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From Urban Landscapes to Alpine Gardens

The World Congress of Landscape Architecture

Congress Guide


Congress Guide 48th IFLA World Congress 2011 Zurich, Switzerland, June 27– 29 Scales of Nature: From Urban Landscapes to Alpine Gardens

The 48th IFLA World Congress is jointly organised by


Dear Congress participants I wish you a heartly welcome to Zurich, a nice stay in our town and a successful conference in the beautiful venue of Kongresshaus right on the lakefront with a splendid view to the Alps. Zurich is distinguished by the attractive topography formed by its lake and the rivers Limmat and Sihl as well as the surrounding hills covered by forests. Thanks to the wide provision of public open spaces and parks, Zurich is effectively a green city with a broad range of recreational amenities. Especially with the innovative concepts and unique designs of the new parks built in the last few years in the former industrial areas of North Zurich our city has contributed to the international discourse about how landscape may be shaped in urban space. Take the opportunity and have a look at Zurich’s premium contributions to contemporary landscape architecture. It’s worth a trip! Corine Mauch Mayor of the City of Zurich

Welcome to Switzerland! Leutschenpark is illuminated at night by a blue light band. Photo: Christopher T. Hunziker

The Swiss landscape architects are proud to welcome you in Zurich for the 48th IFLA World Congress. Landscapes are the result of human action and an active design process to which we, as landscape architects, can make active and valuable contributions. Guides by the theme “Scales of Nature: From Urban Landscape to Alpine Gardens” we invite you to discover the rich variety of different landscapes of Switzerland. Pascal Gysin President of the Swiss Federation of Landscape Architects BSLA

Wipkingerpark along the bank of river Limmat.

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Sunday 26 June 2011 Topos Landscape Award 2011 | Welcome Reception

Monday 27 June 2011 Theme of the day – Urban areas

07.00

07.00

Registration desk opens Kongresshaus

09.20

Keynote Speaker 1 Guido Hager Kongressaal

10.00

Keynote Speaker 2 Mohamed Elshahed Kongressaal

10.45

Tea/Coffee break

11.15

Keynote Speaker 3 Prof. ir. Winy Maas Kongressaal

Topos Landscape Award 2011

12.00

Lunch – Poster Session 1 – Expo

13.00 Welcome address Ernst Tschannen, Director Grün Stadt Zürich and Robert Schäfer, Editor in Chief Topos

13.30

Sessions 1 Why and how history matters? Theory and history Session Room 1

13.15 SYDNEY Lecture by Sacha Coles, Aspect Studios

4 Food Urbanism I Defining the parameters of and for the movement Session Room 2

14.00 LONDON Lecture by Jamie Dean, Design for London

6 Publicly accessible urban spaces in between public and private interests Session Room 3

14.45 NEW YORK Lecture by Adrian Benepe, Commissioner, New York City Department of Parks & Recreation

8 Densification of urban green space for a landscape of comfort: Access, perception and preferences, socio-cultural differences Session Room 4

16.00 Awarding of the Topos Landscape Award 2011 and award winner’s speech

11 Recreational spaces for tomorrow’s cities – planning approaches and strategies Session Room 5

Session Rooms 3 – 5

15.00

Tea/Coffee break

15.30

Sessions 2 Why and how history matters? Case studies Session Room 1 5 Food Urbanism II Terms of intervention, pilot projects and design approaches Session Room 2 7 Models of co-producing publicly accessible urban spaces Session Room 3 9 Densification of urban green space for a landscape of comfort within a dense urban fabric Session Room 4

17.30

Welcome to Zurich Get-together with Swiss hospitality in abundance on the Blatterwiese lawn in front of the Chinese Garden. Welcome address by Corine Mauch, Mayor of Zurich, Desiree Martinez, IFLA President, and Christian Tschumi, IFLA Delegate and President of the organising commitee, with culinary delicacies and accompanied by the sound of Swiss folk music. Blatterwiese

17.00

Award Ceremony of the Student Design Competition Kongressaal

Technical Visits 1– 5 – long

Opening Ceremony Kongressaal

Technical Visits 6 – 10 – short

12.00

09.00

Round Table 1 Kongressaal

08.00

18.00 19.00

Open Firm Evening Many landscape architecture firms in Zurich and the surroundings and the SukkulentenSammlung (Zurich Succulent Plant Collection) on the lakeshore are inviting Congress participants into their premises to view their work. Furthermore, the exhibition “Mein Park” (My Park) concerning the disproportionate access of men and women to public green spaces, opens its door for a special guided tour. For more details see the leaflet published separately. Zurich and beyond

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Tuesday 28 June 2011 Theme of the day – Peri-urban areas

Wednesday 29 June 2011 Theme of the day – Rural land

07.00

07.00

08.00

Registration desk opens Kongresshaus

08.00

Registration desk opens Kongresshaus

09.00

Keynote Speaker 4 Prof. Dr. Marcel Meili Kongressaal

09.00

Keynote Speaker 7 Dr. phil. Raimund Rodewald Kongressaal

09.45

Keynote Speaker 5 Prof. Dr. M. Koch and Dipl. Arch. M. Schumacher Kongressaal

09.45

Keynote Speaker 8 Andreas Spiegel Kongressaal

10.30

Tea/Coffee break

10.30

Tea/Coffee break

11.00

Keynote Speaker 6 Prof. Dr. Kongjian Yu Kongressaal

11.00

Keynote Speaker 9 Prof. Joan Iverson Nassauer Kongressaal

12.00

Lunch – Poster Session 2 – Expo

12.00

13.30

Sessions

13.30

Lunch – Poster Session 3 – Expo

22 Managing valuable land-scapes – Approaches and instruments Session Room 2

17 Multi-functional use of temporary open spaces in densified urban environments Session Room 3

24 Sustainable energy landscapes 2.0 – Design practice Session Room 3 16 Strategies for peri-urban areas – On our way to peri-urban farming? Session Room 4

19 Green traffic network Session Room 4 3 Why and how history matters? Conservation of historic gardens Session Room 5

28 Green strategies Session Room 5

15.00

Tea/Coffee break

15.30

Sessions

15.30

Sessions

13 Urban agriculture and its contribution to dealing with problems in the periphery of agglomerations Session Room 2 18 Temporary and permanent transformations of open space in urban landscapes Session Room 3 10 Densification of urban green space for a landscape of comfort – Acknowledging for the user’s different preferences Session Room 4 26 Biodiversity in the city – Determinants for enhancing urban biodiversity and designing ecologically resilient green spaces Session Room 5

17.00

Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe Award and winner’s speech Kongressaal

Technical Visits 17 – 22 – short

15 Peri-urban areas – Traditional qualities and broken aesthetics Session Room 1

Technical Visits 11 – 16 – long

Tea/Coffee break Research Platform Tagungszentrum

15.00

21 Waterscape experiment – Visions of integrated landscapes, watercourses and cities that belong together II Session Room 1 23 Landscape planning for national and nature parks – Requirements and success factors Session Room 2 25 Sustainable energy landscapes 2.0 – Design methods Session Room 3 27 Biodiversity in the city – Coexistence of biodiversity and people: Social aspects as drivers for urban biodiversity Session Room 4 29 Green strategies – The Green City initiative Session Room 5

17.00

18.00

18.00

19.00

19.00

20.00

Technical Visits 23 – 26 and 36 – long

12 Peri-urban spaces, their functions and aestetics in relationship to urban centres Session Room 2

Technical Visits 27 – 35 – short

20 Waterscape experiment – Visions of integrated landscapes, watercourses and cities that belong together I Session Room 1

Round Table 2 Kongressaal

Sessions

14 Strategies and design approaches for peri-urban areas Session Room 1

Closing Ceremony Kongressaal

Farewell Party

Gala Dinner

A look back at the Congress and an opportunity to give delegates a taste of South Africa as the next venue.

An opportunity to exchange experiences, compare notes and make new international contacts in an informal atmosphere.

Blatterwiese

Kongressaal

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8

Registration

A

B

C

Claridenstrasse

YOU A RE HERE

Ground floor Kongresshaus Zurich

D

Tagungszentrum

Session Room

Session Room

Session Room

5

4

3

Lake Zurich

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First floor Kongresshaus Zurich

Second floor Kongresshaus Zurich

Session Room

2 Session Room

1

Bar

Poster Presentation

Expo Tea/Coffee break and lunch Student Competition Poster Presentation

Kongressaal Expo Tea/Coffee break and lunch

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Lake Zurich

Lake Zurich

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WELCOME RECEPTION

Sunday 26 June 2011

WEL COME TO ZURICH

12:00 Topos Landscape Award 2011 Presentation of the Topos Landscape Award 2011 and landscape architecture seminar “New York – London – Sydney”. Three global cities and the challenges they will face in the future. Session Rooms 3 – 5

17:30 Welcome to Zurich! Get-together with Swiss hospitality in abundance on the Blatterwiese lawn in front of the Chinese Garden. Welcome address by Corine Mauch, Mayor of Zurich, Desiree Martinez, IFLA President, and Christian Tschumi, IFLA Delegate and President of the organising committee, with culinary delicacies and accompanied by the sound of Swiss folk music. Blatterwiese

The lawn of Blatterwiese is the venue of the Welcome Reception and the Farewell Party as well.

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THEME OF THE DAY – URBAN AREAS

Monday 27 June 2011

URBAN AREAS

07:00 Registration desk opens

09:00 Opening Ceremony Inauguration of the Congress by City Councillor Ruth Genner, Head of Zurich City Council Civil Engineering and Waste Disposal Department, and Desiree MartĂ­nez, IFLA President, and Pascal Gysin, BSLA President. Kongressaal

09:20 Keynote Speaker 1 Guido Hager, Landscape Architect BSLA, Hager Landschaftsarchitektur AG, Zurich The Managing Director of Hager Landschaftsarchitektur AG and Hager International AG has devoted himself to the theme of gardens for over 25 years and has sympathetically regenerated some key historical parks in Zurich and in other towns, taking into consideration their horticultural heritage. Kongressaal

10:00

Keynote Speaker 2 Mohamed Elshahed, New York University, Cairo As a doctoral candidate in the Middle East Studies Department at New York University Mohamed Elshahed currently lives in Cairo, where he is conducting research for his thesis on architecture and urban planning in Egypt from 1939 to 1965, with an emphasis on the Nasser years. In his thesis he examines architectural transformation from anticolonial nationalism to postcolonial developmentalism in Egypt. Mohamed Elshahed has a Bachelor of Architecture degree from the New Jersey Institute of Technology and a Master in Architecture Studies from MIT. Kongressaal

10:45 Tea/Coffee break Opportunity to visit the Expo and the Poster Presentation.

11:15 Keynote Speaker 3 Prof. ir. Winy Maas, Architect, MVRDV, Rotterdam A partner in MVRDV, the architecture firm set up in 1991 and best known for its experimental style and designs. Winy Maas is currently one of the most successful Dutch architects worldwide and has had a significant influence on the regeneration of Dutch architecture. Kongressaal

12:00 Lunch Poster Session 1 and the opportunity to visit the Expo. 14

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THEME OF THE DAY – URBAN AREAS

Monday 27 June 2011 13:30

13:30 –15:00

Sessions 1 | Why and how history matters? Theory and history Dr. phil. I. Annemarie Bucher Learning from history is a widely accepted attitude in landscape design, one which also provides straightforward access to this field of knowledge. The role of history not only reveals the symbolic dimensions of the landscape but also inspires a creative approach towards it. Designing gardens and parks, in particular, has come to epitomise strategies of reading the landscape and dealing with nature. This session discusses the role of historical sources and explores how they can serve as an instrument for reading the landscape, and how they guarantee its understanding as a basis for identity creation. The cultural history of landscapes as a fundamental of design and theory has been neglected for a long time. It reveals the symbolic dimensions of landscapes, inherent in physical landscapes and in various archival sources. Nowadays reading cultural landscapes and analyzing historical layers have expanded theoretical approaches to landscape both for preservation and design. Yet such historical knowledge can help us better understand the roots of landscape design, and how the present landscapes in different cultures have evolved over centuries. This session discusses the role of history in landscape architecture, as it has become increasingly apparent to both practitioners and theorists. Session Room 1

Round Table 1 4 | Food Urbanism I Defining the parameters of and for the movement Craig Verzone The fields of agriculture and urbanism have traditionally been seen as mutually exclusive, despite their extreme interdependence. In recent years, a burgeoning grass-roots movement has emerged with the aim of re-integrating agriculture into the life of the city. For this movement to reach its full potential, design and agricultural researchers need to develop innovative spatial solutions to the problems surrounding food and urbanism. The Food Urbanism I Session outlines some of the fundamental intentions and historic precedence of this movement, as well as examining strategies meant to facilitate urban development that integrate both city life and food production cycles into a more harmonious coexistence that is socially, economically, and environmentally responsible. Session Room 2

6 | Publicly accessible urban spaces in between public and private interests Dr. Ing. Juliane Pegels Open spaces like plazas, parks, and promenades are often not the sole product of municipal activities. A large number of these publicly accessible urban spaces are created by a range of public and private stakeholders with varying interests. Depending on the context of each project, the stakeholders play different roles and take on different responsibilities in developing, building and managing an urban space. Hence, relationships vary in which the public-private co-production of space is organized, as well as influencing how successful the space works. Since a large number of public spaces are created through these different interests, this session will discuss the opportunities and limitations of co-producing publicly accessible urban spaces: it will present existing strategies and instruments, experiences and new challenges. Bringing together speakers, who have studied the co-production of publicly accessible spaces in different countries, this session will identify the issues to be taken into account when involving private and public stakeholders in creating urban spaces. Session Room 3

8 | Densification of urban green space for a landscape of comfort: Access, perception and preferences, socio-cultural differences lic. phil. Petra Hagen Hodgson and dipl. geogr. Heidi Kaspar In order to counter urban sprawl, we find at the forefront of contemporary urban planning theory the concept of an edificial densification. It puts urban green spaces at risk since it depletes their spatial reserves. Today, no suitable landscape planning concepts exist to counter an edificial densification. This session puts the focus on the everyday use of public parks and housing developments: How are urban green environments perceived, experienced and used by different user groups? What are the specific spatial, aesthetical and ecological qualities that take into account the variety of the users’ needs in order to support their well-being and facilitate an appropriation of the place? How can the conceptualisation, planning and everyday use of urban green spaces take existing gender differences into account in a way that enables people to step out of discriminating social structures? What kind of strategies facilitate a sense of belonging and social participation? Session Room 4

11 | Recreational spaces for tomorrow’s cities – planning approaches and strategies Dipl. Ing. FH Jasmin Dallafior The quality of life in cities and urban regions is characterized by a whole network of open spaces and natural landscapes. While their social and ecological importance remains undisputed, safeguarding and developing open space networks is an extensive planning task. It can only be tackled with a set of differentiated planning instruments and an integrative planning approach. From an international perspective, contemporary trends and developments span a wide range, from shrinking to excessively growing cities and regions – developments to which open space planning has to find appropriate answers. What is the significance of open space planning in managing processes of growth and shrinkage? How is it being integrated into urban development policies and processes? What is the role of open space planning in the transformation and (re)structuring of urban settlements? What is its contribution to the development of spaces that are sustainable and of high quality? What structures are to be developed which meet the social, ecologic and aesthetic needs of contemporary and future generations? Session Room 5

Participation in planning and projects Presenter: Brigit Wehrli-Schindler, Director Office of Urban Development, Zurich; Panellists: Gudrun Hoppe, Zurich; Christine Ziegler, Basel; Lilli Licka, Vienna; Lukas Schweingruber, Zurich Participatory processes are often involved when it comes to spatial development and the design of our living and working environment in Switzerland. People and companies affected by planning processes demand comprehensive information and want to become involved. Often public projects are immediately successful, sometimes the room for manoeuvre is too narrow in order to be able to take into appropriate consideration the concerns of those affected. In this context, co-determination processes can play an important role and often valuable results can be achieved. In this round table discussion, experts from Switzerland and Austria will talk about participation in planning and projects. They will present their own procedures, discuss the opportunities and risks of consciously initiated participatory processes as well as processes triggered by the intervention of affected residents. Kongressaal

15:00 Tea/Coffee break Opportunity to visit the Expo and the Poster Presentation.

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THEME OF THE DAY – URBAN AREAS

Monday 27 June 2011 15:30 Sessions 2 | Why and how history matters? Case studies Dr. phil. I. Annemarie Bucher Learning from history is a widely accepted attitude in landscape design, one which also provides straightforward access to this field of knowledge. The role of history in landscape architecture has become increasingly apparent to both practitioners and theorists. It not only reveals the symbolic dimensions of the landscape but also inspires a creative approach towards it. Designing gardens and parks, in particular, has come to epitomise strategies of reading the landscape and dealing with nature. This session discusses the role of historical sources in garden and landscape architecture. It explores how these historical sources can serve as an instrument for reading the landscape, and how they guarantee its understanding as a basis for identity creation. The session also aims to provide an insight into the archives and the availability of sources for historical research, design input, and the conservation of historic gardens and cultural landscapes. Landscape history, as such, can be viewed as an essential ingredient in the formation of specific landscape identities. As the creation of a territorial identity goes hand in hand with the construction of the landscape, it is important to investigate the resulting coherence in practice. This session provides an insight into some examples of case studies using methodologies for the exploration of the material and cultural analysis of landscape along historical lines. Session Room 1

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5 | Food Urbanism II Terms of intervention, pilot projects and design approaches Craig Verzone Food systems have historically played a vital role in the design of cities, though that role is not always acknowledged by designers. Modern innovations in logistical networks and the industrialization of food continue to alter the spatial and living patterns of the contemporary city, especially as the world’s urban population continues to increase at a rapid rate. The discipline of landscape architecture is well poised to deal with these challenges and opportunities. By drawing from its deep roots in both the realms of agriculture and urban design, its recent interest in reclaiming derelict sites for productive social ends, and its ability to manage multifaceted processes over time, the tools of the discipline can be used to generate urban form and reconfigure existing urban spaces to productive agricultural ends. The Food Urbanism II Session aims to investigate the impact of food on urban design by examining new architectural and landscape strategies for the integration of food production, processing, distribution and consumption in the contemporary city. Session Room 2

7 | Models of co-producing publicly accessible urban spaces Dr. Ing. Juliane Pegels This session focuses on specific case studies from the USA, UK, Albania and Iran. In those countries, like in several others, publicly accessible urban spaces are often the co-product of public and private stakeholders, which regularly results in competing and even contradictory interests. The case studies will show how the process of creating publicly accessible spaces differs in various urban contexts, the multiplicity of public and private stakeholders involved in the process and how diverse their interests are. Furthermore, the cases will show how complex the start-up and organization process is and what efforts can be made (if any) to mediate competing interests. Since the speakers come from different backgrounds they will look at and report on their case studies from varying perspectives. Accordingly, they will draw specific conclusions for municipal planners, urban designers and planners and academics. Session Room 3

9 | Densification of urban green space for a landscape of comfort within a dense urban fabric lic. phil. Petra Hagen Hodgson and dipl. geogr. Heidi Kaspar In order to counter persistent urban sprawl, we find at the forefront of contemporary urban planning theory the concept of an edificial densification. It puts urban green spaces and in particular those in housing estates at risk since it depletes their spatial reserves. Green spaces, however, are of vital importance for a high quality

of life and for a sustainable urban development. Today, no suitable landscape planning concepts exist to counter an edificial densification, which makes it necessary to discuss new design strategies. This session puts the focus on the everyday use of public parks and housing developments and discusses answers to the following questions: How are urban green environments perceived, experienced and used by different user groups? What are the specific spatial, aesthetical and ecological qualities that

take into account the variety of the users’ needs in order to support their well-being and facilitate an appropriation of the place? How can the conceptualisation, planning and everyday use of urban green spaces take existing gender differences into account in a way that enables people to step out of discriminating social structures? What kind of strategies facilitate a sense of belonging and social participation? Session Room 4

Edificial densification usually ends up with smal trees on top of an underground garage.

17:00 Award Ceremony of the Student Design Competition Awarding of superior environmental design achievements made by students from all over the world. Kongressaal

19:00  Open Firm Evening Many landscape architecture firms in Zurich and the surroundings and the Sukkulenten-Sammlung (Zurich Succulent Plant Collection) on the lakeshore are inviting Congress participants into their premises to view their work. Furthermore, the exhibition “Mein Park” (My Park) about the disproportionate access of men and women to public green spaces, opens its door for a special guided tour. For more details see the leaflet published separately. Zurich and beyond 19


THEME OF THE DAY – URBAN AREAS

Monday 27 June 2011 Technical Visits 1 | Recreational space by the water: Guided tour along the River Limmat Ladina Koeppel Mouzinho, Grün Stadt Zürich Sigrun Rohde, Grün Stadt Zürich At the start of the tour, in the landscaped area between Schlieren and the city of

Zurich, participants will be informed about the comparatively large-scale plans and strategies at higher level, such as the Limmat area/city of Zurich Landscape Development Concept (LEK) and the Limmat Conurbation Park. The coexistence of recreation, nature and field observation, as well as other demands on this landscape, will be explained by means of the cantonal LimmatAuenpark Werdhölzli flood protection project that is almost completed. The tour will proceed along the recently designed Fischerweg along the River Limmat, which flows freely here, and then upstream towards the more urban area of Zurich-West and further towards the city centre. By means of measures already in place, participants will be shown how waterside recreation can take shape in the city. 13:00, Meeting Point A

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2 | Industrial transfor­ mation and horticultural jewels in Winterthur Stephan Herde, Rotzler Krebs Partner Landschaftsarchitekten The urban development of Winterthur has always been characterised by the careful and conscious management of open spaces. In the course

of the town’s industrialisation and associated considerable growth, residential areas were created interspersed with green spaces, characterising Winterthur even today as a “Garden City”. The large industrial areas in the city centre and in Oberwinterthur increasingly declined in importance as production locations as the machinebased industries moved away and since the 1980s have opened up undreamed of possibilities for inner-city development. This excursion along these former industrial areas, steeped in history, shows the most diverse projects following the industrial transformation, design of new squares and parks, residential estates, temporary use and district regeneration projects. In contrast, isolated jewels of 19th century Swiss landscape architecture can still be seen. 13:30, Meeting Point B

3 | Hönggerberg-Affoltern Landscape Development Concept (LEK) Daniela Bächli, Grün Stadt Zürich The tour will provide information about the Landscape Development Concept (LEK) planning tool and the specific results of the Hönggerberg-Affoltern

4 | Recreational activities in the municipal forest: Management, costs and benefit Regina Wollenmann, Grün Stadt Zürich The technical visit focuses on the management, costs, and benefits of recreational activities in the municipal forests. The forests of Zurich

5 | Sihl and Limmat: Urban timeout on the riverbanks Alexander Heinrich, Rotzler Krebs Partner Landschaftsarchitekten In recent years there has been an increase of open spaces for those seeking recreation along the two rivers, Limmat and Sihl – areas that are not the focus

6 | New Oerlikon park landscape Hein van der Plas, Zurich Office of Waste, Water, Energy and Air (AWEL) Outstanding park areas have been created in the north of the city of Zurich since 2001 as part of an urban development process. Each of these parks is designed to

Landscape Development Concept participatory planning process on a walk through the area between the Seebach and Affoltern districts of Zurich that is used in a number of diverse ways. The considerable building development in the residential area is especially conspicuous in this area of the city. This excursion fo-cuses, however, above all on the effects of the growth in residential housing on the landscape. The many different demands on land use by agriculture and forestry, nature conservation and the crowds of people seeking recreation on the remaining green spaces lead to many diverse conflicts of use. An image of the landscape in the future, alongside specific regeneration measures for the “peaceful coexistence” of recreation, nature conservation and agriculture were developed in the LEK Hönggerberg-Affoltern Landscape De-velopment Concept planning process together with the diverse user groups. 12:50, Meeting Point C

are very close to the town and are used for a variety of recreational activities. The different activities are not always free of conflicts. Therefore, amongst others, it is the task of the municipal forest department to manage these conflicts and jointly develop solutions in a process of dialogue. An illustration of what this means, drawing on the examples of a toboggan run, bike trail, and playgrounds, will be given on site. Possible solutions of the conflicts that can occur will be discussed, as well as the costs and benefits of recreational infrastructures in forests, on the basis of these examples. 13:30, Meeting Point D

of tourism activities, such as the shores of the lake or the Limmatquai in the historical Old Town. The tour along historical urban structures will take in locations and projects along the two rivers. An interesting development process is taking place here in the flashpoint between urban use and intervention into oases of nature. For example in 2005 the Sigi Feigel Terrace was created as a seating area with steps on the bank of the River Sihl, as well as the Lettenareal on the waterworks canal (Limmat). While the terrace on the Sihl is used above all by students and workers in the districts nearby as a place to have their lunch, the Lettenareal has become the “place to be” for young people. These new open spaces are integrated into a series of existing facilities or facilities about to be created in the near future along the rivers. 14:00, Meeting Point A

meet the specific needs of the users and is an example of outstanding contemporary landscape architecture. The MFO Park is characterised by loggias and a sundeck surrounded by innumerable climbing plants. The Oerliker Park was designed for change from the outset by the involvement of the users. The Wahlenpark is primarily intended for sports and games. En route, participants will gain an insight into the planning history of the district and the design and use of the parks. 15:15, Meeting Point B

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THEME OF THE DAY – URBAN AREAS

Monday 27 June 2011 Technical Visits 7 | Listening to the city: Acoustic trail through the Old Town Andres Bosshard, Zurich University of the Arts (ZHdK) Experience the acoustic spaces in a city with your senses on a walk with Andrew Bosshard from the Kunsthaus Art Museum to

the Lindenhof. Hear and experience surprising moments of sound in the city and their effect on the overall space. Open your ears to the language of the city: how do building façades, squares, back yards and floor finishes speak to us? How do we talk to the city? Understand how sounds and urban spaces coexist and discover the first steps to designing acoustic spaces as an underlying base for the urban identity of the city. Active hearing itself is a design change of the fleeting acoustic dimension of our surroundings. 15:30, Meeting Point C

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8 | Open spaces in housing construction: New living on the urban fringe, seen by the example of Zurich-Affoltern Dr. Daniel Kurz, Building Surveyor’s Office of the city of Zurich The city of Zurich is growing today primarily due to inner compaction. Residential

properties from the 1930s and 1940 are often replaced by an even greater density of new buildings. The last open spaces in the urban fringe have recently been built over by large residential estates. Community-based building cooperatives ensure that attractive open spaces are created with the new build projects. This tour passes through new cooperative residential estates in the district of Affoltern. The tour will discuss the demands of the residential environment where there is a high density of residential properties. 15:30, Meeting Point D

9 | Open spaces in the Sihl river area Lone Severin, Grün Stadt Zürich This excursion provides a large-scale overview of the area around the River Sihl. The Sihl area concept and a selection of individual projects will be presented on site.

10 | Station sparrows and peregrine falcons: Inner city habitats Stefan Ineichen, Settlement ecologist Animals and plants appreciate the city as a habitat and have advanced right into the city centre. Stefan Ineichen, residential ecologist and co-author of

The history of the old paper factory and its development into the busy and muchfrequented Sihlcity area of the city will unfold on the tour. From the green roof landscape of the shopping centre, the Sihl area opens up into the adjacent Allmend Brunau area of common land and the urban landscape of Zurich. Visiting the Allmend Brunau, with its extensive open spaces and sports facilities, the tour will focus on the development history of the recreation space, the experience of the space and provide information on the tree plantings and use of the common land. 15:00, Meeting Point A

the recently published book “Stadtfauna (Urban Fauna)” about the 600 species of animal living in the city of Zurich, guides a walk from the Central Station, via the Platzspitz, and the Lettenareal to the viaduct over the Limmat, presenting the diversity of urban habitats, and demonstrates where southern plants flourish, how wall and sand lizards live, why urban bees produce superb quality “urban” honey and where the peregrine falcons nest that had almost died out only a few decades ago. 15:30, Meeting Point B

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THEME OF THE DAY – PERI-URBAN AREAS

Tuesday 28 June 2011

PERI URBAN AREAS

08:00 Registration desk opens

09:00 Keynote Speaker 4 Prof. Dr. Marcel Meili, Meili Peter Architekten, Zurich Meili Peter Architekten, one of the leading Swiss architecture firms, has established its reputation particularly with urban development and ambitious constructions. Prof. Meili lectures at the ETH – Zurich Science and Technology University and is deeply committed to the urbanistic debate. Kongressaal

09:45

Keynote Speaker 5 Prof. Dr. Michael Koch and Dipl. Arch. Maresa Schumacher, yellow z, urbanism architecture, Zurich and Berlin Yellow z predominantly works in the fields of urban development concepts, planning strategies, district and design planning and conceptual planning for public buildings and land. Kongressaal

10:30 Tea/Coffee break Opportunity to visit the Expo and the Poster Presentation.

11:00 Keynote Speaker 6 Prof. Dr. Kongjian Yu, Turenscape, Landscape Architecture, Urban Planning, Beijing Prof. Yu is the founder of the Turenscape landscape architecture firm and the Graduate School of Landscape Architecture at Beijing University. Through his lecturing and the projects he has been involved with, he has rapidly become one of the leading contemporary landscape architects in China and enjoys significant international renown. Kongressaal

12:00 Lunch Poster Session 2 and the opportunity to visit the Expo.

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THEME OF THE DAY – PERI-URBAN AREAS

Tuesday 28 June 2011 13:30 Sessions 14 | Strategies and design approaches for peri-urban areas Prof. Joachim Kleiner The session aims to present specific strategies and design approaches in a peri-urban context. It opposes theories of sustainable regionalism to design-oriented approaches. On the basis of lessons learned from the experience of developing overall visions, strategies or projects for peri-urban landscapes, the session will identify and prioritise factors and land-uses that define the quality of peri-urban landscapes. The session will synthesise, discuss and generalise a successful approach for designing the peri-urban landscapes of the future. Session Room 1

12 | Peri-urban spaces, their functions and aestetics in relationship to urban centres Almut Jirku The future of peripheral landscapes is a topic that is broadly discussed. Especially in the peripheries of big cities they are coming under pressure from urban, non-agricultural uses and urban sprawl. Often important infrastructures that function for the urban centres are placed there; obsolete land uses leave their traces. It is necessary to integrate or re-integrate these elements into peripheral landscapes. At the same time the landscape has to be developed for recreational and ecological purposes. Also important are the functional and spatial connections between periphery and centre. All these diverse interests inevitably change the face of the landscape. The question is how to transform these landscapes for new uses and how to maintain them economically. The transformation of aesthetic standards is a necessary requirement for this and an important task for landscape architecture. The session aims to present and discuss examples from several countries. More specifically, the successes and problems of the projects presented should be worked out and recommendations for further work should result from the session, especially with regard to cooperation with local people and producers. Session Room 2

17 | Multi-functional use of temporary open spaces in densified urban environments Karin Hindenlang Temporary fallow land in densified urban areas offers space for the creative use of their grounds, spontaneous activities and simple implementation, which specifically meets the needs of young people. There is no need for sophisticated designs. Based on simple rules, people from various origins are encouraged to express their needs and are invited to participate in the use of the land at close quarters. Thus, the concern of citizens to be involved in the shape of their extended residence or work environment can be awakened and can contribute to enhancing their habitat. The session will present and discuss empirical examples as well as innovative ideas and contemporary theory with regard to temporarily available open spaces and their occupation by residents. Session Room 3

19 | Green traffic network Urs Walter In densely populated areas, pedestrians and cyclists need a cross-linked road and path network. Residents, as well as commuters and the working population, can also benefit from extensive green and open spaces. Together with cross-linked public transportation, conditions can be created for high quality living and working environments. The session will present best practice studies and field reports on the topics mentioned above. Session Room 4

3 | Why and how history matters? Conservation of historic gardens Dr. Johannes Stoffler This session discusses the role of historical sources in garden and landscape architecture. It explores how these historical sources can serve as an instrument for reading the landscape, and how they guarantee its understanding as a basis for identity creation. The session also aims to provide an insight into the archives and the availability of sources for historical research, design input, and the conservation of historic gardens and cultural landscapes. Historical gardens and cultural landscapes are not only an important source in current land-scape design practice. But they often form a major part of the cultural identity in people’s everyday life. The conservation of this cultural heritage is a

challenging task. Underlying plants’ life cycles and alterations in design and use over the decades, historical gardens are constantly changing. This session discusses the area of tension between conservation and change. It outlines the cultural diversity of our garden heritage and looks for practical approaches and tools. Session Room 5

Peri-urban area in the north of Zurich: Where agriculture and urban dwellings meet.

15:00 Tea/Coffee break Opportunity to visit the Expo and the Poster Presentation. 26

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THEME OF THE DAY – PERI-URBAN AREAS

Tuesday 28 June 2011 15:30 Sessions 15 | Peri-urban areas – Traditional qualities and broken aesthetics Prof. Joachim Kleiner The session will discuss traditional as well as new and unorthodox landscape qualities in a peri-urban context. The handling of traditional landscape heritage or infrastructure is compared to new flexible and temporary infrastructures in peri-urban landscapes. Besides pointing out the threats and opportunities of the urban fringes, the session is looking for a new approach to the design of peri-urban landscapes of the future beyond their sometimes broken aesthetics. Session Room 1

13 | Urban agriculture and its contribution to dealing with problems in the periphery of agglomerations Almut Jirku The future of peripheral landscapes is a topic that is broadly discussed. Especially in the peripheries of big cities they are coming under pressure from urban, non-agricultural uses. It is also necessary to integrate the infrastructure needs of the cities, like pylons, sewage plants, etc. into peripheral landscapes. All of these diverse interests inevitably change the face of the landscape. At the same time, there is a renaissance of a specific kind of agriculture in the cities: “urban agriculture”. The question about how to transform landscapes for new uses so that they can be managed economically while maintaining an aspect pleasing to non-agriculturists is an important one. For this the transformation of aesthetic preferences is an important aspect in landscape architecture. The session aims to present and discuss examples from several countries. More specifically, the successes and problems of the projects presented should be worked out and recommendations for further work should result from the session, especially with regard to cooperation with local people and producers. Session Room 2

18 | Temporary and permanent transformations of open space in urban landscapes Karin Hindenlang Open spaces in urban areas encourage architects, designer and artists to develop playful events, creative activities, and temporary or permanent installations in collaboration with local residents and authorities. Vacant locations serve as laboratories for innovative ideas towards better contemporary urban life and identity. In various examples the question of durability and sustainability is raised: What are the long-term effects of temporary events on urban planning and design? Under what conditions will temporary installations change to permanent transformations? The session aims to present and discuss reviews of design and installation projects as well as transformation processes with regard to open spaces and their reappropriation. Session Room 3

10 | Densification of urban green space for a landscape of comfort – Acknowledging for the user’s different preferences lic. phil. Petra Hagen Hodgson and dipl. geogr. Heidi Kaspar In order to counter urban sprawl, we find at the forefront of contemporary urban planning theory the concept of an edificial densification. It puts urban green spaces at risk since it depletes their spatial reserves. How are urban green environments perceived, experienced and used by different user groups? How are the variety of the users’ needs taken into account in order to support their well-being and facilitate an appropriation of the place? How can the conceptualisation, planning and everyday use of urban green spaces take existing gender differences into account in a way that enables people to step out of discriminating social structures? What kind of strategies facilitate a sense of belonging and social participation? Session Room 4

26 | Biodiversity in the city: Enriching urban life and work – Determinants for enhancing urban biodiversity and designing ecologically resilient green spaces Bettina Tschander Biodiversity in the cities is exceeding by far diversity in agricultural surroundings. Therefore, cities bear a special responsibility for the conservation and support of biodiversity, not only for the benefit of animals and plants but also for the benefit of people by providing them with the opportunity to experience nature in the middle of the city. While urban areas are being densified, we must pay attention to the amenities of residential and open spaces. The aim of this session is to present and discuss planning ideas, projects and case reports resulting from campaigns on the biodiversity of landscape architecture. Densified urban environments, fragmentation and management intensity have a negative impact on urban biodiversity. Public greeneries and residential areas offer opportunities for providing near-natural habitats which contribute to

residents’ quality of life at the same time. The session presents different approaches in dealing with the design and management of urban biodiversity while balancing the social needs of people. Session Room 5

17:00 Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe Award and winner’s speech The Award is the highest honour that IFLA can bestow. It recognises a living landscape architect whose lifetime achievements and contributions have had a unique and lasting impact on the welfare of society and the environment and on the promotion of the profession of landscape architecture. Kongressaal

20:00 Gala Dinner An opportunity to exchange experiences, compare notes and make new international contacts in an informal atmosphere. Kongressaal 28

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THEME OF THE DAY – PERI-URBAN AREAS

Tuesday 28 June 2011 13:30 –18:00 Research Platform Presentation of the main current research by a number of different institutes, universities, teaching and research institutions in Switzerland and abroad. Presenter: Pascal Gysin, landscape architect MLA BSLA, BSLA President Synthesis und final discussion lead: Prof. Dr. sc. ETH Zurich Udo Weilacher, Technische Universität München, Faculty of Architecture, Institute for Urban Design, Urbanism and Landscape, Chair of Landscape Architecture and industrial Landscape Objectives: – Knowledge transfer of Swiss universities and research institutions concerning research topics related to landscape architecture and landscape development – Needs and trends in landscape research – Information about research opportunities in Switzerland in the field of landscape architecture and planning – Message / list of demands: Current state of research in the field of landscape architecture and planning in Switzerland. – Answers to these questions: Where are the gaps in research and education? What are we to do? What strategies are appropriate? Tagungszentrum

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Presenting Schools and Institutes: Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zurich Prof. Dr. Adrienne Grêt-Regamey, Institute for Spatial and Landscape Planning (IRL), Chair of Planning of Landscape and Urban Systems (PLUS), Associate Professor Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL) Dr. Christoph Hegg, Deputy Director and Head of Department of Planning and Logistics Dr. Marcel Hunziker, Economics and Social Sciences, Social Sciences in Landscape Research, Team leader Prof. Dr. Felix Kienast, Landscape Dynamics, Titular Professor for Landscape Ecology at the Department of Environmental Sciences at ETH Zurich, Senior Scientist WSL

University of Applied Sciences of Eastern Switzerland (FHO) Prof. Dr. Ing. Susanne Karn, HSR Hochschule für Technik Rapperswil, Landscape Architecture Department, Institute for the History and Theory of Landscape Architecture (GTLA), Head of the Institute Zurich University of Applied Sciences (zhaw) Prof. Jean-Bernard Bächtiger, School of Life Sciences and Facility Management, Institute of Natural Resource Sciences, Head of the Institute

One of the loggias at MFO-Park.

Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF) Urs Steiger, National research program “Landscapes and Habitats of the Alps” (NRP 48), National research program “Sustainable development of the built environment” (NRP 54), Communications and imlementation officer NRP 48 / 54 University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland (HES-SO) Prof. Laurent Daune, Haute Ecole du Paysage de l’Ingénierie et de l’architecture (hepia), Geneva, Pole Construction and environment, Department of Landscape Architecture, Institute of landscape, architecture, construction and territory (inPACT), Head of Department

Recreational activities at Oerliker Park. Photo: Christian Altorfer

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THEME OF THE DAY – PERI-URBAN AREAS

Tuesday 28 June 2011 Technical Visits

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11 | Wildnispark Zürich Sihlwald: Wilderness by the gates to the city Christian Stauffer, Wildnispark Zürich Sihlwald Wildnispark Zürich Sihlwald is the combination of a small national park, an animal park and a museum. Alongside the Sihl Forest, the Zurich

12 | Unesco World Heritage Centre: Swiss Tectonic Arena Sardona Sigrun Rohde, Grün Stadt Zürich Sarah Schaub, SKK Landschaftsarchitekten The Swiss Tectonic Arena Sardona in the north-eastern part of the country covers a mountainous area of 32,850

13 | Thur river landscape Margrith Göldi Hofbauer, Grün Stadt Zürich Robert Bänziger, Ingenieurbüro Bänziger Stefano Pellandini, AWEL The “Flood protection and meadow landscape of the mouth of River Thur” project has four objectives: To protect the area from

14 | Rothenthurm moorland landscape in the canton of Schwyz: A diverse natural and cultural region Peter Marty, zhaw School of Life Sciences and Facility Management, Institute of Natural Resource Sciences The Rothenthurm highland moor is one of the most

15 | The Urban Farmers Andreas Graber, Technical Director UrbanFarmers, zhaw School of Life Sciences and Facility Management, Institute of Natural Resource Sciences The Urban Farmers want to bring agriculture back into the city. Urban Farmers want to raise fresh fish and grow

16 | Art structures in the landscape Alois Züger, akw The Wägital valley in the south-eastern corner of the canton of Schwyz was flooded in August 1924, creating a new landscape with new villages and a new transport infrastructure. This area was inhabited as

Wilderness Park is renowned as a park of national importance and has therefore been the only Swiss park to be awarded the title “Nature Experience Park”. This label is awarded to large-scale strictly protected nature reserves adjacent to urban conurbations. As well as offering the strictest protection, the park also offers intense experiences in nature to the inhabitants of the conurbation. The excursion visits the Visitor Centre, the beaver and otter sanctuary and the growing natural forest, where participants will be informed about the history of the Sihl Forest, the formation of the current organisation and what is on offer in the park. In the Visitor Centre, participants will view exhibitions on the topic of wilderness and the Sihl Forest project. The importance of nature in society will be discussed on a hike through the Sihl Forest, along with the values created by the Wildnispark Zürich Sihlwald. 13:00, Meeting Point A

ha, which features seven peaks that rise above 3,000 m. The area displays an exceptional example of mountain building through continental collision and features excellent geological sections through tectonic thrust, i.e. the process whereby older, deeper rocks are carried onto younger, shallower ones. The Glarus Alps are glaciated mountains rising dramatically above narrow river valleys and are the site of the largest post-glacial landslide in the Central Alpine region. The tour will provide you with an insight view into an unusually high density of geotopes, witnesses to the earth’s history such as the Lochsite, the Tschingelhorn mountains with Martinsloch as well as the visitor management set up to protect this unique world heritage. 12:15, Meeting Point B

flooding from the Rhine and Thur rivers, revitalise the meadow land around the Thur in line with the Swiss Meadow Ordnance, improve conditions for agricultural production and guarantee recreational use in the long term. The first phase already completed involves the revitalisation of the River Thur and its oxbow lakes in the largest flood meadow area in the central Swiss Mittelland region. The natural morphological development of the River Thur can be witnessed following the removal of the river control structures in 2010. The forest, some 270 hectares in size, is managed in a very nature-friendly manner. No intervention is permitted on 25 hectares and a further 40 hectares have been seriously pruned, thereby creating habitats for plants and animals that like dry conditions and poor soil. 13:00, Meeting Point C

important and, at 1,137 hectares, one of the largest single interconnected areas of moorland in Switzerland. The moorland landscape provides habitats for many endangered or threatened species of animal and plant. The moor is the characteristic element of the highland valley and has a close interaction with agricultural use and the development of the community of Rothenthurm. This excursion focuses on the different habitats of the moorland, biodiversity, land use and nature conservation issues. Both historical aspects, as well as the cultural significance for the region, will be discussed. The landscape forms part of a planned Schwyz Regional Nature Park. The potential of close-to-nature tourism will be discussed alongside possible risks for the moorland area. 13:00, Meeting Point D

vegetables in greenhouses on flat roofs and unused waste land in a sealed water cycle, a process known as aquaponics. The excrement from the fish is recycled by natural processes in the cycle. The system is completely organic and works without fertilizers, pesticides, fungicides and antibiotics. Urban Farmers is a spin-off organisation of the ZHAW in Wädenswil. The Clean Tech start-up company wants to bring together ecological sustainability, social capital and economic success. The founders of Urban Farmers will explain the philosophy and future strategy of their organisation for urban food production and will present their aquaponic demonstration system with a variety of different species of fish and plants. 13:00, Meeting Point B

far back as the first century of our calendar. It became famous by the construction of the Bad-Wägital spa hotel at the end of the 19th century. The first plans were mooted back then about using hydropower and they became a reality with the merger of two electricity companies, which were granted licenses in 1918 to utilise hydropower. A new landscape with a lake was created in the Wägital valley in the foothills of the Alps with the construction of the dam. The ferroconcrete power stations built between 1922 and 1925 are witness to Swiss engineering of the 1920s and demonstrate careful management of the landscape. They are still operating today in their original states. 12:30, Meeting Point A

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THEME OF THE DAY – PERI-URBAN AREAS

Tuesday 28 June 2011 Technical Visits 17 | Listening to the city: Acoustic walk from Seebach to the Opfikerpark Andres Bosshard, musician and artist, sound art and sound architecture Experience the acoustic spaces in the periurban landscape with your senses on a walk with Andres Bosshard. Hear and

experience surprising acoustic moments of the periurban city and their effect on the space. Open your ears to the language of the city: How do viaducts, open urban spaces, rows of facades, high-rise offices and arterial roads talk? Understand how sounds and urban spaces coexist and discover the first steps to designing acoustic spaces as an underlying base for the urban identity of the city. Active hearing itself is a design change of the fleeting acoustic dimension of our surroundings. 15:30, Meeting Point A

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18 | Zurich Central Station: Nature between the tracks Max Ruckstuhl, Grün Stadt Zürich Barbara Huber, SBB Environment Switzerland’s largest railway station has been extended over the last twenty years. The city of Zurich is growing and its public transport

system is growing at a similar pace. At the same time, the track area, measuring some 100 ha, is home to a huge ecological diversity of species. Several hundred species of plant and animal live amidst the tracks. The successful evaluation and balancing model achieves a balancing act between ecology and the expansion of the rail infrastructure. The tour will show how this balancing model has been set up and how it is executed in practice by planners, engineers, designers and ecologists. The Swiss National Railway construction management team will provide an insight into what is currently their largest construction site. Biologists will show where lizards are currently living and how habitats can be created for wild bees and other species of animal. A unique outlook from a platform not normally accessible will provide a unique view over the massive track network in front of Zurich Central Station, across to the Uetliberg hill and onward to the Swiss Alps. 13:45, Meeting Point B

19 | Agriculture on the urban fringe: Healthy world of yesteryear or a trendsetter for urban food production? Markus Wittmer, Grün Stadt Zürich Bettina Kellenberger, Grün Stadt Zürich Agriculture on the fringes of the city faces a whole raft of

different challenges. The pressure for recreation is increasing with corresponding consequences, and land-use pressure for residential properties and the associated expansion of the infrastructure reduces the amount of land available for agriculture. In addition food prices continue to fall. Rising population numbers offer farmers an opportunity for direct marketing of their products and to raise awareness of sustainable food production amongst the population. The effects that this all has on urban agricultural businesses and how farmers deal with this is shown by an example in the north of Zurich. A farming family in the Zurich-Seebach district will present its business and explain how they have adapted in recent years to the market situation. 15:30, Meeting Point C

20 | Zurich Stream Concept: Purpose, state of play, future challenges Franz Günter Kari and Mirja Lagerström, Zurich Disposal and Recycling Services; Reto Sigel, Grün Stadt Zürich A Stream Concept was passed in 1988 by the City Council with the objective of

opening up previously culverted streams in the process of residential development of the area. The Stream Concept is known internationally renowned among experts as an integral component of urban drainage. Zurich has around 108 km of streams, 64 km of which run through forests and more than 44 km of which run through residential areas. Some 36 km of streams in residential areas are now fully open. Around 18 km of streams have been opened up since 1988 and around 3 km have been renaturated. Together they now all constitute vital routes for ecosystems, valuable habitats for flora and fauna and local recreation areas for the inhabitants of the city. This excursion, which visits selected streams, shows the conflicting priorities of these projects and the many diverse demands they have to fulfil. There will also be a discussion of future requirements, such as flood protection and a discussion about the conditions required to ensure the continuity of an interdisciplinary project such as thus over more than 20 years. 15:15, Meeting Point D

21 | The tree stock of the garden city of Schwamendingen Ladina Koeppel Mouzinho, Grün Stadt Zürich The garden city of Schwamendingen is a district of Zurich. With around 29,000 inhabitants it grew in the period from the 1940s to the 1970s. Large

22 | Open spaces in residential estates: A walk through the Zurich district of Wollishofen Karl Stammnitz, Grün Stadt Zürich Switzerland, and Zurich in particular, has had a long tradition of cooperative housing construction. This excursion heads to

areas of open spaces with an extensive stock of trees and wide green belts still characterise the district today. Many residential estates are in need of renovation and new, more compact and dense, residential estates have been built. The settlement pattern and valuable stock of trees are coming under pressure because of the large areas that are not permitted to be built upon. As there is no general protection of trees in the city of Zurich, an analysis of the tree stock of this district made recommendations – that are voluntarily implemented – about how to manage the existing stock of trees. The district, an analysis of the tree stock and the recommendations proposed will be discussed on a ramble through the district. Information will also be provided about selected planned and completed construction projects. 15:30, Meeting Point B

Wollishofen, a strikingly green district in the south of the city where a wide range of different typologies of residential areas and open spaces can be found: from former industrial areas to the modestly extended garden city, from recently completed new high-density replacement buildings to the integrally maintained Classic Modern Werkbund housing estate. An explanation of the “Entlisberg Master Plan” provides a view of the longer-term future of the district. The tour will finish with a visit to the Entlisberg motorway covering. Allotment gardens and areas that have been left near-natural link the popular residential district with the surrounding landscape thanks to a network of paths. 15:30, Meeting Point D

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THEME OF THE DAY – RURAL LAND

Wednesday 29 June 2011

RURAL LAND

08:00 Registration desk opens

09:00 Keynote Speaker 7 Dr. phil. Raimund Rodewald, Managing Director, Swiss Foundation for Landscape Protection, Berne In his capacity as a lecturer, Dr. Rodewald addresses the issues of landscape aesthetics and sustainable landscape development. He has developed the Swiss Foundation for Landscape Protection to become a recognised institution, which again and again draws public awareness to the enforcement of contingencies in urban planning, the weaknesses of legal protection of our landscapes and the necessity for the right of appeal of associations. Kongressaal

09:45

Keynote Speaker 8 Andreas Spiegel, Environmental Scientist ETH – Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, Senior Climate Change Advisor, Swiss Re, a leading global reinsurer, Zurich Alongside his role as coordinator of Swiss Re’s Group-wide activities towards climate change, Andreas Spiegel is also a member of the Swiss Climate Delegation at the United National Climate talks and represents Swiss Re to a number of organisations, such as the UNEP FI Climate Change Working Group, Climate Group, Climate Wise and the Geneva Association, an insurance industry think tank. Kongressaal

10:30 Tea/Coffee break Opportunity to visit the Expo and the Poster Presentation.

11:00 Keynote Speaker 9 Prof. Joan Iverson Nassauer, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor The Professor of Landscape Architecture at the School of Natural Resources and Environment has received many awards for her research work investigating public acceptance and the cultural sustainability of environmentally beneficial landscape change. In her current projects she is researching the ecological effects of the rehabilitation of contaminated sites and industrial wasteland, among other things. Kongressaal

12:00 Lunch Poster Session 3 and the opportunity to visit the Expo.

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Wednesday 29 June 2011 13:30 Sessions 20 | Waterscape experiment – Visions of integrated landscapes, watercourses and cities that belong together – I Stefan Rotzler The current water issues, such as water shortage, water pollution or flooding, are of particular concern in the rural-urban fringe. It is therefore important to develop a new landscape architectural design method based on the analysis of the physical conditions of water landscapes, such as topography, geology and drainage. This new method could become an important key towards a more sustainable environment and a trigger for ecological urbanism. This session will present and discuss case studies and research projects, conducted by experts and international universities. The contributions communicate visions of integrated landscapes, watercourses and cities that belong together. Session Room 1

22 | Managing valuable landscapes – Approaches and instruments Prof. Dr. Margrit Mönnecke The development and operation of national and nature parks constitute an essential element of a modern policy of landscape protection. The intention is to protect and develop biodiversity and landscape values in the rural and peri-urban area. Often this requires the participation of the public. The session aims to show and discuss how different perspectives can be considered for the development of valuable landscapes. What approaches have proved successful and which instruments were used? The session could lay the foundation for a global network in landscape planning with national and nature parks and therefore support future international collaboration of landscape planning in the context of parks and other large-scale protected areas. Session Room 2

24 | Sustainable energy landscapes 2.0 – Design practice DipLA Tim Kaysers A generation of energy landscapes aims to sustain quality of life without harming landscape quality, biodiversity and other landscape services. Landscape architects, planners and designers are believed to play a critical role in the transition of today’s fossilfuel landscapes to sustainable energy landscapes. Energy-conscious spatial planning and landscape design will be one key to preserving landscape quality and biodiversity. This implies a reduction in energy demand and assimilation of renewable energy. This session deals with the assimilation of energy landscapes and shows how the understanding, respect and implementation of natural circular processes can reduce energy demand and thus contribute to the development of sustainable landscapes. One translation of such circular systems will be illustrated in the session, where new forms of alternative bio-fuel production and bioprocessing are being set up across a whole region. The second presentation emphasises the advantages of dual use in solar fields in contributing to the visible sustainability of energy landscapes. The integration of energy transmission infrastructure in the landscape will be subject in the third presentation. The final presentation proposes the foundation of an international charter for sustainable design principles. Session Room 3

16 | Strategies for periurban areas – On our way to peri-urban farming? lic. phil. Gertraud Dudler-von Piechowski “Urban farming”, “guerrilla gardening” or “intercultural gardens” are only some of the words that have hit the headlines. The session aims to discuss different aspects and strategies for dealing with agriculture and gardening in a peri-urban context. It presents best-practice examples of how to tackle the challenges by integrating participants and users into the process of agricultural production. Furthermore, strategies outlining the valorisation of boundaries between urban areas and rural land will be part of the discussion. Session Room 4

28 | Green strategies Axel Fischer Natural and open spaces of high sojourn quality do not only exist due to the ideas and work of landscape architects. To influence political decisions in the process of urban development, it is necessary to promote ideas and strategies as well as initiatives by non-profit organisations and citizens’ initiatives. This session aims to present and discuss NGOs as “green organisations” (e.g. nature conservation associations, citizens’ action committees, guerrilla gardeners) that support green ideas and green strategies to strengthen and encourage the development of green spaces. Session Room 5

13:30 –15:00 Round Table 2 Open Space, Freedom and Communication Presenter: Robert Schäfer, Editor in chief Topos, Munich; Panellists: Mohamed Elshahed, Cairo; Yaser Abunasser, Beirut; Anette Gangler, Stuttgart; Jason Prior, London; Juliane Pegels, Aachen What role does public open space play in the evershifting field of modern society? We have seen the extraordinary symbolic function of Tahrir Square in Cairo earlier this year. Education, emancipation and equal rights are the basic ingredients necessary to the

development of a democratic society. The right of individuals to express their own freely held opinions is still a dream for so many people in 2011. How do open spaces allow this mixture of ingredients, encourage these basic rights? We need places for social life, interaction and communication. Open spaces are of utmost importance in this respect; they are the places where interaction, exchange and confrontation take place. They are the places where dialogue becomes possible. Which qualities are needed for squares and other urban open spaces to serve as social meeting points for this essential exchange and dialogue? Is tradition and symbolic value more important than that of professional designs, full of aesthetic, ecological and functional ambitions? This panel raises the question of whether landscape architecture and urban design are able to generate places of communication and social exchange. The debate begins with Tahrir Square and continues with an investigation into the open access and use of urban spaces in different social systems, in Switzerland as well as in China. The underlying question is certainly how virtual media will change urban life and urban open spaces. Kongressaal

15:00 Tea/Coffee break Opportunity to visit the Expo and the Poster Presentation.

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THEME OF THE DAY – RURAL LAND

Wednesday 29 June 2011 15:30 Sessions 21 | Waterscape experiment – Visions of integrated landscapes, watercourses and cities that belong together – II Stefan Rotzler The current water issues, such as water shortage, water pollution or flooding, are of particular concern in the rural-urban fringe. It is therefore important to develop a new landscape architectural design method based on the analysis of the physical conditions of water landscapes, such as topography, geology and drainage. This new method could become an important key towards a more sustainable environment and a trigger for ecological urbanism. This session will present and discuss case studies and research projects, conducted by experts and international universities. The contributions communicate visions of integrated landscapes, watercourses and cities that belong together. Session Room 1

23 | Landscape planning for national and nature parks – Requirements and success factors Prof. Dr. Margrit Mönnecke In many countries, the development and operation of national and nature parks constitute an essential element of a modern policy of landscape protection. The intention is to protect and develop biodiversity and landscape values in the rural and peri-urban area. The session aims to show and discuss the different approaches of landscape planning in various countries with regard to the national and nature parks, the function of landscape planning in the framework of the management of national and nature parks, consulting, education and research, as well as offering an international exchange of experiences between practice and research. The session should lay the foundation for a global network in landscape planning with national and nature parks and therefore support the future international collaboration of landscape planning in the context of parks and other large-scale protected areas. Session Room 2

25 | Sustainable energy landscapes 2.0 – Design methods Dr. Dipl. Ing. Sven Stremke The session focuses on the planning and design of sustainable energy landscapes. Existing approaches and new methods will be discussed that show promise of facilitating both a reduction in energy demand and provision of renewables through energy-conscious landscape planning and design. The session will begin with a study on how three existing energy landscapes developed over time and to what extent planners and designers were involved in the transformation of those landscapes. The second presentation demonstrates several research by design projects on the impact of wind turbines conducted by artists, scientists and landscape architects. A third presentation will reveal how applying a multidisciplinary approach can help in understanding why certain interventions are met with opposition. Finally, an advanced approach to the design employing 3D GIS landscape visualisations will be presented and discussed with the audience. Session Room 3

27 | Biodiversity in the city: Enriching urban life and work – Coexistence of biodiversity and people: social aspects as drivers for urban biodiversity Bettina Tschander Biodiversity in the cities is exceeding by far diversity in agricultural surroundings. Therefore, cities bear a special responsibility for the conservation and support of biodiversity, not only for the benefit of animals and plants but also for the benefit of people by providing them with the opportunity to experience nature in the middle of the city. While urban areas are being densified, we must pay attention to the amenities of residential and open spaces. The aim of this session is to present and discuss planning ideas, projects and case reports resulting from campaigns on the biodiversity of landscape architecture. Social aspects are strong arguments for undertaking biodiversity restoration: green environments for recreation and human well-being, the need for relationships and social interaction, experiences in nature and wilderness areas in cities, people participation in the design and management of urban green

areas, the establishment of identity in changing parts of the city. Different examples of urban parks illustrate the potential of synergies between social needs, nature conservation and the creation of natural surroundings. Session Room 4

29 | Green strategies – The Green City initiative Jardin Suisse The Green City is a European initiative. It aims to improve the quality of life in cities with more public and private green. The green has many positive effects - such as on the well-being of people on social life and on the environment. These positive effects are reflected in economic, ecological and socio-cultural values. The “Green City” is a response to the current social and political challenges. The initiative aims to promote awareness of the value of green in European cities. This will be done through the following measures: inform the economy and politics, but also the public about the many positive features of vegetation and green spaces for the quality of life, the well-being, the enrichment of social ties, stimulate the economy and the preservation of the environment. Session Room 5

17:00 Closing Ceremony Kongressaal

19:00 Farewell Party A look back at the Congress and an opportunity to give participants a taste of South Africa as the next venue. Blatterwiese The renatured stream Leutschenbach with a viewing balcony.

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THEME OF THE DAY – RURAL LAND

Wednesday 29 June 2011 Technical Visits 23 | Villa gardens by Lake Zurich Roland Raderschall, raderschallpartner ag This excursion provides an insight into three villa gardens dating back to the 19th century and into the nationally important Archive for Swiss Landscape Architecture in Rapperswil.

The gardens of the Villa Stünzi and the Villa Seerose in Horgen are evidence of the silk industry in the middle of the 19th century. Rich entrepreneurs built their Classical villas with large landscaped gardens along the lake road on the outskirts of Zurich that were later reduced in size or destroyed by the construction of the railway and the extended building along the lake. The excursion then continues by boat across Lake Zurich to the Villa Alma in Männedorf. The builder of this villa also came from a textile and leather production dynasty and built the villa in the Art Nouveau style of the early 20th century. The villa and garden are protected today and the villa houses a private care home and nursing home. The history and the maintenance work of the grounds of the villa will be discussed. In conclusion, the excursion will head for the Archive for Swiss Landscape Architecture in Rapperswil, where participants can view the original plans of some of the villa gardens. 13:00, Meeting Point A

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24 | Therapy gardens in nursing homes and rehabilitation clinics Susanne Karn, HSR Hochschule für Technik Rapperswil Therapeutic gardens in nursing homes and health institutions are a relatively new landscape architectural field in Switzerland. The

excursion will present the particular requirements of therapy gardens in two large and well functioning premises. The Reusspark in Niederwil is a centre for the care and management of chronically ill, primarily geriatric people. The “Protected Reusspark Promenade Garden” was built in 2005 and was designed by the landscape architect Felix Naef. It is one of the most extensive and best planned centres for dementia in Switzerland. A therapy garden was designed as part of the extension and renovation of the Bad Zurzach rehabilitation clinic between 2004 and 2008, which permits ergotherapy and physiotherapy and now also horticultural therapy outdoors. The garden was built as part of a research project by Zurich University for Applied Science (ZHAW) and the University for Technology in Rapperswil (HSR). 13:00, Meeting Point B

25 | Parks in the region: Transition from the city to the countryside Florian Glowatz-Frei, planikum GmbH, Martin Rein-Cano, topotek 1 Landschaftsarchitekten Berlin, Gerwin Engel, asp Landschaftsarchitekten Zürich, Stephan Schubert, Planpartner AG Zürich, Lukas Schweingruber, Schweingruber Zulauf Landschaftsarchitekten Zürich The conurbation of Zurich is today home to over 1 million people. The Glattal is a key

expansion axis of this residential area and is therefore subject to constant urban development pressure. The planning and creation of highly-qualified, modern open spaces provides stimulus for the urban development of Zurich towards creating an attractive city in which people enjoy living. This tour heads for three recently constructed parks that illustrate the different strategic and design approaches to solving the challenges faced by parks in the conurbation. While the Heerenschürli sports ground provides expansive spaces with a linear-urban signature and blends the most diverse land uses, more gentle rural themes and rambling patterns characterise the Griespark in Volketswil. The grounds of the Zellwegerareal in Uster obtain their impetus from the involvement and interpretation of the industrial and urban development past of the area. 13:00, Meeting Point C

26 | Light rail trip to the Glattal: Sustainable interlinking of residential areas, jobs and local recreational space Hannes Schneebeli, VBG Verkehrsbetriebe Glattal AG, Rainer Klostermann, Feddersen & Klostermann Public transport is one of the key strategies for the

sustainable development of the city and metropolitan region of Zurich. The newest transport system in the canton of Zurich will be shown on a special trip on the recently completed section from Stettbach to the airport and to ZurichOerlikon. The Glattalbahn light rail system has been able to close a gap in the public transport network. The new route also created an important stimulus for urban redevelopment. The tour will discuss the current issues of urban landscapes, residential and working areas, compaction in and around the city and landscape in the context of mobility and living space. The Glattalbahn makes a significant contribution to the quality and image of the region, not only by making local recreation areas more easily accessible but also by the design of the line and the approach from façade to façade. For example, 7 hectares of track grass (green tracks) were incorporated or planted with 200 trees. 13:00, Meeting Point D

27 | Learning from history I On the trail of well-known Swiss landscape architects: The conquest of the lake shore Silvia Steeb, Grün Stadt Zürich Brigitt Sigel, art historian The walk starts on the Bürkliterrasse with an explanation of the quay

facilities and their importance for the development of the city. The tour then continues along the right shore of the lake to the Utoquai where the historical promenade of 1887 runs parallel to the modern extension built in 1971. The straight lakeside promenades end in the park-like Seefeldquai along the Riesbach marina. The high point of this walk along the lake shore is the romantic Seeuferweg that follows the waterline, built by the famous Swiss landscape architects Willi Neukom and Dölf Zürcher with its large sandstone slabs dating back to 1963. This key Swiss landscape architectural work is regarded as an exemplary model far beyond the borders of Switzerland. The Zürichhorn, the delta of the once wild Hornbach, forms the end point of the guided tour. 15:00, Meeting Point A

28 | Collections of wooded groves and spinneys as an integral part of park design: Based on the example of the Enzenbühl Cemetery Roger Fischer, Grün Stadt Zürich Marianne Herold, Funeral and Cemeteries Office The Enzenbühl Cemetery

was opened in 1902 to take pressure off the adjacent Rehalp Cemetery. The Master Mason of the City of Zurich, Arnold Geiser, planned the steeply inclined cemetery grounds with a neo-Gothic funeral chapel at their highest point. It was extended in 1933/34 to its current size. The architect Konrad Hippen­ meier, together with the Mertens brothers, landscape architects, created a cemetery with changing rural and architecturally designed spaces filled with tension. The Mertens brothers wanted to give the cemetery the feel of a park, with their choice of plants and visual inclusion of the landscape. The Enzenbühl Cemetery became the outstanding work by the Hippen­ meier / Mertens brothers collaboration and the original concept has been retained unchanged to date. The exceptionally rich planting of the groves and spinneys is popular amongst experts for the teaching of botanical knowledge. The entire cemetery grounds and 112 graves have been protected as a national monument since 2004. 15:15, Meeting Point B

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THEME OF THE DAY – RURAL LAND

Wednesday 29 June 2011 Technical Visits 29 | Learning from history II On the trail of well-known Swiss landscape architects: The left lake shore Judith Rohrer, Grün Stadt Zürich Sabina Hubacher, Haerle Hubacher Architekten BSA The walk starts on the General-Guisan-Quai with an explanation of the lakeshore

banks dating back to 1880 and their effect on the development of the city. The tour then continues through the Arboretum, opened in 1887, which has an extraordinary collection of trees and was created by one of the best horticultural artists of his era. Only relics have been retained from the legendary G59 Swiss Horticulture Exhibition of 1959, including the so-called “Honeycomb Garden” by the Enge Marina. The excursion ends at the Mythenquai lido, representing the bathing landscape of the 20th century. 15:00, Meeting Point C

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30 | Learning from history IV On the trail of well-known Swiss landscape architects: Letzigraben Open-air Pool, a park pool in the Modernist style (Max Frisch/Gustav Ammann 1949) and its continued development up to the present day. Ulrich Ammann, Grün Stadt Zürich Dr. Johannes Stoffler, Landscape Architect The Letzigraben open-air pool is the most important work by the Swiss architect and author Max Frisch. In

collaboration with the landscape architect Gustav Amman, the two men created a park pool, the character of which can still be felt some 60 years after it was first opened. The Letzibad, as it is known, is the most important historical, architectural and cultural witness of the city of Zurich. The land on which the pool was built has a very long and tumultuous history. A farm stood here in Roman times, followed by a munitions depot and even a gallows in the 19th century. The changing pavilions are cleverly grouped around the perimeter of the land, creating a large, cohesive area for swimming. The organically shaped pools lie in gently landscaped, park-like surroundings. A number of groves of trees and shrubs further contribute to the “garden” feel of the pool. The pool was refurbished and renovated in 2006 and placed under national monument protection. 15:00, Meeting Point D

31 | Development areas in Zurich-West Marcel Frey, Grün Stadt Zürich The change from industrial area to a more mixed-use district can be experienced on this tour in Zurich-West. The number of jobs will rise from 20,000 today to 30,000 to 40,000 in future and soon

8,000 inhabitants will be living in Zurich-West instead of the 3,000 living there today. The excursion will show the challenges faced by this change and the associated compaction of the district in terms of the new land-use, for residential housing, culture, work and recreation in the open spaces. Following an introduction in the Zurich-West Information Centre, completed and planned evaluation measures (Turbinenplatz, Halle Puls 5, Ampèresteg, Wipkingerpark, Gleisbogen, Westpark Innenhof and Pfingstweid) will be visited. 15:00, Meeting Point B

32 | Leutschenpark Open space in a development area on the urban fringe Hein van der Plas, Zurich Office of Waste, Water, Energy and Air (AWEL) New open spaces have been created alongside high-rise buildings in the Leutschenbach district on the northern fringe of the

city as part of an urban redevelopment project. The centre of this part of the district is formed by the Leutschenpark completed in 2008 with its landmark, an over-sized “Tree pot” and a 180 m long seating bench around the outside. A blue band of light curves through the tops of the trees at night reminiscent of the Leutschenbach stream that runs underground through the area. The upgraded green zones along the side of the Riedgraben, Leutschenbach and Katzenbach streams link the new district. 15:15, Meeting Point A

33 | Public playgrounds in downtown Zurich Marc Furst, Grün Stadt Zürich The city of Zurich places over 550 public playgrounds at the disposal of children, teenagers and their accompanying persons. About 150 well-tended playground facilities are

located in public parks, sports facilities and public outdoor pools. The others are typically part of school ground and are open to the public outside of school hours. The city of Zurich’s Office of Parks and Open Spaces is well-known for its planning of playgrounds based on about a dozen criteria which make sure that all the relevant issues have been identified and considered. Furthermore, an all-inclusive project management provides support for the project managers on their way to a successful result: Seeing children with bright eyes at the opening of a playground, parents feeling well and an improved quality of life for a whole district. The tour will offer an insight into the special features and the origins of three playgrounds in the vicinity of the congress centre. 15:10, Meeting Point C

34 | Open spaces in housing construction: 1930s to 1950s Dr. Daniel Kurz, Building Surveyor’s Office Zurich Switzerland has a long tradition of cooperative house building. This excursion takes visitors to classic examples of residential properties built in

the 1930s to 1950s in the Sihlfeld workers’ district. There the large-scale public street areas and the large parks in the cooperative housing systems form a networked system of open spaces of different qualities and finely judged privacy. The tour ends in the Heiligfeld estate that was built in 1954 with its public park designed by Gustav and Peter Amman. 15:30, Meeting Point A

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Wednesday 29 June 2011 Technical Visits

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35 | Multifunctional forest management in an urban context: How to balance requirements for recreation, wood production and ecological services Regina Wollenmann, Grün Stadt Zürich This short technical visit focuses on multifunctional

36 | Learning from history III On the trail of well-known Swiss landscape architects: Willi Neukom, Fred Eicher and Dieter Kienast Claudia Moll, ETH Zurich This excursion takes in works by the most important Swiss landscape architects of the 1960s to 1980s: The Hinterriet Cemetery in

forest management in an urban context. The forests of Zurich are very close to the town and used for a variety of recreational activities. However, the forests still have to satisfy local wood demand. At the same time they contain 342 spring water collections which serve as independent emergency drinking water supply. It is the task of the municipal forest department to balance the different requirements for recreation, wood production and ecological services. The tour will pay a visit to a reservoir, a recreational facility for bikers and a logging operation. Drawing on these examples possible solutions to the conflicts that occur will be discussed. 15:15, Meeting Point D

Küsnacht designed in 1964 by Willi Neukom (1917– 1983), the Eichbühl Cemetery in Zurich Altstetten designed by Fred Eicher (1927–2010) in 1966 and the Brühl Park in Wettingen, an early work by Dieter Kienast (1945–1998), that he designed between 1979 and 1983. The development timelines of Swiss landscape architecture in the recent past will be illustrated. 13:00, Tagungszentrum

PSA Publishers

THEME OF THE DAY – RURAL LAND

Architecture on your mind? Browse our Profiles of Selected Landscape Architects for inspiration. world-architects.com

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F1 | World-Architects.com Cyber Café

Expo Kongresshaus Zurich

Profiles of Selected Architects and Landscape Architects. The premium network of selected contemporary architects brings designers, clients, and contractors together in the goal of advanc­ing quality. In addition to over 2,500 offices profiled from more than 40 countries, job listings, a products showroom and an events calendar help support architects and others in this goal. World-Architects.com is an indispensable communication tool for building professionals and the leading medium for those who want to create and promote good architecture and landscape architecture. The cybercafé provides attendees with access to internet, email and messaging to other attendees. PSA Publishers Ltd., Ausstellungsstrasse 25, CH-8005 Zürich, Switzerland

Contact: Phone +41(0)44 271 27 11, Fax +41 (0)44 271 27 50 mail@world-architects.com, www.world-architects.com F1

F2 | Grün Stadt Zürich and Information Desk F2 F5

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Grün Stadt Zürich, the city of Zurich’s Office of Parks and Open Spaces is responsible for the planning, construction and maintenance of green and open spaces on behalf of the residents of the city of Zurich: forests, public parks, lakeshores and riversides, cemeteries and sports grounds, avenues, natural habitats, allotment gardens and farms. Furthermore, the city of Zurich is one of the main supporting organisations of the Foundation Wildnispark Zurich which runs the deer park in Langenberg and the Sihlwald forest, Switzerland’s first wilderness park labelled as Nature Discovery Park. Every day, around 430 employees are committed to preserving and improving the high quality of life in town.

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Grün Stadt Zürich, Beatenplatz 2, CH-8001 Zürich, Switzerland

Contact: Phone +41 (0)44 412 27 68, Fax +41 (0)44 212 09 38, www.stadt-zuerich.ch/gsz

F3 | IFLA International Federation of Landscape Architects

F1 World-Architects.com Cyber Café F2 Grün Stadt Zürich and Information Desk F3 IFLA and BSLA F4 Zürich Tourism F5 Topos F6 Acosim AG F7 Stabilizer 2000 GmbH F8 H. Lorberg Baumschulerzeugnisse GmbH & Co. KG P1 Hess AG Form+Licht P2 HSR Hochschule für Technik Rapperswil P3 Orell Füssli Buchhandlungs AG P4 Bruns Pflanzen Export GmbH & Co. KG P5 pumptracks GmbH P6 LudoCrea.ch P7 BURRI public elements AG

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The International Federation of Landscape Architects (IFLA) is the body representing Landscape Architects worldwide, providing leadership and networks that support the development of the profession and its effective participation in the realization of attractive, equitable and sustainable environments. Its purpose is to coordinate the activities of member associations when dealing with global issues, and to ensure that the profession of landscape architecture continues to prosper as it continues to affect the design and management of our environment. The Federation aims to provide a united voice and advocates high standards in tertiary education and practice. IFLA provides a forum for debate and networking, as well as for the promotion of the profession and the services which the profession provides. The profession of landscape architecture will play an increasing role in the future of our planet through the aesthetic, social and ecological skills of landscape architects. International Federation of Landscape Architects (IFLA), 63, Avenue d’Auderghem, B-1040 Bruxelles, Belgium

Contact: Christine Bavassa, Phone +32 (0)2 230 37 57, Fax +32 (0)2 230 37 57, admin@iflaonline.org, www.iflaonline.org

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F3 | BSLA Bund Schweizer Landschaftsarchitekten und F3 | Landschaftsarchitektinnen The Swiss Federation of Landscape Architects BSLA FSAP. The federation understands its role as being the voice for Swiss landscape architects working in private practice or public administrations in the planning and design sector. They also represent those working in teaching and research positions as well as students working towards a future in the profession. The BSLA publishes the professional journal “anthos” and represents Swiss landscape architects in the IFLA. On behalf of the profession and the federation, the BSLA fulfills an important community function in pursuing its goal of ensuring the sustainability of the designed environment in Switzerland. BSLA FSAP, Rue du Doubs 32, CH-2300 La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland

Contact: Peter Wullschleger, Phone +41 (0)32 968 88 89, Fax +41 (0)32 968 88 33, bsla@bsla.ch, wwwbsla.ch

F6 | Acosim Mortar Systems Acosim produces and distributes first-class paving mortar for natural stone paving. Two factors make Acosim mortar especially strong and durable: the unique quartz sand originating from Switzerland’s Bergell region, and Acosim’s patented production process. All Acosim products are produced under strict quality control at the Acosim factory in Schmerikon, Switzerland. The Acosim System is now routinely specified in Switzerland as the gold standard for paving mortars for use with natural stone. The system comprising three component parts – paving mortar products, vibrating and cleaning machinery and design guidelines for the road layers – was tested at the EMPA road testing facility in Switzerland, and was found to have a design lifetime of over twenty years. Drawing on an excellent reputation in the Swiss market, Acosim aims to position the company as a top-quality provider in the European market as well. Today, Acosim is active in Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Germany, Austria, Luxemburg, the Netherlands and Great Britain. Acosim AG, Rietbrunnen 22A, CH-8808 Pfäffikon SZ, Switzerland

F4 | Zürich Tourism Welcome to Zürich! Zürich Tourism is happy to welcome you and wishes you an unforgettable stay in our city. As a lifestyle capital on the water, Zürich offers the unique mix of discovery, pleasure, nature and culture. The finest culinary highlights, unlimited shopping pleasure, over 50 museums and more than 100 galleries, Switzerland’s liveliest nightlife, numerous events and countless green oases in the center of the city tempt guests to linger and enjoy. Zürich Tourism, Stampfenbachstrasse 52, CH-8021 Zürich, Switzerland

Contact: Phone +41 (0)44 215 40 00, information@zuerich.com, www.zuerich.com

F5 | Topos The International Review of Landscape Architecture and Urban Design. As the leading international review of landscape architecture and urban design, Topos publishes examples of successful projects and designs from all over the world. Topos provides worldwide surveys of planning activities, urban design projects and concepts, planning strategies for cities, urban regions and cultural landscapes. Topos highlights interdisciplinary work and examines future questions arising within the landscape architecture profession. Apart from international projects on all scales, Topos gives an overview of current news, reviews of relevant books and reports on important conferences and exhibitions. Topos, Georg D.W. Callwey GmbH & Co. KG, Streitfeldstr. 35, D-81673 München, Germany

Contact: Livio Coduri, Phone +41 (0)55 420 11 52, Fax +41 (0)55 420 11 55, info@acosim.ch, www.acosim.ch

F7 | stabilizer 2000 GmbH A company using 100% natural products. The raw material for Stabilizer binder is an agricultural product. The plants are dried and ground to a fine powder in mills. Stabilizer has been successfully used in North America since1982 and in Europe since 1997. Over the years, the original Stabilizer binder has been further developed by research and development and is, today, also successfully used in areas prone to erosion. Materials mixed with Stabilizer binder can be reused at all times. We can recommend a product of which we are totally convinced. Benefit from durable and economical Stabilizer. Communal and private areas: Footpaths and alleyways, Cycle paths, Promenades, School yards, play areas, Garage entrances, Roads and car parks. Landscaping: Wet and dry seed, Slope stabilizations, Tree disc surfaces, Paving joints, Humus-free cultivation. Sports surfaces: Golf courses, Race courses, Equestrian dressage areas, Baseball courts, Tennis courts, Football and all-weather pitches. stabilizer 2000 GmbH, Postfach 1510, CH-6011 Kriens, Switzerland

Contact: Phone: +41 (0)41 322 1129, Fax: +41 (0)41 322 1128 info@stabilizer2000.com, www.stabilizer2000.com

Contact: Phone: +49 (0)89 436 00 50, Fax: +49 (0)89 436 00 51 47, info@callwey.de, www.topos.de

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F8 | Lorberg Baumschulerzeugnisse GmbH & Co KG Lorberg nurseries were founded in Berlin in 1843 and are owned by Lorberg family for six generations. With the reunification of Germany Lorberg nurseries had the opportunity to establish most modern production facilities in Tremmen, 30 km west of Berlin. The nurseries expanded in the following years by opening branches south of Berlin and in southern Germany (Baden-Baden). We now offer an extensive range of products from over 700 ha: from simple bushes to trees with heights up to 15 m. A speciality of Lorberg nurseries is the artistic design of topiaries. We provide a wide range of shaped trees like roof-shaped Tilia or umbrella-shaped Amelanchier and many varieties of instant hedging up to 5 m high. We even produce topiaries following historical examples: our designed trees decorate European parks such as Summer Garden, St. Petersburg or Sanssouci, Potsdam! In the continental climate of Berlin area, we produce plants which cope well with these conditions. Our trees and shrubs are healthy growing, characterized by strong roots. And you can obtain top quality container plants or air pots for summer planting as well. Get in touch with us! You are very welcome to visit Lorberg nurseries and get your own impression of our high quality plants. H. Lorberg Baumschulerzeugnisse GmbH & Co. KG, Zachower Straße 4, D-14669 Ketzin OT Tremmen, Germany

Contact: Hanno Leight, Phone: +49 (0)3 32 33 84 0, Fax +49 (0)3 32 33 84 100, lorberg@lorberg.com, www.lorberg.com

P1 | Hess AG Form+Licht Public design in harmony with the users, natural surroundings and architectural settings. A leading force on the international lighting market, Hess AG is a respected name for innovative, attractive outdoor lighting. Hess’s broad product diversity ensures the availability of the best lighting solution for every application, whether it’s the illumination of outdoor public spaces or exterior architectural lighting, etc. Hess invests a great deal in the development of energyefficient lighting products, which has helped produce one of, if not, the most diverse ranges of efficient street lighting available on the market. This is a major reason why Hess is one of the first choices of cities and municipal governments planning the complete replacement or upgrading of existing lighting systems. The energy-efficient products employ precision-engineered optical systems with computer-designed reflectors, state-of-theart light sources, such as LEDs, etc., providing the operator with superior economy and unparalleled lighting quality. Besides lighting, Hess manufactures street and site furnishings, making it one of the few manufacturers capable of providing architects and designers with the products for a consistent overall design. Hess’s products are exported to over 40 different countries worldwide.

P2 | HSR Hochschule für Technik Rapperswil HSR Hochschule für Technik Rapperswil is a leading institution in landscape architecture and the only university offering a Bachelor’s degree in this domain in German speaking Switzerland. In their work, landscape architects combine ecological, design and technical knowledge with the ability to adopt a networked approach and to engage in planning and conceptual work. They design parks and gardens, compile landscape development concepts and care plans for nature reserves, draw up recreation and free space concepts, configure historical gardens, assist in returning rivers to their natural state and direct construction projects. In so doing, they make an essential contribution towards shaping public and private free spaces and to the sustainable development of our landscape. Careers Thanks to its versatility, the education enables students to work for landscape architects, ecological and engineering consultants, gardening contractors, public authorities at communal, municipal or cantonal level, nature and environmental protection organisations, and consultants. Once they have acquired the appropriate experience, landscape architects can assume project management, leadership and overall management functions. HSR Hochschule für Technik Rapperswil, Oberseestrasse 10, po box 1475, CH-8640 Rapperswil, Switzerland

Contact: University Services, Phone: +41 (0)55 222 41 11, office@hsr.ch, www.l.hsr.ch

P3 | Orell Füssli Buchhandlungs AG As one of the leading bookshop chains in the German speaking part of Switzerland, Orell Füssli takes care that bookworms will not run out of their elixir of life at any time, in any place. Founded in 1519, Orell Füssli is represented in 10 cities, with 4 shops in Zurich alone. The “Kramhof” branch at Füsslistrasse is the biggest with a floorspace of over 2,000 m2. The department “Krauthammer” deserves a special mention: enthusiasts will find here an extensive selection of books, postcards and presents on the topics of architecture, design, art and photography, in a modern loft-atmosphere. On the Bahnhofstrasse, directly next to Rennweg, you will find The Bookshop, the biggest English speaking bookshop on the European mainland, with more than 40,000 books on a vast selection of topics, and an exclusive selection of English DVDs, magazines, audio books and British and American food items. More Orell Füssli stores are at Bellevue in Zurich and in the Airport Centre of Zurich Airport. Orell Füssli Buchhandlungs AG, Dietzingerstrasse 3, Postfach CH-8036 Zürich, Switzerland

Contact: Phone: +41 (0)848 849 848, Fax: +41 (0)44 455 56 20 orders@books.ch, www.books.ch

Hess AG Form + Licht, Lantwattenstraße 22, D-78050 Villingen-Schwenningen, Germany

Contact: Phone: +49 7721 9200, Fax: +49 7721 920250, hess@hess.eu, www.hess.eu

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P4 | Bruns Pflanzen Export GmbH & Co. KG Bruns Pflanzen, founded 1876, is Europe’s largest and most prestigious nursery, located in North Germany. Bruns has been known as a supplier of high-quality plants to the landscape trade and garden centres throughout Europe for more than 130 years. Today more than 40,000 varieties and sizes of plants are produced on more than 500 hectares of land and in containers. The excellent quality of our plants and a reliable customer service are the aims having priority in our business concept, which is based on skill, creativity, continuity and success. Customers of Bruns are landscape contractors, landscape architects, local authorities, large industry companies and garden centres. 300 highly motivated staff at Bruns Pflanzen is the pillar of the success, who professionally and innovatively meet the customers’ wishes. The family business Bruns Pflanzen has developed over the past 130 years from a market gardening firm to one of Europe’s leading tree nurseries. The ever-increasing success of the company is based on the high quality in all areas. Bruns Pflanzen Export GmbH & Co. KG, Johann-Bruns-Allee 1, D-26160 Bad Zwischenahn, Germany

P7 | BURRI public elements AG BURRI public elements AG was founded in 1907 in Zurich. The fourth generation operates the business with production plants and its own development and design department in Glattbrugg and a European sales department in Germany. BURRI offers a broad range of products in the field of public elements® for public space. This includes benches, chairs, bins, bollards and LED-streetlamps, as well as signage systems, LED light boxes and light solutions for train stations and airports. BURRI public elements AG has always worked with prestigious architects, landscape architects, designers as well as with research facilities and universities. Personal commitment from concept to detail, experience and professional competence are the source of these long-lasting business relations. Our experience with construction design and the continuous further development of tried and tested systems facilitate diverse synergies and customized solutions. BURRI public elements AG Zürich, Sägereistrasse 28, CH-8152 Glattbrugg, Switzerland

Contact: Phone +41 (0)44 874 44 22, Fax +41 (0)44 810 95 26, info@burriag.ch, www.burriag.ch

Contact: Phone: +49 (0)4403 6010, Fax: +49 (0)4403 601135, info@bruns.de, www.bruns.de

P5 | pumptracks GmbH The Swiss based company pumptracks gmbh, plans and builds public pumptracks, worldwide. pumptracks GmbH, Postfach 5229, CH-8050 Zürich, Switzerland

Contact: Pete Stutz, Fabian Vollrath, Phone: +41 (0)79 722 02 21, info@pumptracks.ch, www.pumptracks.ch

P6 | LudoCrea.ch LudoCrea.ch is the Swiss representative of Corocord Spacenet GmbH in Berlin, Germany and Richter Spielgeräte GmbH in Frasdorf. For adolescents who are in constant search of sites to play and self-determination, a holistic development is of top importance. With our contribution to playground design, we offer a balance and complement to our technical environment. Our range of games considers the stages of child development. We have set the following objectives in development, manu­­fac­ turing, testing and improving our playground equipment: High play value, as much security as necessary, lasting stability, maintainability, ecological orientation, targeted use of materials. We use wood as basic material. Wood has high gaming value when properly used. We also use high quality stainless steel and ropes. Our careful workmanship ensures high durability. Challenge us, ask for a consultation! The Corocord spacenets and Richter playground equipment are available in most European countries, in the USA and Canada. LudoCrea.ch, Grossteilerstrasse 50, CH-6074 Giswil, Switzerland

Contact: Phone: +41 (0)41 675 0 367, Fax: +41 (0)41 675 0 368 info@ludocrea.ch, www.ludocrea.ch, www.corocord.com, www.richter-spielgeraete.de

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The tramway line of Glattalbahn is covered with grass and framed by plane trees.

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Partners of the industry

We will also showcase a first prototype installation of the UrbanFarmers BOX concept, a novel approach of a mobile, completely independent and sustainable way of growing your own locally grown food in the city. www.urbanfarmer.ch

Scientific partners BURRI public elements AG was founded in 1907 in Zurich. The fourth generation operates the business with production plants and its own development and design department in Glattbrugg and a European sales department in Germany. BURRI offers a broad range of products in the field of public elements® for public space. This includes benches, chairs, bins, bollards and LED-streetlamps, as well as signage systems, LED light boxes and light solutions for train stations and airports. BURRI public elements AG has always worked with prestigious architects, landscape architects, designers as well as with research facilities and universities. Personal commitment from concept to detail, experience and professional competence are the source of these longlasting business relations. Our experience with construction design and the continuous further development of tried and tested systems facilitate diverse synergies and customized solutions. www.burriag.ch

Holcim is one of the world’s leading suppliers of cement and aggregates (crushed stone, gravel and sand) as well as further activities such as ready-mix concrete and asphalt including services. The Group holds majority and minority interests in around 70 countries on all continents. www.holcim.com

UrbanFarmers. Our mission is to develop eco-sustainable urban agricultural systems for locally grown food in the city, for the city. Our rooftop greenhouse UrbanFarms will provide organic, fresh and sustainably grown food to the UrbanFarmers community. A Spin-Off of the Zurich University of Applied Sciences (zhaw) in Wädenswil, UrbanFarmers aims to become a pioneer in the development of urban agriculture as part of a sustainable lifestyle in cities of the 21st century. UrbanFarmers is the Hub WWF Schweiz Fellow of 2011 and the winner of the Swisscanto Prix Nature Generation Zukunft 2011. As part of your participation at the IFLA 2011, we will host a technical visit in Wädenswil, presenting our Aquaponic pilot installation.

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HSR Hochschule für Technik Rapperswil, University of Applied Sciences is proud to host this year’s student competition and wishes you all the success. HSR is a leading institution in landscape architecture and the only university offering a Bachelor’s degree in this domain in German speaking Switzerland. www.hsr.ch

The Institute of Natural Resources Sciences IUNR belonging to the Zurich University of Applied Sciences is one of Switzerland’s leading research and educational institutions. The application-oriented research and development concentrates on sustainable use and development of both urban and rural landscapes. Focal points are “Green Care and Planting Design”, “Protection of natural resources” and “Nature and leasure”. www.zhaw.ch

The Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research is a research institute of the Swiss Confederation. It is part of the ETH Domain and employs approximately 500 people. WSL is concerned with the use, development and protection of natural and urban spaces and holds a leading position inter­ nationally in these research areas. WSL research aims at finding ways to sustainably manage landscapes and forests for maximum benefit to people’s quality of life and to handle the natural hazards in the best possible ways. www.wsl.ch

Media partners

Topos, the International Review of Landscape Architecture and Urban Design. As the

leading international review of landscape architecture and urban design, Topos publishes examples of successful projects and designs from all over the world. Topos provides worldwide surveys of planning activities, urban design projects and concepts, planning strategies for cities, urban regions and cultural landscapes. Topos highlights interdisciplinary work and examines future questions arising within the landscape architecture profession. Apart from international projects on all scales, Topos gives an overview of current news, reviews of relevant books and reports on important conferences and exhibitions. www.topos.de

But that’s not all. In addition to the best products and materials, all of which have earned the fully independent Architonic seal of approval, www.architonic.com also features hand-picked architectural projects of note, as well as the latest design news and features, making the website the number one choice for professionals. For invited members from within and beyond the architecture and design industries, Architonic is the ultimate platform to promote their premium products and other business offerings in a visually sophisticated, relevant and effective way. www.architonic.com

Travel partner

anthos is the Swiss journal for landscape architecture: Topical, critical, enquiring and forward-looking, bilingual throughout, with all contributions in German and French. Plus an issue is being produced in English to mark the 48th IFLA Word Congress 2011. anthos is international with a Swiss focus. www.antos.ch

Profiles of Selected Architects and Land­scape Architects The premium network of selected contemporary architects brings designers, clients, and contractors together in the goal of advancing quality. In addition to over 2,500 offices profiled from more than 40 countries, job listings, a products showroom and an events calendar help support architects and others in this goal. World-Architects.com is an indispensable communication tool for building professionals and the leading medium for those who want to create and promote good architecture and landscape architecture. www.world-architects.com

Architonic is the number-one online business-to-business community that connects architects, building owners and contract clients with manufacturers, agents and retailers internationally, as well as with trade fairs and the design press. Founded by architects Nils Becker and Tobias Lutz in 2003, Architonic allows you to select the right products for your projects at exactly the right time for you, thanks to its fast and effective research tools.

Swiss International Air Lines (SWISS) serves 72 destinations in 39 countries all over the world (as of summer 2011) from its Zurich hub and the further Swiss international airports of Basel and Geneva with a fleet (as of summer 2011) of 90 aircrafts. Switzerland’s airline embodies typical Swiss values such as hospitality, quality in every detail and personal care: SWISS aims to make all its customers feel totally at home. SWISS is committed on various fronts to the careful and sustainable use of natural resources, and regards a responsible attitude to the environment as an integral part of its corporate culture. As part of the Lufthansa Group and a member of Star Alliance, SWISS remains true to its mission of providing quality air services that link Switzerland with Europe and the world. www.swiss.com

Tourism partner

Zürich Tourism is happy to welcome you and wishes you an unforgettable stay in our city. As a lifestyle capital on the water, Zürich offers the unique mix of discovery, pleasure, nature and culture. The finest culinary highlights, unlimited shopping pleasure, over 50 museums and more than 100 galleries, Switzerland’s liveliest nightlife, numerous events and countless green oases in the center of the city tempt guests to linger and enjoy. www.zuerich.com

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Venue partner

The Kongresshaus Zurich is a house of tradition and is highly regarded by the city and its people. As a company that is called on to serve the public at all times, we carry a great responsibility. That’s why we place the utmost value on exemplary treatment of our clients and guests, as well as our suppliers and business partners. We strive to achieve leadership status in all areas of our activities. We constantly monitor the quality of our services and we improve them with innovative ideas and new stimuli. At the Listening to suggestions. Implementing ideas. Fulfilling wishes and meeting needs. For clients and guests, for suppliers and business partners. The Kongresshaus Zurich aims to live up to its reputation in every way possible. www.kongresshaus.ch

Supporter Josefwiese is a typical example of a Volkspark, the kind of public parks created at the end of the 19th century.

The lawn pyramids at Louis Häfliger Park are reminiscent of the former ammunition huts.

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Imprint Patronage Committee Ruth Genner, Chairwoman of the Committee, City Councillor, Head of the Civil Engineering and Waste Management Department Markus Akermann, CEO, Member of the Board of Directors, Holcim Ltd. Prof. Dr. Ralph Eichler, President of Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zurich Markus Kägi, Councillor of the Canton Zurich, Director of the Cantonal Building Authority Kurt Zibung, Councillor of the Canton Schwyz, Director of the Department of Economic Affairs Organising Committee Dr. Christian Tschumi, IFLA Delegate and President of the Organising Committee Pascal Gysin, BSLA President Peter Wullschleger, BSLA Secretary General Ernst Tschannen, Director of the City of Zurich’s Office of Parks and Open Spaces Hayal Oezkan, Secretary General of the 48th IFLA World Congress 2011 Zurich, Switzerland Advisory Board Desiree Martínez, IFLA President Scientific Committee Paul Bauer, Chairman of the Committee, Head division Planning and Construction GSZ Claudia Moll, Doctoral Candidate, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zurich Prof. Dr. Ing. Susanne Karn, HSR Hochschule für Technik Rapperswil, Landscape Architecture Department, Head of the Institute for the History and Theory of Landscape Architecture (GTLA) Prof. Jean-Bernard Bächtiger, Zurich University of Applied Sciences (zhaw), School of Life Sciences and Facility Management, Head of the Institute of Natural Resource Sciences Dr. Marcel Hunziker, Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL), Economics and Social Sciences, Social Sciences in Landscape Research Stefan Rotzler, Landscape Architect BSLA, Partner of Rotzler Krebs Partner GmbH Editor Hayal Oezkan, Secretary General of the Congress Graphic Design Thomas Bruggisser, Buggisser Moser, Zurich Publisher Stadt Zürich Grün Stadt Zürich (GSZ) Beatenplatz 2 CH-8001 Zürich Switzerland gsz-info@zuerich.ch www.stadt-zuerich.ch/gsz Copyright © 2011 Grün Stadt Zürich All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, or stored in a database or retrieval system, without the prior written permission of the publisher.



Congress Guide - IFLA World Congress 2011 Zurich Switzerland, June 27-29, www.ifla2011.com