Page 1

AMENITY ARCHITECTURE systemic - small scale - urban


ERUTCETIHCRA YTINEMA nabru - elacs llams - cimetsys


AMENITY ARCHITECTURE systemic ­ small scale ­ urban Joshua Kiffer 


Committee

Master of Architecture ­ 2011 Chair:   Co­Chair: 

MARK McGLOTHLIN  RUTH RON


The following is a Masters Research Project presented to the  !"#$%&'#()*+,*-.+&#/0*123++.*+,*4&23#(%2(5&%*#"*60&(#0.*,5.7..8%"(* of requirements of the degree of Masters of Architecture. University of Florida ­ 2011

The University of Florida College of Design, Construction and Planning School of Architecture 331 Architecture Building PO Box 115702


Contents

abstract

6

project questions

7

research

8

case studies

18

pre­design exercise

30

context

36

interventions

42

conclusions & recommendations

66

bibliography

70


Abstract 8

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


Project Questions 9

These questions are of focus throughout the project: “How does the city strengthen its identity while establishing a  distinct boundary?” and, “Can architecture play a role in this  action?” “Can small­scale contemporary architecture be used to  create and/or give an identity to a district, region, or  neighborhood?”


Research 10

LOCATION & HISTORY   The area now known as Orlando is centrally located  within both the state of Florida and within Orange County.   4.(3+5;3*(3%*9&.0"/+*0&%0*7&'(*'(0&(%/*0((&02(#";*'%((.%&'* in the early 1840s, it was not until 1850 when the city 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a few local landowners.     The late nineteenth century brought about the  connection of Orlando to the South Florida Railroad.  This  2+""%2(#+"*,+&(#7%/*(3%*.+20.*%2+"+8)@*0(*(3%*(#8%*2+"'#'(#";* +,*0;&#25.(5&%*P6&#80&#.)*2#(&5'Q*0"/*(+5&#'8?**F&+8+(#+"* +,*(3%*0&%0:'*&%'+5&2%'*=0'*2&%/#(%/*(+*(3%*$#'#(+&'*=3+8*

Orlando city limits

Positioning: centrally located Orange County


Gainesville

Orlando

Daytona Beach


Research

Organization: 27 districts

12

often frequented the new railroad.  One of those visitors was  George Barbour, a travel writer. Barbour saw great potential  in Orlando’s early years, stating: “A good hotel here would be  sure to attract many visitors and there is a probability that  such a one will be erected soon” (City of Orlando, 1984).   * 4*7&%*#"*IJJR*#&+"#20..)*<%208%*(3%*20(0.)'(*,+&*(3%* 2#():'*"%B(*<++'(*#"*'%((.%8%"(?**C3#'*7&%*/%'(&+)%/*80")* older wooden structures, providing the reasoning and space  ,+&*(3%*2+"'(&52(#+"*+,*"%=*0"/*8+&%*7&%A&%(0&/0"(*<&#2>* <5#./#";'?**C3#'*"%=*.++>*+,*6%&80"%"2%*0((&02(%/*.0"/* '6%25.0(+&'*0"/*=%0.(3)*(+5&#'('*'%%>#";*0*"%=*/%'(#"0(#+"* for their winter residences.   * E06#/*;&+=(3*0&+5"/*ISIT*=0'*'60&>%/*<)*#"/5'(&#0.* development, citrus production as well as the exploitation of  lumber as a natural resource. Capitalistic tendencies were  the main motivation behind this growth, tendencies that  .%/*(+*0*60((%&"*+,*/%$%.+68%"(*(30(*U30'*<%%"*&%V%2(%/*#"* the standardized and simple residential architecture built  to provide large numbers of houses to meet immediate  demands and yield lucrative returns” (City of Orlando, 1984).   Development through “speculative subdivision” was the  standard for Orlando; this type of rapid development limited  (3%*()6#20.*#/%"(#()A80>#";*,%0(5&%'*0*2#()*+,(%"*%'(0<.#'3%'* during its initial growth stages.  Suddenly Orlando’s strong  agricultural roots, that ordinarily would have served as  0"*#/%"(#()A80>#";*,%0(5&%*+,*(3%*2#()@*=%&%*#"'(%0/*<%#";* +$%&(0>%"*<)*(3%*.52&0(#$%*%B60"'#+"*0''+2#0(%/*=#(3*&%0.* estate and tourism. 

LANDSCAPE Through many years of capitalist  expansion, the city limits have become a  wandering and expanding territory, often times  informally incorporating other smaller cities.  As a result of the rapid growth and constant  annexation of land in Orlando, a simple  organizational grid layout of the city was not  possible and the city limits wander in a counter  intuitive manner.  The unorganized expansion of  the city has contributed to an unclear distinction  of where Orlando is actually located.  Currently,  the city is divided into 27 districts that attempt to  organize the city within its limits.    

However, one of Orlando’s most abundant 

natural landscapes was used to interrupt the  otherwise disorderly development, and instead  informed the structure of further development.  The city’s dense systems of lakes that operate  0'*0*3#;3.)*#/%"(#70<.%*,%0(5&%*+,*(3%*&%;#+"*


Landscape as infrastructure: Great Park concept of parks,  lakes and pleasure drives

13

images from www.cityoforlando.net

were used in conjunction with the design and  development of parks, roads, and neighborhoods.   Using this relationship between natural and man­ made elements as a basis for development and  inhabitation provided a way to think of nature as  infrastructure.

“Orlando’s affection for the lake front dates back  (+*(3%*%0&.)*ISTT'@*=3%"*(3%*2#():'*'(&%%(*60((%&"*=0'*7&'(* established.  Preserving the lake front as public realm was  standard practice at that time, so many of Orlando’s historic  neighborhoods are focused on one or more lakes.” (Lewis,  n.d., pg.13)   In addition to the utilization of the lakes as basic  urban infrastructure, civic leaders also ordered for a  dense canopy that would be provided by the planting of  approximately 400 oak trees in 1885.  In the early 1900s,  this effort was reinforced by the planting of over 5,000  additional live and water oak trees as part of a systematic  <%05(#720(#+"*+,*9&.0"/+:'*&+0/=0)'@*.0>%'3+&%'@*0"/*+6%"* '602%'?**1)'(%80(#2*<%05(#720(#+"*=0'*60&(*+,*(3%*M#()* Beautiful Movement, the dominant trend and motivating  force in American urban design from the 1890’s to the  1920’s.  The movement was characterized as having a  reverence for natural beauty and its close relationship with  the urban environment. * G"*ISWX*(3%*M#()*+,*9&.0"/+*2+88#''#+"%/*2#()* 6.0""#";*7&8*Y0&.0"/*Z0&(3+.+8%=*[*4''+2#0(%'*(+*6&%60&%* a plan for the city.  Included in the commissioned plan were  aspects such as land use, transportation, recreation, and  +6%"*'602%*6.0"'?**\0>%'*=%&%*'6%2#720..)*#/%"(#7%/*#"*(3%* 7&8:'*6.0"*0'*%.%8%"('*(30(*'3+5./*<%*+="%/@*/%$%.+6%/*0"/* maintained with the object of adding to and conserving their  “notable beauties” (Lewis, n.d., pg.9).  * N3#.%*8523*+,*(3%*#"'6#&0(#+"*,+&*(3%*7&8:'*%,,+&('*


Research 14

208%*,&+8*(3%*2#():'*%B#'(#";*<%05(#720(#+"*6.0"'@*#(*=0'* 0.'+*;.%0"%/*,&+8*'%$%&0.*#"V5%"(#0.*05(3+&'@*6.0""%&'*0"/* 2&#(#2'?**1523*0*.#'(*#"2.5/%/*-&%/%&#2>*\0=*9.8'(%/@*M0.$%&(* ]05B@*4"/&%=*H02>'+"*^+="#";@*^0"#%.*Z5&"308@*H+3"* E5'>#"@*0"/*_<%"%`%&*Y+=0&/?**G"'6#&0(#+"*/&0="*,&+8* 9.8'(%/*0"/*]05B@*/%'#;"%&'*+,*O%=*a+&>:'*M%"(&0.*F0&>*0'* =%..*0'*Z+'(+":'*_8%&0./*O%2>.02%@*2+"(&#<5(%/*(+*(3%*2#()* 6.0"*<)*20..#";*,+&*(3%*2&%0(#+"*+,*0*b&%0(*F0&>?**C3#'*2+"2%6(* 2+"2%"(&0(%/*+"*2+""%2(#";*.0&;%*60&>'*0"/*.0>%'*=#(3*0* ')'(%8*+,*6.%0'5&%*/&#$%'?**G"*IScS@*/5%*(+*(3%*6+65.0&#()* 0"/*'522%''*+,*%0&.)*<%05(#720(#+"*%,,+&('@*(3%*b&%0(*F0&>*

2+"2%6(*7"0..)*208%*(+*<%#";*=3%"*(3%*M308<%&* +,*M+88%&2%*'6+"'+&%/*0*'2%"#2*&+0/*&+5(%* (3&+5;3*9&.0"/+?**C3%*'2%"#2*&+5(%*'3+=20'%/*Wc* 8#.%'*+,*<&#2>A60$%/@*(&%%A.#"%/*'(&%%('*(30(*=+$%* (3&+5;3*"58%&+5'*"%#;3<+&3++/'*0"/*%#;3(%%"* .0>%*'#/%*;&%%"'602%'*(30(*=%&%*2+"'#/%&%/*(+* <%*(3%*8+'(*0%'(3%(#20..)*6.%0'#";?*P\%=#'@*"?/?@* 6;?IcQ

Olmsted & Vaux: Boston’s Emerald Necklace


15

AMENITY  As discussed earlier, the early developmental  '(0;%'*+,*9&.0"/+*'0=*0*'(&+";*#"V5%"2%*#"*"0(5&0.* elements. Parks, trees, and lakes were considered a  vital part of the infrastructure needed to promote life  in the city.  However, their role within the city has since  diminished, as evidenced by the following quote from  Orlando’s Families, Parks and Recreation Vision Plan  (FPR), a planning initiative to bolster park spaces in the  city.   

“As the city grew and prospered during the post World War II  period, some of the principles of the City Beautiful Movement  were forgotten in the rush to accommodate new residents.  During  this period, streets were constructed without sidewalks or street  trees; neighborhoods were developed without adequate parks; and  #"(%&2+""%2(#$#()*=0'*'02&#72%/*,+&*%B6%/#%"2)?d*(City of Orlando,  2007, pg.4)  

While not the deeply integrated components  they were before, the current role of natural elements  in Orlando has become that of an urban amenity.  As the city recognizes these elements as still very  valuable and important to the growth of Orlando, they  are trying to restore these current urban amenities to  the historical importance they once held as necessary  2+86+"%"('*+,*230";%*0"/*/%$%.+68%"(?**M#()*+,72#0.'* began this restoration initiative in the late 1990s,  #('*65&6+'%*(+*%"2+5&0;%*0*8+&%*$0&#%/*%B6.+&0(#+"* of the city through the use of such urban amenities  including ­ but not limited to ­ parks, trees and lakes.  

!"#$%&%'$( 2

a  men  i  ty      a desirable or useful feature or  facility of a building or place

ur  ban   a  men  i  ty      site or region­specific goods and  services that make some locations  particularly attractive for living and  working

The result was a program labeled “City Beautiful – The  Legacy Continues,” which has since added approximately  250 acres of community and neighborhood parkland, as  well as extensive upgrades to 35 additional city parks.  The  program is still in action and has a central goal of continuing  the traditions that began with Orlando’s original City  Beautiful Movement. This new approach, however, intends  to simultaneously articulate the FMR’s role in supporting the  economic, educational, physical, and social wellbeing of city  residents. (City of Orlando, 2007, pg.5)    A study titled “Amenities Drive Urban Growth”  details the use of amenities as a way of distinguishing and  /%$%.+6#";*0*2#()*+&*"%#;3<+&3++/@*/%7"#";*0*pure amenity  as “a non­produced public good, such as weather quality,  that has no explicit price” (Clark, et.al., 2002, pg.497).   C3%*6.0"'*/&0="*56*<)*9&.0"/+*2#()*+,72#0.'*#"2.5/%*80")*


Research 16

)*+',"-$./&0%+!.,1-2"(3 1

such social and cultural amenities, as well as large­scale  architectural growth.  Orlando’s Green Network Report  PbOEQ*/%7"%'*'#8#.0&*08%"#(#%'*0'*5&<0"*'602%'*20..%/*U(3#&/* places.” 1**1+2#+.+;#'(*E0)*9./%"<5&;*7&'(*2+#"%/*(3#'*(%&8* 0"/*.0<%.'*(3#&/*6.02%'*0'*U(3%*80")*65<.#2*6.02%'*0"/*'602%'* where people can gather, set aside the worries of home  P7&'(*6.02%'Q*0"/*=+&>*+&*'23++.*P'%2+"/*6.02%'Qd*(City of  Orlando, n.d., pg.18). These third places are important to the  /%$%.+68%"(*+,*25.(5&%*0"/*5&<0"#'8@*'%$%&0.*2+5"(&#%'*0"/* cities of Europe have inherited the use of such places.   

UC3#&/*6.02%'*0&%*#"2.5/%/*#"*0")*/#'25''#+"*+,*e50.#()*+,*6.02%*<%205'%*(3%)* are the places where people want to gather.  Linking these types of places to  +(3%&*#86+&(0"(*%.%8%"('*+,*(3%*65<.#2*&%0.8*#'*%''%"(#0.*#"*+&/%&*(+*2&%0(%*0* (&5.)*2+86&%3%"'#$%*65<.#2*&%0.8*6.0"?d*(City of Orlando, n.d., pg.19)

This MRP aims to explore a smaller­scale of  0&23#(%2(5&0.*#"(%&$%"(#+"'*A*0*'20.%*(30(*20"*,5.7..*(3%* 2#():'*'80..%&*08%"#()A<0'%/*"%%/'?*G"*&%2+;"#`#";*'80..%&* 0&23#(%2(5&%*0'*0*"%=*066&+023*(+*5&<0"*08%"#(#%'@*#(* can serve to unite the two separate groups that currently  2+86+'%*9&.0"/+:'*2+885"#()*A*6%&80"%"(*2#(#`%"'*0"/* (&0"'#%"(*(+5&#'('?*G(*#'*(3+5;3(*(30(*#,*(3%'%*(=+*5"#('*20"* unite socially and geographically, a richer and more cohesive  cultural city identity will emerge.   CY_*E4CG9O4\_*   C3%*2#()*+,72#0.':*6.0"*(+*%"2+5&0;%*(3%*5'%*+,*5&<0"* amenities involved the creation of events, programs, and  /%$%.+68%"(*<+0&/'?*2  Most of these plans do not directly 

Pubs of England  Sidewalk cafés of Paris  Beer gardens of Germany

identify architecture as a focus, but rather the  establishment of events for social interaction.   However, one of the development boards that  does indeed address architecture is a group  called the Community Planning Studio (CPS).   The CPS was tasked with identifying issues  related to future development and planning  in neighborhoods throughout Orlando.  The  MF1*(3%"*#/%"(#7%/*0*"58<%&*+,*0&23#(%2(5&0.* objectives 3*#"*+&/%&*(+*0//&%''*(3%*#/%"(#7%/* development issues as they relate to various  areas in the city.  In total, the CPS has outlined  strategic vision plans for six major areas of  Orlando.  * C3&%%*+,*(3%*&%'5.(#";*7$%*0&23#(%2(5&0.* objectives of the plan directly relate to topics  within this project, including Urban Form,  Architectural Details, and Pedestrian Friendliness.  It can be argued that these city­planning 


17

!"4"1',5"$&.6'-+!( "4"$&( ,+'7+-5(

-+20%&"2&*+-1 '68"2&%4"(

2

3

Downtown Development Board  Metro Orlando Economic Development      Commission  Community Planning Studio Downtown Orlando Entrepreneur Zone Orlando Film Festival Orlando Farmers Market Orlando Fringe Festival Buy Local Orlando

   Encourage an elclectic mix of  archtectural styles     Create a human­scale to the  architecture     Reflect the rhythm and scale of  the city fabric

objectives, along with others, can be met through  the implementation and placement of several  contemporary architectural interventions.   C3%*7&'(*+<f%2(#$%@*&%,%&&#";*(+*Urban Form,  suggests the incorporation of:

to the residential, business, and commercial surroundings.   The last objective topic, Pedestrian Friendliness, lists another  area for improvement, stating:

“Appropriate transitions between the residential neighborhood  and activities along Edgewater Drive to protect the residential  character of the neighborhood, reduce monotony of commercial  development,  and  provide  opportunities  for  compatible  development.”

Potential development projects could  employ the use small­scale interventions to  address this suggested transition in scale, use,  and density.  Transitions between the low­ density historic neighborhoods and high­density  developments could also be addressed in a  similar manner.  A human­scale can be created  by simply allowing the intervention architecture  to be accessed as an element that is secondary 

  “Create a system of arcades in the center core, and/or a system of awnings  inside and outside the core, to provide shade and protection from the  elements and encourage walking.”

This statement exhibits the potential consideration of  elements typical to a city or neighborhood. This new outlook  would allow these elements to become opportunities where  interventions can be deployed, and thus use the otherwise  mundane as opportunities to enliven the surrounding area.   Other interventions throughout the city can refer to current  or future objectives in development plans, pertaining to  0*'6%2#72*6.02%*0"/*<%2+8#";*0*6+(%"(#0.*8%(3+/+.+;#20.* framework for the expansion of infrastructure.


Research 18

9+-!%&%'$-1.:*$2&%'$(. ':.&0". 5'$*5"$& THE MONUMENT AS PRECEDENT   Historically, monuments have taken on similar  functions within a city or neighborhood, linking places and/ or events through an object or structure. 4  Identifying one  '6%2#72*%"/*&%'5.(*(+*(3%*02(*+,*2+"'(&52(#";*0*8+"58%"(*#'* +,(%"*/#,725.(?*C3%*2+8<#"0(#+"*+,*%$%"(@*3#'(+&)@*0"/*2+"(%B(* often produce a distinct and varied result. Architecture  Professor and Philosopher Bart Verschaffel states,   

C3%* 8+"58%"(0.* #'@* 7&'(* +,* 0..@* 0* g,+&8:?* * H5'(* 0'* (3%0(&%@* &#(50.@* +&* ,%0'(@* monumentality is  a  form  that  contains  and  categorizes  events  and  social  life.    By  containing  social  life  and  differentiating  between  modes  of  social  interaction,  these  forms  simultaneously  assign  a  proper  place  to  events,  actions and social roles.  However, each “form” is also...sedimentation of past  events turned into “form” (Verschaffel, 1999, pg.333).

It is not the intention of this MRP to create  monuments for the city of Orlando. Rather, the interest and  intent lies in studying how monuments are created and  how they take on additional or secondary functions.  Both  of which affect a space and its corresponding inhabitants.   Developing architectural interventions in a manner similar  to that of monuments could solidify their ability to serve  as places or spaces of potential social interaction.  These  interventions can become a place for not only historical  &%V%2(#+"@*<5(*0.'+*0*6.02%*,+&*(3%*0''%8<.)*+,*5"/%$%.+6%/* future events.  Verschaffel aptly states, “The monument  is a product and sign of power.  But that does not imply  that a monument cannot function differently.  It does not  imply that the monument could not be used in other ways 

4 Commemorate ­people   ­past events   ­important values or truths   ­lends dignity to quotidian   Object of power   ­dominance   ­durable   ­long lasting * A#86+'%'*+,72#0.*$0.5%'

;"2'$!-+<.:*$2&%'$(. ':.&0". 5'$*5"$& 5    Diverts attention from banalities  of the everyday     Forces bodies to make detours,  thus inscribes the past into present      Tu r n   w o r l d   i n t o   a   p l a c e   o f  rememberance     Impose thoughts and memories     Make it evident that the present  has a past


19

(Verschaffel, 1999, pg.335).”  This alternative  function that Verschaffel suggests can perhaps  take a new direction and steer away from the  heavier historical meaning often associated with  monuments. 5  The direction and destination  becomes one of societal interaction, where the  monument or intervention begins to present the  context rather than itself ­ ultimately allowing  (3%*2+"(%B(*(+*%B6&%''*=30(*#'*'#;"#720"(*+&*$#(0.* about the precise placement of the intervention. 

“All these  fountains,  streets  and  facades,  parks,  inscriptions and statues taken together, just create  a stage where ordinary people play out their own  lives.” Bart Verschaffel 


Case Studies 20

Research question: Can small­scale contemporary architecture  be used to create and/or give an identity to a district, region,  or neighborhood? Several projects from across the world have attempted this  feat and have succeeded at a variety of scales.  The three  case studies examined for this project not only exist at  different scales in relation to one another, but also in relation  (+*(3%8'%.$%'*0"/*(3%#&*'6%2#72*2+"(%B('?*C3%'%*20'%*'(5/#%'* include:

The National Tourist Routes – Norway

Stripscape – Phoenix, Arizona

Citymine (d) – Brussels, London, Barcelona National Tourist Routes ­ Norway Saunders Architecture Jensen & Skodvin Arkitektkontor


21

images from A­I­R architecture

Stripscape ­ Phoenix, Arizona Darren Petrucci 

Citymine (d) ­ London, Brussels Ball 

Citymine (d) ­ London, Brussels & Barcelona Bubble  images from citymined.org


Case Studies 22

THE NATIONAL TOURIST ROUTES   The Government’s Architectural Policy of Norway  addresses the issue of architecture and design nationwide;  this policy applies to both publically­ and privately­developed  0&23#(%2(5&%?**C3%*F+.#2)*/%7"%'*0&23#(%2(5&%*0'@*U4..* our man­made surroundings. It embraces buildings and  #",&0'(&52(5&%@*+5(/++&*'602%'*0"/*.0"/'206%?**G(*#'*0<+5(* #"/#$#/50.*<5#./#";'*0"/*<5#./#";'*#"*#"(%&02(#+"@*0<+5(* (3%*(+(0.#()*+,*(+="'@*6+65.0(#+"*2%"(%&'*0"/*.0"/'206%'?d* PO+&=%;#0"*D#"#'(&#%'@*WTTS@*6;?*LQ**b#$%"*(3#'*$%&)*.0&;%* '2+6%*+,*(3%*6+.#2)@*(3%*2+5"(&)*30'*/#&%2(.)*#"2.5/%/*0* "58<%&*+,*65<.#2*'%2(+&*05(3+&#(#%'@*+"%*#"*60&(#25.0&*<%#";* the Norwegian Public Roads Administration. The roads  0/8#"#'(&0(#+"*'%%'*(3%#&*6&+/52(*0'*<%#";*U'(&%(23%'*+,*&+0/'* where the positive interplay between the road and the unique  .0"/'206%*#'*=30(*;#$%'*#"/#$#/50.'*;++/*%B6%&#%"2%'d*PO+&'>* ,+&8@*6;?SQ?*E+0/'*0&%*=3%&%*(3%*(&5%*#/%"(#()*+,*O+&=0)*#'* <%.#%$%/*(+*<%*,+5"/*A*=3#.%*(&0$%.#";*0.+";*#('*2+0'(@*(3&+5;3* the Fjords and into the small towns.1 Their vision aims to  expand the importance and experience of getting from one  destination to the next. * G"*ISSR*(3%*O+&=%;#0"*;+$%&"8%"(*0"/*60&.#08%"(* #"#(#0(%/*6.0"'*,+&*0*6&+f%2(*>"+="*0'*C3%*O0(#+"0.*C+5&#'(* Routes.  The goal of the Routes project is widespread and  purposed to enhance the experience of nature and the  0(8+'63%&%*#"*%023*.+20(#+"?*C3%*6&+f%2(*;+0.'*'(0(%@*U95&* ambition is to leave traces of our own time and to offer  (+5&#'('*;++/*%B6%&#%"2%'*0(*(3%*'08%*(#8%*0'*=%*7"/*

images from turistveg.no

Overview of Norway: 18 individual routes

“Each National  Tourist  Route  has  its  own  identity  but  is  nevertheless  part  of  a  comprehensive  mosaic  consisting  of  18  stretches  of  road.    Mountains,  fjords  and  coastal landscapes represent strong elements  along these stretches of road.” (Norsk form,  pg.13)


1 Features along the roads: fjords ­ mountain passes ­ small towns

23

new ways of solving the problems of developing necessary  infrastructure” (Norsk form, pg.8).    The routes project consists of a network of roads  that span the entire west coast of Norway, operating at the  scale of the entire country.  A narrowing­in of purpose and  scale takes place at key points along the route through the  use of architectural interventions.  Norway’s widespread  population clusters and the intricacies of each local landscape  determined exact placement of the interventions.  Architects  were also able to draw inspiration from local history and  traditions. This focus on a larger system is intended “to make  Norway more attractive for tourists traveling through Norway  by road, as well as to strengthen Norwegian industry and  boost settlement patterns, particularly in outlying areas”  (Norsk form, pg.11). * N#(3#"*%023*'#(%@*'6%2#72*#/%0'*0"/*(0'>'*0&%* developed while still incorporating functional roadside  amenities.  Some examples of these practical amenities  include car parks, pull­off points, information points,  overnight parking, sites for eating a meal and lighting a  20867&%@*(&0'3*<#"'@*65<.#2*(+#.%('@*.++>+5(*6+#"('@*0"/* emergency shelters.  The routes project establishes these  practical amenities as provocative and unique architectural  interventions.  Each intervention explores a way of cultivating  a potential that has always existed, but is rarely experienced,  “What was initially purely pragmatic has been cultivated into  works of architecture that supply their own narrative.  The  amenities give the location a name and a character” (Norsk  form, pg.20).


Case Studies 24 Amenity structure: toilet facilities ­ closed and intraverted

Stegastein, Aurlandsfjellet Amenities Served: Lookout point – Toilet facilities   Aurlandsfjellet consists of two amenity­driven  structures that are represented through distinctly different  architectural interventions.  The toilet facilities place the  user on the edge of a steep cliff, establishing the goal of  each amenity at this stop ­ to showcase the surrounding  landscape. The unique form and materiality of each structure  helps establish a difference in function, while uniting them  as part of a larger system of contemporary architecture.   The goal of presenting the landscape is fully realized at  the second structure as the user experiences the dramatic  lookout point.  Initially, the focus is on the lookout point  itself. However, as the user begins to venture out onto the  structure, it becomes simply the “means to an end” and  the user no longer notices the structure but instead the  landscape.  Aurlandsfjellet architects Todd Saunders and  Tommie Wilhelmsen point out, “Even though we have chosen  an expressive form, the concept is a form of minimalism, in  an attempt to conserve and complement the existing nature.” 


Site diagram: vehicular & pedestrian circulation 

“What was initially purely pragmatic has been  cultivated into works of architecture that sup­ ply their own narrative.  The amenities give  the location a name and a character” 

25

Amenity structure: lookout point ­ minimalistic form  compliments nature 


information stand

Case Studies 26

Liasanden, Sognefjellet Amenity Served: Rest area with toilet facilities   Similar to the entire Tourist Route project, this rest  area at Sognefjellet is comprised of several layers that  constitute a larger whole.  Designers wanted to let the  landscape completely dictate the design of this particular  rest stop.  The act of occupying the space between the trees  +"A'#(%*&%e5#&%/*'%$%&0.*'6%2#72*&%02(#+"'*(+*(3%*.0"/'206%?** Each newly developed component of the project is meant to  interact with the surroundings, and its temporary inhabitants,  in a discrete manner.  The gravel driving path and trunk  protection elements are designed to expand and reshape  continually as the trees grow.  Several additional layers of  functional elements contribute to the overall experience of the  rest stop.  Benches, chairs, and picnic tables ­ all designed  to contain the user in a similar manner ­ populate the open  spaces not intended for use by cars.  This seemingly random  disbursement across the site allows for a secondary scale  of exploration through the site.  A nearby stream is fully  022%''#<.%*(+*,++(*(&0,72*0"/*<%2+8%'*0"*+<f%2(*(3%*&%'(*'(+6* takes advantage of by placing a series of benches near it.   Materiality of the benches, chairs, and picnic tables also aligns  with the various functions they serve.  For example, seats  are always made of large pieces of wood, while seemingly  tenuous pieces of metal act as the structural elements that  3+./*56*(3%*=++/?**F&+f%2(*0&23#(%2('*,&+8*(3%*7&8*H%"'%"*[* Skodvin Arkitektkontor note just how crucial a role the site  played in this project by stating, “The site is an indispensable  condition for establishing the geometry of this plan in order  ,+&*(3%*#/%0*(+*%8%&;%*#"(+*0*'6%2#72*2+"7;5&0(#+"*+&*.0)+5(?*

gravel driving path & trunk protection

Bench & table  2+"7;5&0(#+"'h 80(%&#0.*'#8#.0&#(#%'


27

wooded landscape & layers of program

vehicle circulation & parking

N#(3+5(*0*'#(%@*(3#'*2+"2%6(*30'*"+*2+"7;5&0(#+"* ­ it is only a method that needs to be applied”   PO+&'>*,+&8@*6;?WQ?*** * N3#.%*(3%*'20.%*+,*(3#'*DEF*#'*8523*'80..%&* (30"*(30(*+,*(3%*E+5(%'*6&+f%2(@*(3%*2+"'#/%&0(#+"* +,*%023*;#$%"*%B086.%:'*0<#.#()*(+*"0&&+=A#"*+"*0* 60&(#25.0&*2+"(%B(*0"/*6&+$#/%*0*/#&%2(*0"/*'6%2#72* &%'6+"'%*=#..*#"V5%"2%*(3%*#"(%&$%"(#+"'*+,*(3#'* DEF?*

amenities included: benches, tables, restrooms


Case Studies 28

STRIPSCAPE – Phoenix, Arizona (pdf as source)  Amenity Served: Street lighting, pedestrian shelter, art  display, signage, bus stop   Darren Petrucci, architect as well as the Director  of the School of Architecture + Landscape Architecture at  Arizona State University, has worked with the concept of  urban improvement through amenities in the city of Phoenix,  Arizona.  Petrucci’s project titled “Stripscape” in Phoenix is  a complete redesign of the pedestrian thoroughfares along  a one­mile stretch of road. Petrucci chose to refer to the  improvements in infrastructure as pedestrian amenities,  he states,  “Stripscape attempts to graft a new type of  infrastructure onto this generic landscape in an attempt  to develop a connective tissue that can facilitate the rich  complexity of urban life” (Petrucci, n.d., pg.41). These added  amenities were considered a necessity because all street­side  identifying features were stripped during an effort to increase  road width.     This project uses the common elements present  within the city (e.g., signage, street lighting, temporary  pedestrian shelter and art display) and attempts to blend  them into a cohesive unit, which is then used to give an  identity to the area.1 Each of these elements makes an  appearance as small and subtle monuments, each one  informing, protecting, and locating the user all while  establishing a prescribed itinerary.  This itinerary is not 

imported from elsewhere but emergent from  place, and fueled by the businesses and  people of the context.  Business signage was  directly incorporated into each structure,  directly imbedding the local character into the  intervention as a whole.  The monumentality  of each structure does not come from power or  history, but from its ability act as a small stage  where ordinary people play out their own daily  lives.  Although the approach to this MRP involves  a scope broader than a single road, Petrucci’s  project can provide a framework for deployment  of architectural glimpses throughout Orlando  that consider and integrate their contextual  surroundings.


29

images from A­I­R architecture

one mile strech of pedestrian thoroughfares

2 signage street lighting  temporary pedestrian shelter  art display


Case Studies 30

CITY MINE(d) – Brussels, London, Barcelona   City Mine(d) describes their organization as an  “International network of individuals and collectives involved  with city and local action. It brings together micro­initiatives,  creates urban interventions and makes public space”  (Citymine (d), n.d.). Compared to the other case studies,  City Mine(d) is a less architectural and more art­based  program that deals with the overall organization of a city  and its individual constituents.  The goal is to provide more  attainable, process­based solutions to issues of citizenship,  democracy, and the city.  Interventions are used within the  urban environment and are the ideas of the city’s everyday  inhabitant.  Their work can be further described as “urban art  interventions as a positive way to empower diverse groups  and individuals in the city” (Citymine (d), n.d.). M#()*D#"%P/Q*/%7"%'*0"*5&<0"*#"(%&$%"(#+"*0'h   ^%7"#(#+"* I* A* 4"* %63%8%&0.* =+&>* +,* 0&(* =+&>* #"* 65<.#2* '602%* (30(* brings together disparate users of that space and in doing so empowers the  disenfranchised among them.

^%7"#(#+"*W*i*4*(%86+&0&)*=+&>*+,*0&(*#"*0*'e50&%@*'(&%%(@*60&>*+&* terrain vague  as  an  opportunity  to  bring  people  together  and  to  introduce  creativity and new perspectives into otherwise polarized urban discussions.

establish presence of  young people

groups moving & gathering in public spaces


31

all images from www.citymined.org

unexpected presence is used  to draw attention to activity,  person, or place

Young Black Women’s Group of  London: reclaimed local park

Ball – Brussels

Bubble – Brussels, London, Barcelona

* 4*"#"%A,++(*/#08%(%&*#"V0(0<.%*<0..*=0'* 5'%/*(+*%'(0<.#'3*(3%*6&%'%"2%*+,*)+5";*6%+6.%* 0'*=%..*0'*(3%*'602%*(3%)*+2256)*=#(3#"*(3%*2#()?** -&%%.)*8+$#";*,&+8*6.02%*(+*6.02%@*(3%*23#./&%"* 0"/*(3%*<0..*0&%*,&%%*(+*&+08*(3%*2#()*0"/*#('* +6%"*'602%'?**Y+=%$%&@*(3%*Z0..*#'*"+(*f5'(*5'%/* 0'*0*6.0),5.*/%$#2%@*U#('*5'%*#"*(3%*65<.#2*&%0.8* #'*0.'+*0*=0)*(+*&0#'%*0=0&%"%''*0<+5(*(3%*&+.%* +,*65<.#2*'602%*#"*(3%*2#()*0"/*#('*/%$%.+68%"(?d* (<0..@*WTTTQ**C3#'*6&+f%2(*5"/+5<(%/.)*30'* 6+.#(#20.*5"/%&(+"%'@*<5(*%'(0<.#'3%'*#('*6.02%* #"*0&23#(%2(5&%*0'*=%..?**G('*#"'(0..0(#+"*0"/* '5<'%e5%"(*5'%*2&%0(%'*;&+56'*+,*6%+6.%*(30(*7"/* 0"/*8+$%*(3&+5;3*+6%"*65<.#2*'602%@*605'#";* 0"/*;0(3%&#";*0.+";*(3%*=0)?**4*=0)*+,*%B6.+&#";* (3%*.0)+5(*+,*0*2#()*#'*2&%0(%/@*6+(%"(#0..)*.#">#";* 0&%0'*+,*$0&#%/*5'%'?

Similar to the Ball, the Bubble project is a very mobile  0"/*5'%&A/%7"%/*=0)*(+*#"(%&02(*=#(3*65<.#2*'602%?**C3%* Bubble is a large 50’ x 20’ translucent bag, its unexpected  6&%'%"2%*#'*5'%/*(+*/&0=*0((%"(#+"*(+*0"*02(#$#()@*6%&'+"@*+&* 6.02%*(30(*=+5./*"+&80..)*&%80#"*5""+(#2%/?**U4.+";*=#(3*(3%* !"#/%"(#7%/*G"V0(%/*9<f%2(@*60''%&'A<)*'%%*0*;&%%"*'602%* (3%)*=%&%":(*0=0&%*+,*<%,+&%j*,+&*(3%*8%/#0*#(*20"*'%&$%*0'* 0*.%"'*(+*,+25'*0((%"(#+"*+"*0*.+20.*+&*2+885"#()*02(#$#()?* C3%*<5<<.%*#'*0.'+*0"*0''%(*,+&*(3+'%*=#(3*.#((.%*8%0"'*#"* (3%*'(&5;;.%*,+&*'602%?d*Pbubble, 2002Q**4"*%B086.%*+,*(3%* Z5<<.%:'*%,,%2(*+"*0*2#()*#'*'%%"*#"*(3%*'(+&)*+,*0*;&+56*+,* ;#&.'*,&+8*(3%*a+5";*Z.02>*N+8%":'*b&+56*+,*\+"/+"?*C3%'%* ;#&.'*5'%/*(3%*Z5<<.%*(+*&%2.0#8*0*60&>*#"*O+&(3*\+"/+"?**C3%* %$%"(*3%.6%/*0((&02(*0((%"(#+"*,&+8*(3%*"%0&<)*G"(%&"0(#+"0.* ^0"2%*M%"(%&@*;0#"#";*+66+&(5"#(#%'*,+&*(3%*;&+56*+,*)+5";* =+8%"*(30(*(3%)*80)*30$%*"+(*+(3%&=#'%*0((&02(%/?


Pre­design exercise 32

Site plan:  new circulation path

Venetian Workshop     Creating a contemporary piece of architecture within  the historic city of Venice requires a delicate navigation of  several factors.  The most important factor to consider in this  challenge becomes how one can contextually link a modern  6&+f%2(*(+*#('*3#'(+&#20.*'5&&+5"/#";'*0"/*#/%"(#70<.%*,%0(5&%'?** ]%"#2%*30'*80")*'523*#/%"(#70<.%*,%0(5&%'@*<5(*(=+*+,*(3%* most prominent are their seemingly omnipresent gondolas  and the many “Campos” that serve as public parks.  Campos  are areas where several pedestrian paths meet and become  a public square for interaction.  These Campos give Venice  a livelihood that would be hard to experience without the  dense public thoroughfares that lead to them.       The Venetian shipbuilding industry dates back to  the beginning of the city’s existence.  The type and scale  +,*<+0(*6&+/52%/*#"*]%"#2%*30'*;&%0(.)*%$+.$%/@*3+=%$%&@* the city’s daily operations are still intrinsically linked to the  2+"'(&52(#+"@*80#"(%"0"2%@*&%60#&@*0"/*+6%&0(#+"*+,*(3+'%* small manoeuvrable wooden boats.   The resulting project attempts to meld this lifestyle  ,%0(5&%*=#(3*(30(*+,*(3%*2#():'*0<5"/0"(*65<.#2*60&>'@*(3%* project devotes public space to the act of repairing the city’s  many small wooden boats.  Integration of public circulation  through the site’s center allows for an unconventional public  $#%=*+,*(3#'*f+<*0"/*#('*6&+2%''%'@*02(#";*0'*0*.#$%*%B3#<#(*+,* the history and workings of Venetian shipbuilding.  Overall  function and construction technique conceptually bind the 

Looking east: view of construction systems and rhythm created  


33

Section: construction exploration  


35

Perspective: view from new circulation route

workshop, site, and city.  Additionally, the use of varying  structural systems begins to mimic the layering of structure  and skin present within the actual boats.  Similar to the  boats, a primary structural system sets the major rhythm  while also providing support for a secondary permeable skin.   Although existing oceans away from Orlando, this  project allowed for an exploration of how a contemporary  piece of architecture can provide an amenity­based use for  the public realm.  Another major difference to this MRP is  the Venetian projects solitary existence apart from a larger  system of interventions. However, this isolation allowed  (3%*/%'#;"*6&+2%''*(+*2+"2%"(&0(%*+"*+"%*'6%2#72*'#(%?**C3%* ability to concentrate on detailed portions of a project and its  context allows the design to give meaning to the intervention  and anchor it to the chosen site. 


37

Perspective: view from  existing campo


Context 38

ORGANIZING THE CITY    Given the aforementioned counterintuitive  organization of Orlando’s city limits, it was determined  that a new organizational structure must be applied before  (3%*#/%"(#720(#+"*+,*#"(%&$%"(#+"*'#(%'*20"*<%;#"?**C3#'* determination dictated the need to diagram potential  solutions to organizational issues in order to give order to the  25&&%"(*2#()*.0)+5(?   The initial approach to the Orlando project was  similar to that of Norway’s National Tourist Route, involving  the placement of interventions throughout the entire city,  .+20(#";*(3%8*#"*6+65.0(#+"*2.5'(%&'?**C3#'*6&+$%/*(+*<%*0"* ineffective strategy for Orlando; long distances between each  intervention made it hard to conceive of them as a cohesive  5"#(?**C3%*C+5&#'(*E+5(%*'522%%/%/*=#(3*(3#'*(%23"#e5%* because interventions were located along one stretch of road  0"/*=%&%*/%.#<%&0(%*'(+66#";*6+#"('*0.+";*#(?**G"*9&.0"/+@* 3+=%$%&@*(3%*;+0.*#'*(+*5"2+$%&*2%&(0#"*0&%0'@*&%e5#&#";* 0*6%&'+"*(+*%B6.+&%*(3%*.+20.*(%&&#(+&)?**4.'+@*;#$%"*(3%* presence of many intersecting roads at varying scales and  densities, the ability of one road to simply escort a person  (+*%023*#"(%&$%"(#+"*=0'*"+(*6+''#<.%*+&*/%'#&%/?*G(*=0'* determined that smaller clusters of interventions related to  '6%2#72*0&%0'*+,*(3%*2#()*20&&#%/*8+&%*6+(%"(#0.*#"*#/%"(#,)#";* with the area of their deployment and thus eliminated a  2%"(&0.*/%6%"/%"2%*+"*&+0/=0)'?   In considering this new direction, an additional  diagramming layer was needed in organizing Orlando’s city  limits, for both visual comprehension and site selection  65&6+'%'?*C3#'*"%=*.0)%&*0#8%/*(+*#/%"(#,)*0&%0'*+,*3#;3*

population clusters near perimeter of city

Downtown node: sits in traditional city limits

population densities that could potentially house  the planned interventions.  This additional  diagramming layer revealed that a majority of  the city’s population clusters formed near the  perimeter of Orlando, while only one was located  within the core.  It is important to note that  (3%*'6%2#72*/%8+;&063#2'*+,*(3+'%*6+65.0(#+"'* were not factors of consideration, as one of  the main intentions of the project is to unite  all of Orlando’s inhabitants, both transient and  permanent.


39

5 Organizational systems: lakes, roads & parks

PROJECT ZONES   Using current population statistics,  six different zones of high­population density  =%&%*#/%"(#7%/?*C3%*`+"%'*=%&%*0.'+*23+'%"* based on their inclusion in a structured growth  #"#(#0(#$%*0'*/%7"%/*<)*(3%*2#()*6.0""%&'?**C3%* term “structured growth” refers to the growth  80"0;%8%"(*6.0"'*+,*(3%*2#()?**C3%'%*'#B*0&%0'* were later narrowed down to one that would  %$%"(50..)*'%&$%*(+*3+5'%*(3%*#"(%&$%"(#+"'?*C3%* selected zone is located within the original city  limits and also holds the city’s Central Business  ^#'(&#2(?**\+20(#";*(3#'*7"0.*23+'%"*`+"%*=#(3#"* the original city limits places the interventions in  (3%*0&%0*=3%&%*<%05(#720(#+"*(%23"#e5%'*=%&%*

7&'(*%86.+)%/*#"*ISWX*A*(3%*(%23"#e5%'*56+"*=3#23*(3%*2#()* =0'*/%'#;"%/*(+*;&+=*,&+8?** * C3#'*23+'%"*`+"%*30'*5"/%&;+"%*0*'#;"#720"(*'3#,(* #"*'20.%*#"*(3%*60'(*/%20/%@*#"$+.$#";*(3%*#"2+&6+&0(#+"*+,*0* .0&;%*"58<%&*+,*3#;3A&#'%*&%'#/%"(#0.*(+=%&'?**Z%205'%*+,*(3#'* .0&;%A'20.%*;&+=(3@*(3%*6&+f%2(:'*'80..A'20.%*#"(%&$%"(#+"'* =#..*'(&#$%*(+*8#(#;0(%*(3%*.+''*+,*3580"*'20.%*0&23#(%2(5&%* =#(3#"*(3%*/+="(+="*/#'(&#2(?** * Y0$#";*+&;0"#`%/*0"/*/%7"%/*0*6&+f%2(*`+"%*+,* 9&.0"/+*(+*=+&>*=#(3#"@*(3%*"%B(*+<f%2(#$%*=0'*(+*#/%"(#,)* (3%*80f+&*+&;0"#`0(#+"0.*')'(%8'*6&%'%"(?**4'*'(0(%/*%0&.#%&@* 9&.0"/+:'*%0&.)*/%$%.+68%"(*3#";%/*56+"*(3%*5'%*+,*(3%* .0>%'@*0'*(3%)*=%&%*(3%*8+'(*#/%"(#70<.%*,%0(5&%*=#(3#"*(3%* 2#()*0"/*`+"%?**4'*'523@*(3%*&+0/@*3#;3=0)@*0"/*&0#.*')'(%8'*


Context 40

1

in this chosen area were located in a manner that showcased  the lakes and also serviced the nearby neighborhoods.   Additionally, early city planners mandated that green space  around lakes, within the downtown region, be allocated for  public use.  To this day, the lake responsible for the iconic  image of downtown Orlando, Lake Eola, is still a large park  space dedicated to public use.  The fact that this public  space still exists represents the continued commitment to  preserving public space in the area. SITE SELECTION   In order to carefully select the location and number  of intervention sites in a manner that would accurately  represent the entire zone, it was necessary to conduct a  deeper analysis of the chosen project zone. This further  analysis aimed to identify residual spaces of residential  "%#;3<+&3++/'@*2+88%&2#0.*0"/*+,72%*/#'(&#2('@*0'*=%..*0'* unused green spaces.  These residual spaces have typically  <%%"*#/%"(#7%/*'#86.)*0'*(3%*2#():'*U.%,(+$%&'d*i*+,(%"*.+'(*#"* the larger scale and function of surrounding developments  and never considered for their potential to serve a functional  65&6+'%?**G(*#'*=#(3#"*(3%'%*#/%"(#7%/*&%'#/50.*'602%'*(30(*(3%* interventions will be used to give new meaning to each space  i*0'*=%..*0'*(+*2+..%2(#$%.)*;#$%*9&.0"/+*0*')'(%8#2*"%(=+&>* of publicly accessible architecture.  * Z%)+"/*(3%*#"#(#0.*2&#(%&#0*+,*<%#";*2.0''#7%/*0'*0* residual area, intervention sites were examined based on a  variety of different criteria, including:

>+'?%5%&<.&'.(<(&"5.':. ,-+@(A.1-@"(.B. 0%(&'+%2.!%(&+%2&( Selecting sites near these elements was desired  because many of the ancillary functions of a  2#()*=%&%*0.&%0/)*6&%'%"(*"%0&<)?**1#(%A'6%2#72* interventions could not only draw on these  functions for inspiration, but also rely on them for  their ability to bring people to a site.  Placement  within historic districts could also serve to reveal  previously hidden parts of the city.

C$4'14"5"$&.D%&0.2%&<E(. %!"$&%#"!.!"4"1',5"$&-1. ,1-$(

2

9&.0"/+*2#()*+,72#0.'*30$%*/%7"%/*2%&(0#"*`+"%'* =#(3#"*(3%*/+="(+="*&%;#+"*0'*`+"%'*,+&*2+"(#"5%/* +&*6.0""%/*&%"%=0.@*6.0"'*(30(*30$%*/%(0#.%/*65<.#2* '602%*0'*+"%*+,*'%$%&0.*0&%0'*,+&*#86&+$%8%"(?

3

9+-$(%&%'$-1.$-&*+".-$!. 20-+-2&"+%(&%2(. ,"+&-%$%$7.&'=

   scale     surrounding functions & land use     scale and modes of circula­ tion in & around site     boundary conditions


Site disbursement: '#B*7"0.*'#(%'

1

41

2

5

@

@

4

3

6

To ensure that the sites accurately depicted the  selection criteria collectively, six sites were chosen: three  based on their proximity to the systemic elements of the city  (parks, lakes, historic districts) and three lie within areas  #/%"(#7%/*<)*(3%*2#()*,+&*6.0""%/*&%"%=0.?**4..*'#B*+,*(3%*'#(%'* %8<+/#%/*230&02(%&#'(#2'*.#'(%/*#"*(3%*(3#&/*0"/*7"0.*2&#(%&#+"?** C3#'*(&0"'#(#+"0.*230&02(%&*=0'*0"*%0'#.)*#/%"(#70<.%*(&0#(*(30(* <%;0"*(+*.#">*(3%*'#B*'%.%2(%/*'#(%'?**   Three of the six selected sites will be developed into  ,5&(3%&*/%(0#.?*C3%*/%'#;"*=#(3#"*(3%'%*'#(%'*#"(%"/'*(+*&%$%0.* how the interventions can individually create an identity for  a small area, as well as establish a larger connection within  (3%*/+="(+="*/#'(&#2(?**C3%*2+""%2(#+"*,&+8*+"%*#"(%&$%"(#+"* (+*(3%*+(3%&*=#..*<%*%'(0<.#'3%/*(3&+5;3*'20.%*0"/*5'%?**_023* =#..*,5"2(#+"*#"*&%'6+"'%*(+*(3%#&*'6%2#72*'5&&+5"/#";'@*=3#.%* 6&+$#/#";*0"*0&%0*,+&*(3%*;%"%&0.*65<.#2*(+*;0(3%&?**C3%* interventions are thought of as small­scale contemporary  architecture purposed to provide the city’s inhabitants with  0*8+&%*#"(#80(%*'602%*,+&*#"(%&02(#+"?**C3%*'80..A'20.%* approach also aims to stimulate the direct interaction of all  (3%*6%+6.%*6&%'%"(*=#(3#"*9&.0"/+?*C3#'*6.0""%/*#"(%&02(#+"* intends to bridge the gap between the city’s transient and  permanent inhabitants, which may eventually lead to a more  3+.#'(#2*#80;%*+,*9&.0"/+?*

0              0.10                     0.25                                        0.50 Mile

Approximate Scale: 1" = 0.20 Mile


Context 42

F'5,'(%&%'$.':. -11.(%?.(%&"(

six sites were chosen: three based on their  proximity to the systemic elements of the city  (parks, lakes, historic districts) and three lie within  0&%0'*#/%"(#7%/*<)*(3%*2#()*,+&*6.0""%/*&%"%=0.

site

lakes ­ wetlands 

sites 2, 3 & 5 were selected to be developed in  further detail

routes

buildings

zoning

Edgewater

Big Tree Park

1

2


Lake Eola

Church Street

3

4

Greenwood Wetlands 5

Train Station 6

43


Interventions 44

;%&".GH.I.J+""$D''!.K+6-$.L"&1-$!(= (%&".2'5,'(%&%'$

   Directly south of Anderson Street  and Highway 417, a major artery of  Orlando     Sits at the perimeter of a neigh­ borhood with single­family resi­ dences     Occupies the northern edge of a  small lake

Site composition: assemblage elements

   Various types of zoning near site

Program Greenwood Urban Wetlands is portion of land with  "+*/#&%2(*,5"2(#+"*+&*+22560"2)*2.0''#720(#+"?**G(*#'*25&&%"(.)* zoned as a park, but features very few of the amenities that  0&%*+,(%"*0''+2#0(%/*=#(3*0*65<.#2*60&>?**C3%*60&>*#'*.02>#";* an anchoring element that can create a connection to both  (3%*0/f02%"(*"%#;3<+&3++/*0"/*(3%*'5&&+5"/#";*&+0/=0)'?** Parking is currently available providing access to the public  0'*=%..*0'*(3%*&%'#/%"('*+,*(3%*<+&/%&#";*"%#;3<+&3++/?


M'*+.7-11"+%"(= 4-+%-&%'$.':.1%70&

45

   reflected     filtered     early morning     north

Site plan: gallery  placement

Design Scheme 1   The concept for this proposal concentrated on the  site’s ability to be seen from a number of vantage points.   Views of the site were available from the roads to the  north, the neighborhoods to the west and south, as well  as the cemetery to the east.  Concentrating on this idea  of observation and display, a series of four small internal  galleries or pavilions were developed.  Each small structure  would be oriented towards a different direction to not only  capture a distinctive light quality, but also to correspond  back to its immediate surroundings.  The advantage of  having several structures also helped to highlight the overall  site, leading the user through the site while also forcing a  pause in several places.  By purposing the structures as both  galleries and pavilions, their functions can be manipulated for  various events and user needs. 


Interventions 46

Final Design * C3%*7"0.*/%'#;"*2+"2%"(&0(%/*+"*80#"(0#"#";*/#&%2(* 022%''*(+*0"/*,&+8*(3%*"%#;3<+&3++/*0'*=%..*0'*(3%*&+0/'* (+*(3%*"+&(3?**C+*80>%*(3#'*/#&%2(*2+""%2(#+"*6+''#<.%@* (3%*#"(%&$%"(#+"*30/*(+*<%*6.02%/*+"*(3%*"+&(3%&"*%/;%* +,*(3%*.0>%?**C3%*b&%%"*O%(=+&>*E%6+&(*65<.#'3%/*<)*(3%* M#()*+,*9&.0"/+*#/%"(#7%'*(3%*.0>%,&+"(*0'*0"*%.%8%"(*(30(* 20"*U'(&%";(3%"*"%#;3<+&3++/*2+3%'#+"*<)*2&%0(#";*0* 6.02%*,+&*"%#;3<+&'*(+*8%%(*0"/*;%(*(+*>"+=*%023*+(3%&* #"*0*2+"$%"#%"(@*"%5(&0.*%"$#&+"8%"(k(3%*.0>%,&+"(*#'*0"* #88%/#0(%.)*&%2+;"#`0<.%*&%,%&%"2%*6+#"(*,+&*<+(3*&%'#/%"('* 0"/*$#'#(+&'?d*PM#()*+,*9&.0"/+@*"?/?@*6;?IKQ**-+..+=#";*(3%* #/%0*6&%'%"(%/*#"*(3#'*'(0(%8%"(@*(3%*7"0.*/%'#;"*=+5./* 2+"2%"(&0(%*0..*'+2#0.*#"(%&02(#+"*'602%'*#"*+"%*0&%0*+"*(3%* '#(%?**Z)*/+#";*'+@*(3%*.0>%,&+"(*#'*;#$%"*0"*+<f%2(*(30(*=#..* 3%.6*0''#;"*0"*#/%"(#()*(+*(3%*2+"2%6(*+,*0*&%,%&%"2%*6+#"(?** C3#'*/%'#;"%/*#"(%&$%"(#+"*=+5./*30$%*'602%'*,+&*#"(%&"0.#`%/* 0'*=%..*0'*%B(%&"0.#`%/*#"(%&02(#+"?*

* C3%*,+&8*=0'*7&'(*0,,%2(%/*<)*(3%* '%60&0(#+"*+,*(=+*,5"2(#+"'*A*(3%*#"(%&"0.#`%/* 60&(*<%#";*0*2+"/#(#+"%/*'602%*,+&*8%%(#";'*0"/* %$%"('@*=3#.%*(3%*%B(%&"0.#`%/*6+&(#+"*02('*0'* 0"*+6%"A0#&*60$#.#+"*,+&*;0(3%&#";?**N#(3*%023* '602%*,5"2(#+"#";*#"*2+"(&0'(*(+*+"%*0"+(3%&@*(3%* &%e5#&%8%"('*=%&%*5"#e5%.)*/#,,%&%"(?**C3%*(=+* '(&52(5&%'*0&%*$#'50..)*2+"(&0'(#";*A*+"%*066%0&'* '%.,A2+"(0#"%/*=3#.%*(3%*+(3%&*#'*2+86.%(%.)* (&0"'60&%"(?**M+""%2(#";*(3%'%*(=+*'602%'*=#(3* 0*'+5(3*,02#";*'30/#";*/%$#2%*"+(*+".)*,5.7..%/* 0"*%''%"(#0.*,5"2(#+"@*<5(*0.'+*6&+$#/%/*0*$#'50.* 0&80(5&%*,+&*(3%*6&+f%2(?**C3%*066&+023*0B#'*0.'+* /#&%2(.)*#8602(%/*(3%*/%'#;"j*(3%*0B#'*=0'*5'%/* (+*25(*#"(+*<+(3*(3%*<5#./#";*0"/*'30/#";*/%$#2%@* $#'50..)*+6%"#";*(3%*'(&52(5&%*56*(+*(3%*0$0#.0<.%* +"'#(%*60&>#";?**

Form & structure: interaction between forms ­ sun shading device ­ deck


47

Design sequence: ­locate structure on  lake shore ­split structure ­add shading device ­alter form based on  approach axis 

Plan: dock connecting the two structures


Interventions 48


49


Interventions 50


51


Interventions 52

;%&".GN.I.O-@".)'1-= (%&".2'5,'(%&%'$

   Lies on the southeast corner of  Lake Eola     Car and pedestrian pathways  already present     Occupies large un­shaded area     In the middle of large mixed­use  corridor

Site composition: assemblage of elements

Program The longtime iconic image of downtown Orlando, Lake  Eola is the site of community gatherings, the largest of which  being the Farmer’s Market.  This market has been functioning  at its present location, on the southeast corner of Lake Eola,  for over 20 years.  Currently, the market does not have any  physical connection to the site; it simply lives near the lake  temporarily each week on Sunday morning. The addition of a  useable feature to the fringe of Lake Eola could begin to help  the market claim a territory and identity even during non­ operational hours.

S


Shading structure: open and closed  variations

53

Anchor system: users can move chairs along grid, creating dynamic  gathering points 

Design Scheme 1   As an extension or break­out space for the Farmer’s  Market, the original idea was to occupy a portion of the land  directly adjacent to the market.  This land, still part of the  public park connected to Lake Eola, was a sun­soaked and  often unused area.  The original concept intended to bring  a shading structure into a portion of the site, thus providing  an enticing gathering point that can also serve as respite  for farmer’s market shoppers.  In addition to the structure,  a grid at ground level would anchor a system of moveable  chairs.  Occupants could move their chairs along the grid  lines, allowing for the spatial layout to change depending on  the intensity of use and desired level of social interactions. 


5'6" 2'6"

Interventions

Final Design   In comparison, scheme 2 was designed to create a  similar but more structured and intimate interaction space.   By using the dimensions of a 2­person restaurant booth, a  7"#(%*'602%*,+&*#"(%&02(#+"*=0'*2+"7;5&%/?**C+*/%(%&8#"%* the placement and arraignment of these “pods”, the Farmers  D0&>%(*=0'*+"2%*0;0#"*&%,%&%"2%/?**C%"('*5'%/*,+&*(3%* market are a 10’ x 10’ module; this module was then used  (+*2&%0(%*0*;&#/*02&+''*(3%*'#(%?**C3%*;&#/*=+5./*"+(*+".)* serve as an organizational technique but would contain the  functional ability to provide power and anchoring points for  the tents.  Spreading the farmers market across the site,  allowed for the clustering of tents and people, creating a  new spatial layout of the area.  A grid that gave the market  the ability to create new more dynamic layouts that could be  rearranged to achieve a desired result or vary depending on  the vendors coming to market from week to week.   * C3%*U6+/'d*=+5./*0.'+*&%.)*+"*(3%*;&#/*,+&*6.02%8%"(@* doing this would create spaces of a similar dimension to  (30(*+,*(3%*80&>%(?**C+*,5&(3%&*;5#/%*(3%*6.02%8%"(*+,*(3%'%* pods, the shading radius of on­site trees was determined.   Precisely locating the existing shade patterns would allow  (3%*6+/'*(+*0((&02(*5'%&'*%$%"*+"*(3%*3+((%'(*/0)'?**C+*8#8#2* groups created during a typical farmers market, eight pods  were arranged into two groups.  Each group contained four  pods, the orientation and placement of which focused the  users’ attention onto an elevated deck.  Each deck could  then become a space for a variety of formal and informal 

2'6"

F+/*2+"7;5&0(#+"h <0'#2*/#8%"'#+"'*5'%/* (+*2&%0(%*8+/5.%

1'6"

54

1'6" 6'0"

potential materiality

uses when the market is not operational, such  uses could include community meetings, small  performance events, catered parties, etc.


55

Design sequence: ­extrapolation of grid ­tree shading radii ­occupational area  expanding to shade 


Interventions 56

Plan: two pod groupings occupying grid


57

Two pod groupings: orientation of pods is focused  on the deck activities


Interventions 58


Interventions 60

;%&".GP.I.Q%7.9+"".>-+@= (%&".2'5,'(%&%'$

   Less than give minute walk to  nearby lake     Direct access from neighborhood  streets     Two blocks from large commer­ cial and office district     Embedded within neighborhood  fabric

Program Currently a large Live Oak sits on the site, the same  type of tree that was part of the City Beautiful Movement  of Orlando.  The 500­year­old Live Oak is the dominant  feature of a small plot of undeveloped land in a historic  Lake Highland neighborhood.  The act of reconnecting and  presenting the tree to neighborhood residents and visitors  =0'*2+"'#/%&%/*$#(0.*,+&*(3%*7"0.*/%'#;"*6&+6+'0.?


61

Design sequence: ­undamaged oak on­site ­occupation of damaged space ­vertically oriented,  minimal footprint  Layer properties: canopy ­ rest or pause limbs ­ circulation   trunk/roots ­ grouping

Final Design    The main design consideration for this  intervention was the presence of the large live  oak on­site.  The decision to select this site  for the tree’s presence was largely due to the  opportunity for a direct reference to the goals  of the historic City Beautiful Movement.  The  tree has sustained a considerable amount of  damage after enduring many years of storms  and hurricanes.  This damage is most evident in  the visibly severe atrophy to a sizeable portion  of the trunk and corresponding canopy.  The 

/080;%*.%,(*(3%*'#(%*,%%.#";*5"7"#'3%/*0"/*%B6+'%/@*0"/* (35'@*U2+86.%(#";d*(3%*(&%%*<%208%*(3%*2+"2%6(50.*066&+023* ,+&*(3#'*#"(%&$%"(#+"?** * G"*+&/%&*(+*2+86.%(%*(3%*(&%%@*8#"#80.*;&+5"/* #"(&5'#+"*0"/*0$+#/0"2%*+,*/#&%2(*0((0238%"(*<%208%* 80"/0(+&)*6&+f%2(*;5#/%.#"%'?*C+*0$+#/*2+"(02(*=#(3*(3%* ;&+5"/*#"*0"*#"(&5'#$%*80""%&@*(3%*+&#%"(0(#+"*+,*(3%* #"(%&$%"(#+"*=0'*(5&"%/*$%&(#20..)?**N+&>#";*=#(3*0*$%&(#20.* +&#%"(0(#+"*0..+=%/*,+&*0*'%2(#+"0.*2+860&#'+"*+,*(3%* (&%%*0"/*(3%*2+&&%'6+"/#";*.%$%.'*+,*(3%*#"(%&$%"(#+"?**4* /%2+"'(&52(#+"*+,*(3%*.0)%&'*0"/*230&02(%&#'(#2'*+,*(3%*(&%%*


Ground level: grouping ­ truck/roots

Interventions 62

in turn inspired the organization of the intervention.  Each  level of the intervention corresponds with a layer of the tree,  beginning with the trunk and ending with the canopy.     The material palette of this intervention is fairly  simple ­ consisting of only metal and a translucent plastic ­  so as to not detract from the dynamic texture provided by  the tree.  The use of translucent plastic would celebrate the  tree’s presence by allowing shadows cast upon it to be seen  from both sides.  Benches, bike racks and gathering areas  were incorporated into the ground level, enhancing its use as  an urban amenity.       Tree view: for the tree climbers

Third level: seating within the  canopy


First level: circulation point ­ limbs

Second level: rest/pause #1 ­ canopy

Third level: rest/pause #2 ­ canopy

63

Social layering: layers create  interaction layers


Interventions 64


Interventions 66


Conclusions and Recommendations 68

1

This MRP aimed to explore the use of small­scale  0&23#(%2(5&0.*#"(%&$%"(#+"'*0'*0*8%0"'*(+*,5.7..*9&.0"/+:'* smaller amenity­based needs. In recognizing smaller  architecture as a new approach to urban amenities, the pre­ /%'#;"*&%'%0&23*6&+2%''*0..+=%/*,+&*#/%"(#720(#+"*+,*(3%*2#():'* needs in order to determine a set of design objectives for  each intervention. 1   * 4.(3+5;3*+".)*+"%*+,*(3%*'#B*#/%"(#7%/*`+"%'*+,* 9&.0"/+*=0'*/%$%.+6%/*,+&*(3#'*DEF@*(3%*6&%A/%'#;"*&%'%0&23* provided a platform for this design approach to be applied to  0")*+"%*+,*(3%*+(3%&*7$%*#/%"(#7%/*`+"%'?*C3&+5;3*(3%*5'%*+,* architectural interventions, each zone is given the potential  to establish its own unique identity, while simultaneously  being part of a larger scheme.  Recommendations for further  %B6.+&0(#+"'*0"/*0/06(0(#+"'*+,*(3#'*6&+f%2(:'*,&08%=+&>* follow.   The examination and incorporation of typical cultural  "+&8'*+&*02(#$#(#%'*=#(3#"*9&.0"/+*20"*6&+$#/%*0"*0//#(#+"0.* layer of depth and purpose to each designed intervention.   It would be valuable to consider those activities that  are perhaps considered commonplace or dismissed, as  (3%)*'%./+8*/#&%2(.)*#"V5%"2%*+&*#"(%&02(*=#(3*(3%*65<.#2* ;&%%"*'602%'*#"*(3%*2#()?*9"2%*#/%"(#7%/@*(3+'%*(+6#2'*20"* become a new programmatic direction for a future series of  interventions.   * 9"%*'523*(+6#2*=+&(3*#"$%'(#;0(#";*2+5./*<%*(3%* idea of food and how it is accessed in the city.  It has been  postulated that how food is accessed can affect and reshape 

R68"2&%4"(.&0-&.D"+".2'$(%!"+"!.%$.&0". !"(%7$.!"4"1',5"$&.-$!. "?"2*&%'$.%$21*!".&0".:'11'D%$7=

   Unite the two separate groups that currently  compose Orlando’s community ­  Permanent  citizens  and  transient  tourists.  It  was  thought that if these two units can be united socially  and geographically, a richer and more cohesive cultural  city identity would emerge.

   Thoughtfully occupy the spaces of Orlando that  have little purpose or identity ­   In  considering  the  historic  settlement  patterns  and  30630`0&/* +&;0"#`0(#+"* +,* (3%* 2#()@* (3#'* 6&+f%2(* #/%"(#7%/* sites  in  which  to  place  the  architectural  interventions  so  as to further the city’s physical and identity development.

   Connect to the city on both micro and macro  scales ­  Cues  taken  from  both  the  interventions’  immediate  context along with citywide historical patterns allowed  this architectural strategy to exist on a variety of scales.   _023*'6%2#72*'#(%*&%e5#&%/*0*20.25.0(%/*&%'6+"'%*#"*(3%* projects’ adaptations in form and function. 


69

neighborhoods, organizational patterns, and  a number of other elements present within a  city.   Those food access points can include  farmers markets, grocery stores, restaurants,  street side vendors, etc.  Each of these access  6+#"('*0.'+*+="'*0*'6%2#72*'60(#0.*#/%"(#()*A*0..* of which vary greatly in scale, character, and  location.  Additionally, types of food, restaurants,  0"/*80&>%('*0&%*0..*#/%"(#()A2&%0(#";*,%0(5&%'* of cities. The buying, eating, and cooking of  ,++/*30'*0*.0&;%A'20.%*#8602(*+"*(3%*2#()*0'*0* =3+.%@*0'*=%..*0'*0*'80..A'20.%*#"V5%"2%*+"*3+=* a particular space is organized.  These activities  often have the tendency to become hidden within  interior spaces, seldom existing within the city’s  public realm.  Rethinking the way in which these  activities are offered to, and encountered by, the  65<.#2*20"*2&%0(%*"%=*#/%"(#(#%'*0"/*&%A%'(0<.#'3* 2+""%2(#+"'*(+*'6%2#72*0&%0'?   The rationale for this potential  programmatic exploration is grounded in  9&.0"/+:'*.0&;%'(*#"/5'(&)?*C3%*$%&)*7<%&*+,* Orlando’s identity – the industry on which it  thrives – is hospitality and food service. Using the  planned architectural interventions, this identity  that is so often enlarged, institutionalized, and  impersonal can be carefully and creatively woven  into the chosen sites throughout Orlando. The 

industry that serves as the core of Orlando’s activities can  be celebrated through architectural interventions, as they  become intimate and intentional portraits of the city. Citizens  and visitors may experience a new version of not only the  city, but also the industry, as it exists outside of its perimeter  realm and into the core of Orlando.   Orlando has the potential to be re­presented through  the use of venues dedicated to the buying, eating and  cooking of food.  However, the traditional ideas of how these  activities operate will need to be altered.  The most common  0"/*%0'#.)*#/%"(#70<.%*$%"5%*,+&*0.(%&0(#+"*<%2+8%'*=3%&%* people eat ­ restaurants.  Eating venues offer a place in  between work and home, often giving a sense of intimacy.   Severing the traditional connection to buildings and their  interiors can help to enhance this intimacy.  Encouraging  movement into the public realm in the spirit of European  piazzas will help establish a stronger link to the city.  Public  parks and open spaces can become the new scene for  buying, eating, and cooking food.


Conclusions and Recommendations 70

            “As places of consumption, restaurants have to catch  and hold the attention of customers.  And as places that offer  a way to make use of the time ‘in between’ other activities  and spaces, they take on the dual role of facilitating easy  movement while also creating enough interest to temporarily  0.(%&*6%/%'(&#0"*V+=*0"/*/+8#"0"(*'60(#0.*60((%&"?**N+&>#";* #"*0*80""%&*'#8#.0&*(+*7.(%&'*+&*'%8#A6%&8%0<.%*8%8<&0"%'@* controlling and regulating movement across the larger  terrain of the dominant space and the larger cityscape,  restaurants help draw the eye to an image or place offering a  new perspective, and with it the possibility of reinterpreting  the meaning of the whole.”      Ab0#.*10(.%&


71


Bibliography 72

Betsky, A. (2009). Uneternal city: Urbanism beyond Rome. Milan: Mar­ silio. City of Orlando, (n.d.). Connecting the elements of orlando’s public  realm, green network report Retrieved from www.cityoforlando.net City of Orlando, Edgewater Drive Vision Plan. (2009). Edgewater drive  vision task force Orlando: Retrieved from www.cityoforlando.net City of Orlando, Families, Parks and Recreation Vision Plan. (2007). Re­ trieved from www.cityoforlando.net City of Orlando, Orlando Historic Preservation Board. (1984). Orlando  history in architecture Clark, T. N., Lloyd, R., Wong, K. K., & Jain, P. (2002).  Amenities Drive  Urban Growth.  Journal of Urban Affairs, 24, 493­515. Dickinson, J. W. (2003). Orlando: City of dreams. Charleston, SC: Arca­ dia Pub. Doroshenko, P., & Contemporary Arts Museum. (1994). Dennis Adams:  Selling history. Houston, Tex: Contemporary Arts Museum. Echavarria, M. P. (2008). Portable architecture & unpredictable sur­ roundings. Barcelona: Links International Franck, K. A. (2002). Food + architecture. Chichester, West Sussex:  Wiley­Academy. Franck, K. A. (2005). Food + the city. Chichester: Wiley­Academy. Harland Bartholomew & Associates, Orlando, Florida City Plan, 1926. Krier, R. (1979). Urban space (Stadtraum): Rob Krier. London: Academy  Editions.


73

Lewis, P.S. City of Orlando, (n.d.). Orlando’s “beautiful” heritage Re­ trieved from www.cityoforlando.net Moskow, K., & Linn, R. (2010). Small scale: Creative solutions for better  city living. New York: Princeton Architectural Press. Mulligan, Gordon. (2009, January 4). Urban amenities. Retrieved from  http://www.scitopics.com/Urban_Amenities.html Oldenburg, Ray. The Great Good Place: Cafes, Coffee Shops, Bookstores, Bars, Hair Salons and Other Hangouts at the Heart of a Community. New York: Marlow & Company, 1989. Petrucci, D.  (n.d.).  Stripscape:  Pedestrian Amenities along 7th Ave­ nue.  Retrieved November 15, 2010, from http://places.designobserver. com/media/pdf/Stripscape:__P_385.pdf Richardson, P., & Dietrich, L. (2001). XS: Big ideas, small buildings.  New York, N.Y: Universe. Siegal, J. (2002). Mobile: the art of portable architecture. New York:  Princeton Architectural Press. Tschumi, B., Tschumi, B., & Folie, C. (1987). Le parc de la villette / Ber­ nard Tschumi, Cinegramme Folie. Paris: Champ vallon. Verschaffel, B. (1999).  The monumental: on the meaning of a form.   The Journal of Architecture, 4, 333­336. Berre, N., Norsk form., & Nasjonale turistveger prosjekt. (2006). Om­ veg: Arkitektur og design langs 18 nasjonale turistvegar = Detour.  Oslo: Norsk form. Norwegian Ministries, Norwegian Architecture Policy. (2009). architec­ ture.now Oslo, Norway: Otto Stenersen Boktrykkeri AS. 


MRP Amenity Architecture  

MRP book amenity architecture university of florida

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you