Page 1

A Community Resource for Employment, Education and Enrichment

Fall / Winter 2010 Volume 11 / Issue 3

Smart job search page 2

Focus on Faculty

Yes, You Can!

page 9

Recognize your value page 6

SUCCESS STORIES

Achieve the 4Cs

page 5

page 4 Heather Rought, of Gowen, completed three years of classes at MCC before transferring to Davenport University.

NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. POSTAGE

2800 College Drive Sidney, Michigan 48885-9723

ECRWSS RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMER

PAID ANN ARBOR, MI PERMIT #48

YOU DON'T HAVE TO GO FAR, TO GO FAR

pages 8-10


Paris, Rome, Florence & Pompeii

May 2011

Embark on an in-depth adventure through Rome and Paris, two iconic European capitals, and visit Florence and Pompeii along the way, during an eight-day study abroad trip.

GED

Contact MCC Visual Arts Coordinator Carolyn Johnson by e-mail at cjohnson@montcalm.edu or by calling 989-328-1248, or visit www.montcalm.edu/studyabroad.aspx.

Montcalm Community College

The test is available at MCC: May 5 May 6 June 2 June 3 July 6 July 13 August 2 August 3 at MCC's M-TEC: January 10 January 17 February 7 February 14 March 7 March 14 April 11 April 18

It can make a BIG difference

at the Panhandle Area Center: January 11 January 18 February 8 February 15 March 8 March 15 April 12 April 19

Earn your GED

(General Educational Development) certificate at MCC.

GED TEST PREPARATION

is offered through an $83 six-week, noncredit, online course. Sessions begin Jan. 19, Feb. 16, March 16, April 20 and May 18.

GED PREP STUDY GUIDES,

ranging from $18.95 to $29.95, are available at the MCC Bookstore. The GED TEST costs $100 and pre-registration is required.

Visit www.montcalm.edu/GED or call 989-328-1266 or 231-937-7995 for more information.


Managing Editor:................................................... Terry Smith Editor:.............................................Shelly Strautz-Springborn Graphic Design/ Advertising: .......................................Jody Butler Hedrick

Visit MCC on the Web at: www.montcalm.edu

Contents

Features

2

Board of Trustees Martha Jean Brundage Karen Carbonelli Carol Deuling-Ravell

CAREER WATCH

Smart Job Search

There's a right way — and a wrong way — to look for a job

3 I'm Outta Here When does it make sense to change careers?

Montcalm Community College

CareerFocus

Questions about the Montcalm Community College programs and services described in this publication should be directed to the Enrollment Services Office at 989-328-1277 or 1-877-328-2111 (toll free). Comments or questions about the publication itself can be directed to Shelly Strautz-Springborn at 989-328-1243 or shellys@montcalm.edu. MCC’s TTY number is 989-328-1253.

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Achieve the 4Cs Communication, collaboration, critical thinking and creativity

MCC STUDENTS

5 SUCCESS STORIES A spotlight on Alicia Hoople and Christina Halverson

Richard Ellafrits Patricia Hinrichs Robert Marston

6 Yes, You Can How to recognize your value

Roger Thelen Robert C. Ferrentino is MCC’s president.

Cover Article

CAREERFOCUS is published three times a year by:

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You don't have to go far, to go far

Montcalm Community College

MCC offers plenty of transfer options

2800 College Drive Sidney, MI 48885-9723 in partnership with Washtenaw Community College, Ann Arbor, MI.

In Every Issue WHAT IS YOUR CAREER DIRECTION?

All rights reserved. No part of the material printed may be reproduced or used in any form or by any means, elec tronic or mec hanic al, inc lud ing p hoto c o pyi ng, re c ord i ng or by any i nformatio n storage retrieval system without the permission of the publisher. It is the policy of Montcalm Community College that no person; on the basis of race, sex, color, religion, national origin or ancestry, age, marital status, height, weight, disability or Vietnam- era veteran status; shall be discriminated against in employment, educational programs, activities or ad missions. In addition, arrangements can be made to ensure that the lack of English-language skills is not a barrier to admission or participation.

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11

A to Z Back to basics

16

facts & finds

News about Careers

and Education

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MCC Students = Success! Check out MCC student success stories on page 5.

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C areer Foc us

Feature

Smart Job Search

There’s a right way — and a wrong way — to look for a job

By Margaret Steen

hen you’re looking for a job, the quality of the time you spend searching is often more important than the quantity. “There are folks who are spending a ton of time sitting in front of the computer, sending their résumés off into cyberspace and not getting any responses,” says Sarah Boland, coordinator of career and employment services at Diablo Valley College in Pleasant Hill, Calif. To make the best use of your job search time, first consider how companies fill jobs. More than onequarter of outside hires were made via referral in 2009, according to a survey by CareerXroads. Company Web sites accounted for about 22 percent of outside hires, and job boards for about 13 percent. The survey found very few hires from social media. Networking, then, should be your top priority, since it leads to referrals. Use job boards in moderation.

Social media may be better as a networking tool than as a direct link to a job.

Step away from the computer Experts’ main advice on what not to do: Don’t spend all your job search time in front of a computer screen. “Your time online looking for a job can almost be like a black hole if you don’t spend it wisely,” says career coach Chandlee Bryan of Best Fit Forward. Many of the activities that are recommended, such as getting out of the house and meeting people, can also keep you from becoming depressed and giving up on your search — a definite recipe for failure.

Proceed with caution A number of traditional and newer job search tools can be very helpful — but only if you use them correctly and don’t go overboard.

• Job boards. Do look online for jobs, but don’t make this the centerpiece of your hunt. “If you can find an online job posting, so can thousands of other people,” says Dr. Janet Civitelli, associate director of university career services at the University of Houston. “I recommend limiting online surfing for job postings to one hour per day.” • Social media. Facebook, LinkedIn and other sites can be great for keeping up connections with people who may be able to help you. But again, you can spend too much time online and not enough on other parts of your search. Civitelli recommends limiting social media time to an hour per day as well. • Online research. It’s a great idea to identify some key companies you’d like to work for, then go to their sites for job postings and news. “Go to those Web sites and really learn what’s going on,” says Wendy Gelberg, owner of Gentle Job Search and Advantage Résumés. Just make sure it doesn’t become a substitute for connecting with people.

“The key is to be out in the world and engaged with others.”

• Working with recruiters. Remember that recruiters work for the company that is hiring, not for you. Do talk to recruiters who specialize in your field, but don’t spend a lot of time on it, says Barbara Safani, owner of Career Solvers. If you’re right for a position they are filling, they will be in touch. • Job fairs. Use job fairs to get a sense of what companies are looking for and to practice introducing yourself and interviewing. But don’t assume you’ll walk out with a job.

Go where the people are You should spend most of your job search interacting with other people. The relationships that are likely to be most fruitful are those that involve more than you simply asking, “Do you know of any openings?” “It’s not just about selling yourself,” Boland says. “It’s about active listening and being genuinely interested in what others are saying.” Activities that help you get to know a wide variety of people are helpful, even — or especially — if you don’t spend every minute asking people about jobs. Some job seekers join success groups, groups of people who are looking for work and agree to meet regularly to help each other. Volunteer work, classes and internships are all good ways to make professional contacts as well. A limited part of your networking time may be spent at the computer, sending follow-up notes to people you met or setting up lunches and informational interviews. “The key is to be out in the world and engaged with others,” Civitelli says. CF

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CareerFocus

Feature

I’m Outta Here

When does it make sense to change careers?

By James Militzer

s he entered his 50s, Mark Noonan had what most people would consider a wildly successful career. A high-flying tech executive, he earned six figures and travelled the world. But when his wife died unexpectedly in 2004, he found himself questioning his path. “I knew I wanted to give back to the community, so I did a lot of soul searching and left my job,” he says. After earning a degree in gerontology at Portland Community College, he found work at a nonprofit that serves seniors. “There’s definitely a difference in pay. But I go home every day knowing I’m making a difference, which was not how I felt in the tech industry.”

Before you take any drastic steps, you should figure out if you’re fed up with your career – or just frustrated with your job. Though midlife epiphanies like

Noonan’s aren’t uncommon, in today’s economy a career change is often a necessity rather than a choice. If you’re unhappy (or unemployed) in your current field, how can you decide if it’s time to shift to a new one? And if you opt to change careers, should you make a gradual

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transition, or quit your current job and jump in with both feet?

A toe in the water Martha Mangelsdorf, author of Strategies for Successful Career Change, recommends caution. “If you’re thinking of making a dramatic career change, find some low-risk ways to explore a new career before you quit your job,” she says. “Talk to people in the field and find out what it’s like, or maybe see if you can shadow them at work. Take an evening class — community colleges are ideal for career changers because they’re affordable, vocationally focused, and well-suited to working with adult learners. Get some part-time or volunteer work that’s relevant to the career you’re exploring. Or do a small-scale consulting project for a friend or relative, to get a feel for the work and to make sure you really like it.” According to Talane Miedaner, career coach and author of Coach Yourself to a New Career, “There are loads of people who are able to transition, while hanging onto their current job and working in the evenings or weekends to build something new. It’s not always easy to quit and start fresh. First you’ve got to get your résumé to read a

little differently, and sometimes it’s easier to do that within the place you already are. So look for things you can volunteer for, within your current job, that will take you one step closer to where you want to end up.”

Jumping in But if you do decide to quit one job to seek another, Miedaner recommends you save enough to cover your everyday expenses while you’re searching. Plan on a sixmonth reserve if you’re looking for a new job and two years of reserves if you’re planning to start your own business. And if you’re considering a lowerpaying career, you need to crunch the numbers first. “Get really clear on what your monthly expenses are, and all the things that you’re going to cut,” she says. “Generally, if you can get the housing situation right, that makes the rest easier. People sometimes think, ‘Well, I’ll give up my daily cappuccino,’ but they keep the same house. Yet you can easily afford ten cappuccinos a day if you’re living in a smaller house with lower taxes.” Mangelsdorf agrees, but she cautions that before you take any drastic steps, you should figure out if you’re fed up with your career —

or just frustrated with your job. “If you’re just slightly dissatisfied with your job, think about making small shifts that would make you happier,” she says. “Are there any parts of your job that you like? Is it possible to do more of those, and less of the parts you don’t like? If not, there may even be different types of jobs in your industry or organization that you might enjoy more.” But if you truly are miserable in your career, Miedaner says, don’t be afraid to pull the plug. “I knew a client who was a successful sales manager in a corporation, made loads of money, but he wasn’t happy. Ever since he was a little boy, his dream was to be a policeman — so he became a policeman. His family downsized their house, and their whole lifestyle was seriously downgraded. But when his wife was asked if it was worth it, she said, ‘A hundred times yes, because there’s nothing worse than living with somebody who’s unhappy. Now he loves what he does. He’s happy, and I’m happy.’ “So having a slightly higher quality of life doesn’t compensate for having a job that really stinks. Changing careers is not an easy thing to do. But in the end, it is so worth doing.” CF

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C areer Foc us

Career Sense

Achieve the 4Cs

Everyone needs these core traits to succeed f you want to get ahead at work or land a good job, you need four Cs.

By Vickie Elmer

No, we don’t mean your grades should be average — far from it. We mean your crucial traits must include a mastery of the 4Cs — communication, collaboration, critical thinking and creativity.

Count to four Those four traits will become increasingly important to employers in the years ahead, according to a recent American Management Association survey of 2,115 managers. They are foundational skills that will help you win work and win promotions. The 4Cs “pretty much apply to anyone’s job,” and will stay with you when you move up, says Manny Avramidis, the American Management Association’s senior vice president of global human resources. They will work for security guards, securities analysts and CEOs.

The 4Cs “pretty much apply to anyone’s job.” They will work for security guards, securities analysts The AMA defines the 4Cs this way: and CEOs. • Communication refers to the ability to effectively express ideas in writing and in speech. • Collaboration means the ability to work with others who may be different from you or have different points of view. • Critical thinking is the ability to make decisions, solve problems and take appropriate action. • Creativity refers to being innovative and using your imagination to see what’s NOT there and to make something happen.

Why they matter The 4Cs are growing in significance because of the pace of change in business and the amount of work that must be accomplished in teams. “I can see them become increasingly more important because the world is getting smaller and smaller,” says Avramidis, who

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communication collaboration critical thin thinking creativity oversees the hiring and development of some 1,000 AMA staffers around the world.

They are important enough that three-quarters of managers already have started measuring their current staff’s communication skills, critical thinking and collaboration during performance reviews. In about half the cases, workers were considered “only average” in communications and creativity and innovation, the AMA research found. The 4Cs and similar lists have been called crucial by other organizations including the Society for Human Resource Management. Yet two-thirds of human resources managers say some new workers lacked critical thinking, self-direction, overall professionalism and written communications skills, all of which are on SHRM’s core competencies lists. “Being a subject-matter expert is not enough, particularly in a down economy,” says Margo Rose, whose career in human resources has led her to jobs in social media, recruiting for a Cincinnati law firm and establishing Hire Friday on Twitter. “Critical thinking is so important. I define critical thinking as looking at an issue from lots of different viewpoints and making an informed decision. If (job hunters) can convey that in a job interview, they’re going to be heads above the rest.”

Learn how

Start by grading yourself on your 4C skills. Then ask a former boss or coworker to be brutally honest in assessing you, too. Spend time thinking of occasions when you came up with novel solutions or built a bridge with your words. That will give you some target areas in which you can increase your strengths and reduce weaknesses. If you’re trying to add more of these into your life and your résumé, jump into some activities, such as the debate team or the international business round table or a new fundraiser for your favorite charity. Here are four other approaches, shared by Avramidis: • Join activities that require communication and collaboration, and then document them on your résumé. • Choose classes where the professor has built the 4Cs into the coursework, and stay away from basic lecture classes where you never use them. • Grab an internship or part-time job to learn in an environment similar to one you may land in full time later on.

Though all four skills are important, effective communication really is crucial at every age and stage of a career. And just because you can talk for hours with your friends does not mean you’re connecting with the hiring manager who’s 15 years older than you — or 15 years younger. Employers also appreciate seeing the 4Cs woven into your résumé and your experiences. Critical thinking combined with communications and creativity means an individual stands out as “a problem solver....finding solutions no one else has even thought of,” says Rose. “That’s going to be a tremendous boon to your career.” CF

• Develop your skills using some new communication tools, whether IM or ShareSlide or a social network related to your field. But remember, you need to be able to talk face-to-face too. Montcalm Community College I www.montcalm.edu

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CareerFocus

Feature

on

SPOTLIGHT MCC Alumni Education is a “gift” that keeps on giving for Christina (Falzon) Halverson. At age 26, Halverson has earned three academic degrees, built a successful career working for the FBI and recently joined the staff of ADG: Creative, an independent communications company based in Columbia, Md.

Christina Alicia (Falzon) Halverson Hoople-Zank

Hoople-Zank says her experience at MCC provided a “good academic foundation,” which helped her achieve success in her professional endeavors. “I have always been proud of the education I received at MCC,” she says.

Halverson says she has come so far so fast in part because of her decision to take high school and college credits simultaneously at Montcalm Community College when she was a teenager. She earned her first of three college degrees in 2002. At the time, Halverson was just 18 years old and graduated from high school at the same time she earned an associate degree in general studies from MCC. That fall, she transferred to Northeastern University in Boston, Mass., where she earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology with a minor in neurobiology in 2005. She went on to complete her master’s degree in forensic psychology at Marymount University in Arlington, Va., in 2007. A Stanton native, Halverson worked in the Washington, D.C., area as an intelligence analyst with the FBI for two years. In September, she joined the staff of ADG: Creative, which provides brand development, strategic communications, marketing, e-learning, software development and consulting services to a variety of clients, including federal agencies, academic institutions and commercial enterprises. “I typically do exclusive work with the federal team developing products for and assisting our federal clients,” Halverson says. “I add a strategic advantage because of my previous work with the FBI.” Halverson says the time she spent at MCC “jump-started” her education “and, ultimately, my career by laying groundwork for me in several areas. “My previous education and experiences, including those at MCC, equipped me to tackle difficult problems and resolve them with actionable and relevant solutions,” Halverson says. “Attending MCC was an amazing opportunity for me. I often consider myself fortunate because I am so young and have been able to experi-

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situations,” she says. “I’m always working to find new techniques to help me become a better teacher, meet the needs of my students and make learning fun.”

“By starting my education at MCC, I saved money and reduced the total amount of my student loans,” she adds. In addition to an affordable and solid academic experience, she says she gained valuable experience through careerrelated volunteer programs in her MCC classes.

ence so much. This would not have been possible without MCC.

Education runs in Alicia Hoople-Zank’s family.

“All of my classes transferred from MCC to the university, which minimized the amount of time I had to attend there before moving on to my master’s degree. Despite the ‘small town’ location of MCC, the instructors are very dedicated to their students and are passionate about the education that they instill in them,” she says.

Her parents both are retired teachers, and Hoople-Zank says she grew up wanting to be a teacher, too.

In addition to her coursework, Halverson was a member of MCC’s Alpha Tau Alpha Chapter of the Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society and was involved with the student choir. She also experienced rock climbing, learned sign language interpreting, was a tutor and worked in one of the college’s computer labs – all experiences she says helped shape her into the person she is today. “The small class sizes and individual attention afforded me the tailored education that I needed at such a young age,” Halverson says. “The instructors took time to meet with me outside of class and guide me in my endeavors. I still visit some of them when I come back to the area for vacation. Without the contribution of the dedicated staff at MCC, I would not be where I am today.” Halverson encourages others to “remember that the education you are receiving is a gift that will help shape your future.”

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In her first year as a fifth-grade instructor at Walnut Hills Elementary School in Greenville, she says the position is her “dream job. I spend my days working with students and helping them advance their skills in math, social studies and science.” A 2004 graduate of Central Montcalm High School, Hoople-Zank earned an Associate of Liberal Arts degree from Montcalm Community College in 2006. She then transferred to Grand Valley State University, where she earned a bachelor’s degree with a major in social studies and an emphasis in history, and a minor in elementary education in December 2009. As a student teacher, Hoople-Zank taught kindergarten at Lincoln Heights Elementary School in Greenville. “It was a great teaching experience,” she says. Hoople-Zank spent much of spring semester 2010 substitute teaching and continuing to build her skills before being hired as a full-time teacher. “I feel like my goals are always changing, depending on the students and their

“The teaching market is pretty saturated right now with qualified teachers,” Hoople-Zank says. “There are a lot of people with solid academic credentials applying for teaching jobs. But, to be successful, I think it’s all about what you can do to set yourself apart from everyone else. I feel like I was able to get a lot of really great real-life experience at MCC as part of my class work. “In my Math for Elementary Teachers class, we were required to volunteer in a classroom and work with students on an individual basis,” she says. “It helps me now as I’m teaching math because I have a baseline of how kids learn.” When it was time to transfer to GVSU, Hoople-Zank says the process “was easy and streamlined.” At MCC, she earned the MACRAO (Michigan Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers) stamp – an agreement among Michigan colleges and universities that ensures that general education credits from community colleges are accepted at participating four-year institutions. She says this designation helped her make a smooth transition during the transfer process. Hoople-Zank urges others to “plan ahead for college and take time to organize class schedules to earn credits in courses that will transfer. “Take your education seriously,” she says. “Large or small, college is college, and your future success will depend on the effort you put into it.” CF CareerFocus I Fall /Winter 2010

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C areer Foc us

Feature

Yes, You Can

By Anita LeBlanc

How to recognize your value iven the choice between hiring two equally bright candidates — a shiny, happy person or a negative sad sack — who would you choose? It’s a nobrainer; individuals exuding self-confidence — faith and trust in their abilities — are those we want to be around and hire. Lynne Sarikas, director of the MBA Career Center at Northeastern University’s College of Business Administration says, “When a candidate doesn’t show an ounce of confidence, I may feel terribly sorry, but I can’t hire them. We tell students, ‘You are selling yourself in interviews. You can’t do this effectively if you don’t believe in yourself.’ ” Marilyn J. Sorensen, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist and author of Breaking the Chain of Low Self-Esteem, says a lack of selfconfidence can be a symptom of low self-esteem, a condition where a person mistakenly believes that they are inadequate, unlovable, unworthy or incompetent. This way of thinking only increases a job seeker’s fear of making a mistake or failing — and plunges their level of self-confidence.

While cascading job loss, financial strain and depression may erode the confidence of the most optimistic person, it doesn’t change the fact that people still want to hire capable, confident people. Both note that while cascading job loss, financial strain and depression may erode the confidence of the most optimistic person, it doesn’t change the fact that people still want to hire capable, confident people. What can you do if you’re unemployed and suffering a confidence crisis? Help is closer than you think.

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Eliminate the negative, accentuate the positive Sarikas and Sorensen believe selfconfidence is an inside game, one where you must take action to change your thoughts. The first step for the confidence-challenged, says Sorensen, is to diligently edit negative thoughts and only allow authentic self-statements based on fact, truth or history in order to eliminate inaccurate, self-defeating thoughts and behaviors. In other words, when you think, “I’m an unemployable loser,” remember that you have been employed and the contribution you made: “I had a job and I was a reliable, hard-working employee. I’ll have a job again.” Both recommend taking stock and writing down your positive traits (Are you honest, funny, cooperative, sincere?), your successes and examples of situations in which you overcame adversity. If you feel your job loss was because of your own negligence, acknowledge it and move on. Rehashing and selfrecrimination are cold, comfortless companions. Can’t recall what’s so great about you? Ask a friend, former coworker or manager to jog your memory or supply appreciation or recommendation letters. Reference your list and collection of credentials and endorsements often to maintain your self-appreciation. It may sound silly, but no more so than living in your head thinking about how unemployable and unlikeable you are — and far more productive.

Take a break from you Obsessive thinking about you and your situation won’t restore confidence. Sometimes you need to unplug the thinking-about-me machine and make a contribution to others to release yourself from fear and doubt. Being conscious of others’ needs and doing something to make a positive difference can help you rediscover your usefulness and well being. That’s why experts recommend volunteering or seeking no-cost ways to be of use while between jobs. Serve breakfast at a soup kitchen once or twice a week or rake leaves

for an elderly neighbor. Doing small acts of kindness have a way of getting negative thoughts out of our heads and putting self-affirming ones in their place.

Prepare and practice How can you boost your confidence pre-interview? Sarikas says preparation and practice are key. She suggests thoroughly researching the company and your interviewers. Consider questions you’re likely to be asked and your responses. Prepare your own questions and list examples of your work or experiences relevant to the position. Sarikas also suggests anticipating questions such as, “Tell me about a time you had conflict and how you resolved it?” or, as the iconic interviewer Barbara Walters once

queried, “What kind of tree would you be?” Ask friends to practice interviewing with you and give you feedback about your performance. Before interview time, ask a friend or mentor for a personal pep rally and then pump yourself up with accurate, positive self-talk. Sorensen adds the importance of taking time to review your list of factual and truthful statements and historical record of successes.

Be here now Focus is the watchword for confident interviewing. Sarikas says it’s important when interviewing to believe that this is the best place for you to be at this point in time. Don’t think about how long you’ve

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CareerFocus

Quiz

What’s Your Confidence Quotient? Genuine self-confidence takes courage ake this quiz to see if you know how to hold on to your self-confidence after a job loss.

1 By Anita LeBlanc

The best strategy to get your confidence back after a job loss is to:

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To accurately assess your positive traits:

a. Acknowledge the loss and give equal time to assessing how you did or didn’t contribute to the situation. b. Tell everyone about your bad break and rotten former employer. They are certain to agree with you and you’ll feel so much better.

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4

You’ve scored an interview! What should you do to get ready?

a. Find a list of positive affirmations, look in the mirror and say them out loud to yourself each day. b. Write down the things you know that are undeniably good about you. Ask a friend or coworker to jog your memory if you need help.

The best thing to do just before going into a job interview is to:

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a. Remember all your authentic positive traits and experiences.

Give yourself one point for each correct answer.

been unemployed, how you need a job or your competition. Take the heat off by being attentive to and interested in those interviewing you. Be yourself and don’t apologize for what you are not. After all, it’s generally not who you are that holds you back, it’s worrying about who you think you’re not. Be the best you can be and the rest will take care of itself. CF

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1–a. Job loss, currently impacting millions across the nation due the economic downturn, is consistently listed as a top stressor. Personal factors — excessive tardiness or absenteeism or being unfocused at work — can be other reasons behind losing a job. Sorensen suggests not taking your job loss personally if you didn’t do anything wrong. However, if you did play a part, you must be willing to take an honest look at yourself. She suggests writing about why you think you lost your job and what you did rather than ruminating about it in your head. Having the facts written down will help you move on. 2–b. Generic affirmations, such as “I’m a good person,” feel and sound absurd for a reason: They are non-specific and lack authenticity. Sorensen says true confidence comes from acknowledgment of one’s specific, genuine positive attributes. Are you unsure of yours? She

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recommends asking others for help when compiling a positive inventory. They are often able to remind us of our good qualities when stress inhibits our memory. 3–a. No one can take away your undeniable positive attributes and experiences. Dwelling on past mistakes or situations that you feel didn’t work to your advantage are bona fide confidence killers. 4–b. People are undeniably more interested in learning about you when you take an interest in them. As Dale Carnegie, author of How to Win Friends and Influence People said, “You can make more friends in two months by becoming interested in other people than you can in two years by trying to get other people interested in you.” You show your respect and interest when you take the time to learn about your hoped-for employer and interviewer. The bonus is you go to your interview prepared for an intelligent discussion, a key confidence booster, according to Sarikas. 5–a. While it’s important to continue researching and applying for

b. Get your Google on and learn all you can about the company and interviewer.

It’s been a while since you’ve lost your job, you’ve had several dead-end interviews and are feeling desperate. The best thing to do is:

b. Think about all the mistakes you’ve made so you won’t make them again.

Answer Key

a. Nothing. They’ve seen your resume and they want you. Job, here you come!

a. Take some time to help a friend or volunteer a few hours a week. b. Continue to make your job hunt your first priority. The harder you work at it, the more likely it is you’ll find a job.

jobs, obsessive job hunting and nonstop networking can exhaust you and wreak havoc on your confidence. Certainly spend time each day on your search, but take a break and help others if you find yourself feeling inadequate and frustrated. It can be the best thing you can do to help yourself. Why? Because being of service gives your life meaning. It’s a reminder that while you may currently feel impotent career-wise, you still have purpose and power in your ability to be useful to others — a sure-fire nutrient that will make your confidence bloom and grow.

Scoring 4–5 points: Well done! You’ve got what it takes to shine. 2–3 points: Not bad, but understanding and employing some confidence raising tactics may help you enhance yours. 0–1 point: Time for a confidence makeover. Consider asking a friend or mentor to help you in your quest for improved self-confidence. CF

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CareerFocus

Feature

TRANSFER

You don't have to go far, to go far

By Shelly Strautz-Springborn

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MCC offers a high-quality, affordable education with plenty of transfer options

eather Rought, Ethan Cole and Jeremy Ball all have one thing in common – they attended Montcalm Community College before transferring to a university. They are just a fraction of the 6.8 million students in the United States who attend a community college each year. According to the American Association of Community Colleges, nationally, about 43 percent of all students begin their education at a community college before moving on to a four-year institution.

Putting transfer to work More and more students are finding that a community college is the best place to begin their bachelor’s degree since the first two years of required courses are general education classes that can be taken at a college close to home and at a fraction of the cost of a university. “Transfer students get the same degree as students who spend four years – and a lot more money – at a four-year institution,” says MCC Vice President for Academic Affairs Rob Spohr. “Because of various factors, students often will start at a four-year institution, end up not doing well there, and transfer to MCC. Most often they end up doing very well here and trans-

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Heather Rought Montcalm Community College I www.montcalm.edu

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fer back to a four-year school where they are ultimately successful.”

and now I’m paying $339 an hour. MCC saved me thousands of dollars.”

Spohr attributes MCC’s student success to a variety of factors – quality instructors, smaller class sizes and personalized instruction.

An affordable option

“We find many students are intimidated at a university and do better in smaller classrooms with personal contact with their instructor,” he says. “Starting at MCC helps them build the foundation they need to excel in a larger university setting.” Rought began her studies at MCC during fall semester 2007 and completed three years of classes before transferring to Davenport University. She took advantage of a 3+1 articulation agreement between the institutions, which means she completed three years of coursework at MCC before transferring to Davenport where she has just one year of classes to complete her bachelor’s degree. “All of my credits transferred,” the 22-year-old Gowen native says. “I planned every course I took at MCC with my future transfer to Davenport in mind. I received help from an MCC counselor first, and then I met with a counselor at Davenport. Between the two of them, I came out with a game plan that worked for me.” Ball, 22, completed requirements to earn his MACRAO (Michigan Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers) designation. This agreement among Michigan colleges and universities ensures that general education credits from community colleges are accepted at participating four-year institutions. “I really didn’t have a specific program of study at MCC, but I am really glad that I was able to complete my general education requirements there,” Ball says. “When I went to MCC, the tuition rate was about $70 per credit hour,

MCC instructors offer courses suitable for a degree or transfer

MCC’s estimated annual tuition rate for full-time in-district students is $2,370 per year for 30 credit hours. That same credit load would cost about $10,710 at a public university.* For students who complete their first two years of basic educational requirements at MCC, this equals a savings of more than $16,000 in tuition when compared to the cost of a university.

Focus on Faculty

ll pbe m a C Bob

Rought says she is debt free because of MCC’s affordable tuition and fees. “I think most people view college as a way to achieve their desired career, and they assume they have to spend a ton of money in the process – at least that’s what people told me,” Rought says. “But, just because people expect it, it doesn’t have to be that way. I feel like I beat the system by not accruing any college debt.”

“Being in the classroom is a neat feeling. It’s fulfilling to see students who work hard and achieve success,” Campbell says.

Cole, a 21-year-old Greenville native, agrees. “The instructors and classes at MCC prepared me well for the university and in some regards were actually more thorough than my instructors at the university,” Cole says. “I would recommend MCC to students looking to attend a university later on because it is a comparable education for much less expense.”

Meet with an advisor According to the Web site MyMajors.com, as many as 80 percent of incoming college freshmen haven’t settled on a program of study. Spohr recommends all students take time to meet with an academic advisor early in their college experience. “We have professionals available to help students define their interests and their strengths,” he says. “This process helps guide them as they continued on page

10

Kristen Diehl

M

ontcalm Community College Instructors Bob Campbell and Kristen Diehl teach a variety of business and computer information systems courses that help build the foundation many students need to transfer to another institution. Bob Campbell MCC Business Instructor Business Instructor Bob Campbell believes in the saying, “Give a man a fish, and he’ll eat for a day; teach a man to fish, and he’ll eat for a lifetime.” “I know from personal experience that education creates opportunities that you otherwise would not have had,” Campbell says. Before attending college, Campbell worked as a custodian. He says when he enrolled in college, his professional career path started to take shape. “Prior to finishing my degree, I landed a job as an accountant,” he says. “I left that accounting job to go into teaching.”

Jeremy Ball

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Ethan Cole

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In January 1984, Campbell joined MCC as a part-time instructor, and in August 1986, he landed a full-time position at the college. He teaches accounting, management and business law courses.

Campbell earned an associate degree in business from MCC, a bachelor’s degree in business with an emphasis in accounting from Aquinas College and a master’s degree in vocational technical education from Ferris State University.

Kristen Diehl MCC Computer Information Systems (CIS) Lab Coordinator CIS Lab Coordinator Kristen Diehl says teaching students about technology is always on her mind. Diehl teaches a variety of business, management and CIS courses at MCC and she serves as the advisor of the college’s Business Professionals of America (BPA) club. She says each week she shares technology news with her students to keep them up-to-date on the latest technology trends. “I enjoy getting students excited about technology and how they can use it,” she says. Diehl says one of her primary goals as an instructor is to help students “connect business to their everyday lives. Everything can be thought of as a business – the doctor’s office, school and government – and learning how to manage it effectively and efficiently ultimately helps students be successful in the workplace.” Diehl earned a bachelor’s degree in small business management from Ferris State University and a master’s degree in education from Aquinas College. Prior to joining MCC as an instructor in 2006, she worked for 10 years in the automotive management field, where she gained experience in production scheduling, purchasing and warehousing. CF

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9

select classes and as they consider an institution that they may transfer to in the future.”

education, manufacturing technology and restaurant/food industry management •

Franklin University – Business

In addition, he says it’s important for students to work with an academic advisor at both MCC and the receiving institution to ensure a smooth transfer process.

Kaplan University – Accounting, business/management, marketing, criminal justice, information technology, nursing and psychology

“Always contact the receiving institution early. Transfer rules are made by the four-year institution and can be changed by them at any time,” he says. “Too many times students get a transfer agreement, but that agreement changes before they graduate from MCC. It’s frustrating for students to take classes they don’t need or that won’t transfer.”

Michigan State University – Landscape management

Northwood University – Business/ management

Walsh College – Accounting, business/management, information technology and marketing

Cole says he worked with a coordinator at Northwood University for nearly two years before he transferred there.

Visit www.montcalm.edu/articulations for a complete list of MCC’s transfer agreements with other colleges and universities.

“Always contact the receiving institution early. Transfer rules are made by the four-year institution and can be changed by them at any time.” — Rob Spohr, MCC Vice President for Academic Affairs

“We had an articulation figured out for me and all of my credits from MCC transferred,” he says.

Articulations pave the way for seamless transfers Articulation agreements define a method for transferring credits and coursework between colleges and universities and are intended to make it easier for students transferring from one institution to another. MCC partners with several universities to offer articulations covering a variety of subjects, including: •

Central Michigan University – Business/management

Cleary University – Business and health care management

Davenport University – Business/ management, computers, cosmetology, criminal justice/corrections, early childhood development, education, electronics, health care/medical information systems and nursing

Ferris State University – Biotechnology, business, computer-aided drafting, health care, early child

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Putting it all together By starting at MCC, students receive a quality education that is close to home and at a fraction of the cost of a university. MCC’s instructors convey leading-edge concepts and advanced skills to students and MCC's graduates go on to achieve success at other institutions and in many professions. Plus, the college regularly receives reports from other institutions showing that MCC students who transfer to universities outperform the students who started at those universities. “This clearly supports the fact that MCC’s curriculum is rigorous and prepares students well for life after MCC,” says MCC Associate Dean of Student Services Debra Alexander. Simply put, it just makes sense to attend MCC. CF

A Transfer Glossary Articulation agreement

Gen ed (general education)

An articulation agreement is a detailed agreement between a community college and a four-year institution that spells out exactly what students need to transfer credits to a specific program. It is a formal contract signed by both institutions that has an expiration date. A list of colleges and universities that MCC has articulation agreements with appears in the A to Z Directory under the Transfer heading on page 15 of this publication.

General education courses are academic courses in writing, math and the liberal arts and sciences that form the foundation of most bachelor’s degree programs. These courses generally are available and required at both two-year and fouryear institutions.

2+2

This agreement among Michigan colleges and universities ensures that general education credits from community colleges are accepted at participating four-year institutions. Most Michigan colleges and universities participate in MACRAO – but not all. The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor and Michigan State University are two notable exceptions – both require students to follow specific transfer guides.

A 2+2 articulation agreement is a typical transfer plan in which students complete two years of credit courses at a community college and transfer to a four-year institution to complete the final two years of their bachelor’s degree.

3+1 A 3+1 articulation agreement is an innovative transfer plan in which students earn an associate degree plus an additional 30 credits at a community college and transfer to a four-year institution to complete the final 30 credits of their bachelor’s degree.

Associate degree An associate degree is a two-year degree generally earned at a community college. Some associate degrees are specifically designed to act as the foundation for transfer to fouryear bachelor’s degree programs, while others are primarily intended to prepare students for an occupation. To earn an associate degree at MCC, students must have earned a minimum of 60 credits and have completed all requirements of the program.

Certificate Certificate programs focus on training students for a specific occupation and generally range from 30 to 60 credits of coursework depending on the program. MCC offers certificates in programs from entrepreneurship to welding.

MACRAO (Michigan Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers)

Occupational program An occupational program is an associate degree program at a community college in which students receive training for specific occupations. Examples include registered nursing, business/accounting and computer-related fields.

Transfer Transfer is the process by which students enter a college or university after being enrolled at another institution. MCC has numerous options for students to complete the classes necessary to fulfill basic program requirements, which can be transferred to four-year institutions toward a bachelor’s degree.

Transfer guide Transfer guides are resources developed by two- and four-year institutions that detail the classes that will transfer from one college to another and apply toward graduation in specific programs. CF

Visit http://my.montcalm.edu/ics/ Student/Transfer_Information.jnz for more transfer information.

* The average yearly cost at a university is based on the 2010-11 undergraduate tuition rates at Central Michigan University, Ferris State University and Grand Valley State University, and does not include the price of books, fees or housing. Montcalm Community College I www.montcalm.edu

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College means different things to different people. For some it’s a given. Raised to value education, these students know that a degree is the best way to a good job and a lifetime of economic security. For others it’s a second opportunity to learn more, earn more or follow a dream that has been put on for hold too long.

degree to get you on your way to a career, a promotion or a four-year college; or a bachelor’s, master’s, doctorate or professional degree that fulfills a lifelong ambition. Montcalm Community College can provide the first step to each of these goals. MCC’s 65 certificate, degree and job-training programs can help you reach your educational goals regardless of what point you are at in your life.

College can mean a short-term certificate to get you into a new career; an associate

Montcalm Community College: A-Z

CareerFocus

BACK TO BASICS

A to Z

If your goal is a four-year degree, our transfer classes will get you halfway there — and at a lower price than most public and private colleges and universities. Plus, MCC’s articulation agreements with other colleges and universities can help you make even more progress in some areas of study, allowing you to complete up to three years of coursework before transferring to another institution. To find out more about how MCC can help you reach your goals, make an appointment to visit with an MCC counselor by calling 989-328-2111. CF

What follows is an alphabetical listing of programs and areas of study offered by Montcalm Community College. Call 989-328-1277 or toll free 1-877-328-2111 or visit MCC on the Web at www.montcalm.edu for more information.

Academic Skills

Automotive Technology

Montcalm Community College offers courses that enhance your opportunities for academic and workplace success, including courses in reading, spelling, vocabulary and study skills.

MCC offers several job-training programs, one-year certificates in Automotive Technology and Small Business Development Management and an associate-degree program. Associate of Applied Science Degree in Automotive Technology

Accounting

Automotive Technology Certificate

MCC offers an Associate of Applied Science Degree that prepares students for jobs with duties assigned to a beginning accountant, such as verifying additions; checking audits, postings, and vouchers; analyzing accounts; and preparing financial statements. This degree also provides credits for transfer to four-year accounting-degree programs including the Franklin University online Bachelor of Science in Business Administration and Davenport University’s bachelors’ degrees in accounting and finance. Associate of Applied Science Degree

Small Business Development/Management Certificate in Automotive Technology Average yearly earnings*: $34,264-$48,212

Biology MCC offers biology, botany, microbiology, anatomy and physiology, and zoology courses and a field-based nature study course. These courses can be the foundation for additional studies at a four-year institution in a variety of science-related areas.

Average yearly earnings*: $29,500-$48,500

Coursework in biology may be applied to an Associate of Science Degree or to any associate degree at MCC.

Allied Health Please see EMT, medical assistant or Health Care Revenue Cycle I & II.

Anthropology MCC offers cultural anthropology and Indian Cultures of North America.

Business MCC offers a Certificate of Entrepreneurship that prepares students for work related to running a small business including bookkeeping, service and product pricing, customer service and computer applications. The certificate can be the foundation for continued study at the associate-degree level. Certificate in Entrepreneurship

Apprenticeship MCC offers an Apprentice Certificate that prepares students for certification by the Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training. Apprentice Certificate

Average yearly earnings*: Customer service representative: $30,500-$45,500 Bookkeeper: $29,500-$42,500 New accounts clerk: $29,500-$48,500 MCC offers job training certificates in entrepreneurship, retail, retail management and supervision.

Archaeology

Job Training Certificates

MCC offers Fieldwork in Michigan Archaeology.

Art MCC offers drawing, painting, design, ceramics and photography courses. Coursework in art may be applied to an Associate of Arts Degree or to any associate degree at MCC.

MCC offers a variety of associate degrees that prepare students for entry-level business positions in management, marketing, international business and general business administration. These degrees can be the foundation for continued study at the bachelor’sdegree level including the Franklin University online BS in Business Administration and Davenport University’s bachelor’s in human resource management, management and marketing degrees. Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Administration/ Entrepreneurship Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Administration/Management Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Administration/Marketing

* Earnings

Career Portal, Discover, noted.

are from

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Associate of Arts in International Business

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Business Information Systems

Computer Information Systems (continued)

MCC offers an Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Information Systems that prepares students for entry-level business/management careers with employers that use commercially available computer application software packages. This degree can be the foundation for continued study at the bachelor’s-degree level including the Franklin University online BS in Management Information Systems and Davenport University’s bachelor’s in PC & LAN management degree.

MCC offers an Input Productivity job-training certificate that prepares students for jobs requiring computer-based data entry.

Associate of Applied Science Degree

MCC offers a one-semester Office Applications job-training certificate for Microsoft Office users who want to upgrade their Office Suite skills. Office Applications

Average yearly earnings*: $33,130-$42,100

MCC offers a Professional Studies job-training certificate for office professionals who want to update or complement their existing skills.

Chemistry MCC’s introductory chemistry class is a one-semester course intended for non-science majors and allied health professionals. MCC’s college chemistry class is a two-semester sequence designed for professionals majoring in science (biology, biotechnology, chemistry, physics, engineering, pre-med, pre-dentistry, BSN, pre-pharmacy, etc.). MCC also offers organic chemistry. All three courses count toward science credits in any of MCC’s degree programs. Coursework in chemistry may be applied to an Associate of Applied Science Degree or to any associate degree at MCC.

Professional Studies MCC offers a Web Design Specialist job-training certificate for students interested in web design, creation and authoring tools. Web Design Specialist

Computer Support Technology

Average yearly earnings*: Chemical technician: $40,500-$59,500

Child Development MCC offers a Child Development Associate training program that prepares students for the Child Development Associate credential conferred by the Council for Early Childhood Recognition. Child Development Associate training program

MCC offers a Certificate in Computer Repair that provides the background and skills necessary for entry-level jobs as computer help-desk technicians or computer support technicians. This certificate also provides skills for employment installing and maintaining computer hardware and software and diagnosing and repairing complex computers and related devices. In addition, it provides the content and skills necessary for A+ certification by the Computer Technology Industry Association. Certificate in Computer Repair

Average yearly earnings*: $20,000-$30,150

Average yearly earnings*: $37,000-$58,000

MCC offers an Associate of Applied Science Degree in Early Childhood Development that prepares students for jobs in childcare centers where you are expected to organize and lead activities of pre-kindergarten children. This degree also provides courses for transfer and learning that can be applied to four-year programs in early childhood development and education. Associate of Applied Science in Early Childhood Development

MCC offers an Associate of Applied Science Degree in Computer Repair that prepares students for jobs installing and maintaining computer hardware and software and diagnosing and repairing complex computers and related devices. The degree also provides the foundation for continued study at the bachelor’s-degree level including the Franklin University online BS in Technical Administration. Associate of Applied Science Degree in Computer Repair

Average yearly earnings*: $30,500-$39,240

Average yearly earnings*: $40,000-$63,500

Communications MCC offers speech, American Sign Language, business communications, communication in criminal justice, communications in nursing, interpersonal communications and journalism courses. Coursework in communications may be applied to any associate degree at MCC.

Cosmetology MCC offers a Certificate in Cosmetology that prepares students for the State Licensing Board Examination. Certificate in Cosmetology Average yearly earnings*: $27,500-$39,500

Computer Information Systems MCC offers a Certificate in Information Processing Assistant that prepares students for entrylevel employment in administrative support occupations. The certificate also provides the foundation for continued study at the associate-degree level.

MCC offers an Associate of Applied Science Degree in Cosmetology Management that prepares students to operate in today’s business setting as a shop manager and for cosmetology licensure testing.

Certificate in Information Processing Assistant

Associate of Applied Science Degree in Cosmetology Management

Average yearly earnings*: $33,500-$38,044

Average yearly earnings*: $26,312-$34,112

MCC offers an Associate of Applied Science Degree in Information Systems that prepares students for employment in information and administrative support areas. Average yearly earnings*: $27,530-$35,454 MCC offers a CIS Job Readiness job-training certificate for students entering or re-tooling for today’s workplace who need up-to-date basic computer information skills. CIS Job Readiness MCC offers a Digital Publishing & Presentation job-training certificate for students interested in desktop publishing or digital and web-based presentations. Digital Publishing & Presentation * Earnings

are from otherwise noted.

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Criminal Justice and Corrections MCC offers a Corrections Officer training program that prepares students for correctionofficer positions with the Michigan Department of Corrections. In addition, the course work is applicable to MCC’s certificate program in Criminal Justice/Corrections.

Associate of Applied Science Degree in Information Systems

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Input Productivity

Corrections Officer training program Average yearly earnings*: State of Michigan Corrections Officer: $37,000 MCC offers a Certificate in Criminal Justice/Corrections that prepares students for careers with state, county or city correctional agencies. In addition, the course work meets Michigan Corrections Officer Training Council pre-employment guidelines. Certificate in Criminal Justice/Corrections

unless

Average yearly earnings*: $41,610-$48,890 Montcalm Community College I www.montcalm.edu

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Criminal Justice and Corrections (continued)

Engineering Technology

MCC offers an Associate of Applied Science Degree in Criminal Justice/Corrections or an Associate of Applied Science Degree in Criminal Justice/General that prepare students for entry-level jobs in the criminal justice career field. These degrees also provide the foundation for continued study at the bachelor’s-degree level.

MCC offers an Associate of Applied Science Degree in Engineering Technology that prepares students for employment in this field. The program offers many hours of practical experience to compliment the theory. The program may be transferable to a four-year university for a degree in engineering technology.

Associate of Applied Science Degree in Criminal Justice/Corrections or Criminal Justice/General Average yearly earnings*: $34,000-$43,500 Police officer: $43,700-$60,490 Detective: $56,250-$78,750 Parole officer: $48,440-$61,740 Bailiff: $29,940-$40,780

Drafting Technology MCC offers a Certificate in Technical Drafting that prepares students for jobs in which you create drawings to offer a variety of views of the object, which are often used in an engineering or manufacturing situation. The certificate also provides the foundation for continued study at the associate-degree level. Certificate in Technical Drafting Average yearly earnings*: $30,700 MCC offers an Associate of Applied Science Degree in Technical Drafting & Design that prepares students for jobs in industrial drafting in which you use computer-aided drafting skills to develop detailed drawings for electronic, mechanical and machinery applications. The degree also provides the foundation for continued study at the bachelor’s-degree level including the Franklin University online BS in Technical Administration and Davenport University’s bachelor’s in management degree. Associate of Applied Science Degree in Technical Drafting & Design Average yearly earnings*: $37,670-$53,250

English and Literature MCC offers composition, American literature, English literature, oral interpretation, short story, children’s literature, youth literature, the novel, drama as literature, film, poetry and creative writing courses. Coursework in English and literature may be applied to an Associate of Arts Degree or to any associate degree at MCC.

Executive Secretary Please see Computer Information Systems.

Fitness MCC offers a variety of credit and noncredit fitness and physical education courses and activities. The College provides a fully equipped fitness center, an NCAA-size swimming pool, a gymnasium, a climbing wall and tennis courts to support these offerings. Coursework in fitness may be applied to any associate degree at MCC.

Fluid Power/Hydraulics Please see Industrial Maintenance.

French MCC offers first-year French courses.

Economics MCC offers microeconomics and macroeconomics courses. Coursework in economics may be applied to an Associate of Science Degree or to any associate degree at MCC.

Coursework in French may be applied to an Associate of Arts Degree or to any associate degree at MCC. Average yearly earnings*: Language Interpreter: $30,540-$60,700

Education

German

MCC offers education course work that serves as the foundation for continued study at fouryear institutions including introduction to teaching, art for the elementary teacher, mathematics for the elementary teacher and music in the elementary classroom.

MCC offers first-year German courses. Coursework in German may be applied to an Associate of Arts Degree or to any associate degree at MCC.

Associate of Applied Science in Education Paraprofessional

Electronics MCC offers a Certificate in Electronics Technology that prepares students for jobs diagnosing and repairing complex electronic devices. This certificate also provides the foundation for continued study at the bachelor’s-degree level. Certificate in Electronics Technology MCC offers an Associate of Applied Science Degree in Electronics Technology that prepares students for jobs diagnosing and repairing complex electronic devices. Course work may be transferable to a four-year university. Associate of Applied Science Degree in Electronics Technology Average yearly earnings*: $44,491-$60,195 Electronics Engineer: $39,580-$59,850 Electrical Technician: $45,280-$63,260

Emergency Medical Technology (EMT) MCC offers EMT/Basic and EMT/Specialist training that prepares students for licensure as an EMT in the state of Michigan and for jobs with Michigan ambulance services transporting patients to hospitals. EMT/Basic EMT/Specialist

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Health Care Revenue Cycle I & II MCC’s Health Care Revenue Cycle I course prepares students for a career in health care admission and billing processes. MCC’s Health Care Revenue Cycle II course prepares students for a career as a patient account technician.

History MCC offers U.S., Michigan, Civil War, Native American and 20th-Century world history courses. Coursework in history may be applied to an Associate of Arts Degree or to any associate degree at MCC.

Humanities MCC offers a variety of humanities courses including Humanities I and II, western culture, arts, music, philosophy and theater. Coursework in humanities may be applied to an Associate of Arts Degree or to any associate degree at MCC.

* Earnings

are from otherwise noted.

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Law Enforcement Please see Criminal Justice.

Machine Tool Technology MCC offers a Certificate in Machine Tool Operation that prepares students for jobs that require advanced skills in the use of tool-room lathes, mills, precision grinders and sophisticated measuring instruments. Students learn processes and machine tool set-ups as well as a working knowledge of CNC programming and operation. Certificate in Machine Tool Operation Average yearly earnings*: Drill Press Operator: $32,000-$47,500 Milling Machine: $28,000-$50,000

Management Please see Business.

Manufacturing MCC offers a Certificate or Associate Degree in Integrated Manufacturing Technology that prepares students for high-tech manufacturing jobs such as those at United Solar Ovonic. Integrated Manufacturing Technology certificate and associate degree

Marketing Please see Business.

Mathematics MCC offers mathematics courses to support students in business fields including business mathematics and statistics; education including mathematics for elementary teachers; technical fields including applied algebra, applied geometry, applied oblique angle trigonometry and electronics mathematics; preparatory learning including mathematical bridges, arithmetic review, transition to algebra, pre-algebra, elementary algebra, intermediate algebra and trigonometry; and general transfer including college algebra, calculus and analytic geometry, mathematical investigation, and probability and statistics. Coursework in mathematics may be applied to an Associate of Science Degree or to any associate degree at MCC.

Medical Assistant MCC offers a Certificate in Medical Assistant that prepares students for employment in doctors’ offices and clinics and for other health providers for medical office and medical clinical duties. It also prepares students for certification as a Certified Medical Assistant.

MCC offers a Level I – LPN-Eligible Certificate in Practical Nursing that prepares students for national licensure as a practical nurse. This certificate also prepares students for employment opportunities in all settings of health care from hospital to home care, and it provides first-year course requirements for the associate-degree nursing program. Level I - LPN Eligible Certificate in Practical Nursing Average yearly earnings*: $35,464-$41,891 Note: 2009 MCC certificate graduates responding to a survey reported annual earnings of $35,746. MCC offers a Level II – RN-Eligible Associate of Applied Science Degree in Nursing that prepares students for national licensure as a registered nurse. This certificate also prepares students for employment opportunities in all settings of health care from the hospital to the community. In addition, it provides the foundation for continued study at the bachelor’s-degree level including BSN programs at Ferris State University, Grand Valley State University, Saginaw Valley State University and the University of Phoenix. Level II - RN Eligible Associate of Applied Science Degree in Nursing Advanced standing program for LPNs seeking an associate degree in nursing Average yearly earnings*: $52,300-$64,400 Note: 2009 MCC associate-degree graduates responding to a survey reported annual earnings of $48,821.

Office Systems MCC offers an Associate of Applied Science Degree in Medical Information Systems that prepares students for expanded job opportunities in office settings where technical skills in computer usage, spreadsheet and database software packages, desktop publishing, and telecommunications are important and where increased responsibilities require time management, human relations and accounting skills. Students may customize the program by selecting from courses related to general office, medical office or legal office administration. The degree also allows students to apply course work to a four-year degree including the Franklin University online BS in Health Services Administration. Associate of Applied Science Degree in Medical Information Systems Average yearly earnings*: $31,836-$42,805 Medical Technicians: $24,000-$43,521

Philosophy MCC offers introductory philosophy, philosophy of world religions and bioethics courses. Coursework in philosophy may be applied to an Associate of Arts Degree or to any associate degree at MCC.

Photography Please see Art.

Certificate in Medical Assistant

Physical Education

Average yearly earnings*: $23,982-$31,699

Please see Fitness.

Music

Physical Science

MCC offers music fundamentals, music appreciation, music in the elementary classroom, voice improvement courses and credit for participating in the MCC Alumni and Friends choir.

MCC offers physical science and physics courses.

Coursework in music may be applied to an Associate of Arts Degree or to any associate degree at MCC.

Nursing MCC offers a Nurse Assistant training program that prepares students for testing for Competency Evaluated Nurse Aide (CENA) certification in the state of Michigan. The program also prepares students for an entry-level job as a nurse assistant helping to care for patients in long-term care facilities, hospitals and other health-care facilities. This training articulates into MCC’s nursing program. Training program in Nurse Assistant

Coursework in physical science may be applied to an Associate of Science Degree or to any associate degree at MCC.

Political Science Please see Social Science.

Psychology MCC offers general psychology, child psychology, abnormal psychology and psychology of sex and gender courses. Coursework in psychology may be applied to an Associate of Arts Degree or to any associate degree at MCC.

Average yearly earnings*: $24,294-$26,478 * Earnings

are from otherwise noted.

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Quality Control MCC offers a variety of quality control courses including SPC and ISO/QS internal auditor training.

Renewable Energy MCC offers a job-training program that provides a comprehensive introduction to renewable energy and energy efficiency, and a transferable academic foundation for students interested in pursuing an associate or bachelor’s degree in a variety of sustainability-related programs. It also provides a general understanding of sustainable and renewable energies that can be applied personally or professionally. Coursework in environmental science – “Introduction to Renewable Energy” and “The Science of Energy” – meets MCC’s general education science requirement as well as the MACRAO science requirement.

Secretarial Studies Please see Office Systems.

Social Science MCC offers courses in social science including sociology and social problems. Political science courses include the American political system and international relations. Coursework in social science may be applied to an Associate of Arts Degree or to any associate degree at MCC.

Montcalm Community College has partnered with several universities to offer articulations covering a variety of subjects: Central Michigan University – Business/management Cleary University – Business and health care management Davenport University – Business/management, computers, cosmetology, criminal justice/ corrections, early childhood development, education, electronics, health care/medical information systems and nursing Ferris State University – Biotechnology, business, computer-aided drafting, health care, early child education, manufacturing technology and restaurant/food industry management Franklin University – Business Kaplan University – Accounting, business/management, marketing, criminal justice, information technology, nursing and psychology Michigan State University – Landscape management Northwood University – Business/management Walsh College – Accounting, business/management, information technology and marketing Visit www.montcalm.edu/articulations for a complete list of transfer agreements with other colleges and universities.

Spanish MCC offers first-year Spanish courses. Coursework in Spanish may be applied to an Associate of Arts Degree in International Business or to any associate degree at MCC.

Supervision and Management Please see Business.

Theater MCC offers drama as a performing art classes. Coursework in theater may be applied to an Associate of Arts Degree or to any associate degree at MCC.

Welding MCC offers a Welding Technology Certificate that prepares students to work in a career welding metal parts together according to layouts, blueprints or work orders using gas welding or brazing and any combination of arc welding processes. Welding Technology Certificate Average yearly earnings*: $27,980 - $45,620 MCC offers an Associate of Applied Science Degree in Welding Technology that prepares students to take the AWS steel plate welding certification exam. Associate of Applied Science Degree in Welding Technology

Writing Transfer Transfer is the process by which a student enters a college or university after being enrolled at another institution. Students should work with an MCC counselor or instructor to help ensure successful transfer. Associate of Arts, Associate of Science, Associate of Applied Science and Associate of Liberal Studies Degrees Average yearly earnings*: Bank Manager: $67,500 - $98,500 Education: $42,000 - $67,500 Social worker: $35,500 - $62,500

MCC offers a variety of writing courses including introduction to college writing, improving reading and writing, business communications, technical writing, English composition and creative writing. Coursework in writing may be applied to any associate degree at MCC.

Zoology Please see Biology.

Articulation agreements define a method for transferring credits and coursework between colleges and universities and are intended to make it easier for students transferring from one institution to another. As an example, the Walsh College – 3+1 Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts in Marketing means that students can take three years of coursework at MCC, and then only need to complete one year at Walsh College to earn a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts in Marketing. Transfer students earn the same degree as students who start at the four-year college or university, but realize a substantial savings in tuition costs.

* Earnings

are from otherwise noted.

989-328-1277

I Montcalm Community College I www.montcalm.edu

Career Portal, Discover,

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U.S. Bureau

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Labor Statistics,

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I

CareerFocus I Fall/Winter 2010 15


C areerFoc us

Feature 2010 UniverThe Jobs The sum A mer ican We Want St udent Su r vey

asked college students to name the employers they’d most like to work for. Their answer varies depending on their college major, but for the fourth year in a row Web giant Google came out on top overall.

A

N

D

Where college students want to work: • Business and IT students–Google • Engineering students–NASA • Natural science students–National Institutes of Health • Humanities and liberal arts students–Teach for America Source: www.universumglobal.com

Money Still Isn’t Everything This recession has been coined the “man-cession” because of the massive job losses in the construction and manufacturing industries, which traditionally employ disproportionately high percentages of men… Last month the unemployment rate for women fell to 7.9 percent, compared with a steady 10 percent unemployment rate among men. Live What a 9.7-percent Unemployment Rate Means, U.S. News and World Report www.usnews.com, Feb. 5, 2010

What Kind of Job Is That?

Looking for a career with a promising future? Have you ever considered becoming a brownfields redevelopment specialist and site manager, a genetics counselor, a skin care specialist or a wind energy operations manager?

Genetic Counselors • Assess individual or family risk for a variety of inherited conditions, such as genetic disorders and birth defects. • Projected growth of 14 to 19 percent • Median salary: $43,630

(and Work) Happily Ever After

In his new book, Drive The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us, bestselling author Daniel Pink explains that money really doesn’t motivate people to do their best work.

Work life and home life aren’t as separate as you might think.

If you’re happy in your job, you’re probably happy in your marriage too. That’s one finding of The Early Marriage Project which has been studying what makes marriages work — or not work–since the mid 1980s under the direction of Teri Orbuch, Ph.D.

Skin Care Specialist • Cleanse and beautify the skin by giving facials, full-body treatments, head and neck massages, and by applying makeup. • Projected growth of 20 percent • Median salary: $28,730

For the sake of a healthy marriage, Orbuch (also known as Psychology Today’s Love Doctor) recommends that couples regularly talk about their work day and find effective ways to relieve the stress of the workplace.

Many of the jobs on the list are old standbys such as registered nurses, computer software engineers and school teachers, but you’ll be surprised at the new, unusual and offbeat careers that are expected to grow in the near future.

Wind Energy Operations Manager • Manage wind field operations, including personnel, maintenance activities, financial activities and planning. • Projected growth of 7 to 13 percent • Median salary: $90,230

Most importantly, the study finds that spending your workday at challenging, rewarding activities contributes enormously to overall happiness and makes you a happier spouse.

Here’s the scoop on the jobs:

Source: online.onetcenter.org/help/bright

You say you’ve never heard of any of these jobs and have no idea how to get one? You’ll find them on the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics list of Fastest Growing Careers or so-called “bright outlook careers.”

Brownfield Redevelopment Specialist and Site Manager • Plan and direct cleanup and redevelopment of contaminated properties for reuse. • Projected growth of 7 to 13 percent • Median salary: $90,230

I

16 Fall/Winter 2010 I CareerFocus

While we expect to be paid fairly for our work, it’s not cash that drives us to excel. What most of us really want from our jobs is interesting work, and the freedom to explore, innovate and master our profession. We’d also like to get a little recognition for a job well done. Drawing on research into human motivation, Pink concludes, “The secret to high performance and satisfaction — at work, at school, and at home — is the deeply human need to direct our own lives, to learn and create new things, and to do better by ourselves and our world.” CF

“Workers who are fulfilled and stimulated during the workday tend to be happier individuals,” Orbuch concludes. Source: “Happy Employees Make Happy Spouses: 4 Ways to Be a Happily Married Employee”, April 28, 2010 Psychology Today (www.PsychologyToday.com)

Montcalm Community College I www.montcalm.edu

I 989-328-1277


MCC Upcoming Events December 1-January 7

February 18

March 17

A religious artifacts exhibit, “An Interfaith Display of Object, Documents and Art,” is in the small art gallery in MCC’s Instruction North Building. Viewing is by appointment only by calling 989-328-1234. Admission is free.

MCC hosts a belated Valentine’s Day dance and concert at 7 p.m. in the gymnasium in MCC’s Activities Building. Admission is free.

MCC Social Science Instructor Ken DeLong presents “Perspectives on the Impact of

January 11-February 19

Artwork by area artists and members of the Montcalm Area Art Association and the Mid-Michigan Arts Council is on display in the art gallery in MCC’s Instruction North Building. Admission is free.

“Early Native American Art and Natural Artifacts,” an art and science exhibit on loan from the Cranbrook Institute, is on display in the art gallery in MCC’s Instruction North Building. Admission is free.

January 26 MCC Language Arts Instructor Jim Fatka presents “Blues – Pain and Humor,” from noon to 1:30 p.m. in rooms D303-305 in MCC’s Beatrice E. Doser Building. Lunch is provided for students with a current MCC ID and is $2 for all others. The event is sponsored by MCC’s Music Club.

March 1-31

March 13 MCC’s drama class presents public performances of a children’s play at 2 and 4 p.m. in MCC’s Barn Theater on the college’s Sidney campus. The title will be announced at a later date. Admission is free.

Visit www.montcalm.edu/Arts-andCulture.aspx or call 989-328-2111 for more information.

January 31 In honor of Martin Luther King Day, guest lecturer Lisa Key presents “Dealing with Diversity” from noon to 1 p.m. in rooms D303-305 in MCC’s Beatrice E. Doser Building. Admission is free. Lunch is provided for students with a current MCC ID and is $2 for all others. The event is sponsored by MCC’s Culture and Travel Club.

Montcalm Community College

Historical and Contemporary Terrorism on the World’s Indigenous Peoples” from 5 to 6 p.m. in rooms D303-305 in MCC’s Beatrice E. Doser Building. Dinner is provided for students with a current MCC ID and is $2 for all others. The event is sponsored by MCC’s Culture and Travel Club.

March 18 MCC celebrates the Oscar Awards with the Monty Awards at 7 p.m. in MCC’s Barn Theater. Admission is free.

March 26 MCC offers a bus trip to Chicago to visit a variety of cultural attractions including the Field Museum of Natural History, Shedd Aquarium, the Adler Planetarium, the Art Institute of Chicago and the Museum of Science & Industry.


Health Care Careers. Apply Here. Spectrum Health Kelsey and United Hospitals Enjoy access to the resources of the largest health care system in West Michigan and smaller, more intimate care settings at Spectrum Health Kelsey Hospital in Lakeview and United Hospital in Greenville. Careers at the bedside or behind the scenes connect patients and families to the entire Spectrum Health system. Call Human Resources at 616.225.6383 or 877.631.2150.

spectrum-health.org/jobs

CareerFocus Fall/Winter 2010  

A resource magazine with helpful college-related information

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