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J

.

O

.

C rchitecture

oan

Livero

oncepts

A

&

ortfolio

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able of

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ontents

Manifesto..............................................................................................................................2 Skills and Recognition........................................................................................................3 Cochiti Pueblo Language Canter......................................................................................4 ConDocs.............................................................................................................................12 Re-Imagining Shelburne Road - 4our Districts............................................................18 Norwich University Architecture Hall...........................................................................24 Project C.E.S.E.R..............................................................................................................30 Contact Information

Water Media.......................................................................................................................34 Other Works.......................................................................................................................36

Joan E. Olivero Email: oliverojoan@gmail.com

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his portfolio is a collection of some of the works I have partaken in during my tenure at the Norwich University School of Architecture and Art. It is in chronological order commencing with my most recent project to earlier projects that helped mold my capabilities as a designer. Throughout the portfolio you will also notice some of the art I have created, as to show versatility in media usage. Feel free to look through my portfolio and contact me with any questions, concerns, or career opportunities you may have. My resume is available upon request.


M

anifesto

W

hat is architecture? In simple architecture is forever. Meaning it is, has always been, and will always be one of man kinds greatest innovations. Without architecture we, as a society, do not have life. Architecture can help thriving societies exceed not only economically, but emotionally as well. Architecture is the happy medium between art and science. Architecture is a way of life. Architecture is forever.

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S

kills and

R

ecognition

SketchUp Artlantis Renderer AutoDesk Revit AutoDesk AutoCAD Photoshop Illustrator InDesign Microsoft Office Model Making Painting Charcoal Graphite Watercolor Photography Printmaking Town of Shelburne, VT Planning Commission: - Re-Imagining Shelburne, VT “4our Districts” project selected top five for presentation public presentation. Norwich University Chameleon: - “Who Am I? Me vs. Me” received special recognition as an Outstanding Achievement in Art. It demonstrated Americanization and identity struggle. 3


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ochiti

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ueblo

L

anguage

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enter

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he Cochiti Pueblo Native Americans are a small group of about 1,200 people contained within approximately 54,000 acres of land in Pueblo de Cochiti, NM. These Native Americans, like many, are worried about losing their culture and language. This particular group has been affected the most by society than any of the other Pueblo Native Americans, twenty others exist, primarily due to their reliance on plumbing, electricity, and above all radio and television exposure.

T

he Language Center was about 16,000 sq. ft. and had to be placed on an awkwardly shaped 20,000 sq. ft. site. This required a design solution that had to be resolved. The solution was to break up the building into three separate structures, each serving for a different function; they would then be tied together through one single roof system. The southern-most building was to house classrooms, a lounge, and a library; this would be the area designated for adolescents, and young adults. The center building was the multipurpose room for town meetings and gatherings. It also functioned as a gym and cafeteria. The eastern-most building featured a day-care, offices, a nursery, a staff lounge, and a waiting area; this area was intended for the younger children and the staff who could watch over them. The multipurpose room also served as a boundary between the different age groups. The southern space featured an old cottonwood tree that could not be cut down and designated the site boundary; it also provided shade into the multipurpose room. Each building also featured straight trajectory exits, meaning from either two buildings the occupant could have a straight view from the entrance of the first building to the exit of the second building. This allowed for more linear circulation and a way for people to keep an eye on what is going on in other areas of the building.

T

he building was primarily constructed of reinforced concrete and reinforced concrete beams to support the concrete slab ceiling structure; it also featured curtain walls. The roof system had an all around four feet overhang, except along the southern buildings where at it’s furthest it’s 17.5 ft. in order to keep proportionality along the ground slab. Reinforced concrete was chosen as the primary structure due to the areas hot arid climate. This would provide the thermal massing desired, while the large overhangs provide the shade needed around the curtain walls, as to not allow concentrated heat build up inside. *First major project using Autodesk Revit

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Fourth Year Spring 2011


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ochiti

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ueblo

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anguage

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enter

Fourth Year Spring 2011

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ochiti

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Fourth Year Spring 2011

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ueblo

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anguage

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enter


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ochiti

1’

16’

1’

16’

1’

16’

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ueblo

L

anguage

C

enter

North/Longitudinal Section

North Elevation

South Elevation

Fourth Year Spring 2011

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C

ochiti

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1’

16’

1’

16’

1’

16’

East/Transverse Section

East Elevation

West Elevation

Fourth Year Spring 2011

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ueblo

L

anguage

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enter


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ochiti

P

ueblo

L

anguage

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enter

Multipurpose Room

Plan 1’

Fourth Year Spring 2011

16’

9


C

ochiti

Roof Membrane

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ueblo

L

anguage

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enter

Decking Dimensional Lumber Concrete Beam Thermal Air Space Rigid Insulation 4” Poured-in-Place Concrete Panel Anchor CMU Flashing 2x16 P.T. Wood

Summer Solstice 6PM

2x10 P.T. Wood Sill 2x8 P.T. Wood Dimensional Lumber

Metal Furring Caulking Vertical Reinforcement Gravel

Wall Section

Footing 1/2” Rebar

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1/8”

Fourth Year Spring 2011

2’

Winter Solstice 9AM


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ochiti

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ueblo

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anguage

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enter

Chi

ld P

Mul

tipu Roo rpose m

Tee n

Play

lay

Are

a

Are

a

Site Plan 1’

Fourth Year Spring 2011

32’

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C D on

T

hese construction documents represent the stairs that were to be originally implemented into the Cochiti Pueblo Language Center. As with all design developments things change. Though the stairs were completed the design for the center worked better as a one-story building. Not only would it be more handicap friendly/accessible, it would also eliminate the cost and maintenance that comes with an elevator.

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he stairs were made up of poured-in-place concrete, from the bottom step to the first landing. Then it would take a ninety degree turn up to the second floor, and that portion was to be constructed of steel framing.

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Fourth Year Spring 2011

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C D on

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5’ - 0”

9’ - 10”

3’ - 0”

11T @ 11”

0’ - 2”

1 1/2” x 1 1/2” Steel Bar Guardrail Top

2” dia. Steel Pipe Poured-in-Place Concrete Stairs 1/2” dia. Curved Steel Pipe

4T @ 11” 3’ - 8”

5’x3’x1 1/2” Steel Floor

R3 A-04

2x12 Treads

0’ - 2”

3’ - 0”

D3 A-04 MC 12x50 Steel Stringer

Steel Channel 3’0” O.C.

Plan 1’

8’

Fourth Year Spring 2011

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C D on

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1 1/2” x 1 1/2” Steel Bar Guardrail Top

1 1/2” x 1 1/2” Steel Bar Guardrail Top

3/4” x 3/4” Steel Bars 3 1/2” O.C.

1/2” dia. Curved Steel Pipe 2” dia. Steel Pipe

3’ - 6” 3’ - 4 1/2”

0’ - 9”

0’ - 1 1/2” Typical

0’ - 10”

0’ - 5 1/2” Typical

2x12 Treads 3/4” x 3/4” Steel Bars 3 1/2” O.C.

2” dia. Steel Pipe 1/2” dia. Curved Steel Pipe W10 x 12 Beam R1 A-04

3’ - 0”

MC 12x50 Steel Stringer 9’ - 11”

R2 A-04

0’ - 7” 0’ - 7”

3’ - 0”

3’ - 6”

0’ - 7” 0’ - 7” 0’ - 7”

0’ - 8 1/2”

3’ - 0” 3’ - 3”

Elevation A 1’

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Poured-in-Place Concrete Stairs

4’ - 9 1/2” 0’ - 3 1/2” O.C. Typical

18’ - 11”

Elevation B 1’

8’

Fourth Year Spring 2011

8’

6’ - 10”

1’ - 9 3/4”


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1 1/2” x 1 1/2” Steel Bar Guardrail Top 2” dia. Steel Pipe

2” dia. Steel Pipe 1/2” dia. Curved Steel Pipe 3/4” x 3/4” Steel Bars 3 1/2” O.C.

5’x3’x1 1/2” Steel Floor 9” Concrete Slab

5’x3’x1 1/2” Steel Floor

D1 A-04 0’ - 9”

1 1/2” x 1 1/2” Steel Bar Guardrail Top

0’ - 7” Typical

D2 A-04

0’ - 1 1/2” Typical 0’ - 5 1/2” Typical

3/4” x 3/4” Steel Bars 3 1/2” O.C.

W10 x 12 Beam

0’ - 1 1/2” Typical 0’ - 5 1/2” Typical

Steel Plate w/ 1” dia. bolts and 1/2” dia. screws

MC 12x50 Steel Stringer 3’ - 0”

3’ - 6”

MC 12x50 Steel Stringer 2x12 Treads

0’ - 7” Typical

W10 x 12 Beam

9’ - 11”

9’ - 11”

2x12 Treads 2x8 Risers

Poured-in-Place Concrete Stairs

2’ - 11”

3’ - 0”

3’ - 0”

5’ - 1”

3’ - 3”

18’ - 1”

Section A 1’

0’ - 2”

8’

0’ - 1 1/2”

Section B 1’

8’

Fourth Year Spring 2011

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C D on

5’ - 0”

ocs

0’ - 7” 0’ - 11”

5’x3’x1 1/2” Steel Floor

2x8 Risers

Handrail

MC 12x50 Steel Stringer

Guardrail

Steel Angle 2x12 Treads 0’ - 2” 0’ - 9” 0’ - 6”

9” Concrete Slab

0’ - 7”

Steel Channel 3’ 0” O.C.

Steel Plate w/ 1” dia. bolts and 1/2” dia. screws

2x6 Wall Stud

W10 x 12 Beam

D3

0’ - 11”

Stringer/Carriage Connection Scale: 1” = 1’ 0”

3’ - 7 1/2”

D1

Beam Connection and Top Landing to Tread Connection Scale: 1” = 1’ 0”

Steel Angle w/ 1” dia. bolts and 1/2” dia. screws

MC 12x50 Steel Stringer 5’x3’x1 1/2” Steel Floor

0’ - 1 1/2”

0’ - 9”

9” Concrete Slab 0’ - 6”

3’ - 0”

W10 x 12 Beam

D2

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Beam Connection Scale: 1” = 1’ 0”

Fourth Year Spring 2011

Notes: Beams are to be bolted at connections. Steel angles are to be used at the concrete landings. Top landing to be a steel floor connected to top riser by steel angle. Steel channels to be placed 3’ - 0” O.C.


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0’ - 2”

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0’ - 3 1/2” O.C

3’ - 0”

0’ - 3 1/2” O.C

1 1/2” x 1 1/2” Steel Bar Guardrail Top

3’ - 0”

2” dia. Steel Pipe

3’ - 6”

3’ - 0”

2” dia. Steel Pipe 1 1/2” x 1 1/2” Steel Bar Guardrail Top

1/2” dia. Curved Steel Pipe

Railing Spacing Scale: 1” = 1’ 0”

R2

3/4” x 3/4” Steel Bars 3 1/2” O.C.

Concrete Stairs 3/4” x 3/4” Steel Bars 3 1/2” O.C. R1

1’ - 4” O.C.

Handrail Spacing and Connection Scale: 1” = 1’ 0”

0’ - 11”

1 1/2” x 1 1/2” Steel Bar Guardrail Top

0’ - 1 1/2” 0’ - 2”

Notes: Railings are to be connected onto stringers by welding. Handrail supports to be curved and welded to the guardrail. Top of guardrail to be welded to the bars. All corners and connections to be welded an then smoothed out. 2” dia. Steel Pipe R3

1/4” dia. Handrail Support Curved Steel Pipe

Handrail to Guardrail Connection Scale: 1” = 1’ 0”

Fourth Year Spring 2011

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e-imagining

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e-Imagining Shelburne Road was a project based on a two-miles stretch along route 7 in Shelburne, VT. It was a town planning project that posed the question as to how the town can get more tourists to visit it and actually stay. The town has three attractions that brought revenue and tourists into it but after their short visit they would leave and take their money elsewhere. Lodging was at a minimum and what was there was small and unattractive. The Planning Commission personally requested our suggestions to fix this issue.

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our Districts, a play off “For Our Districts,” was the solution undertaken for this project. Originally called “Amusing Shelburne” the project focused on theme parks and amusement parks. How do these places attract and order their facilities in order to obtain tourists/guests? How do they attract all age groups? These were some of the questions I asked myself.

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fter an analysis of multiple theme/amusement parks a consensus was brought forth. Most of the parks had a basic idea of orienting their features from gentle rides, to the thrill rides, to the roller coaster rides somewhere in the middle. In order to achieve this I broke up the two mile strip into four separate districts. Each one supporting an aspect of the amusement park study.

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rom either the North or South entrance residents/guests would venture into a “gentle” district; these districts were the Housing and Gathering districts, respectively. After it would progress into the “thrill” districts; these were the Recreational district and the tail of the Shopping district, where it was essentially a spot for farmers markets and/or a recreational park area. Finally, the occupants would reach the “roller coaster” district; this was the shopping district which would by far be the busiest and most involved.

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he house district featured affordable housing for lower income families. Each house carried three apartment units for a total of sixty-three families. This area also features the “theme” part of a theme park.

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he recreational district featured hotels, restaurant, tennis courts, a pool, a gym, and beautiful scenery. It also had a trail that led across the railroad to a lovely view of Lake Champlain.

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he shopping district featured businesses, small and big, more restaurants, a park/farmers market area and an homage to Church Street, a shopping street in the adjacent town of Burlington, which has a church at the end of the street.

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he gathering district was a massive park area for community meetings, celebrations, and concerts. It also featured a building for indoor meetings and a stone bridge.

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Fourth Year Fall 2010

S

helburne

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oad

-4

our

D

istricts


R

e-imagining

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helburne

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oad

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our

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istricts

Housing District

Fourth Year Fall 2010

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R

e-imagining

Recreational District

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Fourth Year Fall 2010

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helburne

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oad

-4

our

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istricts


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e-imagining

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helburne

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oad

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our

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istricts

Shopping District

Fourth Year Fall 2010

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R

e-imagining

Gathering District

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Fourth Year Fall 2010

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helburne

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oad

-4

our

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istricts


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e-imagining

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helburne

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oad

Housing District Plan

Shopping District Plan

-4

our

D

istricts

Recreational District Plan

Gathering District Plan

Fourth Year Fall 2010

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N

orwich

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aranoia and proxemics were the two major factors the NU Architecture Hall was based on. The point of the project was to show the “good,” the beauty, in the “bad,” the ugly. The building was approximately 67,000 sq. ft. total, spread out through four floors. It was to be located on Payne Mountain and would use the slate from an adjacent quarry for its exterior facade.

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he building had a central circular break up that was open to below and staggered, creating an oculus. The light would come through the glass roof structure and beam down from the top floor to the bottom floor. As the day progressed the light would track through the first floor giving the sensation that the occupant is always being watched commemorating the sense of paranoia. Proxemics was practiced by only allowing an average of fifteen students per room and allowing them to have at least a three foot radius of space freeing up their personal bubbles substantially.

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he roof structure was largely inspired by the Fiera Milano glass structure. The building would be made up of steel frame construction and a slate facade. It was to be circular through a birds-eye view, or roof plan, but each floor was only a quadrant of the circle.

Fiera Milano structure

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Third Year Spring 2010

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niversity

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rchitecture

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all


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orwich

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niversity

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rchitecture

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all

Third Year Spring 2010

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orwich

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Third Year Spring 2010

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niversity

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rchitecture

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all


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orwich

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niversity

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rchitecture

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all

Third Year Spring 2010

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orwich

niversity

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rchitecture

32’

32’ 4’

4’

1st Floor Plan

2nd Floor Plan

32’

U

Open to Below

32’

4’

4’

3rd Floor Plan

4th Floor Plan

Open to Below

Open to Below

Open to Below

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Third Year Spring 2010

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all


N

orwich

U

A

niversity

rchitecture

Nailing Concrete

Truss

H

all

1” Composite Steel Decking

Slate Facade

Horizontal I Beam

1” Air Space

1” Rigid Insulation 32’ 4’

West/Longitudinal Section

Gypsum Board

I Beam Column

2” Rigid Insulation

6” Concrete Slab

4” Pea Gravel

Concrete Footing/ Foundation Wall Section 1/4”

32’ 2’

4’

South/Transverse Section

Third Year Spring 2010

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P

roject

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roject C.E.S.E.R, Community Emergency Shelter for Evacuated Residents, was located by the bank of the Winooski River in Montpelier, VT. At the site there was an abandoned building that would be demolished and a railway turntable that needed to be incorporated into the project. The project was about 30,000 sq. ft. and it’s occupants would be Vermont residents in need of shelter due to unforeseen tragedies that rendered their living spaces useless. The project included twelve transient rooms, a day-care, personnel offices, a place of worship, a garden area, a nursery, a cafeteria, and more. All of these spaces had predetermined adjacencies and had to be figured out in the layout. The buildings structure was made up of steel frame construction with a brick facade.

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he solution chosen, in which to incorporate the railway turntable to the building, was to create an elliptical garden area that not only complimented the angle of the railway but also carried a familiar shape related to a circle. This created a long spacious garden area that allowed various activities to take place. The garden area also faced south in order to maximize light and heat exposure. The building also featured a cantilever along the West and North sides of the building to allow for miscellaneous activities to take place, essentially adding an extra space. It would also allow for occupants to have a “framed” view of the Winooski River.

Turntable Shown/Site Plan

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Third Year Fall 2009

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roject

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2.25’

18’

Southeast Elevation

2.25’

18’

Northwest Elevation

2.25’

18’

Northwest Section

Third Year Fall 2009

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roject

32

2.25’

18’

Northeast Elevation

2.25’

18’

Southwest Elevation

2.25’

18’

Southwest Section

Third Year Fall 2009

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roject

CesEr .

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Metal Cap Membrane 20 yr. Bonded Built-Up Roofing

Anchor Steele Angle Weld Insulated 1’ ribbed concrete slabs HVAC Hanging Ceiling

Wood furring strip creating buffer space

Gypsum Board

2.25’

18’

1st Floor Plan

Vertical Reinforcement Lateral Reinforcement

Polystyrene Foam

Web Reinforcement resist diagonal tension Tensile Reinforcement

Steel dowels anchor column to footing

Wall Section 1/4”

2’

2.25’

18’

2nd Floor Plan

Third Year Fall 2009

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ater

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M

edia


W

ater

M

edia

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O

ther

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W

orks


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ther

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orks

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T

hanks for

R

eading and

y T our

Architecture Is Forever.....

ime



Portfolio