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Jodi Craig Academic Portfolio Boston Architectural College M.Arch December 2017


Spring 2015 Andreason & Dixon 60 Morton Crossing

Fall 2014 Kristen Fritsch 40 ‘Aina ‘Amakihi

Spring 2014 Ramsdell & Chun 24 Panoptopio

Fall 2011 Youngjin Lee 4 Interface

Contents

Jodi Craig - Spring 2016

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Class: Studio C2 - Interface:Chihuly Museum Instructor: Youngjin Lee Semester: Fall 2011 Duration: 15 Weeks Concept: Air is stimulated, pushed, relieved and solidified to create blown glass. Transform these ideas into architecture to guide the visitor through the museum. Experiences are created as the visitor and architecture interface with the artwork.

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Interface Jodi Craig - Spring 2016


The Chihuly Museum Premise Create a museum to house the blown glass works of Dale Chihuly that would also contribute to the revitalization of Fort Port Channel. The program for the building was that, along with indoor & outdoor galleries, it contain: • Lobby & reception areas • Restaurant • Store • Glass workshop and multi-media studios • Administration offices • Loading and unloading docks The Glassworks of Dale Chihuly Dale Chihuly is a world renown glass artist whose enormous body of work spans over three decades. His blown glass works are so varied in size, shape and color, that a museum designed to hold these objects and take advantage of their unique awesomeness should consider the works being shown. In doing so, both experiences of viewing the art and visiting the museum would be maximized. The Art of Blowing Glass We visited MassArt’s glass studios to learn more about the art of glass blowing, as well as to see what was needed for a workshop studio. Along with learning about the basic requirements, something that impressed me the most was the concept of AIR. The studios were very warm, the artists needed to work quickly once the melted glass was removed from the furnace to prevent it from hardening, and they also needed to blow air into a very long tube to stretch the glass to its desired size and shape.

Interface

Jodi Craig - Spring 2016

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Diagram showing the east and west seawalls of the Fort Point Channel Basin, and the high and low water marks.

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Interface Jodi Craig - Spring 2016


Site Analysis The Site The site lies at the very end of the Fort Point Channel Basin, adjacent to the Gillette building. According to their Fort Point Channel Waterfront Activation Plan from May 2002, The City of Boston considers the basin to be ”a hidden treasure that can become transformed into one of Boston’s most unique public spaces.” History of Fort Point Channel

The view looking out of the building site: from the front - up the Fort Point Channel and from the back - to the Gillette parking lot.

• 1837 - seawalls constructed • 1880s - warehouses, machine shops, a sugar refinery and an elevator manufacturer resided here • 1895 - center of wool trade • 1900 - almost all lumber & sugar brought into Boston stored here • 1905 - Gillette relies on Fort Point Channel as a direct shipping route • 2000+ - Gillette is the largest industrial employer in the City

Panoramic view of the area within which the building will be placed, shows the industrial nature and varied sizes of the buildings.

Other new buildings in the area show that Boston has introduced a modern aesthetic into this very historic area.

Interface

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Site Analysis Building Heights An analysis of the current and proposed building heights for the area show that although most current buildings are between 20 and 99 feet, larger buildings in the 100 to 180 foot range are proposed for the area. The Gillette building falls in the 20-60 foot range.

Existing Building Proposed Building - Based on 100 Acres Master Plan

Transportation Routes The site lies near the intersection of several main vehicular ways and truck routes. Although the MBTA rail yard is nearby and trains travel under the site, the nearest T and bus stops are a distance away. The closest T stop is in a small business area a few blocks to the south. Although a walk from this stop to the site is not an ideal route, this is definitely the most direct route. The other much grander accessible route to the building is along Harborwalk, which brings visitors from Seaport Blvd, 2500 feet down the entire length of the channel to the basin area, and terminates in front of the site.

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Interface Jodi Craig - Spring 2016

TTStop Stop Bus BusStop Stop

Pedestrian Access Pedestrian Access Main WayWay MainVehicular Vehicular Truck Route Truck Route Gallery Site

Gallery Site

MBTA Rail Yard

20 ft. - 60 ft.

61 ft. - 99 ft.

100 ft. - 150 ft.

151 ft. - 180 ft.


Site Analysis Art & Architecture New Modern Building FPAC Studio

Starting in the 1970s, artists began moving to the abundant warehouses found in Fort Point, which offered them large open spaces needed for their work at a reasonable price. Fort Point is now home to over 300 artists that produce works in all types of media. The Fort Point Arts Community’s (FPAC) Spring and Fall Open Studio events bring over 10,000 visitors to Fort Point annually. Some of the newer buildings including Artists for Humanity, the ICA and the Boston Convention and Exhibition center, bring a modern aesthetic to this area of mainly brick warehouse buildings.

Building Uses Institutional Industrial Commercial

Currently, the most abundant building uses are industrial and commercial. As can be seen from the map above, some the spaces deemed as industrial are also considered artists’ studios.

Residential Mixed Use Future Development Green Space - Existing and Proposed

Interface

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Site Analysis Visitor Experience Although hopes for this area hinge upon the creation of public spaces that will create vibrant areas, the reality is that currently there are many areas that are inhospitable to visitors. I visited the site during a average weekday and didn’t see

Inhospitable Area Pedestrian Friendly Area Observed Visitor Restaurant/Cafe Solar Path Wind

Sun & Wind Unfortunately, the wind and sun paths do not coincide with the desirable views from the site. The sun travels around the side of the building that faces the Gillette building. Conversely, strong winds, especially January through March, travel from the north-west, which is the most desirable side to have an outdoor gallery facing the channel views.

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Interface Jodi Craig - Spring 2016


Building Mass and Site In conjuntion with the above explorations, I also tested some initial ideas on the site. Massing studies show aspects of the design, such as where larger volumes for double height spaces could be arranged, where outdoor galleries should be and how to coerce the visitor into making the long journey down the Harborwalk to the museum.

Interface

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Program From the earliest bubble diagram sketches, I wanted to explore the idea of having two distinct but equally important entrances to the site. The entrance from the south would bring visitors from the Broadway T stop and other establishments along Broadway and Dorchester Ave. This route may be the primary access during the winter or on inclement days. The other entrance from the north would bring visitors from other Fort Point venues, but may only be very popular on days when a stroll along the basin would be a pleasant experience. I tried to group spaces according to function, while also being mindful of which spaces would most benefit from the water view. I determined that the restaurant and the store should be located at the water’s edge and administration should reside on the south side. This would allow visitors taking a break from viewing the artwork to take in the channel views, and afford employees sunlit spaces. In this scheme though, the workshop is on the south side as well. This would compound the already difficult task of mitigating the heat from the furnaces to keep the work area comfortable for the artists.

Channel Views

Store Restaurant

With this arrangement of spaces, the outdoor entrance galleries are made smaller and a roof garden is added. This outdoor gallery is accessible by the hall and 2nd floor indoor gallery. These second floor spaces will allow extended views of the Channel and the city beyond. The dining area and store are given a separate wing to allow patrons the option of visiting these spaces without entering the gallery proper. Other spaces are left as above.

Loading/ Unloading

Cafe

Indoor Gallery

Hall

Workshop Outdoor Gallery/ Roof Garden Outdoor Gallery

Store

Kitchen Storage Storage

Shipping & Receiving

Outdoor Gallery

Indoor Gallery (2nd floor)

Administration

Wkrm Video

Prep / Staging Area Designer’s Office

Resource / Center

Workshop Office Hotshop Coldshop

Office Storage

Security Office

Meeting Room

Reception

Hall Restrooms

Lab

Director’s Office

Office

Restrooms

Indoor Gallery

Loading

AV Racks

Interface Jodi Craig - Spring 2016

Studio

Outdoor Gallery

Entrance

AV Stor

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Entrance

Outdoor Gallery

Open Offices

Restrooms

Embrace In this program, an outdoor gallery is placed at each of the separate entrances that bring visitors from either the Channel or the T stop. These galleries will embrace the visitor and place them immediately into the context of Chihuly’s world of glass. The dining area is given a prime location by the Channel to allow views. The indoor galleries, outdoor galleries and administration are all readily accessible from the main hall. The workshop, store and studio are open to the loading and unloading dock to allow ease of deliveries. This dock area is placed near the parking and is separate from either of the two entrances.


Concept Transformation To arrive at a concept for this project, we were to look at everything we had learned about blown glass and the method of creating it, to come up with an idea that could be transformed into a concept for the building and the arrangement of spaces. I was very interested in how instrumental AIR was to the creation of blown glass. I analyzed the process of making glass as I understood it: • AIR is an invisible substance instrumental in the making of blown glass. • AIR, in the form of oxygen, is used to ignite the flames of the furnace. There is energy transfer and movement. • AIR is constricted as it travels along a tube where it is then is released into a larger area which expands the molten glass. • AIR is applied to the glass to relieve and displace the heat. • AIR contracts the glass to solidify it. Stimulates

to

melt glass

AIR

Pushes

to

expand glass

AIR

Restricts

to

solidify glass

Particles

AIR

Relief

GLASS ARTWORK

Visitor

to cause him to ??? Stimulates ??? Pushes ??? Restricts

walk into a new space travel down a confined path stop & rest

Relief

MUSEUM EXPERIENCE

Interface

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Transformation Blown Glass Making Process

Translation to Concept

Ignite

Gallery spaces that encourage movement.

AIR

Push

AIR

Constricted path to gallery

Space opens up & liberates

Visitor

Relieve

AIR

Breathable envelope Spaces open up to outside

Solidify

AIR

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Interface Jodi Craig - Spring 2016

Solid, heavy, massive materials and spaces


Transformation Translation to Gallery Experience

Energy Transfer Movement

• Stimulate - Hall, Store There are two entrances from which the visitor can choose to enter. *Something* causes him to enter one or the other.

• Push - Channel Boardwalk The boardwalk draws the visitor in, leads him to the museum and then frees him to the open outdoor gallery. Expand Push to Limit

• Relieve - Roof Garden, Outdoor Galleries The spaces open up to the outdoors and allow the visitor to stop and reflect. Displace heat

Strengthen Contract

• Solidify - Galleries The spaces are imposing or sheltering, grounding the visitor and making them feel guarded, protected, small.

Interface

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Rubric to Define Spaces

ACTION WORD

ART ON FLOOR/ CEILING

WINDOWS

WATER

INDOOR/ OUTDOOR

SPACE SIZE

HEIGHT REQ’D

LIGHTING

ART ON WALL

HIGH (30’)+

FROM WITHIN

NO

CEILING

YES OR NO

NO

INDOOR

LARGE

LOW (<=10’)

FROM ABOVE

N/A

CEILING

NO

NO

INDOOR

SMALL

MEDIUM ( 10-20’)

AMBIENT

N/A

FLOOR

YES OR NO

YES OR NO

INDOOR/ OUTDOOR

SMALL

MEDIUM (10-20’)

AMBIENT

N/A

FLOOR

YES OR NO

YES OR NO

INDOOR/ OUTDOOR

IGNITE

PUSH

RELIEVE

SOLIDIFY

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Interface Jodi Craig - Spring 2016

LARGE

MODELS EXPLORING THESE IDEAS


Translation I attempted many combinations of the models defined in the rubric to analyze the visitor’s experience. I tried to imagine which artwork would enhance the space due to its inherent nature. I also tried to determine which of these spaces would work better for the building program. Some of the questions I asked were: How do I want the visitor to feel... • as he approaches the building from the north or south? • when he is in an indoor gallery? • when she arrives at the information center? • while sitting at the cafe? • when exiting the museum experience?

Interface

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Putting It All Together Some of my initial thoughts about the visitor experiences were: • Approaching from the north: As the visitor enters the Harborwalk from the city, I want him to look to the Fort Point Channel Basin and see the building as a beacon. As he travels down the boardwalk I want him to feel the pull... excited, interested and curious. As the boardwalk and the channel supply the architecture here, a very simple structure (or simply the channel itself) with an ‘ignite’ piece of art should greet him (I2 in the diagram). • When he is in an indoor gallery: As the visitor transcends the indoor galleries, there needs to be some sense of order and organization to guide him through. He should not feel confused about what he has or has not seen, or which direction to head next. Through a series of different types of spaces (push, ignite, solidy...) he will be given a chance to experience the art and then be guided to the next experience (P2 in the diagram) • While sitting at the cafe: What will draw the visitor to the cafe and how will she feel once there? An ‘ignite’ space will spark the visitor’s interest and cause her to leave the gallery or enter from the Harborwalk. Once at the cafe, she should feel relief - a break from all of the other experiences of the gallery - and have some time to relax. 18

Interface Jodi Craig - Spring 2016

I2, S3, I2 Approach to Museum from N

I2

I2, P2, R2, S1, P5, R5, P3, I1 Indoor Gallery - 1st floor I1, P1, R1 Indoor gallery - 2nd floor

S3

I3, R3 Store/cafe I4, S2 Workshop viewing

R3

I3

I5, P4 Exit I2, S4 Information/Resource Center P4, I2 Approach to museum from S P4, R4 Entrance to administration

R2

I1

S1

I4 S2

P2

P3

I2

S4 R4

P5 P1

R5

R1

I5

P4


Refining Ideas One initial idea I was very interested in at the beginning, was the that of a ‘tunnel gallery’ to guide the visitor off of the Haborwalk and toward the museum. This space would begin at quite a distance away, and once entered, views of the harbor and the museum would be contrived and limited. Along this path, the visitor could be introduced to some of Chiuly’s artwork, and simply by being isolated from the Harborwalk proper would be forced to travel along the given path (Push). Once at the Basin’s end, the visitor would be ‘popped’ out of the tunnel and thrust into the world of Chihuly. (Ignite) I eventually edited this idea out of the design because: • I suspected that the tunnel would seem scary rather than inviting. • The Harborwalk would essentially bring (Push) visitors directly to the site, without the need (and extra cost) of an additional boardwalk. • I discovered that Chihuly had created artwork that floats, such as the Walla Wallas, and placement of these in the water could offer the same benefits that I was trying to create in the tunnel gallery. • I focused more on using the building’s architecture to draw the visitor from the other end of the Channel.

Interface

Jodi Craig - Spring 2016

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The Final Design The First Floor Plan shows a new angled ‘backbone’ has been added to the building. Although the floor plan still sits square on the site, this new angle integrates the administration spaces with the main entrance gallery, and provides a wall to house restrooms and an egress stairway. The angle is carried through the building to the store and restaurant, and eventually ends at the Channel. Here the building is supported by pilings as it gently dips its toe into the water. The covered area created by the raised store and restaurant spaces, allow Harborwalk pedestrians an unobstructed path around the building. PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

First Floor Plan

PRODUCED AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN BY AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

A

PRODUCED AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN BY AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

The circulation path brings the visitor into the building from the north or south. From here, she is guided through several galleries until she reaches the great two-story gallery, at which point she has three options: • enter the store. • continue around the wall to view the workshop and/or enter another small gallery. • Ascend the stairs to the ramp that brings you around the Tower Sculpture, and to the second floor.

WEST ELEVATION

West Elevation

WEST ELEVATION

North Elevation

NORTH ELEVATION

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Interface Jodi Craig - Spring 2016

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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NORTH ELEVATION


The final model showing how the building sits at the edge of the Channel, dipping its toe in the water. The Harborwalk access continues under and around the building. Fenestration and materiality vary for each volume.

Interface

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Section A 1/32” = 1’

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Interface Jodi Craig - Spring 2016


At the conclusion of his museum experience, the visitor ascends the central stair and exits onto the rooftop deck. Here Persians in the glass floor are lit from below and push him toward the city... until he is hovering above the water. The Interface is complete - Architecture, Visitor, Art and City have been united.

Interface

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Class: Studio C1 - Soft Living Instructors: Jarred Ramsdell & Juliet Chun Semester: Spring 2014 Duration: 15 Weeks Concept: Use architecture to bring the best aspects of living in the suburbs to the design of a multi-family housing community in the city. Unit and aggregation analysis was done without knowing the site.

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Panoptopia Jodi Craig - Spring 2016


What is the Meaning of Community?

What is the Meaning of Home?

I investigated the meaning of ‘community’. What does a living environment in the suburbs lack? What aspects would benefit a multi-family community in the city of Boston?

I explored the meaning of ‘home’. How do people really live? What changes are needed in the way we live to meet the needs of a changing planet? Everything is spread out in the suburbs. A person must spend time traveling for everything from food, to work. Even our waste needs to travel. Our homes are placed at great distances, so we rarely see our neighbors. And even if we did, we don’t have any time left to socialize.

What is the relationship between how much stuff we have and how much space we need? large amount of open Space

stuff...

small amount of space 'nano' house

Soft Liv GSEducationalVersion

Jodi Craig

The ideal multi-family community in the city allows: • privacy when desired • chance meetings with your neighbors • safety for children • green spaces • opportunities to grow your own food • city views • proximity to stores, restaurants, jobs • cultural enrichment

GSEducationalVersion

Panoptic 1) permitting the viewing of all parts or elements 2) considering all parts or elements; all inclusive

Archigram - Plug-in City 1964-1966 Community

Looking at the idea of the home as a machine - what are the inputs and outputs? Which ones are necessary and what should be changed?

daily

outputs

inputs as family needs change

inputs & outputs

Soft Living - Week 1 01.29.14

as technology changes perceived obsolescence

Soft Living - Week 3 GSEducationalVersion

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Unit Development

2nd Floor of Family Units

Family Circulation

I determined a square foot requirement that each person would need for each space and created a scheme of how that would relate to the units. Using my bubble diagram analyses, I arranged them into unit floor plans for 1 person, 2 people and 3 people. 1

7 6 5 4 3 2 1

9 10 11 12 13 14 15

Building Services

Cafe/Market

2

3

Walkway

Building Services

Cafe/Market

Back Entrance to Building

One Story Unit

One Story Back Entrance Walkway Unit to Building

One Story Unit

One Story Type A

Family Unit TYPE C Unit

Family Unit

One Story Unit

One Story Unit TYPE B

Walkway Semi-private Spaces

Public / Community Spaces Private Spaces

GROUND FLOOR One Story Unit 2nd Floor of

Garden / Potential Green

Spaces One Story Unit TYPE B

GSEducationalVersion

TYPE 1 Open Gathering Space

3 A-103

Open Gathering Space

3 A-101

1'-0"

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3 A-106

2 1

2 A-106

1/2 BATH

10 11 12 13 15

BATH

SECTION WE BEDROOM

7 6 5 4 3

1'-0"

2 1

15 x 7 1/4" = 9'-2 1/4"

15 x 7 1/4" = 9'-2 1/4"

Mailboxes

Single & Double Units

GSEducationalVersion

9 10 11 12 13 14 15

2 A-106

BEDROOM

BATH

Secod Floor

TYPE 1

TYPE 1

TYPE 3 TYPE 3 UPPER FLOOR UPPER FLOOR

BEDROOM BATH

15 14 13 12 11 10 9

1 A-106

3 A-106

1'-0"

SCALE: 1/8" =

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

15 14 13 12 11 10 9

8

Similiarly, the three-person unit has spaces that are fractionally larger than a two-person unit. 1st FLOOR 2nd FLOOR

Single & Double Units

1 A-106

1'-0"

Panoptopia Jodi Craig - Spring 2016

2ND FLOOR Living experiences are different depending on where the unit is located, such as along a street or surrounding a courtyard

TYPE 3 - LOWER FLOOR Single & Double Units

TYPE 2

TYPE 3 - LOWER FLOOR

Higher Floors GROUND FLOOR

Single & Double Units

GSEducationalVersion

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2nd Floor of Family Units

TYPE 3 LOWER FLOOR

Main Entrance to Building

2 A-106

2 A-106

PATIO

sion

Meeting Space

BEDROOM

KITCHEN

SCALE: 1/8" =

TYPE 3 - Open Gathering LOWER FLOOR Space

Circulation

Circulation

BATH SCALE: 1/8" =

14

LIVING / DINING

3 A-106

9 10 11 12 13 14 15

15 x 7 1/4" = 9'-2 1/4"

4 3

9

15 x 7 11/32" = 9'-2 15/64"

5

7 6 5 4 3 2 1

8

8

ENTRY

1'-0"

15 x 7 11/32" = 9'-2 15/64"

6

UTH ELEVATION

7 6 5 4 3 2 1

TYPE 3 TYPE 3 UPPER FLOOR UPPER FLOOR

3 A-106

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Circulation

GSEducationalVersion

GSEducationalVersion

Semi-private Spaces

Private Spaces

Garden / Potential Green Spaces

Semi-Private Garden

Semi-private Spaces

Meeting Space

Workout

HIGHER FLOORS

Family Unit TYPE C

Public / Community Spaces

Garden / Potential Green Spaces

Pod

GSEducationalVersion

15 x 7 1/4" = 9'-2 1/4"

The two-person unit has spaces that are fractionally larger than a one-person unit, as defined by my space analysis. SCALE: 1/8" =

1/8" =

1 A-303

SECTION SN SCALE: 1/8" = 1'-0" 1st FLOOR

3 A-101

Private Spaces Office

GROUND FLOOR

15 x 7 1/4" = 9'-2 1/4"

1'-0"

Office Pod

15 x 7 1/4" = 9'-2 1/4"

1/8" =

Office Pod

Public / Community Spaces

2 A-103

2ND FLOOR 3 A-103

1 A-203

Second Floor

BEDROOM

KITCHEN

PATIO

FLOOR

Office Pod

GSEducationalVersion

8

ENTRY

Lounge

TYPE 3 - LOWER FLOOR

15 x 7 1/4" = 9'-2 1/4"

PATIO

TYPE 2

8 15 x 7 1/4" = 9'-2 1/4"

KITCHEN

2 A-103

15 14 13 12 11 10 9

8 15 x 7 1/4" = 9'-2 1/4"

LIVING / DINING

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

TYPE 3 - LOWER FLOOR

8

LIVING / DINING

ENTRY

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

15 x 7 1/4" = 9'-2 1/4"

15 14 13 12 11 10 9

BATH

Public Private

Office Pod

TYPE 3TYPE 3 CLOSET UPPER FLOOR UPPER FLOOR 15 x 7 1/4" = 9'-2 1/4"

4 A-101

BATH

STORAGE

8 15 x 7 1/4" = 9'-2 1/4"

1/2 BATH

15 14 13 12 11 10 9

4 A-101

BEDROOM

STORAGE

Fam TYP

2nd Floor of Family Units

Family Units

Daycare

Circulation

TYPE 1

One Story Unit Type A

One Story Unit

Ground Floor

Ground Floor

GSEducationalVersion

Walkway

One Story Unit Type A

One Story Unit TYPE B

TYPE 3 LOWER FLOOR

Back Entrance to Building

Garden / Outdoor Space

Mailboxes

Mailboxes

3

Family Unit Building Services

Mailboxes

Mailboxes

Main Entrance to Building

Main Entrance to Building

1

LIVING / DINING

TYPE 3 LOWER FLOOR

Circulation

PATIO

1

2

7 6 5 4 3 2 1

TYPE 3 TYPE 3 UPPER FLOOR UPPER FLOOR

2

3

1

Main Entrance to Building

Family Unit

Main Entrance to Building One Story Unit

One Story Unit

Circulation

15 x 7 1/4" = 9'-2 1/4"

STORAGE Circulation

BEDROOM

Family Unit Circulation

Cafe/Market

2

3

3

3

15 x 7 1/4" = 9'-2 1/4"

KITCHEN 2

2

2

8

ENTRY

1

BATH

2nd Floor of

2nd Floor Familyof Units Family Units

15 x 7 1/4" = 9'-2 1/4"

1

8 15 x 7 1/4" = 9'-2 1/4"

3

15 14 13 12 11 10 9

1

Then using some of the ideas gathered through my investigations for community life, I tried to arrange the units into a single building. Some ideas I wanted to keep in mind were: • recreating the front and back yard • the experience of getting from one place to another • safety for children • all-inclusive - a city within a city

One Story Unit

2nd Floor of Family Units

GROUND FLOOR


Aggregation Development

Unit Development - ‘Links’ I investigated a modular system (Links) that could be configured based on how much of each type of space the inhabitant wants. Module types include: basic wall, wet wall, window, counter, cabinet and shelf. The biggest problem implementing this system in a multi-family community is determining a uniform site size for each unit. This is a cool idea, but maybe something to look into for another project...

‘L’-shaped units are stacked to provide semiprivate open spaces above and below.

Circulation Core

Choose One ---->

+

OR

Basic Window

Counter

Shelf

Problems to address: Problems to Address: How units - How are are units aggregated? - What is the minimum ‘site’ for a unit? - Circulation between floors aggregated? - Privacy - What are add-ons? Slabs, walls, panels, What ceilings... is the minimum ‘size’ for a unit? Circulation between floors Privacy What are add-ons? Slab, walls, panels, ceilings...

links

Storage

Stacked ‘Links’ provide more variation in openings between spaces.

2 A-201

4'

2 A-201

12'

3 A-201

1 A-201

1 A-201

3 A-201

1 A-201

1 A-201

2 A-201

Stacked ‘U’-shaped units provide the maximum variation in openings between spaces, but this scheme lacks a uniform system.

1st Floor SCALE: 1/8" =

GSEducationalVersion

1'-0"

2 A-201

2nd Floor SCALE: 1/8" =

1'-0"

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Jodi Craig - Spring 2016

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I thought a lot about the gradient between public and private space - semi-public and semi-private - and how this gradient could be manipulated by the inhabitants. Questions I asked where: ‘How do you ‘see’ your neighbors?’ and ‘What constitutes a public space?’. Extrovert

I developed a system of slats that would adorn the front entry of each unit, creating a shuttering configuration, and in essence a ‘stoop’. Depending on how introverted or extroverted the inhabitant is (or is feeling on a particular day), the shutters can be opened in a variety of configurations to allow light into and views out of the unit.

Introvert

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Panoptopia Jodi Craig - Spring 2016


From there, my next step was to bring more order to the aggregation and arrange the units in a linear fashion. These diagrams show the strategies that I would continue to refine from this point on: 1) adjacencies, 2) views, 3)open space and 4) circulation. At this point the building is enclosed with all unit front entries facing each other in a double-loaded corridor fashion.

The view from outside a unit with shutters open, which may promote more ‘stop buys’ and interaction and interaction with neighbors.

Start off with more regularly shaped units placed in a double-loaded corridor arrangement.

GSEducationalVersion

1) Adjacencies: Shift units such that balconies and ‘front’ doors are not directly across from nor next to each other.

The view from inside a unit with shutters open, which allows ‘eyes on the street’.

The view of the interior building corridor, which is not as interesting as anticipated.

2) Views: Shift units slightly to create glimpses out to the surrounding neighborhood.

4) Circulation: Stairways are placed at alternating ends of the corridor on each floor.

3) Open Space: Remove select units to create open space for public gathering and to let light into the corridors.

4) Circulation: People are forced to walk out of their way and pass units and other public spaces.

Panoptopia

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Site Analysis

A site analysis unveiled many positive and negative aspects of the site. Although it abuts the harbor and is near to many shops and restaurants, the Harborwalk passes right by the site and a large commercial building looms over the south side blocking sunlight.

North End

Site

Harbor

A T L A N T I C

These units have direct views to/ from the Harborwalk

Harborwalk

Entrance Face to the Street View of water brings you through site

A V E

• How does the site influence the building’s aggregation that has been developed thus far? • How will the building take advantage of the Harborwalk and views? • Where should different spaces be located? - Cafe near street? - Family units on first floor? - Roof gardens - Extention of Harwalk - Intermingling of family uses & those for single and older residents: - Day care & Fitness - Cafe & media center - Sports & gardening

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Panoptopia Jodi Craig - Spring 2016

General sun path and exposure for trees, gardens, etc.

These units have direct views to larger building and are shaded by it

The Harborwalk currently traverses the perimeter of the site. The largest buildings in the area max out at about five stories.

Accommodate entrance from other building?


Offset floor heights? Views into building Lots of sun on upper floors?

Lift units up? Shops beneath?

Lift units up? Harborwalk!

Which side is better? • Good views north - better for public or private? • View to south look directly into large building • Need some separation... Adjacencies & views: • Walkway and sitting areas • Family - sports, play area, day-care • Trees and gardens • Restaurant and market • Circulation • Gym, conference, gathering spaces • Buffer spaces • Let the public in?

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Final Unit Layouts

‘Front stoop’ allows residents to customize their living experience.

‘Back Door’ & and private outdoor space

‘Front Door’

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Panoptopia Jodi Craig - Spring 2016

Large windows let in light and open unit up on both sides of building


Final Unit Layouts

The view of the building from Atlantic Ave. shows these units have a ery direct relationship with the city and passersby. The roof garden & cafe are on the top left.

The view of a unit on the north side showing its adjacencies the gardens behind and an outdoor gallery above.

All spaces have direct access to fresh air and natural light.

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Typical Double-loaded

Vertical Fence & ‘Stoop’

The overall view of the building from the Harbor shows the rooftop walkway and bridges connecting the north and south sections of the building. Interspersed Public Spaces

Glimpses to Water & City

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Panoptopia Jodi Craig - Spring 2016

The units are arranged in a ‘U’ around an open courtyard area that contains gardens, playing fields and playgrounds. Bridges traverse the courtyard at differing heights to allow residents to used varied circulation paths to and from different activities with the hope of more interaction between neighbors.


Site Concept Chance Meeting Opportunities Filtered Views to Exterior Opportunities to Enjoy Nature Safe Environment for Children Semi-private Spaces Public Spaces

The view looking down from the rooftop walkway at the cafe on the second floor and the orchard below. Any of these spaces have an indirect relationship with one another - you can see whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doing what and can decide to join them if desired!

The courtyard can be used for sports or performance events. There are several areas to view happenings, from the grand stair, to the many ramps and raised platform areas.

The building site plan shows that there are many green areas and lots of opportunities to enjoy nature.

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meeting

bistro

gathering gallery work pods

These elevations show people enjoying different activities offered on the site, such as eating at a restaurant, playing basketball, attending a meeting or playing in the playground.

gym

mall gallery cafe

rental office childcare playground

reception

gardens sports fields

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market

Panoptopia Jodi Craig - Spring 2016

The exploded axon shows the various spaces arranged at different ends of the site and different floors, as well as the many ramps, stairways and boardwalks that can be used to traverse the spaces.


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The Model Although this was my first time using the laser cutter, through many iterations I became proficient in creating several study models, the eventual final model of the building and site.

These templates were used to create my layered building model.

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Panoptopia Jodi Craig - Spring 2016


Panoptopia

Jodi Craig - Spring 2016

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Class: Studio C1 - Biomimicry Intructor: Kristen Fritsch Semester: Fall 2014 Duration: 15 Weeks Concept: Use Biomimicry as a tool to inform the design of a cohousing community in Maui. Use inspiration from the throny devil and the taro plant to design the common house and master plan.

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â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;AinaJodi â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Amakihi Craig - Spring 2016


Site Analysis Despite being nearly 2,500 miles away, Polynesians began to settle the Hawaiian islands between 450 to 750 AD. They brought with them many endemic plants and animals, such as the rat and the Polynesian pig, that have contributed to the devastation of the native species. For example, before the Polynesians discovered Hawaii, the only inhabitants on the islands were birds, insects and the occasional seal. The islands were once home to hundreds of types of birds that had adapted to their particular biome and food sources. Now, due to the introduction of threats such as animals and mosquitos that are lethal to the birds, only forty species remain.

Challenge My first task was to identify the challenges of our site on the Island of Maui. This included researching the climatic characteristics of its biome, its site context, the cultural issues of the island, and cohousing precedent studies.

It is believed that Spanish travelers shipwrecked on the island in the 1500s. Then later, in the 1800s, westerners began to invade the island. Although the native Hawaiians had long inhabited the islands, western civilization brought with it many of the problems that befell the Native Americans. Native Polynesians had over three hundred different types of taro that grew in different climates, wet or dry, mountain region or shore. When the westerner arrived, they cleared the lands for growing rice and sugar, both of which are endemic to the region and require abundant water to grow. This eventually contributed to the current water shortage in Wailuku. By the late 1950s, Wailuku Town was in a state of transition. Like many other older downtown commercial areas, Wailuku’s commercial core began to decline. Several factors contributed to this such as the downsizing of Wailuku’s sugar industry. As the private automobile became the popular mode of travel for most of the island’s residents, Wailuku’s residential population began to disperse, particularly to the subdivisions springing up in Kahului. The loss of population reduced Wailuku’s attractiveness as a retail center. Throughout the 1950s and 1960s, many of the basic regional shopping needs Introduced by previous redevelopment moved to other locations, particularly to the shopping malls two miles away in Kahului. These shopping malls were closer to the market. They also benefitted from an agglomeration of retail activity and adequate parking. Wailuku’s loss of its residential and commercial base resulted in disinvestment and high vacancy rates. As the physical and economic infrastructure began to decline, a host of socioeconomic ills set in. By 1967, the Maui Planning Commission had designated the area as “blighted”. The first plan developed for the area, the 1973 Vineyard Urban Renewal Plan, focused on slum clearance, redevelopment and rehabilitation activities. The principal objective of the plan was to “make this section of Wailuku Central Business District economically viable again, thereby strengthening the entire Central Business District and the city.” The plan was never implemented. In 2006, the Maui Planning Commission developed the “General Plan 2030, Lessons from the Past - A Guide to the Future”, with which it hopes to “create productive and livable urban centers as well as preserve small town character”.

‘Aina ‘Amakihi Hawaiian for ‘land that feeds the Amakihi’

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Biome

Plant Growth Zones

In Kahului Bay, Northeasterly trade winds bring moisture laden air to the windward slopes of Pu’u Kukui

The Maui County Planting Plan and Department of Water Supply have established 5 planting Zones. Our site is in Zone 5.

Kahului Bay - Location of site

Boerhavia Senna Solarium

Thespesia

With increasing elevation, air temperature decreases. Because the cold air is less capable of holding moisture, water precipitates as rain on the north-facing slopes.

Dondonea

Location of site looking toward Iao Valley

Farms Zone 1: > 3000 ft & > 40” annual rainfall Zone 2: > 1000 ft & 20-40” annual rainfall Zone 3: < 1000 ft & < 20” annual rainfall Zone 4: 1000-3000 ft & wetter than Zone 3 Zone 5: Salt Spray - Coastal - Windward Side

Artimisia

Bidens

Nototrichium Ohio Hibiscus

Out of the 34 native species of plants on Maui, only two are suitable to grow naturally on our site.

The Pu’u Kukui summit area at the Iao Valley’s head receives at average of 386 inches of rain per year

Lipochaeta

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‘AinaJodi ‘Amakihi Craig - Spring 2016

Maui farms produce coffee, taro, vegetables, flowers, exotic fruits, greens, sugar cane, pineapples and herbs

Nototrichium


Wildlife

Relative Size of Maui

Since the introduction of non-native predators to the Hawaiian islands, the once thriving bird population has been threatened. Of the 150 different types of birds that once existed in, only 40 species remain, and more than half of these are endangered.

727 sq. mi.

Amakihi

7800 sq. mi.

Precipitation Wind Temperature: 75-100 degrees F Relative Humidity: 70-100%

I’iwi Apapane

Threatened

0-1000 feet 1000-2000 feet 2000-3000 feet 3000-4000 feet 4000-5000 feet

“Trees in the cloud forests of Maui yield more moisture from the clouds than from that which actually falls as rain.” - AskNature.org Fog-laden winds

Annual Precipitation Extinct

Kiwikiu

Akohekohe

Endangered

Alauahio Po’ouli

Kahului

17 in.

Wailuku

34 in.

Boston

43 in.

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Taro Plant

Local Vernacular

The taro plant was brought to Hawaii by Polynesian settlers. It became the stable of the Hawaiian diet and the primary focus of agricultural activity. 300 varieties of taro were developed to suit the different growing conditions on the island. Taro can be made into a variety of dishes, and once cooked and pounded into a pa’i’ai, can be kept almost indefinitely. Today taro is used to make everything from snack chips to ice cream and veggie burgers.

The traditional vernacular of the island had a loose relationship between indoor and outdoor spaces, exclusive use of local materials, large openings to catch the trade winds, wide eaves and a broad lanai

The current vernacular of an ‘affordable’ single family home falls somewhere in between. Wide eaves may block out some sun, but windows are small and there is no connection between the indoor and outdoor spaces.

In the mid-1800s, New England immigrants and missionaries arrived, bringing with them religious beliefs as well as technical expertise in building. Many of the buildings that still exist from this time period reflect the New England influence.

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‘AinaJodi ‘Amakihi Craig - Spring 2016


Site Characteristics

Maui Climate

• • • •

Although Maui does have winter and summer seasons, high temperatures remain in the 80-degree range for most of the year. Although low temperatures can reach the 60s in winter, the water remains above 70 degrees.

The site lies between the coast and lowland tropical rain forest. The property is bordered by an industrial park and the shoreline. The site is currently paved over with asphalt. A metal structure on it serves as an open-air market. It is at the intersection of two major roadways.

Site Location Major Roadway Industrial Buildings Multi-family Housing Dwelling

nubanusit BIOMIMICRY temperature yet remain in the 80-degree range forJODI the CRAIG maui biome BIOMIMICRY high temperatures throughout the year and down to the mid to high 60s for the lows. The water can be Both Maui seasons of winter and summer do vary in

9.11.14

anywhere from 75 degrees in the winter to 82 degrees in the summer.

maui wildlife BIOMIMICRY maui climate BIOMIMICRY GSEducationalVersion

maui vegetation BIOMIMICRY

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Biomimicry as a Tool

White-fronted African Bee Eater

Challenge My second task was to use the Biomimicry Design Lens to inspire the design of a co-housing community master plan and community house.

The bee eater will sacrifice to help a family member raise a clutch of baby birds. Scientists believe this gives the helper bird’s family a survival edge in the harsh African savannah.

Part I

Translation to Master Plan:

Use AskNature.com and other resources to research the natural world to answer the questions

Helper pods where homes are grouped closer together will allow individuals or families to help each other.

How do communities survive and thrive? Potential Inspiration Investigated • White-fronted African Bee Eater • Cliff Swallow • Taro Plant

Cliff Swallow Modular nests are built one on top of another to maximize space, resulting in greater density. Translation to Master Plan: Homes are grouped closer together with open space provided at the outskirts.

Taro Plant The taro plant, which is native to Hawaii, prefers wet soil. If soil conditions are too dry, it successfully propagates by sending out daughter corms. The main corm provides nourishment to the daughters. Eventually, the main corm dies, but the shoots create new ‘main’ corms. Translation to Master Plan: Each housing node contains an offshoot community house to use as the node’s residents desire.

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‘AinaJodi ‘Amakihi Craig - Spring 2016


ce

s on a hey be sel-

lt one . More mited

nCRY

CRY

n CRY

er CRY

ped to .

energy & resources. Helper benefits by gaining experience

birds can lve in limited breeding area.

provides nourishment directly to cormel - no need for seeding. Each unit or group of units provides a separate space for a ‘helper’.

Cliff Swallow

Mud nests are built one on top of another. More birds can lve in limited breeding area.

Each unit or group of units provides a separate space for a 'helper'. Taro Plant

Propagates by sending out cormels. Main corm provides nourishment directly to cormel - no need for Homes areseeding. grouped to

maximize space. 9.18.14

JODI CRAIG

Taro Plant

Propagates by sending out cormels. Main corm provides nourishment directly to cormel - no need for seeding.

Homes are grouped to Homes are Offshoots are supported grouped to maximize space. maximize space. by main 'core'.

master plan BIOMIMICRY insulate Offshoots areBIOMIMICRY supported by main 'core'.

master plan BIOMIMICRY insulate BIOMIMICRY Offshoots are supported by main 'core'.

observation BIOMIMICRY

9.18.14

JODI CRAIG

Offshoots are supported by main ‘core’.

observation BIOMIMICRY gila monster BIOMIMICRY JODI CRAIG 9.18.14

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Biomimicry as a Tool

Flying Saucer Trench Beetle Trenches created by the flying saucer trench beetle collect water because the edges are above the sand surface and perpendicular to fog-bearing wind.

Part II Use AskNature.com and other resources to research the natural world to answer the question:

How do organisms adapt to a climate similar to my site’s to harvest water? Thorny Devil

Potential Inspiration Investigated • Flying Saucer Trench Beetle • Thorny Devil • Cribellate Spider

The grooves on the spikes of the thorny devil lizard draw water to its mouth through capillary action.

Cribellate Spider Web When wet, the web of the cribellate spider forms a unique structure that is a combination of dense spindle knots and connecting joints. The web is able to continuously collect water due to the spindle knots serving primarily as drop collection sites and the joints functioning as condensation sights.

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‘AinaJodi ‘Amakihi Craig - Spring 2016


Techniques Used • Surface Area • Manipulation • Material

• Surface Area • Adapts to environment

• Surface Area • Manipulation • Material

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Common House Biomimetic Inspiration & Initial Ideas Sketches showing ideas for water collection using fog nets that are designed to mimic the channels on a thorny devil.

Thorny Devil - Collection of Water • The thorny devil gathers all of the water it needs from rain, dew, standing water or soil moisture and transports it to its mouth against gravity and without a pumping device. • The semi-enclosed channels that traverse the scales and thorns of its skin are heavily convoluted, increasing the effective surface area to which water can hydrogen-bond, which increases the capillary action to draw water to its mouth. • Its spikes are covered with superhydrophillic material that can extract water from the air by nucleation and condensation. The water droplet grows until gravity forces it down to the base of the spike that allows it to flow.

Traditional Vernacular Pitched Roof

Water Collection Overhang shelters from rain and sun

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‘AinaJodi ‘Amakihi Craig - Spring 2016

Water is collected and drawn to the ‘center’. The reservoir shows the current health of the system - is this a good day to do laundry?


c.) and s". A s reside

- The cormels sprout & give rise to new plants at the onset of the next wet season

cormels and the plant survives

Scheme 1new plants at the onset of the next - The cormels sprout & give rise to wet season

THs 3200

Each node contains several of each housing type that are grouped around the public space (stalks and leaves).

The Common House: - Social/Coorperative - The main corm gives life to the heart of the complex The Common House resources (sunlight,- Iswater, offshoots then dies toharvests allow cormels to use - Uses minimum resources limited resources Thethe Common House harvests them etc.) and distributes them to "offshoots". A portion of - Harvests resources and distributes resources (sunlight, water, etc.) and to "offshoots" Dynamic As long as a new wet season occurs, common spaces reside in a low-tech temporal structure. distributes them to "offshoots". A - Dynamic - changes location new cormels are always forming, and reportion of the common spaces reside esablishing a new 'main' corm in a low-tech structure.

Scheme 2

The Low Tech space co library (books), yoga, k recycling & trash

- Is the heart of the complex - Uses minimum resources - Harvests resources and distributes them to "offshoots" - Dynamic - changes location

The low-tech structure traditional vernacular minimum of resources

• The taro plan prefers wet or boggy water. Throughout the we season, it develops offshoots called ‘cormels.” • If there isn’t sufficient moisture during the dry season, the growth of the main shoot declines until it eventually dies. • The corm provides nourishment to the cormels and the plant survives. • The cormels sprout and give rise to new plants at Bicyc Rec le & Stora ge

Bicyc Rec le & Stora ge

The Common House will be split in two - a technology dependent space resides in one half, the other is low-tech. Pla yco urt & Chil dcare

Art Cult ure

The High Tech space contains the Roffice, estau rant meeting & classrooms, mediaComroom, music, Hou mon se teen room, fitness, and kitchen Ou td Livin oor g

The Low Tech space contains dining, living, library (books), yoga, kids room, mail, recycling & trash The low-tech structure is inspired by traditional vernacular Work and uses a bare minimum of resources.shop S FH 200 s 0

the onset of the next wet season. Market

Relationship to Master Plan The Common House harvests

Garden

Playc ourt & Chil dcare

Recycling &Waste

resources (sunlight, water,-etc.) Social/Cooperative The main corm gives life to and distributes them to the offshoots then dies to allow the cormels to use "offshoots". A portion of the common spaces reside in a lowlimited resources. tech temporal structure that THs 3200

moves to each node in turn to provide support.

Dynamic - Asstructure long as a new by wet season occurs, new The temporary is dismantled the residents and movedare to a always new node. forming While the structure resides cormels and reestablishing a at this new location, the residents of this node can use it to ‘main’ promote their focus. new corm.

GSEducationalVersion

• The Common House harvests resources (sunlight, water, etc.) and distributes them to "offshoots". A portion of the common spaces reside in a low-tech temporal structure that moves to each node in turn to provide support. • The Common House will be split in two - a technology dependent space resides in one half, the other is lowtech. • The High Tech space contains the office, meeting & classrooms, media room, music, teen room, fitness, and The Common House harvests resources (sunlight, water, etc.) kitchen. The Low Tech space contains dining, living,them library and distributes to AThe portion of the (books), yoga, kids room, mail, recycling"offshoots". & trash. lowcommon spaces reside in a lowtemporal structure tech structure is inspired by traditional tech vernacular and that moves to each node in turn to provide support. uses a bare minimum of resources. The temporary structure is dismantled by the residents • The temporary structure is dismantled by the resiand moved to a new node. While the structure resides dents and moved to a new node. Whileatthe this structure new location, the residents of this node can use it to promote their focus. resides at this new location, the residents of this node can use it to promote their focus.

Bicyc Rec le & Stora ge

Bicyc Rec le & Stora ge

Art Cult ure

Com Hou mon se

Work sho p

Garden

Recycling &Waste

Rest

aura nt

Outd Livin oor g

SFH 200 s 0

THs 3200

Playc ourt & Chil dcare

Art Cult ure Com Hou mon se

Rest

aura nt

Outd Livin oor g

Cormel

SFH 1000 s

Market

Playc ourt & Chil dcare

Work sho p

SFH 200 s 0

Corm

‘Oha - bud of corm

‘Aina ‘Amakihi

Jodi Craig - Spring 2016

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SFH 1000 s

Recycling &Waste

The Common House:

teen room, fitness, and

The Taro Plant - Conservation of Resources

- Dynamic - As long as a new wet season occurs, new cormels are always forming, and reesablishing a new 'main' corm

SFH 1000 s

Garden

Market

Each node contains several of each housing type that are grouped around the public space (stalks and leaves).

- Social/Coorperative - The main corm gives life to offshoots then dies to allow cormels to use limited resources

Master Plan Layout

SFH 1000 s

den

g

Master Plan - Biomimetic Inspiration & Initial Ideas • The complex is arranged with several nodes branching off of the Common Area (corm). • Each node contains a public focal point: childcare, recreation, farming or workshop (cormels). • Each node contains several of each housing type that are grouped around the public space (stalks and leaves). • The Common House: of Water Taro Plant - Conservation Master Plan Layout - -IsPrefers thewet heart of the complex or boggy soil conditions The complex is arraged with several - Uses minimum resources nodes branching off of the Common - If there is not sufficient moisture: Area (corm). - Harvests resources and distributes - The growth of the main shoot declines until it eventually dies back Each node contains a public focal point: them to “offshoots” childcare, recreation, farming or workshop - The corm provides nourishment to - Is dynamic (cormels).

childcare, recreation, farming or workshop (cormels).

- The corm provides nourishment to cormels and the plant survives

Work


Common House Process Initial common house ideas - preserve views of the mountains and the ocean. Spaces emminate from a central gathering area highlighted by a water collection display.

Thinking about potential for roof funoff and fog collection. More definted circulation and blur of indoor/outdoor spaces. 1 A-6

1 A-6

1 A-7

1 A-7

1 A-8 1 A-9

1 A-8

GSEducationalVersion

Water collection ideas for the common house. Exposed cisterns show water collection system.

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‘AinaJodi ‘Amakihi Craig - Spring 2016

Development of the children’s node common house offshoot showing a playground and outdoor family gathering area. Residents who choose this node will have a playground for children and a shaded outdoor area to socialize and keep busy toddlers contained.


Initial ideas for sweeping roof water collection and reflecting pool

Development of second floor bridge for views of mountains. Main entrance area is still enclosed. 1 A-8

1 A-9

1 A-9

18

17

16

15

14

13

12

11

10

9

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

1 A-8

1 A-8

1 A-9

1 A-9

GSEducationalVersion

GSEducationalVersion

Views from the bridge connecting the second floor spaces looking out to Kahului Bay.

Views from the bridge connecting the second floor spaces looking inland toward the mountains.

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Final Master Plan - Arrangement

Water Management

The community is arranged with several nodes branching off of the common area (corm). Each node contains several of each housing type grouped around the public space (stalks & leaves).

Each node collects water: • Runoff from walkways feed rain gardens • Roof runoff is collected in an underground cistern, which is then used by the residents of the node. • The main common house has its own cisterns. Water collected is used for common house activities.

Single Family Homes 1200 sq. ft.

REFLECTING POOL BELOW INDICATES HEALTH OF SYSTEM ABOVE-GROUND STORMWATER CISTERN

Single Family Homes 2000 sq. ft.

Townhouses 800-1200 sq. ft.

BELOW-GROUND STORMWATER CISTERN GSE ducatio nalV ersion

BIOSWALE/SURFACE CONVEYANCE

Community Space

Each node ontains an offshoot community space for the residents to use as they desire.

RAINGARDEN CISTERN INPUTS

Common house offshoot

Fixture

Daily Uses

Flow Rate

Duration

Users

5 5 5 1 1

0.0234 0.5 1.5 1.5 1.5

1 Flush .25 min 2 min. 5 min. 10 min.

20 20 13 13 7

Sewage Generation (gal)

Garden Node: Adults: 13 Children: 7

GSE ducatio nalV ersion

SOLAR PATH CRITICAL VIEWS

Foam Flush Toilet Extra Low-Flow Lavatory Extra Low-Flow Kitchen Sink Low-Flow Shower - Adult Low-Flow Shower - Kid Washing Machines

MAIN CIRCULATION

Total Daily Volume Days Total Annual Volume Total Collected from Roofs Deficit:

BIKING/WALKING PATHS WIND & FOG

2.34 12.50 195.00 97.50 105.00 412.34 365.00 150,380.00 84575.00 65805.00

Common House: Kitchen 5 Lavs/5 Toilets 4 Showers Foam Flush Toilet Extra Low-Flow Lavatory

Extra Low-Flow Pre-Rinse Spray

Low-Flow Shower Dishwasher

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‘AinaJodi ‘Amakihi Craig - Spring 2016

5 5 2 2 30 racks

0.0234 0.5 1.15 1.5 .8 per rack

1 Flush .25 min 10 min. 5 min.

50 50 2 5 Total Daily Volume Days Total Daily Volume Total Collected from Roof Credit

5.85 31.25 46.00 75.00 24.00 182.10 365.00 66430.00 72774.00 6344.00

Using a water use matrix, I determined: • Annual water use from the residents as compared to the water collected from the roofs of the houses would result in a deficit of 65,000 GPY. • Annual water use from the common house as compared to the water collected from its roof would result in a credit of 6,000 GPY.


Final Master Plan

The final site plan showing the rehabilitation of the site from asphalt lot to a thriving natural community. Four nodes branch off of the common house and provide a public space specific to the needs of its residents.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Aina â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Amakihi

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Common House - Final Floor Plans

RE

RE

The main entry is open from ‘Main Street’ all the way through the building, to the ocean breezes and views of Kalahui Bay. Indoor and outdoor space become one.

2 A-2

F F

Water from the main roof pours into the reflecting pool below, which becomes a focal point of the entryway and an indicator of water health.

2 A-2

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 18

17

16

15

14

13

12

11

10

1 A-2

3 A-2

All of the Common House programming needs are met: • Indoor/outdoor dining spaces • Workout room • Office • Kitchen • Waste management • Main entryway and mailboxes • Daycare • Living room • Teen room • Performance space • Conference Space • Library and media room

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‘AinaJodi ‘Amakihi Craig - Spring 2016

4 A-2

4 A-2


From the bridge connecting upper floors, there is a breathtaking view of the Iao Valley and mountains.

3 A-2

‘Main Street’ showing a branching walking path connecting the Common House to the residences.

The children’s node gives its residents a convenient outdoor area to hang out with children.

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The front elevation showing the entryway and sweeping roof above which connects indoor and outdoor space and leads directly to the ocean beyond.

Sections showing the very low roof pitches and wide overhangs that allow natural light to enter while also blocking direct sun exposure.

In actuality the sweeping roof should have a pitch matching the roofs of the other spaces, but I was not able to draw this correctly in my drafting program.

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â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;AinaJodi â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Amakihi Craig - Spring 2016 GSEducationalVersion


Abundant open outdoor spaces, such performance space, dining and play areas allow many opportunities for enjoying the tropical weather. The reflecting pool channel is an indicator of water health, while also being a public gathering hub of activity.

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Class: Studio C2 - ADHC Intructor: Claes Andreasen & Joel Dixon Semester: Spring 2015 Duration: 15 Weeks Concept: Create an affordable residential community adjacent to the commuter rail line integrating aspects desired by the neighborhood into the design.

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Morton Crossing Jodi Craig - Spring 2016


Purpose

recommendations for improving the Corridor in the The purpose of the Fairmount Indigo Planning Initiative context of the City of Boston. The Station Area Plans is to create a shared vision and coordinated set of document the community-based planning at each strategies to unlock greater potential for each of the Station Area. The initial phase of planning will result in Site aspects to considerthan would exist for Station Areas we andhad neighborhoods Station Area plans at three stations. Upham’s Corner was • It sits across from the new Morton Street Commuter Railfirst station onArea the Fairmont-Indigo Line. each area acting in isolation. The planning effort focuses the Station Plan to be undertaken. • The back parcel is one of the only natural spots in this part of the city. It has been named in honor of a upon the following: youth who was an innocent victim of gang violence. A Fairmount Indigo Corridor le was created in • The community group Redefining Our Community (ROC) created an RFP for the cityProfi which discussed • Guiding economic development November of 2012 to provide baseline information for their desiresphysical for theand site’s development a variety of interested parties in the community, • highlighted in thegrowth RFP that included in our final design were: a small business incubator, aelected sit• Ideas Encouraging sustainable andwe transit-oriented down restaurant, culinary arts training facilities, and a community focused meeting space. offi cials, planners, investors, researchers, and others. Key development (TOD) areas of focus include demographics, business, real estate, • Prioritizing for existing residents and The communityeconomic consistsprosperity of Caribbean born residents their families, ofofwhom own small infrastructure andmany quality life. Th e profi le represents a business in the neighborhood. They perceive assets of the community to be: long-term residents and and businesses collaborative effort between City agencies, foundations, businesses, active community groups, and cultural diversity. Their concerns include crime, lack of • Incorporating existing planning initiatives (City-led and to do. and With other all planning It provides current data and economic empowerment and teens without enough of the entities. new developments happening Community-based) into one vision for the future some trends that give a useful framework to inform the in the neighborhood, they fear change and the resulting displacement of current residents. planning process. Process and Documentation As one-third of the design team, my tasks focused on creating the unit layouts and then using them as All reports, profibuilding. les and presentations as part of the Th e Planning Initiative process andof the results are building blocks to inform the massing residential portion of the I also worked on finding ways to blend residences in ewith the surrounding throughcan thebedesign planning initiative foundof at:a sculptural wall documented by the several reports. Th Corridor-wide Plan community along the train tracks andIndigo the Serenity Garden. www.fairmountindigoplanning.org. documents the Fairmount Corridor process and

Complementary scales of planning - City-wide (left), Corridor-wide (center) and Station Area (right)

FAIRMOUNTINDIGOPLANNING.ORG

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FAIRMOUNT INDIGO PLANNING INITIATIVE

Site Analysis / Community Outreach Studio Project - Spring 2015 Boston Affordable Housing Development Competition 2nd Place Winner Site: 872 Morton Street, Mattapan/Dorchester Partnership with CNDC

AHDC Team Design: BAC MArch Studio Community Outreach & Financing: Northeastern Urban Planning Students

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Initial Site Concept

The residential building would not exceed the height of the other homes in the neighborhood.

Stairways would connect the commuter line to the site and the lower levels of the commercial spaces to the residential units.

Initial configurations: • 3 story compact residential buildings • Commercial spaces tie the Morton Street Station with our site. • Steep grade at Morton Street incorporated into design Problems with these schemes: • Not enough residential units, incorrect ratio of units • Limited circulation space for the residential units • Too much or too little parking (we would go back and forth on this over the course of the competition) • Vehicular approach from neighboring lot • Not enough natural space preserved for Serenity Garden. GSE duca tiona lVer sion

Connection to Morton Street Connection to Train Station

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4 4 2 2 4 2 4Jodi8 Craig 10 - 4Spring 2016

Morton Crossing

Lower Level Courtyard Grand Stair

Two residential buildings with separate commercial space - conservative approach to increased density


Site Development A variation of each of the four unit types is interspersed throughout the buildings.

My Task

Units open up on 3rd and 4th floors providing green roofs and outdoor patios

Driving Force • Provide 25 total units of a mix of single, 1, 2, & 3 bedroom units • Understand how the required number of units and parking spaces would fit on the site.

Simple unit blocks for each type and size The second floor would be a dense configuration of all unit types. Two first floor 3-bedroom family units would be situated at ground level adjacent to parking. 26 U n

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Design the living units and arrange the required number of apartment types so that we could fit them on the site.

Process • Create block units to represent the four apartment types using the minimum square footage given in the Boston Department of Neighborhood Development Residential Design Standards. • Iterate through four programs for the residential and commercial buildings, tweaking the unit layouts and the arrangement of commercial spaces, stairways, public courtyard and paths. Result • A walkway under Morton Street would connect this site with the commuter rail station. • The stairway along the side of the buildings would be celebrated by the use of lighting and glazing throughout that side of the building. • Once at the lower commercial space, the stairway would open up into a sunken courtyard that would provide entrances and outdoor seating for the commercial spaces. • A grand stair that could also be used as a social gathering space would ascend the final level to the residential units. • A path would lead from Morton Street through the commercial spaces to the courtyard.

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Unit Development

Result

Driving Forces

• Units arranged to allow a separation between private sleeping areas & public living areas. • Circulation kept to a minimum. • Entry ways and coat closets provided. • Separate dining areas allow ample space for gatherings. • Rooms arrangement allows simultaneous activities: watching TV/sleeping, studying/preparing dinner. • Master bedroom has a private master bathroom where possible. • Circulation through the unit skirts the edges of the living spaces, allowing more comfortable rooms that can accommodate a wider number of furniture arrangements.

• ADHC Affordable Housing Guidelines • Boston’s DND Residential Design Standards • Formal Design Critique Challenges • Windows in all bedrooms • Livable spaces despite small square footage Space Requirements Studio 500 net sf - 25x20'

1 Bedroom 750 net sf

13x15

13x10

50 sf

7'

15x15

8x5

7x5

3 Bedroom 1200 net sf

2 Bedroom 900 net sf 11x11

12x10

15x15

11x11

10x5 8'

10x5

8'

7x5

10x10

Unit Block Layouts 759 sf - 33x23' Living

Kitchen Dining

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Stor

Bath

15x15

8'

1222 sf - 47x26'

920 sf - 23x40' 10x7

56 sf

Bedroom

Morton Crossing Jodi Craig - Spring 2016

12x10

14x18 13'

13x12

15x16

~56 sf

10x7

10x11


2 BR

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Ground-level parking under largest building

• Request for one larger building with more total units • No on site parking -2

3 BR

Further development of units

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Honors community request for larger natural area

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First Developer Meeting

My Task

• Refine unit blocks to determine door and window locations • Use input from the design team to create more varied residential buildings

Driving Force

Green space provides natural light to interior of buildings • Three smaller residential units and separate commercial space. • More units divided units across residential buildings + 2 over commercial spaces

Unit placement according to door & window locations Result

• Three residential buildings of increasing size: smaller buildings near residences, larger building near commercial spaces. • 16 parking spaces under largest residential building. • Vehicular entrance from Morton Street • 29 units: 52% 2BR, 24% 3BR, 14% 1BR, 10% Studio

Develop Comments

Vehicular entry from Morton St.

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Final Unit Plans Amenities • Maximum access to natural light and ventilation is provided in all rooms where possible. • Units have been arranged to allow generous windows on two-to-three walls to allow cross ventilation. • Where units abut more public areas, smaller and higher placed windows are still provided. • Storage space has been provided commensurate with the unit type. • In addition to entry closets and bedroom closets, ample space has been provided through the addition of pantry and linen closets. • Each first floor unit has an exterior storage room for bicycles, strollers and other outdoor equipment.

Studio 575 sf

F

F

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1 BR 759 sf

2 BR 960 sf

3 BR 1255 sf

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Morton Crossing Jodi Craig - Spring 2016 GSEducationalVersion


Final Building Aggregation Studio

Community Room

2 BR

Laundry Room

1 BR

Bike Storage

3 BR

Green Roof Commercial

Access to natural light and green space 35 units with no on-site parking Mix of units spread throughout building Serene garden side

My Task Iterate between refining units and arranging them into a single building. Driving Forces • Input from finance team which defined exact number of units and ratio for finance eligibility • Input from design critiques Result • One large 5-story building combines residential and commercial spaces • 35 units: 60% 2BR, 9% 3BR, 20% 1BR, 11% Studio • Units interspersed throughout to promote intermingling of family size and generation • 12,238 sf total green space • 1 ADA unit of each type sprinkled throughout • Many 1st floor units have front and rear entrances and bike storage. • Density is commensurate with future development

Commercial side immersed in activity

1st floor front & back entry & bike storage

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Comfortable Family Living

One bedroom home - living room

Three bedroom home - open kitchen & dining room

Each dwelling unit provides a unique living experience, allowing access to natural light and green spaces.

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Morton Crossing Jodi Craig - Spring 2016

Two bedroom home - dining room


The new Morton Crossing building outline

Serenity Garden Driving Forces â&#x20AC;˘ The Serenity Garden had already been named in honor of slain youth. â&#x20AC;˘ The community group, Redefining Our Community (ROC), wanted a tranquil place where people could enjoy nature.

Existing residential neighborhood

Result A natural space that can be enjoyed by Morton Crossing as well as the surrounding neighborhood.

Some units are private looking onto partially secluded green spaces or the Serenity Garden. GSEducationalVersion

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Public to Private Gradient The most public realms exist at Morton Street and the train tracks. ion ers alV tion uca Ed GS

These gradually transition to the private realm of the Serenity Garden. In between there is a gradient from public to private. 2 A-101

A ET TRE N S RTO MO

By providing different living options, residents will be able to choose the type of setting that appeals to them and provides their families with the optimal living experience.

Public to Private Gradient

Public

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Morton Crossing Jodi Craig - Spring 2016

Private


Walkway Driving Force The commuter rail train tracks and train Challenges • Tracks bordered the entire west side of the site. • Walkway needed for the residents to traverse from Morton Street to the Serenity Garden. Result • Activates the area along the train tracks, providing safe passage from Morton Street through the site to the Serenity Garden. • Walkway turns the barren track expanse into something meaningful. 2' x 4'

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8' x 8' Panels Marine Grade 4' 2' x 4' Fir Plywood with 1 solid2' xface 3.5 Panels per section * 16 sections = 56 panels

2' x 4'

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A 8' x 8' Panels Marine Grade Fir Plywood with 1 solid face 3.5 Panels per section * 16 sections = 56 panels

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Final Massing The massing was developed by stacking units and arranging them such that: • Doors and windows aligned properly to afford maximum daylight and passive heating and cooling for all rooms • Plumbing runs were minimized • Private outdoor areas were created • Front and rear entrances were provided on the first floor • The gradient of public to private throughout the site affords unique living experiences from which to choose

Some units are adjacent to the commercial portion of the site allowing residents to be part of the hustle and bustle provided by the activity.

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Morton Crossing Jodi Craig - Spring 2016


Morton Crossing

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Jodi Craig - Academic Portfolio  

Academic Portfolio - Boston Architectural College

Jodi Craig - Academic Portfolio  

Academic Portfolio - Boston Architectural College

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