2002 | Biennial Exhibition: On Paper, Collaborations in Print and Pulp Memphis College of Art | Memphis, TN. 2002 | Eros Negras: Encountering The Black Female Body | Afro-American Cultural Center | Charlotte, NC. 2005 | Suitcase Exchange |Corban Estates Art Centre, Henderson Waitakere City | New Zealand. 2002 | A New Paradigm | School 33 Art Center | Baltimore, MD. 2002 | Shadows & Silhouettes: The Dangerous Faces of Willie Cole and Juan Logan | Memphis College of Art | Memphis, TN. 2002 | Works From The Collection of Glen & Florence Harymon Center for the Arts | Rock Hill, SC.

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2002 | Native Voices: New Jersey and Westward: The Rutgers Center for Innovative Print and Paper Fellowship Exhibition | Mason Gross School of the Arts Galleries New Brunswick, NJ. 2002 | National Black Fine Arts Exhibition | Puck Building New York, NY. 2002 | Breaking Ground: Building A New Land | John Bigers Gallery African American Cultural Center, North Carolina State University | Raleigh, NC. 2001 | Facing Each Other: Prints Concerning Identity | Rutgers Center for Innovative | Piscataway Township, NJ. 2001 | Print and Paper | Painted Bride Art Center | Philadelphia, PA. 2001 | Loom | Chatham Label Mill | Pittsboro, NC. 2001 | Residents: Summer @ Tryon Center | Tryon Center for Visual Arts Charlotte, NC. 2001 | Homegrown | Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art Winston-Salem, NC. 2001 | National Black Fine Arts Exhibition | Puck Building | New York, NY. 2001 | Our Common Ground | Horace Williams House of the Preservation Society of Chapel Hill | Chapel Hill, NC. 2001 | Expansions | The Durham Arts Guild | Durham, NC. 2000 | TROUBLE SHOOTING gun violence | Great Aunt Stella Center Charlotte, NC.

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2000 | Culture of Class: Issues of Class in North American Culture Decker & Meyerhoff Galleries, College of Art Baltimore | Baltimore, MD. 1999 | Mind and Eye: Works by Contemporary Maryland Artists Government House, Annapolis | Annapolis, MD. 1999 | Bold Poetry, Cade Fine Arts Center Gallery | Anne Arundel Community College | Arnold, MD. 1999 | On Site/In Sight: A Drawing Exhibition | Maryland Art Place Baltimore, MD. 1999 | 73rd Annual International Competition: Printmaking | The Print Center Philadelphia, PA. 1999 | Swift Currents II: African American Art in North Carolina | The Horace Williams House, The Chapel Hill Preservation Society | Chapel Hill, NC. 1999 | Allegories: “A Blues Suite for Rwanda”, Linocuts by Juan Logan and “Mariology”, Monoprints by Susan Page | Cleveland Community College | Shelby, NC. 1999 | Narratives In Print | Evergreen House, The Johns Hopkins University Baltimore, MD. 1999 | Altars In Open Space | Green Hill Center for North Carolina Art Greensboro, NC. 1998 | Tredje Internationella Litografiska Symposiet | Litografiska Akademin Tidaholm, Sweden 1998 | New Prints | Goya Girl Press | Baltimore, MD. 1997 | Augenmusik VI Exhibition | Peabody Archives | Peabody Conservatory of Music | Baltimore, MD. 65


1997 | Metal Forms | Durham Arts Council | Durham, NC. 1997 | Incoming | Maryland Art Place at Fells Point | Baltimore, MD. 1996 | TRAGIC WAKE: The Legacy of Slavery and the African Diaspora in Contemporary American Art | Spirit Square Center for Arts and Education Charlotte, NC. 1996 | Cultural Familiarity | Central Piedmont Community College, Art Gallery Charlotte, NC. 1996 | Augenmusik V Exhibition | Peabody Archives, Peabody Conservatory of Music | Baltimore, MD. 1996 | In Rare Form - Elizabeth Catlett & Juan Logan | Afro-American Cultural Center | Charlotte, NC. 1996 | NC/Barbados Exchange, Across the Spectrum: Contemporary Artists From North Carolina | Artspace | Raleigh, NC. 1995 | Bearing Witness | Suburban Fine Arts Center Highland Park, IL. 1994 | New Acquisitions | Afro-American Cultural Center | Charlotte, NC. 1994 | A Stylistic Dualism: Contemporary Trends In African-American Art National Afro-American Cultural Center | Wilberforce, OH. 1994 | New Acquisitions | Diggs Gallery, Winston-Salem State University Winston-Salem NC. 1993 | Selections From The John M. Howard Memorial Collection of African-American Art | Louisiana Arts and Science Center | Baton Rouge, LA. 66


1992 | NC Arts Council Artists Fellowships 1991-1992 | Green Hill Center for North Carolina Art | Greensboro, NC. 1992 | Four Black Artists of The 90’s | Gainesville College | Gainesville, GA. 1992 | Elizabeth Catlett and Juan Logan - Visual Narratives | A. Montgomery Ward Gallery, University of Illinois | Chicago, IL. 1991 | Currents in Contemporary African American Art | Purdue University West Lafayette, IN. 1991 | Selections from the John M. Howard Memorial Collection of African American Art | Southeast Arkansas Arts and Science Center | Pine Bluff, AR. 1991 | Diversity and Strength | Kennesaw State College Marietta, GA. 1990 | Sign, Symbol and Spirit | Lawton Gallery, University of Wisconsin Green Bay, WI. 1990 | Selected Works | Bob Jones University Greenville, SC. 1990 | The Charlotte Sister Cities 1990 International Art Exhibition Mecklenburg County and City of Charlotte Public Library | Charlotte, NC. 1990 | Dorothy Dehner - Juan Logan | Duke Ellington School for the Arts Washington, DC. 1990 | Selected Works | A. Montgomery Ward Gallery | University of Illinois Chicago, IL. 1989 | Selected Works | Cone Center Gallery, University of North Carolina Charlotte, NC. 67


1989 | Collected Afro-American Art: 20th Century Afro-American Art Gleaned from Raleigh Collections | Municipal Building Art Exhibitions Raleigh, NC. 1989 | Contemporary Greensboro | The Greensboro Artists League Greensboro, NC. 1989 | First Cranwell Galleries Invitational | Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | Blacksburg, VA. 1988 | Earthly Bounds: Environment as Metaphor | The Light Factory Charlotte, NC. 1988 | Juan Logan, Clarence Morgan, Leo Twiggs, Chester Williams The Waterworks Visual Arts Center |, Salisbury, NC. 1988 | Selections From The Collection of Dr. Harold Pride | Johnson C. Smith University | Charlotte, NC. 1988 | Romare Bearden, Juan Logan, Quentin Morris | Leary Seon Company Philadelphia, PA. 1988 | North/South Artists | Uptown Visual Arts Complex Philadelphia, PA. 1987 | Collector’s Choice: The Art of Collecting | North Carolina Central University | Durham, NC. 1986 | The Winter Show | Green Hill Center for North Carolina Art Greensboro, NC. 1986 | Three Painters - David Freeman, Juan Logan, Paul Martyka | The Waterworks Visual Arts Center | Salisbury, NC.

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1985 | Afro-American Art | Duke University Medical Center, Cultural Services Program | Durham, NC. 1985 | Six Artists | Spirit Square Center for the Arts Charlotte, NC. 1984 | Six North Carolina Artists | Pfeiffer College Misenheimer, NC. 1984 | Louisiana Watercolor Society’s 14th Annual International Exhibit New Orleans, LA. 1984 | 1984 Invitational - Black and White | Spirit Square Center for the Arts | Charlotte, NC. 1983 | 4 North Carolina Artists | Green Hill Center for North Carolina Art Greensboro, NC. 1983 | 20th Annual Painting and Sculpture Competition | Associated Artists of Winston-Salem |Winston-Salem, NC. 1983 | Northern Telecom’s Second Annual Exhibition of North Carolina Sculpture Northern Telecom Incorporated, Research Triangle Park | Durham, NC. 1983 | Rocky Mountain National Water Media Exhibition | The Foothills Art Center | Golden, CO. 1983 | The Woodstock School of Art National Painting Exhibition Woodstock, NY. 1983 | Public Art Forum ’83 | Queens College | Charlotte, NC. 1982 | Magic In Art | Spirit Square Center for the Arts Charlotte, NC. 69


1975 | Spring Arts Festival | Arts and Science Center Statesville, NC. 1974 | Ten Black American Artists | Santa Ana College Santa Ana, CA. 1973 | Logan - Rogers - Biggers | Johnson C. Smith University Charlotte, NC. 1972 | Afro-American Art | Duke University Durham, NC. 1972 | Black Expo ’72 | San Francisco Civic Center San Francisco, California 1971 | USA‌?...1971-72 | Carnegie Institute Pittsburgh, PA. 1971 | Benny Andrews - Juan Logan | Carlow College Pittsburgh, PA. 1970 | Black Artists: Denver, 1970 | International House Denver, CO. 1967 | 26th Annual National Exhibition of Afro-American Artists Catherine Hughes Waddell Gallery, Atlanta University | Atlanta, GA.

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Group Exhibitions - Art Fairs

2013 | Art Fusion MIA | Art Basel Miami, FL. 2005 | Palm Beach Contemporary West Palm Beach, FL. 2002 | ArtPalmBeach Modern & Contemporary Art Fair | West Palm Beach West Palm, FL. 1991 | Art Miami 91 | Miami International Art Exposition Miami, FL.

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Group Exhibitions - Galleries

2015 | Power, Protest and Resistance: The Art of Revolution | Skylight Gallery | Brooklyn, NY. 2015 | Messages 5 | Press Street/Antenna Gallery New Orleans, LA. 2014 | Hoi Polloi | Kaplan Gallery | Visarts at Rockville, MD. 2010 | The Narcissism of Minor Differences | Meyerhoff Galleries at the Maryland Institute, College of Art | Baltimore, MD. 2010 | Mixing Metaphors: The Aesthetic, the Social, and the Political in African American Art | Howard University Art Gallery | Washington, DC. 2009 | Selected works from the G.R. N’Namdi Gallery | G.R. N’Namdi Gallery New York, NY. 2009 | African American Currents: Contemporary Art from the Bank of America Collection | 40 Acres Art Galley | Sacramento, CA. 2008 | Strength In Numbers: Artists Respond to Conflict | Sragow Gallery New York, NY. 2007 | Innovations: Recent Editions from the Brodsky Center | Rupert Ravens Contemporary | Newark, NJ. 73


2007 | Glimpse | SACI Gallery (Studio Art Centers International), Florence, Italy. 2007 | Nothing Could Be Finer | Elder Art Gallery | Charlotte, NC. 2005 | Quickening | Museum of Contemporary Art | Tucson, AZ. 2004 | The Body Show | Craven Allen Gallery | Durham, NC. 2003 | All Shook Up! | Pelter Gallery | Greenville, SC. 2003 | In The Midst… | Noel Gallery | Charlotte, NC. 2003 | The Vision From Within | Kemp Art Gallery, Black Academy of Arts and Letters | Dallas, TX. 2001 | Visibilities | Charleston, SC. 2001 | 2001 New Art for the New Century: Painting and Sculpture Lee Hansley Gallery | Raleigh, NC. 2000 | True Colors | Sande Webster Gallery | Philadelphia, PA. 2000 | Selected Works | Tippy Stern Fine Art | Charleston, SC. 2000 | In The Shadow of The Flag | Tippy Stern Fine Art | Charleston, SC. 2000 | North Carolina’s 20th Century Masters | Lee Hansley Gallery Raleigh, NC. 1997 | Prints Washington ’97 | The Hemicycle, The Corcoran Gallery of Art Washington, DC. 1997 | Kerek Zold/Circle Green | Budapest Galeria | Budapest, Hungary 1996 | Southern Ties: Two Generations of African American Artists United by Their Southern Heritage |, Hodges Taylor Gallery | Charlotte, NC. 74


1996 | Inaugural Exhibition | Hodges Taylor Gallery | Charlotte, NC. 1995 | 7 Recent Acquisitions | Hammonds House Galleries | Atlanta, GA. 1995 | New South / Old South / Somewhere In Between Winthrop University Galleries | Rock Hill, SC. 1994 | Important Art of the Nineties | The McIntosh Gallery | Atlanta, GA. 1994 | First Anniversary: Paper | Lee Hansley Gallery | Raleigh, NC. 1993 | 10th Anniversary Exhibition | Jerald Melberg Gallery | Charlotte, NC. 1992 | Collective Exhibition | The McIntosh Gallery | Atlanta, GA. 1992 | Painting The Black Experience | Springfield Art Association Gallery Springfield, IL. 1991 | Gallery Artist | Jerald Melberg Gallery | Charlotte, NC. 1990 | Contemporary African-American Artists | The McIntosh Gallery Atlanta, GA. 1990 | The Big Picture | Marita Gilliam Gallery | Raleigh, NC. 1990 | Salon of Gallery Artists | Marita Gilliam Gallery | Raleigh, NC. 1989 | An Alliance of Artists Against AIDS | Hodges Taylor Gallery | Charlotte, NC. 1989 | Gallery Artists | The McIntosh Gallery | Atlanta, GA. 1989 | Herbert House, Seitu Jones, Juan Logan | Isobel Neal Gallery Chicago, IL. 1988 | Fifteen Black Artists | The McIntosh Gallery Atlanta, GA. 75


1986 | Group Exhibition | Somerhill Gallery | Durham, NC. 1986 | Gallery Artists | Deborah Peverall Gallery | Charlotte, NC. 1986 | New Faces | Gallery Two Nine One | Atlanta, GA. 1985 | Gallery Artists | Deborah Peverall Gallery | Charlotte, NC. 1984 | Progressions and Introductions | Somerhill Gallery Durham, NC. 1984 | Drawing Invitational | Somerhill Gallery | Durham, NC. 1984 | Grand Opening Exhibition | Deborah Peverall Gallery Charlotte, NC. 1984 | Afro-American Artists of North Carolina | Center Gallery Chapel Hill, NC. 1980 | International Sculpture Conference | Raku Gallery and Sculpture Garden | Washington, DC. 1979 | Charlotte on Ice | Davidson College Art Gallery | Charlotte, NC. 1975 | Lam - Logan - Bejarano | Lynn Kottler Galleries | New York, NY. 1974 | Lewis Hawkins - Juan Logan | Rowe Gallery, University of North Carolina Charlotte, NC. 1973 | 3 Sculptors: Anderson - Henry - Logan | Gallery of Contemporary Art Winston-Salem, NC. 1972 | Black Contributors | Rainbow Sign Gallery | Berkeley, CA. 1971 | National Exhibition /Black Artists | Smith Mason Gallery Washington, DC. 76


Awards 2010 | Artist & Editions Award, Baltimore Fair for Contemporary Prints and Editions, Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, MD.

2003/4 | John Michael Kohler Arts Center, Arts/ Industry Residency Sheboygan, WI.

North Carolina Arts Council Artists Fellowship, 1991/1992 and 2002/2003 Raleigh, NC.

2000| McColl Center for Visual Art, Artist-in-Residence, Charlotte, NC.

Mid Atlantic Arts Foundations, “Artist as Catalyst 2000�, Rutgers Center for Innovative Print and Paper, New Brunswick, NJ.

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1999-2001 | Carolina Postdoctoral Scholars Fellowship, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC.

1999 | The Print Center Selection Award, 73rd Annual International Competition: Printmaking, Philadelphia, PA.

1999 | The Ann and Donald McPhail/Philadelphia Museum of Art Purchase Award,The Print Center, 73rd Annual International Competition: Printmaking, PA.

1996-1998 | Phillip Morris Fellowship, Maryland Institute, College of Art, Baltimore, MD.

1984 | 1st Place, Louisiana Watercolor Society’s 14th Annual International ExhibitNew Orleans, LA.

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Collections Juan Logan’s Work can be found in the following collections.

Museums

Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC. Asheville Art Museum, NC. Baltimore Museum of Art, MD. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, CO. Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington, NC. Crocker Art Museum, Sacramento, CA. Gaston County Museum of Art and History, Dallas, NC. Gibbes Museum of Art, Charleston, SC. Greenville County Museum of Art, Greenville, SC. Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL. 81


Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, TN. Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte, NC. Mint Museum of Craft & Design, Charlotte, NC. Morris Museum of Art, Augusta, GA. Museum of African American Art, Los Angeles, CA. Museum of Art, North Carolina Central University, Durham, NC. National Museum of African Art, Washington, DC. Philadelphia Museum of Art, PA. Smithsonian, National Museum of African American History and Culture, Washington, DC. Tubman African American Museum, Macon, GA. Tweed Museum of Art, Duluth, MN. Weatherspoon Art Museum, Greensboro, NC. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY. Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Museum of Art, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, NJ.

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Institutions

Aljira, A Center for Contemporary Art, Newark, NJ. Atlanta Fulton Public Library, Atlanta, GA. Des Moines Art Center, IO. Davidson College, NC. Fine Arts Center, School District of Greenville County, Greenville, SC. Gantt Center for African American Art and Culture, Charlotte, NC. Hammonds House Galleries, Atlanta, GA. Henry Copeland Art Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC. Hudson County Community College, Jersey City, NJ. International Arts and Artists, Washington, DC. Johnson C. Smith University, Charlotte, NC. Johns Hopkins University, Weinberg Building, Baltimore, MD. John Michael Kohler Art Center, Sheboygan, WI. National Gallery, Harare, Zimbabwe North Carolina Arts Council, Artworks for State Buildings, Raleigh, NC. North Carolina A & T State University, Greensboro, NC. 83


Robbins Center for Cross Cultural Communications, Washington, DC. School of Law, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC. Southeast Arkansas Arts and Science Center, Pine Bluff, AK. Spirit Square Center for Arts and Education, Charlotte, NC. The New York Public Library, NY. Winston-Salem State University, NC.

Cities

Art in Embassies Program, Lome, Togo Art in Embassies Program, Pretoria, South Africa City of Belmont, NC. City of Charlotte, NC. City of Durham, NC. City of Winston-Salem, NC.

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Corporations

Adaron Development Group, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC. Ariel Capital Management, Inc., Chicago, IL. Bank of America, Charlotte, North Carolina - Bell South, Atlanta, GA. Blue Cross of Greater Philadelphia, PA. Branch Banking and Trust, Charlotte, NC. British Airways, Chicago, IL. Carney & Brothers Ltd., Chicago, IL. D. C. May Company, Durham, NC. First Union National Bank, Greensboro, NC. Glaxo Incorporated, Research Triangle Park, NC. Guest Quarters Hotel, Charlotte, NC. Hyatt Dorado Beach Hotel, Dorado, Puerto Rico Hyatt House of Winston-Salem, NC. Kaiser Permanente, Raleigh, NC. Kohler Company, Kohler, WI. Johnson & Johnson Corporate Headquarters Collection, New Brunswick, NJ. LCI Corporation, Charlotte, NC. 85


Lincoln National Insurance, Fort Wayne, IN. Litho Industries/Amplith Corporation, Raleigh, NC. McKinsey and Company, Charlotte, NC. Mutual Savings and Loan, Durham, NC. Pepsi-Cola Bottling Company, Charlotte, NC. Poyner & Spruill, Raleigh, NC. Radisson Plaza Hotel, Nashville, TN. Saks Fifth Avenue, Troy, MI. Smith Helms Mulliss and Moore, Charlotte, NC. Sutherland, Asbill and Brennan, Atlanta, GA. Swiss Hotel, Atlanta, GA. The Thompson Agency, Charlotte, NC.

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Lectures

Museums

2014 | The Ogden Museum of Southern Art, New Orleans, LA. 2008 | Levine Museum of the New South, Charlotte, NC. 2006 | Tweed Museum of Art, University of Minnesota Duluth, MN. 2005 | Greenville County Museum of Art, Greenville, SC. 2003 | Greenville County Museum of Art, SC. 2003 | Asheville Art Museum, NC. 2002 | Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte, NC. 2002 | Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, CO. 1998 | Museum of Texas Tech University, Lubbock TX. 1997 | St. Johns Museum of Art, Wilmington, NC. 1997 | Asheville Art Museum, NC. 88


1994 | Montgomery Museum of Art, AL. 1994 | Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte, NC.

Institutions

2014 | Joan Mitchell Center, New Orleans, LA. 2012 | Barton College, Wilson, North CA. 2011 | Maine College of Art, Portland, OR. 2010 | Gantt Center for African Arts and Culture, Charlotte, NC. 2009 | Duke University, Durham, NC. 2008 | Downtown Dalton Arts Initiative and Winthrop University Galleries, 2nd Annual Public Art Forum, Plowden Auditorium, Rock Hill, SC. 2008 | Avery Institute, College of Charleston, SC. 2008 | Clinton Junior College, Rock Hill, SC. 2008 | Winthrop University, Rutledge Auditorium. Rock Hill, SC. 2007 | Rocky Mount Arts Center at the Imperial Centre, NC. 2006 | Kent State University, School of Art, OH. 2006 | Johnson C. Smith University, Charlotte, NC. 2005 | Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, GA. 89


2005 | Coastal Carolina University, Conway, SC. 2004 | University of North Carolina at Pembroke, NC. 2004 | University of Wisconsin at Sheboygan, WI. 2004 | Lawrence University, Appleton, WI. 2004 | John Michael Kohler Art Center, Sheboygan, WI. 2003 | Saint Augustine’s College, Raleigh, NC. 2002 | Winston-Salem State University, NC. 2002 | Guild of Charlotte Artists, NC. 2002 | San Francisco Art Institute, CA. 2002 | Memphis College of Art, TN. 2001 | McColl Center for Visual Art, Charlotte, NC. 2000 | University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC. 2000 | Austin Peay State University, Clarksville, TN. 2000 | North Carolina State University, Gallery of Art and Design, Raleigh, NC. 2000 | American Association of Museums, DC. 2000 | Elon College, Elon College, NC. 1999 | North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC. 1998 | North Carolina Central University, Durham, NC. 1998 | East Carolina University, Greenville, NC. 90


1997 | Howard University, Washington, DC. 1997 | Winthrop University Galleries, Rock Hill SC. 1996 | Afro-American Cultural Center, Charlotte, NC. 1995 | Green Hill Center for North Carolina Art, Greensboro, NC. 1994 | Spirit Square Center for Arts and Education, Charlotte, NC. 1993 | Potsdam College of the State University of New York, Potsdam, NY. 1993 | Fine Arts Center, School District of Greenville County, South Carolina, SC. 1990 | School of Design, North Carolina State University, NC. 1988 | The Light Factory Photographic Arts Center, Charlotte, NC. 1985 | Gaston College, Dallas, NC.

Galleries

2008 | 40 Acre Art Gallery, Sacramento, CA. 2005 | Sumter Gallery of Art, Sumter, SC.1996 | Halsey Gallery, College of Charleston, SC. 2003 | City Gallery at Waterfront Park, Charleston, SC. 1996 | Halsey Gallery, College of Charleston, SC. 91


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Residencies 2011 | Maine College of Art, Portland, OR. 2008 | 40 Acre Art Gallery, Sacramento, CA. 2006 | Kent State University, School of Art, Kent, OH. 2005 | Kennesaw State University, GA. 2002 | San Francisco Art Institute, CA. 1999 | North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC. 1998 | Texas Tech University, Lubbock and the Lubbock Fine Arts Center, TX. 1997 | The Penland School of Crafts, Penland, NC. 1997 | St. John’s Museum of Art, Wilmington, NC. 1996 | College of Charleston and Burke High School, Charleston, SC. 1993 | Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art, Winston-Salem, NC.

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Bibliography Selected Books and Catalogues

Araujo,Ana Lucia. Politics of Memory: Making Slavery Visible in the Public Space, Routledge, 2013 Ater, Renee. Slavery and It’s Memory In Public Monuments, Chicago Journals-American Art, Volume 24, Number 1, Spring 2010. Becker, Howard S., Faulkner, Robert R., and Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Barbara. (Editors) Art from Start to Finish: Jazz, Painting, Writing, and Other Improvisations. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 2006. Bloom, Ken and Cassel, Valerie. Juan Logan: Whose Song Shall I Sing?, Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, Colorado, 2002. Bloom, Ken. STANDARD PRACTICES: Reliquaries for America, Landmark Gallery, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas, 1998. 94


Bloom, Ken. Earthly Bounds: Environment as Metaphor, The Light Factory, Charlotte, North Carolina, 1988. Bontemps, Arna Alexander. Choosing: An Exhibit of Changing Perspectives in Modern Art and Art Criticism By Black Americans, 1925-1985, Museum Press, Inc., Washington, District of Columbia, 1985. Britton, Crystal A. African American Art, The Long Struggle. Smithmark Publishers, New York, 1996, September 30, 2005. Cassel, Valerie and Logan, Juan. “Mr. Logan’s Reliquary”, Proteus, A Journal of Ideas, Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania, Fall 2003. Curnow, Kathy. Juan Logan: Notes and Observations. The Arts Center at the Imperial Centre, Rocky Mount, North Carolina: 2007. Curnow, Kathy. Juan Logan: The Third Place - Painting, Drawings and Sculpture 1996-2006. Duluth: Tweed Museum of Art, 2006. Edge,John T., Engelhardt, Elizabeth S. D., and Ownby, Ted. (Editors)The Larder: Food Studies Methods from the American South, University of Georgia Press, 2013 Fambro, Charles. Painting the Black Experience, Springfield Art Association, Illinois, 1992. 95


Gobel, David and Rossel, Daves. Commemoration in America:Essays on Monuments, Memorialization, and Memory, University of VirginiaPress, 2013. Fredrickson, Laurel. Unintended Relations, Dalton Downtown Arts Initiative, Rock Hill, South Carolina, 2008. Hall, G.K. Index to Black Periodicals, 1985. MacMillan Publishing Company, England, Wales, 1988. Hand, Oscar DePriest and Sykes, Julia Neal. Footprints on the Rough Side of the Mountain. Winston-Salem: Josten Graphics, Incorporated, 1997. Hanzal, Carla. Passing, Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte, North Carolina: 2003. Harris, Michael D. Colored Pictures: Race and Visual Representation. University of North Carolina Press, 2002. Harris, Michael D. Image of America: African American Voices. Walton Art Center, Fayetteville, 2004. Harris, Michael D. Juan Logan: Unconscious Bias, Gallery of Art & Design, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, 2000. Igoe, James and Igoe, Lynn Moody. 250 Years of Afro-American Art: An Annotated Bibliography. R R. Bowker Company, New York, 1976, November 1981. 96


Jones, Kellie. Juan Logan: Paintings and Drawings, Gaston County Museum of Art and History, Dallas, 1986. Kahrl, Andrew W. Juan Logan: Pleasure and Power, Barton College Museum Press, Wilson, 2012. King-Hammond, Leslie. Effective Sight: The Paintings of Juan Logan, Green Hill Center for North Carolina Art. Greensboro, 1995. Leach, Mark. ART Currents 15, “Juan Logan/ Tuckers Grove,� Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte, 1994. Lewis, Samella. Art: African American. Harcourt, Brace & Javanovich, New York, 1976, Hancraft Studios, June 1980. Lewis, Samella. African American Art and Artists. University of California Press, Berkeley, Los Angeles, London, 1990. Revised and Expanded Edition, March 18, 2003. Lineker, Bruce. Civil Rights Now. Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art, Winston-Salem, 1995. Lipsitz, George. How Racism Takes Place. Temple University Press, Philadelphia, 2011.

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Mack, Angela D. and Hoffius, Steven G. (Editors), Landscape of Slavery: The Plantation in American Art. University of South Carolina Press, 2008. Miller, Lauren and West, Jessica. Road In Sight: Contemporary Art In North Carolina. Duke University, Durham, 2005. MacNeil, Robert. Artists Communities: A Directory of Residencies that Offer time and Space for Creativity. Alliance of Artists Communities, Allworth Press; April 1, 2005. Marks, Fred. (Editor) American Art Directory, 2001-2002. National Register Publishing, New Providence NJ, 2001. Opitz, Glenn B. (Editor) Dictionary of American Sculptors: 18th Century to the present. Apollo Books, Poughkeepsie, 1984. Robertson, Jack. Twentieth-Century Artists on Art. An Index to Artists’ Writings, Statements, and Interviews. Boston: G.K. Hall, 1985, MacMillian Publishing Company. 2nd edition (April 1996). Sexsmith, Dennis. Shadows & Silhouettes, The Dangerous Faces of Willie Cole and Juan Logan, Memphis College of Art, Memphis, 2002. Thomas, Dennis. The Black Artist in American: An Index to Reproductions. Metuchen: Scarecrow Press, 1991.

98


Turner, Jane. The Dictionary of Art, Grove: Oxford University Press, USA, 1996. Waddell, Edward. “Juan Logan, Artist,” Black American Literature Forum, Volume19, Number 1, Spring, 1985, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, Indiana. Williams, Lyneise. Juan Logan: Full Disclosure, Greenville County Museum of Art, Greenville, 2005. Williams, Lyneise. Juan Logan: Close Inspection, Sumter Gallery of Art, Sumter, 2005. Williams, Lynesie. Juan Logan: Caught Off Guard, Sturgis Art Gallery, Kennesaw State University, Georgia, 2006. Williams, Michael Warren. The African American Encyclopedia. Marshall Cavendish Corporation, 1997. Xue-Wu, Xheng. Beijing International Art Camp, Suojiacun Art Center, Beijing, 2005. Xue-Wu, Xheng. Noah’s Ark, TsingHua University Art Gallery, Beijing, 2005. Yockey, Ross. Between Two Rivers: The Centennial of Belmont. North Carolina. Sally Hill McMillan and Associates. Charlotte, 1996.

99


American Humanities Index for 1987. Whitston Publishing Company, Albany,1988. ARTISTS/USA, 1974-75: A Guide to Contemporary American Art, Foreword by Herbert Lieberman, Artists/USA, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: 1975. Creating Place: North Carolina’s Artworks for State Buildings. North Carolina Arts Council, Raleigh, 2002. Directions in Afro-American Art. Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University, Ithaca, 1974. New American Paintings, Number 21 The Open Studio Press, Wellesley, 1999. North Carolina Artists and Craftsmen The Wilkes Art Guild, North Wilkesboro, 1974. Personalities of the South. American Biographical Institute, Raleigh, 1973-74. Prop Master at Charleston’s Gibbes Museum of Art Southern Spaces, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, September 21, 2009. Selected Essays: Art and Artists from the Harlem Renaissance to the 1980’s. National Black Arts Festival, Atlanta, 1988.

100


St. James Guide to Black Artists. St. James Press in Association with the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Detroit, New York, Toronto, London, 1997. Who’s Who Among African Americans, Gale Research, Detroit, 1976-77. Who’s Who In American Art, R.R. Bowker Company, Ann Arbor, 1976. Who’s Who in American Art 1999-2000 Millennium Edition, 23rd Edition. Marquis Who’s Who, New Providence, 1999-2000. Who’s Who In The South and Southwest. Marquis Who’s Who. Chicago,1976-77 & 1977-78.

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102


Selected Articles and Periodicals Bush, Tori. “Juan Logan, New Orleans, at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art”, Reviews, Art In America, New York, October 21, 2014

Kastanek, Tasia. “See Double: Juan Logan at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art”, Pelican Bomb, New Orleans, Louisiana, May 21, 2014

“Southern artist explores race, place and power in New Orleans exhibition”, artdaily.org, May 14, 2014

McLellan, Marian. “Scully & Logan”, The New Orleans Art Review, Vol. 32, Nos. 3-4, February, March, April, Louisiana, 2014

Castjohn, Cheryl. “Saving Face, Juan Logan’s ‘Save You’ at the Ogden Museum”,NOLA Defender, New Orleans, Louisiana, March 25, 2014

MacCash, Doug. “Political artist Juan Logan exhibit opens at the Ogden Museum on Thursday”The Times-Picayune, New Orleans, Louisiana

Honaker, Andrea. “Juan Logan: Artist returns to hometown of Belmont while his work enjoys distant acclaim”, Gaston Gazette, Gastonia, North Carolina, December 7, 2013

103


Hurst, Katie. “Art Institute of Charleston Ponders Plantation Life”, Charleston City Paper,South Carolina, May 16, 2012

Appleton, Andrea. “Pulled: Evidence of a Print Community”, City Paper, Baltimore, Maryland, May 2, 2012

“Artist Juan Logan shows work at Barton,” The Wilson Times, North Carolina, March 15, 2012

Ludwig Johnson, Trudi. “On The Mark: Taking Aim at Contemporary Prints and Drawings,” Newsletter, The Print, Drawing & Photograph Society of the Baltimore Museum of Art, Volume 28 – Number 2 – Fall 2010

Dedication of “Grounded Here”, Downtown Greenway, Greensboro, North Carolina, September 13, 2010

“Grounded Here” Ashe Street Public Art Dedication, September 19, Carolina Peacemaker, Greensboro, North Carolina, September 9, 2010

Ober, Cara. “It’s All in the Details”| Art (Visual) | Urbanite Baltimore MagazineMaryland, August 10, 2010

104


Bond, Pamela. “At the BMA: Contemporary Works on Paper”, Downtown Baltimore Examiner, Maryland, July 31, 2010

Schreiber, Barbara. “Life’s a (segregated) beach”, Point 8 Blog, CreativeLoafing, Charlotte, North Carolina, March 9, 2010

Internationally recognized artist Juan Logan commissioned, Carolina Newswire, Greensboro, North Carolina, January 25, 2010

Maschal, Richard. Chapel Hill Artist Tells Stories, News and Observer, Raleigh, North Carolina, November 1, 2009

Jarvis, Craig. “Art Comes to Stay”, News and Observer, Raleigh, North Carolina, October 17, 2009

Arts Commission To Launch Two Downtown Public Art Projects, City of Raleigh, North Carolina, October 15, 2009

Holliday, Jarvis. Impressive new Afro-Am center opens this month, Creative Loafing, Charlotte, North Carolina, October 10, 2009

105


Signature Magazine, “Artists Profile: Juan Logan & Susan Harbage Page”, Gibbes Museum of Art, Charleston, South Carolina, Spring/Summer 2009

Day, Jeffrey, “Some stunning shows for Spoleto”, Carolina Culture, Columbia, South Carolina, May 21, 2009

Natale, Michele, “Behind Charleston’s Façade”, The News and Observer, Raleigh, North Carolina, May 17, 2009

Stokes, Laura. The Gibbes Courageously Reveals Itself in Prop Master, Charleston City Paper, Charleston, South Carolina, May 12, 2009

Hutson-Wrenn, Charlotte. Charleston through an artist’s eye, Artists redefine “Proper” at the Gibbes, Wordpress, Charleston, South Carolina, May 12, 2009

Parker, Adam. “Prop Master”, Unexpected installation challenges views of race, class, gender, sexual identity The Post and Courier, Charleston, South Carolina, May 10, 2009

Stoehr, John. “If you haven’t seen Prop Master, you should if”, Charleston City Paper, Unscripted, May 7, 2009

106


DailyServing, “Prop Master”, April 25, 2009

Pool, Olivia, “Gibbes gets mad ‘Props’,” The Post and Courier, April 2, 2009, Charleston, South Carolina

Dalkey, Victoria, “Serendipity, history on ‘stellar’ display at 40 Acres”, Sacramento Bee, January 23, 2009

Art Knowledge News, “Gibbes Museum of Art to show ‘Prop Master’: An Installation by Juan Logan & Susan Harbage Page”, January 16, 2009

ArtDaily, “Prop Master: An Installation by Juan Logan and Susan Harbage Page to Open at Gibbes Museum of Art”, January 14, 2009

Mason, LaTonya, “Making A Scene”, Pride, September-November 2008, Charlotte, North Carolina

Freeman Whalen, Meg, “Making a Scene”, Charlotte Magazine, July 1, 2008, North Carolina

Spooner, Peter, “New Exhibit at the Tweed,” DuluthWorld, November, 2007 107


Edgar, Robin, “Art and Soul, Eulada and Mel Watt Create A Personal Gallery,” Today’s Charlotte Woman, September, 2006

Tynes, Teri, “Juan Logan, Greenville, SC,” Art Papers, March/April, 2006, Atlanta, Georgia

Halperen, Max, “Winston-Salem, SECCA-Homegrown,” Art Papers, November December, 2005, Atlanta, Georgia

Hicks, Ann, “Strong Images: Juan Logan’s Art Offers Social Commentary,” The Greenville News, December 4, 2005, Greenville, South Carolina

Day, Jeffrey, “North Carolina Artist Gives His All To South Carolina,” The State, December 4, 2005, Columbia, South Carolina

Moore, Nancy, “Artist Likes People To Get Involved In Works,” The Gaston Gazette, November 20, 2005, Gastonia, North Carolina

Day, Jeffrey, “The A List,” The State, November, 20, 2005, Columbia, South Carolina

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Seawright, Sandy, “Juan Logan: A 30-Year Retrospective,” The Charlotte Post, November, 17, 2005, Charlotte, North Carolina

Moore, Ivy, “Close Inspection,” The Item, November, 15, 2005, Sumter, South Carolina. Fox, Catherine, “Voices Well Worth Seeing,” Atlanta Journal-Constitution, June 26, 2004. Atlanta, Georgia

Patterson, Tom, “In The Moment: Columbia Show Is The Best Of Several Strong Regional Art Exhibitions At Venues In The Carolinas This Summer,” Winston-Salem Journal, August 17, 2003, North Carolina

Luecking, Steve. “Juan Logan, Chicago Cultural Center”, Sculpture, May 2003, Vol.22 No. 4, District of Columbia

Gluckstern, J., “Three Artists’ Views Of The Body On Display At BMoCA,” The Daily Camera, September 29, 2002, Boulder, Colorado

Hopkins, Cara, “The Most Dangerous Man In America?, Artist Juan Logan Raises Question At BMoCA”, The Arts, Colorado Daily, September 17, 2002, Boulder, Colorado

109


Camper, Fred. “Pushing Back,” Chicago Reader, March 29, 2002, Chicago, Illinois Hall, David. “Race and Class,” The Memphis Flyer , February 7, 2002, Memphis, Tennessee

Hamilton, Jeanne. “Angry, Leering, Defiant, ‘Dangerous Faces’ Test Our Bias,” Go Memphis, The Commercial Appeal January 19, 2002, Memphis, Tennesse

Burch, Peggy. “Two Man Show Reflects On Racist Vestiges,” The Commercial Appeal, January 19, 2002, Memphis, Tennessee

Hicks, Ed. “Hands-On Training - Memphis College of Art Brings In Two Cutting-Edge Artists,” City Life, January 14, 2002, Memphis, Tennessee

Rhodes, Kristen. “Symbols of Heritage,” Charleston City Paper, Art Review, April 25, 2001, South Carolina.

Medlin, Nell Joslin. “Artist Matches Media To His Message,” The News and Observer, Arts and Entertainment, Sunday, September 10, 2000, Raleigh, North Carolina

Natale, Michele. “Hidden Histories,” Spectator, Arts Forum, August 30, 2000 Raleigh, North Carolina

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Halperen, Max. “Repositories of Deep Emotion,” The News & Observer, Friday, August 25, 2000, Raleigh, North Carolina

Greenberg, Blue. “Juan Logan: Unconscious Bias,” The Herald-Sun, Friday, August 18, 2000, Durham, North Carolina

Rice,Robin. “True Colors - At Sande Webster, artists bring out their best black and white,” Philadelphia City Paper, August 10 , 2000, Pennsylvania

Maschal, Richard. “Wave of The Future,” The Charlotte Observer, Sunday, August 6, 2000,North Carolina.

Fallon, Roberta. “Never A Dull Moment,” Philadelphia Weekly, July 12, 2000, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Martin, Frank. “Flag’ Exhibit Examines Some Controversial Issues,” The Post and Courier, Sunday June 18, 2000, Charleston, South Carolina

Giuliano, Mike. “Personality Crisis, Gomez Exhibits Offer a Broad Mix of Media and Messages,” City Paper, Volume 21, Number 52, December 29, 1999 - January 5, 2000, Baltimore, Maryland

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McNatt, Glenn. “Speaking for Themselves,” The Sun, Tuesday, December 14, 1999, Baltimore, Maryland

Mayes, Alicia. “From The World To Gaston,” The Gaston Gazette, Sunday, September 26, 1999, Gastonia, North Carolina

“College To Host Linocut Prints, Photos, Juan Logan and Susan Page will be featured through May 31,” The Shelby Star, May 9, 1999, Shelby, North Carolina

Patterson, Tom. “Studying At The Altar of Creativity,” Winston-Salem Journal, Visual Art, Sunday, February 21, 1999, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Seymour, Abigail. “Artists Seek Connection With Exhibit of Altars,” The Business Journal, January 22, 1999, Greensboro, North Carolina

“Vested,” January 1999, Charlotte Convention & Visitors Bureau, Charlotte, North Carolina

Grau, Jane. “Artifacts with an American bent,” The Charlotte Observer, Sunday, September 27, 1998, Charlotte, North Carolina

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Kalfas, Caroline. “Ginned: An Installation,” East Magazine, September 10, 1998, Greenville, North Carolina

Meek, Shannon. “Ginned, The heart of American cultural revealed,” Fountainhead, Wednesday, September 9, 1998, Greenville, North Carolina

Jeffries, Suzanne. “New Courthouse Mural Reflects Familiar Images,” The Charlotte Observer/ The Gaston Observer, Sunday, June 28, 1998, Charlotte, North Carolina

Culbertson, D.C. “Gomez Gallery Celebrates Move with Grand Opening,” Every Wednesday, June 10, 1998, Baltimore, Maryland

Dorsey, John. “3 artists grace new space at Gomez Gallery,” The Sun, Wednesday, June 10, 1998, Baltimore, Maryland

Twardy, Chuck. “More Than Skin Deep,” News and Observer, Friday, February 13, 1998, Durham, North Carolina

“What is Art,” Le Millenium, No. 22, 1997, The Ginza Artspace, Shiseido Co. Ltd. Corporate Culture Department, Tokyo, Japan

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Roberts, Timothy. “Artist Logan to paint historical mural for courthouse,” The Charlotte Observer (Gaston Section), Thursday, November 13, 1997, Charlotte, NC.

Cover, Callaloo, A Journal of African American and African Arts and Letters, Volume 20, Number 2, 1997, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Maryland

Duncan, Katherine. “Logan takes clear-eyed look at the world in paintings,” Asheville Citizen-Times, Sunday, June 1, 1997, Asheville, North Carolina

Patterson, Tom. “See with understanding - Logan’s visual language melds symbols, compassion,”

The Charlotte Observer, Sunday, March 23, 1997, Charlotte, North Carolina

Toppman, Lawrence. “Logan’s singular sight colors issues of race, identity, social justice,” The Charlotte Observer, Sunday, March 9, 1997, Charlotte, North Carolina

Cummings, Ann. “Diversity Champion,” Ventures Charlotte, First Quarter 1997, Charlotte, North Carolina

“Effective Sight: The Paintings of Juan Logan At Winthrop,” Carolina Arts, February 1997, Bonneau, South Carolina 114


Aaronsen, Beatrice. “The Halsey Gallery at the crossroads,” The Post and Courier, Thursday,October 24, 1996, Charleston, South Carolina

Halperen, Max. “Juan Logan,” Art Papers, Volume 20 / Issue 2, March/April, 1996, Atlanta, Georgia

Patterson, Tom. “Catlett, Logan make ‘In Rare Form’ A strong statement,” The Charlotte Observer, Sunday, February 11, 1996, Charlotte, North Carolina

Shearin, Margaret. “Juan Logan’s Sculpture: Facing Problems Common To Us All,” Triad, December 6, 1995, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

“Juan Logan, paintings, statement; text June Kelly,” APPEARANCES, Number 23, 1995, New York, New York

Patterson, Tom. “Exhibit Plunges Into Troubling Social Issues,” Winston-Salem Journal, Sunday, October 22, 1995, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Patterson, Tom. “Speaking in Images,” Winston-Salem Journal, Arts, Sunday, September 24, 1995, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

115


Kuhn, Sally. “An Enduring Legacy,” The Gastonia Gazette, Sunday, July 9, 1995, Gastonia, North Carolina

Dougherty. Linda Johnson. “Civil Rights Now,” Art Papers, July/August, 1995, Atlanta, Georgia

Brown, Linda. “New South/Old South/Somewhere In Between,” Art Papers, April/May, 1995, Atlanta, Georgia

Patterson, Tom. “Powerful ‘Civil Rights’ Worth The Trip,” The Charlotte Observer, Sunday, March 26, 1995, Charlotte, North Carolina

Cooper, Doris. “Form & Function,” The Charlotte Observer/The Gaston Observer, Thursday, March 9, 1995, Charlotte, North Carolina

Patterson, Tom. “Rights Fights, SECCA Show Focuses On Current Issues,” Winston-Salem Journal, Sunday, January 22, 1995, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Smith, Dean. “A Portrait of Charlotte,” The Charlotte Observer, Sunday, January 1, 1995,Charlotte, North Carolina

116


Brown, Linda L. “Juan Logan: Not Separate and Apart From,” Art Papers, July/August, 1994, Atlanta, Georgia

Patterson, Tom. “3 Exhibits Show The Breadth, Variety of Juan Logan’s Work,” The Charlotte Observer, Sunday, May 22, 1994, Charlotte, North Carolina

Morris, Tom. “Triple Exposure,” The Gaston Gazette, Thursday, May 12, 1994, Gastonia, North Carolina

Chiles, Kara. “Exposing The Issues,” Wilmington Morning Star, Thursday, March 10, 1994, Wilmington, North Carolina

“Potsdam College Gallery Hosts Dual Exhibition,” Watertown Daily Times, Sunday, November 7, 1993, Watertown, New York

Rodgers, John. “The Art of Dreaming,” Winston-Salem Journal, Sunday, July 11, 1993, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Brown, Linda L. “Juan Logan: New Small Scale Paintings,” Art Papers, March/April, 1993, Atlanta, Georgia

117


Brown, Linda Luise. “Texture and Totem,” Creative Loafing, November 28, 1992, Charlotte, North Carolina

Bretzus, Hunter. “Juan Logan, Painting His Mind,” The Gastonia Gazette, April 25, 1992, Gastonia, North Carolina

Benfield, Andrea. “Gainesville College Marks Month Of Cultural Diversity,” The Times, January 9, 1992, Gainesville, Georgia

“Exhibit Gives Voice To the Black Experience,” The State Journal-Register, January 9, 1992, Springfield, Illinois

Hanson, Henry. “Talking Back: Commentary On Canvas,” Chicago, April, 1991, Chicago, Illinois.

Seawright, Sandy. “Juan Logan’s Show Offers Powerful Images,” Break Magazine,December 12, 1990, Charlotte, North Carolina

Paine, Janice T. “UWGB Has Exuberant Show,” Milwaukee Sentinel, December 7,1990, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

118


Viso, Olga. “Contemporary African American Artists,” Art Papers, September October, 1990, Atlanta, Georgia

Fox, Catherine. “A Festival Group Show That Adds Up,” The Atlanta Journal and Constitution, August 3, 1990, Atlanta, Georgia

Litt, Steven. “Images With A New Edge”, The News and Observer, March 30, 1990, Raleigh, North Carolina

Gamble, Allen. “Juan Logan/Isobel Neal Gallery,” New Art Examiner, November, 1989, Chicago, Illinois

Cullum, J. W. “Juan Logan/McIntosh Gallery,” Art Papers, March/April, 1989, Atlanta, Georgia

Bloom, Ken. “The Paintings of Juan Logan,” Charlotte, Number 2, March/April, 1989, Charlotte, North Carolina

Thornton, Gene. “The Best of Two Worlds in Raleigh,” The News and Observer, February 12, 1989, Raleigh, North Carolina

119


Jinker-Lloyd, Amy. “Logan Exhibit Mixes Works From Four Series,” The Atlanta Journal and Constitution, December 22, 1988, Atlanta, Georgia

Kimmelman, Michael. “Review/Art; A Show by Black Artists Rekindles an Old Debate.” The New York Times, August 7, 1988

Redd, Christopher. “Interviews: Clarence Morgan, Juan Logan, James & Earnestine Huff,” Art Papers, July/August, 1988, Atlanta, Georgia

Donohoe, Victoria. “On Galleries,” The Philadelphia Inquirer, March 7, 1987, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Jessup, Lynn. “Man of Many Talents,” The Greensboro News & Record, January 29, 1987, Greensboro, North Carolina

White, Patrick E. “Painting In North Carolina: An Overview,” The Arts Journal, September, 1986, Asheville, North Carolina

Maschal, Richard. “Artist Puts Energy Into ‘Lifetime Investment’,” The Charlotte Observer, May 16, 1986, Charlotte, North Carolina

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Wilson, Chip. “Paintings Reveal Artist Behind The Work,” The Charlotte Observer,(Gaston Neighbors Section), March 26, 1986, Charlotte, North Carolina

Hamilton, Elsie. “NCNB Collection at Museum,” The Gastonia Gazette, March 2,1986, Gastonia, North Carolina

Sims, Lowery S. “To Be Or Not To Be: Whither The Black Artist In America,” Art Papers, November/December, 1985, Atlanta, Georgia

Vaughn, Billy. “Struggling,” he Gastonia Gazette, October 13, 1985, Gastonia, North Carolina

Greenberg, Blue. “Bucking Tides, Juan Logan Catches New Wave,” The DurhamMorning Herald, September 20, 1985, Durham, North Carolina

Greenberg, Blue. “Black Artists, Mainstream Show,” The Durham Morning Herald, February 10, 1984, Durham, North Carolina

Strong, Jalyne. “Juan Logan’s Ethereal Art,” Charlotte, Volume16, Number 4,1983, Charlotte, North Carolina

121


Hamilton, Elsie. “Art From Belmont Breaks Up Space In Nation’s Capital,” The Gastonia Gazette, August 3, 1980, Gastonia, North Carolina

Reddy, T.J. “Juan Logan, Painter/Sculpture,” Emergence, April 1, 1978, Raleigh, North Carolina

Clement, Melissa. “Show Combines Unusual Techniques, Prices,” The Fayetteville Observer-Times, September 3, 1976, Fayetteville, North Carolina

Pate, Nance. “It’s Ancient Art With Modern Design,” The Fayetteville Observer-Times, September 1, 1976, Fayetteville, North Carolina

“Fayetteville Art Museum Opening New Show Today,” The Fayetteville ObserverTimes, August 29, 1976, Fayetteville, North Carolina

H.G.L. “Three at Kottler Gallery,” Park East, October 9, 1975, New York, New York.

Ghent, Henri. “Qou Vadis, Black Art,” Art In America, November-December, 1974

Newcomb, Bud. “Logan and his Art Reflect Environment,” The Evening Herald, October 26, 1974, Rock Hill, South Carolina 122


Newcomb, Bud. “Logan Art Exhibit Has Humorous Titles,” The Evening Herald, October 4, 1974, Rock Hill, South Carolina

“Varied Shapes for Metal Sculpture,” The Evening Herald, October 3, 1974, Rock Hill, South Carolina

“Winthrop College Plans Sculpture Exhibit,” The Evening Herald, September 30, 1974, Rock Hill, South Carolina

Doar, Harriet. “Steel Sculpture Slows Traffic,” The Charlotte Observer, August 20, 1973, Charlotte, North Carolina

Borden, Pat. “All Five Senses Express Art,” The Charlotte Observer, June 21, 1974 Charlotte, North Carolina

“Art Exhibit at A & T Is Far Out,” The Greensboro Pacemaker, October, 1973, Greensboro, North Carolina

“Juan’s Artistry Goes Round The Clock,” The Tennessean, July 1, 1973, Nashville, Tennessee

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“Juan Logan Uses His Talents for Art and Business,” Winston-Salem Journal, June 3, 1973,Winston-Salem, North Carolina

“Juan Logan: Artist In More Ways Than One,” The Gastonia Gazette, May 31, 1973,Gastonia, North Carolina

“Black Awareness Exhibit,” The Gastonia Gazette, February 16, 1973, Gastonia, North Carolina

“I Am A Man - Says Juan Logan,” Twin Cities Weekly, July 13, 1972, Concord-Kannapolis, North Carolina

“Afro-American Art Exhibit,” The Concord Tribune, July 12, 1972, Concord, North Carolina

Carnegie Magazine, Carnegie Museum, March, 1972, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Book, Ed. “Struggle of Black Man Finds Way Onto Canvas,” The Gastonia Gazette, February, 1971, Gastonia, North Carolina

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Doar, Harriet. “Artist’s Cool Approach to Life Reflected in His Works,” The Charlotte Observer, February 11, 1971, Charlotte, North Carolina

“Black Art,” Empire Magazine (Weekly Supplement to the (The Denver Post) February 15, 1970, Denver, Colorado

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126


List of Works Cover | Juan Logan Passed Down (detail), 2010, Mixed media, 72” x 96” Courtesy of artist Pg 8| Juan Logan Truth Be Told (detail), 2011 Mixed media, 84” x 96” Courtesy of artist Pg 14 | Juan Logan Foundation (Front), 2004 Cast ductile iron, 77” x 180” x 10” Courtesy of Erika Hirugami

Pg 19 | Robert Rauschenber Shades, 1964 Mixed media, 15 1/8” x 14 1/2” x 11 3/4” Art © Rauschenberg Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. Pg 20 | Juan Logan Sugar House, 2011, Mixed media 6’ x 16’ Courtesy of artist Pg 22 | Author unknown Slavery in Jamaica

Pg 17 | Juan Logan You’re So Articulate, 2007 Acrylic on tar paper, 20 7/8” x 16 3/8” Courtesy of artist

Pg 24 | Betye Saar Ragtime, 2005 Mixed Media, 19” x 20” x 2” Courtesy of the Artist

Pg 18 | Sol LeWitt A sphere lit from the top, four sides, and all their combinations, 2004 Inkjet prints, set of 28,18” x 18” Published by Fraenkel Gallery in an edition of 19 Courtesy of LeWitt Collection

Pg 25 | Juan Logan Keeping America Strong, 1996, Acrylic on paper, 30” x 44 1/2” Courtesy of artist

Pg 18 | Andy Warhol Marilyn Monroe (full suite), 1967 Screenprint on paper, 36” x 36” © 2015 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Pg 26 | Fahamu Pecou Fra-Gee-Lay, 2010 Acrylic and oil stick on canvas, 20” x 16” Courtesy of the artist Pg 28 | Juan Logan Lincoln Beach, 2008 Mixed media, 48” x 60” Courtesy of artist 127


Pg 37 | Juan Logan Outskirts 3, 2014 Mixed media, 40” x 40” Courtesy of artist Pg 38 | Juan Logan By Any Other Name, 2001 Wood, tin, steel, brazil nuts, 60”x 48”x 9” Courtesy of artist Pg 40 | Juan Logan Whose Song Shall I Sing?, 2001 Polyurethane resin with iron coating, 72” x 420” x 3 1/2” Courtesy of artist Pg 43 | Juan Logan Some Clouds are Darker (detail), 2011 Mixed media, 72” x 96” Courtesy of artist Pg 49 | Juan Logan Outskirts 2, 2014 Mixed media, 44” x 44” Courtesy of artist Pg 52 | Juan Logan Help Me, Save Me, Love Me, 2009 Mixed media, 5’ x 16’ Courtesy of artist Pg 54 | Juan Logan Outskirts 4, 2014 Mixed media, 40” x 40” Courtesy of artist Pg 60 | Juan Logan Wasting Away (detail), 2010 Mixed media, 72” x 96” Courtesy of artist 128

Pg 72 | Juan Logan Border of Politeness, 2005 Acrylic on tar paper, 62 3/8” x 41” Courtesy of artist Pg 77 | Juan Logan Side Show, 1990 Acrylic on canvas, 60” x 48” Courtesy of artist Pg 80 | Juan Logan Outskirts 8, 2015 Mixed media, 44” x 44” Courtesy of artist Pg 87 | Juan Logan The Margins (detail), 2007 Mixed media, 42” x 60” Courtesy of artist Pg 92 | Juan Logan Pecola (detail), 2005, Acrylic on tar paper, 60 3/4” x 42” Courtesy of artist Pg 102 | Juan Logan Outskirts 6, 2015 Mixed media, 44” x 44” Courtesy of artist Pg 126 | Juan Logan Black Eden, 2008 Mixed media, 48” x 60” Courtesy of artist Pg 129 | Juan Logan Welcome Home, 2010 Still from video lenght 4min 20sec Courtesy of artist


Welcome Home by Juan Logan Video Length: 4 minutes and 20 seconds https://youtu.be/pnU-FrETdqA

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Profile for 300 Arts Project

Juan Logan  

Exploring the work of Juan Logan Authored by Erika Hirugami, BA Founder & Chief Executive Officer at Curator Love

Juan Logan  

Exploring the work of Juan Logan Authored by Erika Hirugami, BA Founder & Chief Executive Officer at Curator Love

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